2017-2018 Graduate Bulletin

Research Methods and Library Information Science

Office: Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall, Room 110
Mail Code: 1999 E. Evans Avenue, Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-2509
Email: edinfo@du.edu
Web Site: http://morgridge.du.edu/programs

Doctor of Philosophy in Research Methods and Statistics

The goal of the Research Methods and Statistics (RMS) PhD is to prepare graduate students with the state-of-the-art skills needed to conduct research in education and the social and health sciences. The faculty members equip students with cutting‐edge research skills, creative educational vision, social responsibility, and sufficient experience in the application of these skills and knowledge to achieve mastery. The faculty are committed to shaping a safe, sustainable, democratic, and just world and believe that high-quality research is one approach to achieving this goal.

The education and social and health sciences fields have a growing need for professionals with strong skills in research design, statistics, qualitative and mixed methods, and data analysis. The RMS PhD course plan provides the courses and experiences necessary to conduct and supervise effective social science research.

Graduates with RMS PhD degrees hold leadership positions in testing and program evaluation companies, universities, school districts, and state agencies, among others.

Doctor of Philosophy in Research Methods and Statistics with a Concentration in Institutional Research

The RMS concentration in Institutional Research is targeted towards professionals with career goals in institutional research in applied settings including higher education, K-12 schools, non-profits, government settings, and business. Foundational coursework will equip Institutional Research students with strong quantitative, qualitative, and mixed research methods skills. Students will specialize in higher education or library and information science and take institutional research content knowledge courses in management, business intelligence, and public policy.

Doctor of Philosophy in Research Methods and Statistics with a Concentration in Qualitative Research

The RMS concentration in Qualitative Research primarily focuses on preparing students with strong, versatile, qualitative research methods skills to be utilized in different fields.

Master of Arts in Research Methods and Statistics

The goal of the Research Methods and Statistics (RMS) MA is to enhance student development and use of research in education and the social and health sciences with a specific focus on program evaluation. The faculty equip students with cutting‐edge research skills, creative educational vision, social responsibility, and sufficient experience in application of your skills and knowledge to achieve mastery. RMS is committed to shaping a safe, sustainable, democratic and just world and believe that high-quality research is one approach to doing this.

The education and social and health sciences fields have a growing need for professionals with strong skills in research design, statistics, qualitative and mixed methods, and data analysis. The RMS MA degree requirements provide the courses and experiences necessary for graduates to conduct effective social science research.

Graduates with RMS MA degrees hold professional positions in program evaluation at non-profit organizations, service agencies, school districts, and state agencies, among others.

Master of Library and Information Science in Library and Information Science

Library and Information Science (LIS) has developed a distinctive program of study to serve the rapidly changing needs of future librarians, archivists and information professionals in the Rocky Mountain region. There are a number of areas of focus including: Archives and Special Collections, Digital Libraries, Early Childhood Librarianship, Academic Libraries, Public Libraries, School Libraries Concentration, Special Libraries, and Web Services Librarianship.

With a dedicated faculty, we get to know our students very well through face-to-face interaction so that we can connect them to the highly regarded professional network in the region (and beyond). Practitioners speak highly of our students and are eager to have DU MLIS students as interns and employees.

Program Accreditation

American Library Association

Master of Library and Information Science in Library and Information Science with a Concentration in Teacher Librarian

The DU Teacher Librarian (T-L) Program is authorized by the Colorado Department of Education (CDE). A concentration in School Libraries prepares students to work with children and young adults in K-12 school libraries as well as youth services departments in public libraries. Colorado endorsement as a Teacher- Librarian requires applicants to have a valid teaching credential, one year of classroom teaching and pass the Place Exam (School Librarian endorsement is available for applicants without classroom teaching experience). Recommendation for the added endorsement as a school librarian is made by the DU LIS Program, but endorsement is granted by the State of Colorado. Individual State requirements vary and may include teaching experience and media examinations in addition to a valid teaching credential. Students should consult with the Colorado Department of Education for the most updated endorsement requirements. Dr. Mary Stansbury of the LIS faculty is the primary contact for this specialization.

Program Accreditation and Authorization

American Library Association

Colorado Department of Education (CDE)

Master of Library and Information Science in Library and Information Science with a Concentration in Research Data Management

Research Data Management responds to the emerging need for well-trained information professionals in the digital environment. The concentration prepares professionals to support the research data life-cycle in the areas of scholarly communication, open access, copyright advice, and research data management, providing bridging coursework in information science and research methods and statistics. It prepares information professionals to manage research data at academic libraries, research service centers, research centers, government agencies, and non-profit organizations.

Doctor of Philosophy in Research Methods and Statistics, Doctor of Philosophy in research methods and Statistics with a Concentration in Institutional Research

Application Deadlines

  • Fall 2017 Priority 1 Deadline: December 1, 2016
  • Fall 2017 Priority 2 Deadline: January 16, 2017
  • Fall 2017  Final Submission Deadline: September 15, 2017
  • Fall 2017 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: July 31, 2017

Admission Requirements

  • Online admission application
  • $65.00 Application Fee
  • University Minimum Degree and GPA Requirements
  • Transcripts: One official transcript from each post-secondary institution.
  • Master's degree
  • GRE: The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required. Scores must be received directly from the appropriate testing agency by the deadline. The institution code for the University of Denver is 4842.
  • Letters of Recommendation: Two (2) letters of recommendation are required. Letters should be submitted by recommenders through the online application.
  • Personal Statement: Each applicant must submit a statement of professional goals; the statement should be approximately 2-3 pages, typed and double-spaced. Please discuss the following in your statement:
  1. Personal, educational, and employment experiences that have shaped your desire for advanced study.
  2. Professional objectives and how you arrived at them.
  3. What you hope to obtain from your chosen concentration and how you intend to apply it professionally. Note: if there is a specific faculty member with whom you would like to work, based on your research interests, please mention and discuss in this statement.
  • Résumé: The résumé (or C.V.) should include work experience, research, and/or volunteer work.

Additional Standards for Non-Native English Speakers

Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. The minimum TOEFL/IELTS/CAE test score requirements for the degree program are:

  • Minimum TOEFL Score (paper-based test): 550
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (internet-based test): 80
  • Minimum IELTS Score: 6.0
  • Minimum CAE Score: 169
  • English Conditional Admission Offered: No, this program does not offer English Conditional Admission.

Read the English Language Proficiency policy for more details.

Read the English Conditional Admission (ECA) policy for more details.

Read the Required Tests for GTA Eligibility policy for more details.

Additional Standards for International Applicants

Per Student & Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) regulation, international applicants must meet all standards for admission before an I-20 or DS-2019 is issued, [per U.S. Federal Register: 8 CFR § 214.3(k)] or is academically eligible for admission and is admitted [per 22 C.F.R. §62]. Read the Additional Standards For International Applicants policy for more details.

Financial Aid

There are many different options available to finance your education. Most University of Denver graduate students are granted some type of financial support. Our Office of Financial Aid is committed to helping you explore your options.

