2018-2019 Graduate Bulletin

Graduate School of Social Work

Doctor of Philosophy in Social Work

The doctoral program at the Graduate School of Social Work trains master's level human service professionals from across the country and around the world to become social work researchers, educators and policy experts.

Founded in 1968, our PhD program is among the oldest social work doctoral programs in the nation. Students work alongside distinguished faculty members to conduct research, write publications and gain substantive and methodological knowledge in the field of social work.

As a doctoral student, you are encouraged to develop a solid understanding of the theories, social interventions and policies that guide research in your individual substantive areas.

The program emphasizes the following:

  • knowledge development through advanced coursework in theory, policy and research methodology;

  • research competencies through required and elective courses, graduate research assistantships and dissertation research;

  • collaboration with faculty working in diverse, substantive areas including youth, child welfare, gerontology, mental health, substance abuse and poverty; and

  • teaching skills through a pedagogy coursework teaching practicum, elective courses and faculty mentoring.

Watch our PhD video to learn more.

Denver Campus Master of Social Work (MSW) Program 

Most students attend our Denver campus MSW program, where they can customize their career preparation by choosing from eight specialized concentrations and three unique certificate programs. Students can also pursue a dual degree with another graduate degree or take courses at other graduate programs on the University of Denver campus. The Denver MSW program attracts students from across the country and around the world. GSSW recently launched a partnership degree with the University of Colorado Denver which allows students to receive a Master of Social Work and a Master of Public Health simultaneously.

Concentrations

- Aging Services and Policy
- Child Welfare
- Children and Youth: Risks and Positive Development
- Family Systems Practice
- Health and Wellness
- Mental Health
- Organizational Leadership and Policy Practice
​- Sustainable Development and Global Practice

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Aging Services and Policy

The Aging Services and Policy concentration prepares social workers to practice across the continuum of services that promote quality of life and independence for older adults and their families. Social workers interested in aging provide clinical care in health, behavioral health, memory care, community and residential settings. Additionally, social workers intervene in social justice issues impacting older adults through educational, management, program development, advocacy and policy work. This concentration emphasizes culturally responsive practice needed for the increasing diversity among older adults locally, nationally and internationally.

Students engage in field education in a variety of settings such as community service agencies and government agencies, home health and hospice agencies, outpatient and inpatient medical care settings, residential facilities across the continuum of care, gero-psychiatry services, and advocacy agencies. Clients are predominately older adults and their families, but may include clients of all ages. These placements can offer opportunities to gain skills in clinical interventions, care management, group work, program and policy development, advocacy, and administration.

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Children and Youth: Risks and Positive Development

This concentration provides students with knowledge and skills to work from a resilience perspective with adolescents and children in a wide variety of settings: mental health, family services agencies, schools, treatment centers, youth correctional facilities, and community agencies.

The concentration gives students expertise in the theories and practices for prevention, early intervention and clinical treatment with children and youth. The overarching frameworks for the concentration are positive youth development and resilience. Students learn clinical strategies that are particularly effective for working with children and youth.

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Child Welfare & Child Maltreatment

The Child Welfare & Child Maltreatment concentration prepares social workers for work with children, youth, and families across the continuum of care within the child welfare system from entry to exit in both public and private child welfare agencies. Using a multi-systemic lens, this concentration focuses on the use of culturally responsive, evidence-based approaches to interventions with children and families who have experience child maltreatment, poverty, domestic violence, mental illness, and substance abuse. Intervention is focused on engaging families, building upon individual and family strengths, preventing and alleviating the consequences of child maltreatment, as well as promoting the safety, permanence and well-being of children who have suffered, or are at risk of, child maltreatment.

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Family Systems Practice

The Family Systems Practice concentration provides students with knowledge and skills to use multi-systemic assessments and interventions to ameliorate client and family distress in a wide variety of settings including but not limited to: mental health and family service agencies, child welfare, legal systems, schools, treatment centers, private practice, and community social service agencies. This concentration prepares students to work in a variety of direct service, practice and family policy settings with diverse clients, individuals, couples, families, organizations, constituencies, and communities.

Through coursework and specialized field placements offering the opportunity to work at the individual family, agency, community or family policy level, students will:

  • Develop an understanding of the needs of children, youth, and multigenerational families seeking social work services

  • Select interventions for best practices,

  • Understand the differences between public funded, nonprofit, and private social work settings,

  • Assess legal and associated ethical issues given complex systems,

  • Evaluate social systems for issues of bias and cultural responsiveness in client engagements and service utilization.

