2016-2017 Undergraduate Bulletin

University Writing Program

http://du.edu/writing

Office: Anderson Academic Commons, Room 282
Mail Code: 2150 E. Evans Ave. Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-7448
Email: writing@du.edu
Web Site: http://www.du.edu/writing

The University Writing Program is dedicated to developing writing abilities across the University for writers in academic, civic and professional situations. The program, grounded in the arts of rhetoric and the craft of writing, pursues these goals through five activities:

  1. Required first-year writing courses
  2. A robust Writing Center, which helps undergraduates and graduates with writing tasks from all disciplines, as well as personal and professional projects, through one-on-one consultations with well-trained consultants
  3. Faculty and support through writing across the curriculum efforts (in such programs as writing-intensive advanced seminar courses and first-year seminars), through writing activities in specific departments or programs, and through consultations with individual faculty and classes
  4. Research on writing, especially among undergraduate students.
  5. Sponsoring a Minor in Writing Practices.

Writing Practices

Minor Requirements

The Minor in Writing Practices develops writing proficiencies at time when employers find writing abilities are vital, when writing shapes civic action, when writing fosters personal development and social interaction, when writing uses evolving technologies.  The minor is open to all undergraduates who have successfully completed WRIT xx22 and xx33 and want to hone their writing, further understanding of writing concepts and theories, and demonstrate abilities to employers and others. Students will complete at least 20 credits of courses culminating in a formal portfolio of their work:

  • WRIT 2000: Theories of Writing (4 credits)
  • Two courses from a list of approved Applied Writing courses (8 credits)
  • One course from a list of approved Theory, History, or Research in Writing courses (4 credits)
  • WRIT 3500: Capstone: Writing Design and Circulation (4 credits)

Students select approved courses from several departments and programs, which offers flexibility and breadth.  

Introduction4
Theories of Writing
Theory, History, Research in Writing 4
Artifacts, Texts, Meaning
Cultural Narratives
Rhetorical/Critical Communication Inquiry
Fundamentals of Argumentation
Landmarks in Rhetorical Theory
Studies in Rhetoric
Studies in Rhetoric
History of Rhetoric
Composition Theory
Cultures in Emergent Digital Practices
Culture, Media and Power
Topics in Writing Theory, History, Research
Applied Writing8
Business Communications I
Introduction to Creative Writing
Creative Writing-Poetry
and Creative Writing-Poetry
and Creative Writing-Poetry
Creative Writing-Fiction
and Creative Writing-Fiction
and Creative Writing-Fiction
Business Technical Writing
Introduction to Publishing
Advanced Creative Writing: Non-Fiction
Newswriting & Reporting
Playwriting
Memoir and Personal Writing
Style and Rhetorical Grammar
Topics in Applied Writing
Capstone4
Capstone: Writing Design and Circulation
Total Credits20

Courses

WRIT 1122 Rhetoric and Academic Writing (4 Credits)

On completing this course, students are expected to have enhanced the following knowledge and skills: analytic and critical reading strategies; a basic understanding of rhetorical situations and rhetorical analysis; the ability to write for specific audiences and discourse communities, using effective conversations for these situations; the ability to write texts that are organized, coherent and substantive, demonstrating rhetorical, linguistic design and analytical competence. The course provides instruction and practice in academic and civic writing for well-educated readers. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as additional exercises. Final portfolio.

WRIT 1133 Writing and Research (4 Credits)

This course builds on the writing and rhetorical skills learned in WRIT 1122 by shifting attention from general rhetorical strategies to specific rhetorical strategies that shape different kinds of academic inquiry. Through introduction to quantitative, qualitative, and textual research traditions, students identify how written reasoning varies in terms of the questions posed, the kind of evidence used to answer them, and the nature of the audience or forum for the result. In addition, the course teaches how to shape research into substantive academic arguments, with attention to the ethical consequences of their rhetorical choices. Students are asked to develop further their linguistic, design, and reasoning competencies, with added consideration of citation conventions. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as numerous additional exercises, in projects requiring library-based research as well as other types. Final portfolio. Prerequisite: WRIT 1122.