Master of Arts in Research Methods and Statistics

Application Deadlines

  • Fall 2017 Priority 1 Deadline: December 1, 2016
  • Fall 2017 Priority 2 Deadline: January 16, 2017
  • Fall 2017  Final Submission Deadline: September 15, 2017
  • Fall 2017 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: July 31, 2017

Admission Requirements

  • Online admission application
  • $65.00 Application Fee
  • University Minimum Degree and GPA Requirements
  • Transcripts: One official transcript from each post-secondary institution.
  • GRE: The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required. Scores must be received directly from the appropriate testing agency by the deadline. The institution code for the University of Denver is 4842.
  • Letters of Recommendation: Two (2) letters of recommendation are required. Letters should be submitted by recommenders through the online application.
  • Personal Statement: Each applicant must submit a statement of professional goals; the statement should be approximately 2-3 pages, typed and double-spaced. Please discuss the following in your statement:
  1. Personal, educational, and employment experiences that have shaped your desire for advanced study.
  2. Professional objectives and how you arrived at them.
  3. What you hope to obtain from your chosen concentration and how you intend to apply it professionally. Note: if there is a specific faculty member with whom you would like to work, based on your research interests, please mention and discuss in this statement.
  • Résumé: The résumé (or C.V.) should include work experience, research, and/or volunteer work.

Additional Standards for Non-Native English Speakers

Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. The minimum TOEFL/IELTS/CAE test score requirements for the degree program are:

  • Minimum TOEFL Score (paper-based test): 550
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (internet-based test): 80
  • Minimum IELTS Score: 6.0
  • Minimum CAE Score: 169
  • English Conditional Admission Offered: No, this program does not offer English Conditional Admission.

Read the English Language Proficiency policy for more details.

Read the English Conditional Admission (ECA) policy for more details.

Read the Required Tests for GTA Eligibility policy for more details.

Additional Standards for International Applicants

Per Student & Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) regulation, international applicants must meet all standards for admission before an I-20 or DS-2019 is issued, [per U.S. Federal Register: 8 CFR § 214.3(k)] or is academically eligible for admission and is admitted [per 22 C.F.R. §62]. Read the Additional Standards For International Applicants policy for more details.

Financial Aid

There are many different options available to finance your education. Most University of Denver graduate students are granted some type of financial support. Our Office of Financial Aid is committed to helping you explore your options.

Master of Library and Information Science in library and information science, master of library and information science in information science with a concentration in school libraries

Application Deadlines

  • Fall 2017 Priority 1 Deadline: December 1, 2016
  • Fall 2017 Priority 2 Deadline: January 16, 2017
  • Fall 2017  Final Submission Deadline: September 15, 2017
  • Fall 2017 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: July 31, 2017

Admission Requirements

  • Online admission application
  • $65.00 Application Fee
  • University Minimum Degree and GPA Requirements
  • Transcripts: One official transcript from each post-secondary institution.
  • Letters of Recommendation: Two (2) letters of recommendation are required. Letters should be submitted by recommenders through the online application.
  • Personal Statement: Each applicant must submit a statement of professional goals; the statement should be approximately 2-3 pages, typed and double-spaced. Please discuss the following in your statement:
  1. Personal, educational, and employment experiences that have shaped your desire for advanced study.
  2. Professional objectives and how you arrived at them.
  3. What you hope to obtain from your chosen concentration and how you intend to apply it professionally. Note: if there is a specific faculty member with whom you would like to work, based on your research interests, please mention and discuss in this statement.
  • Résumé: The résumé (or C.V.) should include work experience, research, and/or volunteer work.

Additional Standards for Non-Native English Speakers

Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. The minimum TOEFL/IELTS/CAE test score requirements for the degree program are:

  • Minimum TOEFL Score (paper-based test): 550
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (internet-based test): 80
  • Minimum IELTS Score: 6.0
  • Minimum CAE Score: 169
  • English Conditional Admission Offered: No, this program does not offer English Conditional Admission.

Read the English Language Proficiency policy for more details.

Read the English Conditional Admission (ECA) policy for more details.

Read the Required Tests for GTA Eligibility policy for more details.

Additional Standards for International Applicants

Per Student & Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) regulation, international applicants must meet all standards for admission before an I-20 or DS-2019 is issued, [per U.S. Federal Register: 8 CFR § 214.3(k)] or is academically eligible for admission and is admitted [per 22 C.F.R. §62]. Read the Additional Standards For International Applicants policy for more details.

Financial Aid

There are many different options available to finance your education. Most University of Denver graduate students are granted some type of financial support. Our Office of Financial Aid is committed to helping you explore your options.

Doctor of Philosophy in Research Methods and Statistics

Degree requirements

Coursework requirements

I. Morgridge College of Education requirements
A. Research17
Complete all of the following courses:
Empirical Research Methods
Introduction to Qualitative Research
Independent Research (Minimum 10 credits) 1
II. Program requirements
A. Measurement9
Complete all of the following courses:
Psychometric Theory
Item Response Theory
Meta-Analysis Social Science Research
B. Research Methods14-17
Complete all of the following courses:
Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis
Program Evaluation Theory
Mixed Method Research Design
Research Ethics
Structural Foundations of Research in Social Sciences 2
Select at least one of the following:3
Topics in Research Design 2
Arts-Based Research 2
Advanced Qualitative Research 2
Survey and Design Analysis 2
Community-Based Research 2
C. Statistics27
Complete all of the following courses:
Correlation and Regression
Correlation and Regression
Analysis of Variance
Analysis of Variance
Multivariate Analysis
Hierarchical Linear Modeling
Structural Equation Modeling
Structural Equation Modeling for the Social Sciences
Latent Growth Curve Modeling
III. Practicum3
Complete the following course:
Practicum in Research
IV. Cognate (Minimum 20 credit hours)20
Total Credits90
1

In order to maintain degree candidacy, MCE doctoral students who have finished all requested course work will register for one dissertation or doctoral research credit or other credit for consecutive terms fall through spring (summers not required) until the student graduates.

2

Optional

A minimum of 90 credit hours is required beyond the earned master's degree.  No credit hours from the earned master's degree can be transferred into the PhD.

Non-coursework requirements

  • Doctoral comprehensive exam
  • Dissertation and oral defense

Doctor of Philosophy in Research Methods and Statistics with a Concentration in Institutional Research

Degree requirements

Coursework requirements

I. Morgridge College of Education requirements
A. Research22
Complete all of the following courses:
Introductory Statistics
Empirical Research Methods
Introduction to Qualitative Research
Independent Research (Minimum 10 credits) 1
II. Program requirements
A. Management4
Select at least one of the following:
Business Design
Performance & Rewards System
Organizational Dynamics
Strategic Human Resources Management
Strategic Management
Managing Strategic Alliances
B. Measurement6
Complete all of the following courses:
Psychometric Theory
Item Response Theory 2
Meta-Analysis Social Science Research
C. Research Methods11
Complete all of the following courses:
RMS 4931Survey and Design Analysis3
RMS 4951Mixed Method Research Design4
RMS 4952Research Ethics1
RMS 4960Program Evaluation Theory3,4
RMS 4940Structural Foundations of Research in Social Sciences 23
RMS 4942Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis 24
RMS 4945Community-Based Research 24
RMS 4946Advanced Qualitative Research 24
RMS 4947Arts-Based Research 23
RMS 4959Topics in Research Design 21-5
D. Statistics18
Complete all of the following courses:
Correlation and Regression
Correlation and Regression
Analysis of Variance
Analysis of Variance
Multivariate Analysis
Choose at least one of the following:
Hierarchical Linear Modeling
Structural Equation Modeling
Structural Equation Modeling for the Social Sciences
Latent Growth Curve Modeling
III. Practicum
Complete the following course:
Practicum in Research
IV. Cognate credits - Specialization Area25-27
Business Information & Analytics/GIS Courses (choose at least one)
INFO 4100Survey of Business Analytics4
INFO 4120Python for Business Analytics4
INFO 4340Data Mining and Visualization4
INFO 4360Complex Data Analytics4
INFO 4240Data Warehousing4
INFO 4280Project Management4
INFO 4300Predictive Analytics4
GEOG 3110GIS Modeling4
GEOG 3130Advanced Geographic Information Systems4
Public Policy Courses (choose at least one)
PPOL 4100American Public Policy System4
PPOL 4200Microeconomics for Public Pol.4
PPOL 4300Quantitative Analysis-Pub Pol4
PPOL 4400Analytical & Critical Skills4
PPOL 4501Great Issues Forum2
PPOL 4502Issues Forum II2
Specialization Area Courses (Choose one option below; Higher Education <or> Library and Information Science)
Specialization in Higher Education (21 credits minimum)
The following courses are required:
HED 4220Org & Governance of Higher Ed4
HED 4212Introduction to Public Policy and Higher Education4
HED 4221Financing Higher Education4
HED 4214History American Higher Ed3
HED 4211Current Issues in Higher Ed4
HED 4284Inclusive Excellence in Organizations 24
HED 4246Issues of Access & Opportunity (Issues of Access & Opportunity) 24
HED 4247Retention, Persistence, and Student Success in Postsecondary Settings 24
Specialization in Library and Information Science (19 credits minimum)
The following courses are required:
LIS 4010Organization of Information3
LIS 4820Digitization3
LIS 4404Metadata Architectures3
LIS 4206Web Content Management3
LIS 4362Government Publications Resources 22
LIS 4700Topics in LIS (Academic Libraries) 23
1

In order to maintain degree candidacy, MCE doctoral students who have finished all requested course work will register for one dissertation or doctoral research credit or other credit for consecutive terms fall through spring (summers not required) until the student graduates.

2

Optional

A minimum of 90 credit hours is required beyond the earned master's degree.  No credit hours from the earned master's degree can be transferred into the PhD.

 Non-coursework requirements

  • Doctoral comprehensive exam
  • Dissertation and oral defense

Doctor of Philosophy in Research Methods and Statistics with a Concentration in Qualitative Research

Degree requirements

Coursework requirements

I. Morgridge College of Education requirements
A. Research
Complete all of the following courses:
RMS 4930Empirical Research Methods3
RMS 4910Introductory Statistics5
RMS 4995Independent Research 1 10 minimum
II. Program requirements
A. Measurement
Complete the following course:
RMS 4931Survey and Design Analysis3
B. Research Methods
Complete all of the following courses:
RMS 4951Mixed Method Research Design4
RMS 4952Research Ethics1
RMS 4960Program Evaluation Theory3
C. Statistics
Complete all of the following courses:
RMS 4911Correlation and Regression4
RMS 4912Analysis of Variance5
or RMS 4913 Multivariate Analysis
D. Qualitative concentration24
Complete 24 credits from the following list:
Advanced Qualitative Research
Community-Based Research
Arts-Based Research
Criticism and Connoisseurship: Qualitative research and the enhancement of practice
Critical Methods for Studying Culture
Performance Ethnography
Cultural Narratives
Ethnographic Methods
Topics in Social Work (InDIGIqualitative Research Methods)
Special Topics
Qualitative Research Methods
Qualitative Methods in Geography
Qualitative Research Methodologies
Qualitative Research Practicum
III. Practicum
Complete the following course:
RMS 4980Practicum in Research3
IV. Cognate20
V. Electives0-5
Total Credits90
1

In order to maintain degree candidacy, MCE doctoral students who have finished all requested course work will register for one dissertation or doctoral research credit or other credit for consecutive terms fall through spring (summers not required) until the student graduates.

A minimum of 90 credit hours is required beyond the earned master's degree.  No credit hours from the earned master's degree can be transferred into the PhD.

Non-coursework requirements

  • Doctoral comprehensive exam
  • Dissertation and oral defense

Master of Arts in Research Methods and Statistics

Degree requirements

Coursework requirements

I. Morgridge College of Education requirement3
Complete the following course:
II. Program requirements
RMS 4921Psychometric Theory3
A. Research Design14
Complete all of the following courses:
Empirical Research Methods
Survey and Design Analysis
Meta-Analysis Social Science Research
Introduction to Qualitative Research
Research Ethics
B. Statistics9
Complete both of the following courses:
Introductory Statistics
Correlation and Regression
Correlation and Regression
C. Evaluation6
Complete the following course:
Program Evaluation Theory
Select one of the following:
Child, Family, School Psychlogy Program Development and Evaluation
International Project Analysis
Cost-Benefit Analysis/Pub Pol
Educational Program Evaluation
Research Methods and Program Evaluation
Program Development and Assessment
D. Practicum3
Complete the following course:
Practicum in Research
E. Cognate requirements5-10
Complete a minimum of 5 credits
III. Thesis Option (5 credits minimum)
RMS 4995Independent Research5-10
Total Credits45 Hours

Minimum number of credits required for degree: 45 credits

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Practicum
  • MA comprehensive exam or Thesis

Master of Library and information Science in Library and Information Science

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

LIS CORE and REQUIRED COURSES
LIS 4000Foundations of Library, Archival, and Information Science3
LIS 4010Organization of Information3
LIS 4015User and Access Services3
LIS 4040Management of Information Organizations3
LIS 4050Library and Information Technologies3
RMS 4900Education Research and Measurement4
LIS 4910Culminating Internship3
or LIS 4901 Capstone Course
Elective requirements
35 Elective credits35
Total Credits58

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Portfolio

Master of Library and Information Science in Library and Information Science with a Concentration in Research Data Management

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

LIS CORE and REQUIRED COURSES
LIS 4000Foundations of Library, Archival, and Information Science3
LIS 4010Organization of Information3
LIS 4015User and Access Services3
LIS 4040Management of Information Organizations3
LIS 4050Library and Information Technologies3
LIS 4910Culminating Internship3
or LIS 4901 Capstone Course
Concentration Requirements
LIS 4700Topics in LIS (Data Visualization)3
LIS 4700Topics in LIS (Data Curation)3
LIS 4135Scholarly Communication3
LIS 4230Database Management Systems3
LIS 4235Scripting for Large Databases4
RMS 4910Introductory Statistics5
RMS 4930Empirical Research Methods3
RMS 4931Survey and Design Analysis3
RMS 4941Introduction to Qualitative Research4
Elective Requirements4
LIS/RMS XXXX
Total Credits53