WRIT 1622 Advanced Rhetoric and Writing (4 Credits)

A writing course for advanced first-year students, emphasizing rhetorical strategies for different academic and civic audiences and purposes; critical reading and analysis; and research. Course sections focus on a coherent set of texts, usually on an issue or theme; contact the Writing Program for specific information each quarter. Students complete at least 20 pages of polished prose in multiple assignments. Final portfolio. Satisfies the same graduation requirement as WRIT 1122. Prerequisite (one of the following): Admission to honors program; score of three or better on AP Language and Composition or Language and Literature exams, or four on the IB English; or specific permission of the director of writing.

WRIT 1633 Advanced Writing and Research (4 Credits)

A continuation of WRIT 1622, this is a writing course for advanced first-year students, emphasizing rhetorical strategies for different academic and civic audiences and purposes; critical reading and analysis; and research. The course has a significant research component. Course sections focus on a coherent set of texts, usually on an issue or theme; contract the Writing Program for specific information each quarter. Students complete at least 20 pages of polished prose in multiple assignments. Final portfolio. Satisfies the same graduation requirement as WRIT 1133. Prerequisites: WRIT 1122 or 1622, plus one of the following: either admission to the honors program; score of three or better on AP Language and Composition or Language and Literature exams, or four on the IB English; or specific permission of the director of writing.

WRIT 1733 Honors Writing (4 Credits)

Honors Writing is designed for students who will benefit from a particularly rigorous and in-depth experience with language. This class offers a theme around which students read serious and challenging texts, including some primary readings in rhetorical theory, and write at least 25 pages of polished prose, with additional less formal writings. The course offers advanced instruction in rhetorical theory and practice, as well as writing in multiple research traditions in the academy. Class has a highly participatory discussion format and students will have latitude in choosing and directing much of their work. Topics vary from section to section. Required for honors students. Prerequisites: admission to the honors program and either WRIT 1622 or WRIT 1122; or permission of the director of writing, in consultation with the director of honors.

WRIT 1991 Independent Study (1-4 Credits)

WRIT 1992 Directed Study (4 Credits)

WRIT 2000 Theories of Writing (4 Credits)

This course introduces a number of theories of writing, providing an overview of complex issues and research into the state and status of writing and writers. It takes up such questions as these: What is writing? Where did it come from? How did it develop--and did it do so the same or differently in other cultures? How do writers develop--and what accounts for differences? What are different types of writing, different situations for writing, different tools and practices--and how do these interconnect? What does it mean to study writing? How have major figures theorized writing, and what tensions emerge among their theories? What are relationships among thought, speech, and writing--and among image, film/video, and sound? How do such theories change our notions of what texts are and what texts do? Students will learn various theorists, historians, and researchers answer these questions, and they will apply that knowledge to their own projects. Prerequisites: WRIT 1133.

WRIT 2040 Memoir and Personal Writing (2,4 Credits)

In learning to write memoir, a writer is learning how to analyze memory, select experiences, invent narratives--all while still being "truthful." In this course, students distinguish memoir from other forms of writing about the self, including autobiography, diaries and journals, blogs, and letters. They read excerpts of published memoirs and drafts of memoirs they write during the course, with a particular interest in how these writers shape and represent their experiences textually: how do people construct the stories they tell about their lives? What is the value of personal writing for writers and readers? And perhaps most importantly, how can we begin to create stories of experiences in compelling ways? Students complete multiple writing projects, including at least one polished short memoir.

WRIT 2050 Style and Rhetorical Grammar (2,4 Credits)

Be concise. Don't split infinitives. Write with flow. Don't end a sentence with a preposition. Avoid the passive voice. Never use "I" in academic writing." Everyone has these maxims about writing and grammar. This course will interrogate those maxims, and provide systematic ways to draft, revise, and polish prose based on the needs and demands of the audience. More specifically, students consider matters of sentence structure and sentence rhythm, cohesion and concision, as well as voice and point of view. Through a series of shorter and longer writing assignments, in-class exercises and activities, and course readings, students hone their writing and grammar skills, all with the goal of writing with improved clarity and grace. The course is open to all students who want to take their writing to a next level of sophistication, clarity, and range. Prerequisite: WRIT 1122 or permission of instructor.