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Portfolio

Master of Library and information Science in Library and Information Science with a Concentration in teacher - librarian

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

LIS CORE and REQUIRED COURSES
LIS 4000Foundations of Library, Archival, and Information Science3
LIS 4010Organization of Information3
LIS 4015User and Access Services3
LIS 4040Management of Information Organizations3
LIS 4050Library and Information Technologies3
RMS 4900Education Research and Measurement4
LIS 4911
LIS 4912
Elementary School Culminating Internship
and Secondary School Culminating Internship
4
Concentration requirements
LIS 4321Collection Management3
LIS 4510Children's Materials and Services3
LIS 4520Young Adult Materials & Services3
LIS 4700Topics in LIS (School Libraries)2
LIS 4508Early Childhoood Materials and Services 13
or LIS 4350 Adult Materials & Services
Elective requirements
21 Elective credits21
Total Credits58
1

Or another literacy or literature class as approved by your advisor.

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Portfolio

Certificate in Library and Information Science with a Concentration in Research Data Management

Program Requirements

Coursework Requirements

LIS 4230Database Management Systems3
LIS 4235Scripting for Large Databases3
LIS 4135Scholarly Communication3
LIS 4700Topics in LIS (Data Visualization)3
LIS 4700Topics in LIS (Data Curation)3
RMS 4910Introductory Statistics5
RMS 4930Empirical Research Methods3
RMS 4941Introduction to Qualitative Research4
Total Credits28

Library & Information Science Courses

LIS 4000 Foundations of Library, Archival, and Information Science (3 Credits)

An overview of the theoretical and conceptual foundations of library, archival, and information sciences and an introduction to the information professions, including principles, values, professional organizations, publications, current and future challenges.

LIS 4010 Organization of Information (3 Credits)

This course introduces basic concepts in the theoretical, practical, and technological aspects of information organization. It provides an overview of the methodologies for organizing and representing information resources in the library, archives, and museum settings.

LIS 4011 Information Access & Retrieval (3 Credits)

Information retrieval is defined as the process of searching for (and retrieving) relevant information within a document collection. The document collection could be textual (bibliographic records), structured and unstructured data, library databases, web based information resources, multimedia resources, and numerical data. This course introduces students to important access and retrieval tools and technologies used to retrieve information that are relevant to a user's information need. In addition to the underlying principles and processes revolving around access and retrieval such as text operations, indexing, query languages, and searching, the course covers relevant topics such as library discovery systems, web based information retrieval technologies, and enterprise search systems.

LIS 4015 User and Access Services (3 Credits)

Overview of human information processing and user services in the changing information environment and different communities of practice. This course introduces the concepts of user information needs, seeking, and processing as a foundation for understanding users and designing user-centered information services. The course examines both traditional reference and current/emerging information services in different settings and populations. Course also introduces the concepts of information literacy, user education, and assessment of information services. Recommend prerequisite: LIS 4015.

LIS 4040 Management of Information Organizations (3 Credits)

An introduction to current theory and practice of management in information organizations through the study of organizations, communications, decision making, planning, leadership, human resources and budgeting. Prerequisite: LIS 4000 or instructor approval.

LIS 4050 Library and Information Technologies (3 Credits)

A foundation course on the applications of information and communications technology in libraries and information agencies. Integrated library systems and the acquisition, evaluation, and implementation of library automation solutions, including electronic resource management systems are explored. The course further introduces database design, Internet technology, web services, cloud computing, computer networks, telecommunications, and computer security. Hardware, software, and other productivity tools and utilities from organizations such as OCLC, Amazon, and Google are discussed.

LIS 4060 Reference (3 Credits)

Information resources include a number of different kinds of reference materials in a wide variety of formats. These include guidebooks, encyclopedias and dictionaries, indexes and abstracts, handbooks, bibliographies, biographical finding tools and biographies, data sets and much more. Many of these resources are available on-line, as well as in print and other digital formats. This course will help students identify and evaluate the most likely resources for information queries in particular settings. It will also provide the opportunity to find answers to real research questions. The course will cover the primary resources for the broad disciplines of business, humanities, sciences, social sciences and government publications in print and electronic formats. Class exercises will reflect the multidisciplinary and multicultural interests and characteristics of library users. Prerequisite: LIS 4015. Recommended prerequisites: LIS 4000 and LIS 4011.

LIS 4070 Cataloging & Classification (3 Credits)

Theory and practice of bibliographic control including the study of representative cataloging using Anglo American Cataloging Rules, 2d ed., rev. with amendments and Library of Congress Rule Interpretations, machine-based representation using the USMARC formats and other standards, and subject analysis and classification using Library of Congress Subject Headings, Dewey Decimal Classification, and Library of Congress Classification, with principle focus on monographs, major media, sound recordings, and serials. Prerequisite: LIS 4010.

LIS 4110 Teaching and Learning with Technology (3 Credits)

A foundation course about the science of effective teaching and the role of technology and media to enhance learning outcomes. This course engages students with skills and knowledge required to incorporate effective media and technology to support the teaching and learning activity. The course primarily explores a wide-range of appropriate educational media and technology that facilitate preparation, presentation, and delivery of content. Most importantly, tools and educational technologies that promote best practices in both classroom interaction and expanding the learningscape outside the classroom are explored. Theories, principles, and strategies supported by the science of learning to improve the learning outcome are discussed.

LIS 4135 Scholarly Communication (3 Credits)

This course will provide a broad understanding of scholarly communication systems regarding the creation, dissemination, and evaluation of scientific information. The concept of scholarly communication refers to the ways researchers publish and disseminate their research findings in the digital environment and encompasses formal and informal channels of communication among scholars. Traditionally, scholarly dissemination systems have involved conference presentations and publication of books and articles in subscription-based journals. Digital technology has transformed scholarly communication by introducing open access publishing models and alternative ways of measuring scholarly impact. This course will explore the changing nature of scholarship and will examine the topics of scholarly publishing, peer review, intellectual property, the open access movement, digital repositories, bibliometrics, and altmetrics.

LIS 4206 Web Content Management (3 Credits)

This course will include instruction in web page creation, selection, and evaluation of web content as well as web site management. Selection of web page content will be discussed in the context of organizational knowledge management and competitive intelligence needs. Differences in information needs for provision of public information and competitive intelligence on Internet pages versus the organizational information needs of Intranets in knowledge management will be explored. This course also will address human-computer interface design to allow web page designers to create effective web pages according to established principles of design.

LIS 4208 Usability (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of usability analysis and user experience research and introduces students to practical methods and techniques in conduction usability evaluation. The focus of the course will be on the selection of appropriate evaluation methods, as well as planning, designing, and conduction usability evaluations of information services. In addition, the course will discuss the methods and tools of user-experience research, the theoretical underpinnings of usability, and the role of usability in iterative design and the development of information systems.

LIS 4209 Information Architecture (3 Credits)

The web is a complex information environment consisting of billions of web pages, users, and clicks and interaction every single day. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of web information architecture (IA) - a discipline that aims to understand the information needs and activities of web visitors and create design elements to help users find their way around in the complex information environment with ease. The course will cover various strategies and skills, in which information architects structure, organize, label, navigate, and search for information on large websites. A service learning component is built into this course so that students can transfer their IA knowledge and skills to a real-world project. The course is designed following a project management approach and students will be exposed to different activities from start to finish.

LIS 4210 Data Visualization (3 Credits)

This course provides a practical introduction to the principles, theories, and applications of information visualization in the research data context. This course contextualizes modern practices in information visualization by examining historical approaches to visualization with an eye on theories that inform contemporary visualization best practices. Using a hands-on component, students will get real-world experience in visualizing datasets, and building visualization dashboards that integrate multiple visualizations.

LIS 4220 Data Curation (3 Credits)

Across the academic domains, digital data are becoming more visible as critical products of scholarly work. Digital technologies, such as sensor networks in the environmental sciences, social networking tools in the social sciences, and the digitization of cultural artifacts in the humanities, allow researchers to produce far greater volumes and complexities of digital data than were possible in the past. Digital technologies, and the data that they produce, offer tremendous opportunity for researchers in every academic discipline to ask questions that were previously impossible to study. Some digital technologies enable researchers to study very local phenomena in great detail. Others enable the integration of many diverse data streams in order to conduct synthesis and longitudinal studies. But while the possibilities of digital data are exciting, they also present tremendous challenges: how to best organize and manage data, how to make data discoverable and accessible to diverse user communities, and how to store and preserve data over the long term.

LIS 4230 Database Management Systems (3 Credits)

This is a foundation course on the principles of database design and the use of database management systems for information professionals. The course covers database systems, data modeling, relational models, relational algebra, SQL, emerging NoSQL systems, data storage and querying, query languages, query optimization, OLAP, transaction management, data warehousing, and data mining. In addition, fundamentals on systems analysis and the database application lifecycle will be reviewed.

LIS 4235 Scripting for Large Databases (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the basics of data storage and acquisition as part of a multi-step data gathering, processing, analysis and visualization effort. The logic and structure of relational databases will be reviewed, exploring the more common databases like SQL Server and Postgres. along with exploration of JSON and NoSQL based data stores. Techniques and methods for automation and scalable data processing will be introduced under the Python programming language with a focus on using Pandas and other libraries to simplify data tasks. These skills will be integrated and applied by the student through the use of prepared data sources, along with use of APIs and web scraping technique to acquire data through internet sources.

LIS 4320 Outreach (3 Credits)

Outreach as a library service is evolving at a rapid pace. This course will examine the history, current practice, and future promise of outreach across all kind of library organizational settings. Topics addressed in this course will include competencies for outreach librarianship; practices in outreach services; definition and scope; planning, designing and budgeting for services; environmental scanning, key performance indicators, and barriers; developing and maintaining partnerships.

LIS 4321 Collection Management (3 Credits)

Topics addressed in this course include collection development and access policies, selection methods and practices, collection assessment, preservation and conservation, de-selection, treatment of rare material, manuscripts and archives, U.S. government publications, non-book and digital formats management, juvenile, and other special materials.

LIS 4330 Library Instruction (3 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to the principles of library instruction and information literacy including a historical overview of their place within the profession. Emphasis is on instruction within an academic setting, but students will learn important educational theories that can be applied to a variety of settings. ACRL and AASL standards will be examined as well as types of instruction, instructional design, collaboration with faculty, various competencies, assessment, and lifelong learning. The class has a strong emphasis on public speaking, communication skills, and the practical application of educational theory.

LIS 4350 Adult Materials & Services (3 Credits)

This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore readers advisory service from a customers perspective. Students study the readers advisory literature and examine all types of genre fiction. Lecture, readings and class discussion will focus on specific genres and authors within them. Students will also be required to read in all the genres.

LIS 4362 Government Publications Resources (2 Credits)

The U.S. government is the world's most prolific publisher, both for tangible and electronic formats. This class will cover the origin, nature, and scope of federal publications and issues related to management, organization, access, and reference services in a federal depository library. Technical/managerial aspects will cover acquisitions, organization, maintenance, bibliographic control, and technical processing. The reference component will cover congressional, presidential, executive branch, and judicial publications in all formats, together with their finding aids.

LIS 4370 Database Searching (2 Credits)

Nearly all historic, traditional search and retrieval tools such as library catalogs, indexes, microform guides, and archival findings aids have migrated to web-based systems. This course explores the complexities of searching for materials in an online environment. Topics to be covered include database and field structures; controlled vocabularies and indexing schema; search syntaxes, reference linking; data exploring and manipulation; non-textual database searching including numerical, image, and multimedia data; metasearch and web-scale discovery technologies.

LIS 4372 Medical Librarianship and Resources (3 Credits)

Overview of information sources and services in health sciences libraries. Principles and practices of medical librarianship as well as sources and services in consumer health information, evidence-based resources, drug and chemical information, systematic reviews and guidelines are covered. In addition, concepts related to health informatics, including search tools and technologies for gene and protein information are discussed.

LIS 4374 Law Librarianship and Resources (3 Credits)

This course provides students with an opportunity to explore the unique challenges that reference services pose in a legal environment. Lecture, readings, and class discussions as well as practical experience allow students to synthesize course content. Prerequisite: LIS 4060.

LIS 4404 Metadata Architectures (3 Credits)

Provides an overview of the principles and theories of metadata development in the digital environment. Focuses on the design and application of metadata schemas for distinct domains and information communities, issues in metadata interoperability, vocabulary control, quality control and evaluation. Examines international standards, activities and projects. Prerequisites: LIS 4010.

LIS 4508 Early Childhoood Materials and Services (3 Credits)

This course prepares librarians to work with infants, toddlers and preschoolers, from birth to age five, and their parents and caregivers, in libraries and pre-school settings. Topics include child development, picture books, materials selection, collection development (print and non-print), programming, story time techniques and promotion. Skills for incorporating early literacy information into early childhood programs and services using “Every Child Ready to Read” methods are introduced and appropriate materials to teach and model the skills are emphasized. Students practice story time techniques and methods for engaging children and adults in pre-literacy skills.

LIS 4510 Children's Materials and Services (3 Credits)

This course is designed to prepare librarians to work with children (ages birth to 12 years) in school and public libraries. Topics covered include children's development, reading interests and needs, materials selection, collection development (including print and non-print materials), discussions of specific genres, reading motivation skills, designing a children's area, and developing various programming ideas. Students read/view/listen to and evaluate a wide variety of materials for and about this age group, prepare and present booktalks and stories, become familiar with review sources, and design a one-year plan for youth services in a school or public library.