WRIT 2500 Topics in Writing Theory, History, Research (4 Credits)

This course provides curricular space for various subjects and foci related to theories about writing, histories of writing and its status and development, or research about writing. Specific offerings of the course will vary according to professor or student needs, interests, and opportunities, and to developing knowledge and research in the field. Examples of possible topics might include multimodality and writing, relationships between visual and verbal rhetoric, the development of specific genres over time, the relationship between academic and civic writing, the history of writing in specific schools or settings, research into the acquisition of writing skills, social policies and practices that affect writing, ethical issues in writing practices, the effects of technologies on writing, and so on. The preceding list is illustrative, not exclusive. Prerequisites: WRIT 1133.

WRIT 2701 Topics in Applied Writing (4 Credits)

Individual offerings of this Topics course teach skills and strategies for writing in a specific professional or public context or for improving in a specific type of writing. The focus is on the texts, genres, conventions, habits, and critical questions salient to writers in a given situation. Each offering will focus on a topic not available in existing courses. Possible examples include: "Writing for the Public Good;" "Publications Editing;" "Writing, Curation, and the Archive;" "Writing (in) the Workplace;" "Writing Profiles and Biographies;" "Nature Writing;" and so on. (The previous list is merely suggestive.) Benefitting the course, the primary writing focus will be on producing texts for/within the topical focus, with emphasis on drafting, revision, and design. Students will also write responses to and analyses of assigned readings (including the work of other students). Prerequisites: WRIT 1133 or permission of the Executive Director of Writing.

WRIT 3500 Capstone: Writing Design and Circulation (4 Credits)

The primary goal of this capstone course for the Minor in Writing Practices is to create and present a professional electronic/web-based portfolio synthesizing university writing experiences. The portfolio showcases and offers reflective insight into a student's writings, demonstrating the writer's ability to navigate diverse rhetorical situations. Students will learn theories and practices for selecting, arranging, and circulating/publishing written work, culmination in a required portfolio that synthesizes their university writing experiences. In addition to practicing principles of editing and design, students will produce a substantive revision of a previous piece of their own writing and compost a theory of writing that synthesizes analyses of their practices with published scholarship and research. The course covers design considerations and strategies and offers studio time for peer and instructor feedback. It culminates with a public showcase. Prerequisites: WRIT 2500 and completion of at least two other courses in the Writing Practices minor.

Faculty

Brad Benz, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, University of Washington

Allan Borst, Teaching Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Jennifer Campbell, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, Auburn University

April Chapman-Ludwig, Teaching Assistant Professor, MA, Illinois State University

Richard Colby, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, Bowling Green St Univ Fireland

David Daniels, Teaching Associate Professor, MFA, Indiana University

Elizabeth Drogin, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, University of California, Berkeley

Amber Engelson, Lecturer, PhD, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Matthew Hill, Teaching Associate Professor, MA, Washington State University

Megan Kelly, Teaching Associate Professor, MA, University of Washington

Kamila Kinyon, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, University of Chicago

Heather Martin, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, University of Denver

Juli Parrish, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, University of Pittsburgh

Lauren Picard, Teaching Assistant Professor, MFA, Emerson College

Casey Rountree, Teaching Associate Professor, MA, University of Denver

Carol Samson, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, University of Denver

Manuel Sanz, Teaching Associate Professor, MFA, University of Notre Dame

Rebekah Shultz Colby, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, Bowling Green State University

Daniel Singer, Teaching Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Denver

Angela Sowa, Teaching Assistant Professor, PhD, Texas Women's University

Geoff Stacks, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, Purdue University

Kara Taczak, Teaching Assistant Professor, PhD, Florida State University

John Tiedemann, Teaching Associate Professor, MA, University of Wisconsin - Madison

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