LIS 4511 Storytelling (2 Credits)

This course teaches librarians the skills, techniques, and procedures for developing and implementing a storytelling Program for children, young adults, or adults. The history of storytelling, its place in the school or public library, and in our culture as a whole, will be included. Students will read a wide variety of stories, learn techniques to adapt them for various settings and groups, demonstrate their ability to tell stories and to develop storytelling programs for two different age groups.

LIS 4520 Young Adult Materials & Services (3 Credits)

This course prepares librarians to work with young adults (ages 12-18) in school and public libraries. Topics covered include young adult development, reading interests and needs, materials selection, collection development (including print and non-print materials), and discussions of specific genres, reading motivation skills, designing a YA area, programming, and intellectual freedom issues. Participants will read/view/listen to and evaluate a wide variety of materials for and about this age group, prepare and present booktalks, become familiar with review sources, and design a one-year plan for a YA department in a small school or public library.

LIS 4535 School Libraries (2 Credits)

This course is a study of school libraries and the characteristics that make them different from other types of libraries. There is an emphasis on information literacy and educational technology standards as they apply to school libraries, the collaborative instructional process, and standards-based instruction including summative and formative assessment revision techniques. Collaborative planning and curriculum development through the school library program is addressed, as well as an understanding of networks and instructional delivery systems. Various strategies to improve students' reading will be addressed, as well as a variety of methods for promoting children's and teen literature through collaboration with classroom teachers. Administration of the school library is addressed in a review of mission statements, goals and objectives, strategic planning, policies and procedures, and communication with school administration. The discussions will create an awareness of the important of leadership and professionalism through educational and professional organizations, lifelong learning, educational research, and mentoring. Most of the concepts in this class will have been introduced in other classes. This class will specifically tie the concepts to the school library setting.

LIS 4610 Alternative Careers-Librarians (3 Credits)

This course will explore the many different types of jobs and careers open to individuals with library-type skills. It will cover both traditional library jobs, for example, law librarianship, archivist work, corporate librarianship, school librarianship, and records management, as well as non-traditional career choices such as information brokerage, publishing, and information advising.

LIS 4700 Topics in LIS (1-5 Credits)

This flexible library and information science course will provide students with the opportunity to explore issues of current importance in the field. Topics and credit hours will vary and will address subjects such as emerging technologies, new methodologies, specific reader services, standards and practices, and social and economic trends in the profession. Prerequisite courses may be recommended or required as determined by the content of the specified course.

LIS 4701 Reference Topics (1 Credit)

This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore information resources in specific subject materials. Lecture, readings, class discussions, and exercises will address all formats of materials including print, electronic, and web resources.

LIS 4702 Type of Library: Topics (2 Credits)

This course is a study of specific types of libraries, such as public libraries, academic libraries, and special libraries, and the characteristics that make them different from other types of libraries. Specific topics covered will depend on the type of library, but may include collections, management, budgets and funding, as well as professional competencies.

LIS 4800 Intro Archives & Records Mgmt (3 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to the objectives and methods of the archival and records management professions including an overview of terminology, issues, and common practices. The systematic control of records throughout their life cycle from creation through processing, distribution, organization, retrieval and archival disposition will be covered. Prerequisites: LIS 4000 and LIS 4010; or instructor permission.

LIS 4805 Records Management (3 Credits)

This course covers the establishment of information maintenance plans, evaluations and audits of records and information management Programs, the records and information survey, retention policies and legal requirements, and techniques for integrating automation to records and information management.

LIS 4806 Advanced Archives (3 Credits)

In this course, students will be given the opportunity to put into practice basic archival principles and functions. Students will perform the actions of appraisal, accessioning, arrangement, description, and access solution review for both analog and digital archival collections. Additionally, students will be given the task of providing solutions for new paradigms in archival processing such as creating a web archive, processing email collections, and capturing social media content. The course will be a combination of lecture, demonstration, lab time, discussion, and projects.

LIS 4810 Digital Libraries (3 Credits)

This course provides a theoretical foundation for the study of digital libraries and discusses the technological, organizational, social, and legal issues associated with the development and use of digital libraries. Through this course students develop an understanding of digital library components and explore theoretical and practical approaches to constructing, maintaining, and evaluating digital libraries. Topics examined include digital library definitions, design and architecture of digital libraries. Topics examined include digital library definitions, design and architecture of digital libraries, information access in the digital library environment, digital library users and user services, data repositories, digital curation, digital preservation, digital library evaluation, and digital librarianship.

LIS 4820 Digitization (3 Credits)

The course offers an introduction to issues and trends in planning, developing and managing digitization projects at libraries, archives, and museums. The focus of the course is on the conversion process of analog materials into the digital format, online delivery, and preservation of master files. The course discusses collection development policy for digital projects, copyright, digital imaging technology, digitization standards and best practices for text, images, audio, and video, metadata for cultural heritage collections, delivery platforms, preservation, project management, sustainability, documentation, promotion, and evaluation of digital projects.

LIS 4830 Building Digital Collections (3 Credits)

This course provides a theoretical foundation and practical experience in building interoperable digital collections. It will introduce students to all aspects of building digital collections, including planning, user needs analysis, selecting standards and content management systems, creating digital objects and metadata, designing user interface, preservation of digital objects, and management and evaluation of digital collections. Topics covered include content creation standards and best practices, metadata, interoperability, sustainability, scalability of management systems, and concepts related to designing access tools and delivery systems. Discussion of technology and its application to digital library practices will be a major theme. The course will be combination of lecture, discussion, and problem solving. It requires participants to conduct independent research and writing. Critical reading of course materials is essential to stimulate active participation in class discussions.

LIS 4850 Digital Preservation (3 Credits)

Students will learn the principles and practices of preserving access to information encoded in digital form. They will learn how to assess digital preservation needs within an institution, write digital preservation policies, and how to collect and present data to make a case for acquiring funds for digital preservation activities. Students will learn the basics of digital information encoding as it applies to the technological aspects of digital preservation, and will learn about current tools and practices used to preserve access to digitally encoded information over time. The course will be a combination of lecture, discussion, and problem solving. It requires participants to conduct independent research and writing. Critical reading of course materials is essential to stimulate active participation in class discussions.

LIS 4901 Capstone Course (4 Credits)

Students in this course will design and complete a project to demonstrate the ability to integrate and synthesize their masters course work and apply their knowledge to a topic. The class meets with an instructor regularly over the nine-week summer quarter. The instructor monitors and guides the students to ensure that they complete the phases of the project in accordance with the proposed timeline and goals. Evaluation will be based on individual performance, with respect to the quality and professionalism of the research, the management of the project, and analytical and writing skills. Prerequisite: Minimum of 45 quarter hours of graduate LIS course work completed, including all core courses, a proposal approved by the academic advisor and faculty permission.

LIS 4902 Internship (1-4 Credits)

This course will offer up to 4 credits for an internship position in libraries and archives. Students are encouraged to gain practical experience.

LIS 4910 Culminating Internship (3 Credits)

This course is designed to supplement the classroom experience by giving students practical experience working in a library or information agency. Various options are available to students depending on their areas of interest and specialization. Opportunities for experience include fields of medicine, law, art, public, and academic libraries. It is the students responsibility to select a practicum site and a field supervisor, who must be approved by LIS faculty. One hundred hours of service over a 10-week quarter are required. The student, faculty, and field supervisor will determine specific requirements for the final paper or report. Students must notify the LIS academic advisor one quarter before enrolling in Culminating Internship. Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of 38 quarter hours of graduate LIS coursework, including all core courses.

LIS 4911 Elementary School Culminating Internship (2 Credits)

This course is designed to provide elementary school practical experience for teacher-librarians by working a minimum of 80 hours in an elementary school library. Prerequisite: Students must have completed most of the required coursework for the degree before enrolling in the Practicum.

LIS 4912 Secondary School Culminating Internship (2 Credits)

This course is designed to provide secondary school practical experience for teacher-librarians by working a minimum of 80 hours in middle or high school library. Prerequisite: Students must have completed most of the required coursework for the degree before enrolling in the Practicum.

LIS 4920 Service Learning in LIS (1-4 Credits)

This course is designed to supplement the classroom experience by giving students an opportunity to participate in a service learning project. Students will propose an independent study component highlighting the learning aspects of the project. The experience should provide practical work in a library or information agency. Various options are available to students depending on their areas of interest and specialization. Opportunities for experience include many areas related to the information needs of an underserved population. It is the students responsibility to select a site and a field supervisor. The student, faculty coordinator, and field supervisor will work together to establish the goals and objectives of the experience. A minimum of 40 hours of service is required for two quarter hours of credit.

LIS 4991 MA Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

Independent study projects allow students more in-depth investigation of the many facets of library and information science. Students must work with an approved faculty advisor and submit a proposal outlining the objectives, scope, outcomes, and evaluation criteria. The faculty advisor and the department director must approve proposals. Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of 30 quarter hours of graduate LIS coursework, including all core courses and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

LIS 4992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

Research Methods and Stats Courses

RMS 4900 Education Research and Measurement (4 Credits)

This course is intended for Master's degree students in the College of Education. Quantitative research designs, empirical methods of data collection and interpretation, and measurement issues in research are examined.

RMS 4910 Introductory Statistics (5 Credits)

This beginning statistics course examines use and interpretation of statistics in educational and human services research, including descriptive and inferential techniques. Cross listed with SOWK 5930.

RMS 4911 Correlation and Regression (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the study of correlation and multiple regression research designs and their application to educational and social science programs. Cross listed with SOWK 5202. Prerequisite: RMS 4910.

RMS 4912 Analysis of Variance (5 Credits)

Conceptual and applied analyses of one-way through factorial nested analysis of variance designs and multivariate analysis of variance are presented. Prerequisite: RMS 4910.

RMS 4913 Multivariate Analysis (5 Credits)

Conceptual and applied analyses of common multivariate statistical techniques used in research in social sciences are presented as are assumptions and limitations of techniques and interpretation of results. Cross listed with SOWK 5950. Prerequisite: RMS 4911 or RMS 4912.

RMS 4914 Structural Equation Modeling (5 Credits)

This course covers major applications of and issues related to covariance structure modeling, specifically confirmatory factor analysis and latent variable path modeling; types of research applications for which covariance structure modeling analyses are appropriate. Prerequisite: RMS 4911.

RMS 4915 Hierarchical Linear Modeling (4 Credits)

This course introduces models that extend multiple regression to analysis of nested data structures common in education and other social sciences. Application of those methods to various forms of multilevel data, including repeated measure (growth trajectory) data is emphasized. Prerequisite: RMS 4911.

RMS 4916 Latent Growth Curve Modeling (4 Credits)

This course covers advanced issues in longitudinal data analysis using structural equation modeling and hierarchical linear modeling with latent variables. It involves both conceptual development and practical implementation of longitudinal data analysis. This course is intended to be a hands-on approach to working with data and addressing research questions that can be best answered by longitudinal data. Prerequisite: RMS 4914.

RMS 4917 Computer Applications in Social Science Research (3 Credits)

This course focuses on use of statistical software and other appropriate software programs in the analysis of quantitative data. Prerequisite: RMS 4910.

RMS 4919 Topics in Statistics (1-5 Credits)

Topics vary by quarter but may include log-linear analysis, factor analysis, or missing data analysis.

RMS 4920 Educational Measurement (3 Credits)

This course examines the meaning, characteristics, and processes of educational measurement and evaluation. Development and interpretation of both standardized and informal tests are considered.

RMS 4921 Psychometric Theory (3 Credits)

This course examines major psychometric theories (e.g., classical, item response) as related to reliability, generalizability, validity, and item analysis methods. Prerequisite: RMS 4910.

RMS 4922 Item Response Theory (3 Credits)

Theory and methods for the educational and psychological measurement of latent variables using item response theory are covered in this course. Prerequisite: RMS 4921.

RMS 4929 Topics in Psychometrics (1-3 Credits)

Topics vary, but include: large scale testing, computer applications of item response theory, affective measure construction, generalizability theory, additive conjoint measurement, and standing testing. Prerequisite: RMS 4921 or instructor permission.

RMS 4930 Empirical Research Methods (3 Credits)

This course provides in depth study of empirical research methods involved in experimental, quasi-experimental, correlational, and single-subject designs.

RMS 4931 Survey and Design Analysis (3 Credits)

Survey techniques, needs assessment, item construction, sampling, maximizing response rates and data analysis; survey construction and data analysis are required. Prerequisite: RMS 4910.

RMS 4932 Meta-Analysis Social Science Research (3 Credits)

This course examines meta analytic techniques in the social sciences. Included are discussions of review of critical data bases, coverage of all major methods of data collection and analysis, and coverage of how best to present meta analytic findings for publication. Prerequisite: RMS 4910.

RMS 4939 Topics in Quantitative Research Methods (1-5 Credits)

Topics vary, but include minimization as an alternative to randomization, propensity score modeling as an alternative to experimental control, and analysis of data from single-subject designs. Prerequisite: RMS 4930.

RMS 4940 Structural Foundations of Research in Social Sciences (3 Credits)

This introductory course on epistemology and research Includes discussion of identification and development of problems for research; introduction to basic quantitative and qualitative methods of conducting research in social science settings, ethnographic, and criticism methods.

RMS 4941 Introduction to Qualitative Research (4 Credits)

This course is designed to provide students with more in-depth understanding of naturalistic, qualitative research methods. It is assumed that students enrolling in this course have already completed an introductory research methods course in either education or another discipline. Purposes and questions posed in their course include: Why should a researcher choose to conduct a qualitative study? How are data collection strategies carried out in a qualitative research design? What are some of the ethical concerns that impact qualitative research?.

RMS 4942 Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis (4 Credits)

In this intermediate level qualitative research course students learn about design, purposeful sampling, field work, observational approaches, and interviews, with special attention directed to the skills and competencies needed to gather and analyze high quality data. Prerequisite: RMS 4941 or instructor permission.

RMS 4943 Computer Applications in Qualitative Research (3 Credits)

Review of assumptions of qualitative designs, types of qualitative approaches and current data-analysis techniques; computer software to analyze qualitative data.

RMS 4944 Action Research (3 Credits)

Definition of action research, whether it improves classroom practice, methods of conducting, strengths and weaknesses; use to improve specific aspects of educational practice, to become more reflective practitioners.

RMS 4945 Community-Based Research (4 Credits)

This class introduces the emerging philosophical and methodological issues that arise when university faculty students collaborate on research with community-based organizations. Prerequisites: RMS 4942 and RMS 4946.

RMS 4946 Advanced Qualitative Research (4 Credits)

This course introduces exemplary qualitative studies and consideration of implications for education and the social sciences, and considers the types of questions asked by qualitative researchers and methods they use, particularly observation and interviewing. Students undertake their own qualitative study to consider application of theory, techniques, and practice to their dissertation research. Prerequisite: RMS 4941 and RMS 4942 or permission of instructor.

RMS 4947 Arts-Based Research (3 Credits)

In this course students explore the ground upon which arts-based research is built and become acquainted with salient issues regarding this kind of research. We practice interviewing, observations and a few arts-based practices. Prerequisites: RMS 4942 and RMS 4946 or permission of instructor.

RMS 4948 Criticism and Connoisseurship: Qualitative research and the enhancement of practice (3 Credits)

Qualitative inquiry in educational settings takes many forms: ethnography, grounded theory, case-study research, and more. What these methods have in common is a framework built upon social science. Criticism and connoisseurship, however, draws its conceptual underpinnings from the arts and humanities. What does it mean to have a conceptual framework dependent upon the arts? How are the methods of educational criticism different from other research methods? This class teaches students how to conduct research using this method and it provides responses to these types of questions in order that students can defend this type of research as well as others that depend on the arts and humanities as their basis.

RMS 4949 Topics in Qualitative Research (1-5 Credits)

This seminar builds on the content of other qualitative research courses offered in the RMS program and meets the students where they are on their dissertation journey; thus learning opportunities are tailored to individual needs as far as possible. Assignments focus on the issues pertinent to the design of dissertation proposals and writing, including ethical issues and IRB preparation, theoretical/conceptual framework, literature review, methodology, data collection and analysis strategies, and various forms of representation.

RMS 4950 Qualitative Research Methodologies (3 Credits)

Each year this course examines three qualitative research methods. The methods that might be covered in any given year include: phenomenology, grounded theory, narrative, case study, and ethnography. For each method, the following is addressed: philosophical and historical foundations, various ways the method has been utilized, and practical recommendations for conducting research utilizing this method.

RMS 4951 Mixed Method Research Design (4 Credits)

This course is designed as a fundamental exploration of mixed model and mixed method approaches. Students design mixed model and mixed method research studies with a particular emphasis on multi-site and longitudinal designs that are especially suited to educational issues. Students learn analysis approaches that incorporate previously learned quantitative and qualitative skills, and apply these in practice problem examples. Prerequisites: RMS 4911, RMS 4930 and RMS 4942.

RMS 4952 Research Ethics (1 Credit)

This course introduces ethical theory and a selection of current issues in research ethics.

RMS 4953 Topics in Data Management (1-3 Credits)

This is a preparatory course emphasizing the manipulation and analysis of data in electronic form.

RMS 4954 Grant Writing (3 Credits)

This course provides a focused overview of grant writing for educators. It examines the development of reference tools (paper, electronic, and online), websites, structuring, and writing funding requests, community collaboration and partnerships, project budgeting, management, evaluation, sustainability, and reporting activities.

RMS 4959 Topics in Research Design (1-5 Credits)

Topics vary, but include single subject design issues, minimization as an alternative to randomization, advances in quasi-experimental design. Prerequisite: RMS 4930.

RMS 4960 Program Evaluation Theory (3,4 Credits)

This course reviews theories of program evaluation and current trends in evaluation.

RMS 4961 Program Development & Evaluation (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the practice of program development and evaluation in school, business, or community agency settings. Both qualitative and quantitative methods of program evaluation are discussed. Students have the opportunity to focus on evaluation of a specific program.

RMS 4962 Program Development and Assessment (3 Credits)

This course focuses on how student affairs administrators conduct student outcomes assessment, evaluate program development, and monitor program and division budgets.

RMS 4969 Topics in Program Evaluation (1-5 Credits)

Topics vary, but include advocacy and policy change, assessment in higher education, multi-level evaluation, cost effectiveness analysis, data visualization and reporting, assessment in distance education, and evaluation in the arts and culture. Prerequisite: RMS 4960.

RMS 4979 Qualitative Research Practicum (1-4 Credits)

Students in the Qualitative Research Concentration may complete the optional Qualitative Research Practicum with an individual professor or with a community partner. The goal of this practicum is to provide further experiences in thinking about, conceptualizing, designing, conducting, and/or presenting qualitative research. Prerequisites include: RMS 4980 Practicum in Research RMS 4941 Introduction to Qualitative Research RMS 4942 Data Collection and Analysis And at least two of the following classes must be taken prior to RMS 4979 as well: RMS 4946 Advanced Qualitative Research RMS 4945 Community Based Research RMS 4947 Arts-Based Research RMS 4948 Criticism and Connoisseurship.

RMS 4980 Practicum in Research (1-5 Credits)

This course provides a supervised experience in design and implementation of an empirical research or evaluation study. Organization of research proposals, completion of human subjects applications, collection, and analysis of data are emphasized. Students are expected to prepare a written report of their project which is suitable for professional presentation or publication.

RMS 4981 Community-Based Research Practicum (1-5 Credits)

Students provide community-based research assistance to a community partner (non-profit, school, community based organization, etc). Student researchers are supervised by DU faculty. This course is an excellent opportunity to match the student's research expertise with the real needs of community partners. Prerequisite: RMS 4945.

RMS 4991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

This course allows Masters students in RMS to study a topic area independently in conjunction with a cooperating faculty member.

RMS 4992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

RMS 4995 Independent Research (1-10 Credits)

This course is for Masters students in RMS whose program requires completion of a Master's thesis.

RMS 5991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

This course allows Ph.D. students in RMS to study a topic area independently in conjunction with a cooperating faculty member.

RMS 5992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

RMS 5995 Independent Research (1-18 Credits)

This course is for Ph.D. students in RMS who are engaged in completing their doctoral dissertation.

Faculty

Nicholas Cutforth, Professor and Department Chair, PhD, University of Illinois at Chicago

Shimelis Assefa, Associate Professor, PhD, University of North Texas

Denis Dumas, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Maryland

Kathy Green, Professor, PhD, University of Washington

Krystyna Matusiak, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Peter Organisciak, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Illinois

Robyn Thomas Pitts, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of North Carolina

Mary Stansbury, Associate Professor, PhD, Texas Womans University

Bruce Uhrmacher, Professor, PhD, Stanford University

Duan Zhang, Associate Professor, PhD, Texas A&M University

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