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Health and Wellness

The Health and Wellness concentration prepares students to be practitioners in diverse health, integrated health and wellness settings. Students study a variety of practice skills, theories and evidence-based modalities to prepare for social work in comprehensive and specialized health care facilities, public health clinics and programs and/or wellness and preventative healthcare programs.

The Health and Wellness concentration allows students to practice specific skill sets that incorporate problem-solving, integrative and strengths-based approaches to care. Students gain exposure to classical Western medical social work settings (such as hospitals), to integrative health settings (where mental health, drug and alcohol intervention, and medical care are connected) and to organizations primarily focused on promoting mental, emotional, physical, spiritual, community, social and/or environmental wellness. Students can choose to experience a range of options from learning medical terminology to studying complementary and alternative medicine techniques focused on the mind-body connection.

Course work also illuminates the history of health and health disparities in the United States and globally, preparing students for culturally competent clinical practice, as well as leadership and advocacy in health and wellness administrative and policy practice.

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Mental Health

The Mental Health concentration focuses on clinical interventions, advanced theory, and research related to mental health, substance use and trauma. Core topics include the assessment of mental health and substance use, skills in crisis intervention and suicide risk-assessment, policy related to mental health and substance use intervention and key clinical interventions and skills.

Courses include intervention in substance use and mental health interventions from several theoretical perspectives: solution-focused, cognitive behavioral, trauma-informed, existential, interpersonal/psychodynamic and strengths/empowerment. Populations include children, adults, and older adults.

Field education placements are offered in agencies that provide psychotherapy, crisis intervention, case management and other clinical interventions related to mental health, substance use and trauma.

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Organizational Leadership and Policy Practice

The Organizational Leadership and Policy Practice concentration prepares social work practitioners to work at community, organizational and societal levels. Practitioners work to build the capacity of communities, organizations and policy-makers to advance human rights, social justice and the well-being of all peoples. Community social workers use leadership skills to develop programs, administer organizations, build community coalitions, craft and analyze social policy, advocate for policy and program change, and implement program and policy research to support best practices for social services delivery. Students complete field work in community based settings and organizations that address a range of social problems and policy issues such as poverty, women’s rights, health care, homelessness and education.

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Sustainable Development and Global Practice

Humans need an ecological understanding of their place in the natural environment to promote personal health and well-being, environmental awareness, sense of belonging in a community, sustainability, resilience and advocacy. Students will develop practice behaviors in assessment, community engagement, education, health promotion, mobilization, organizing, poverty reduction, environmental preservation and capacity building strategies. Students in the Sustainable Development and Global Practice concentration will learn about local and global policies and laws relevant to humane treatment of human and animals, human security, sustainable development strategies in countries emerging from conflict, conservation of nature, biodiversity and sustainability, land use, and water use. 

Courses and field internships will be guided by the principles of human rights, global justice, and sustainability and will  address complex social and economic development, reconciliation and restorative justice, implementation of sustainable development strategies in countries emerging from conflict, conservation of nature, and biodiversity issues to support the systemic interconnections of human-animal and ecosystem health using practice-informed environmental health and capacity-building strategies.

Students learn to partner effectively with families, communities, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and institutions by developing competencies in assessment, community engagement, education, health promotion, mobilization, environmental preservation, organizing and developing strategies to reduce poverty and build capacity.

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Mental Health and Trauma: MSW@Denver

The Mental Health and Trauma concentration focuses on clinical and community based interventions, advanced theory and research related to mental health, substance use and trauma. Core topics include the assessment of mental health and substance use, skills in crisis intervention and suicide risk-assessment, policy related to mental health and health care and key interventions and skills.  Students will learn to apply a critical lens, cultural responsiveness, and empowerment theory to actualize social work’s value of social justice.

Courses include mental health interventions emphasizing cognitive approaches, trauma informed care, prevention and interventions related to substance use, integrated health, interpersonal, relational, and strengths approaches in community mental health. 

Field education internships are offered in settings that provide clinical and community interventions related to mental health, substance use and trauma. Internships may include individual, group and family therapy, crisis intervention, case management and other clinical and community based interventions.

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Advanced Social Work Practice: Four Corners Program

The Advanced Social Work Practice Concentration prepares social workers to practice across the continuum of services at micro, mezzo and macro levels with a wide range of populations and settings to meet the needs of their community.  Additionally, social workers intervene in social justice issues impacting local populations through educational, management, program development, advocacy and policy work. This concentration emphasizes culturally responsive practice needed for the increasing diversity in communities locally and nationally.

Students engage in field education in a variety of settings such as community service and government agencies, health and hospice agencies, residential facilities, schools, child welfare settings and more.  Clients include individuals, families, groups and communities.  These placements can offer opportunities to gain skills in clinical interventions, care management, group work, program and policy development, advocacy, and administration.

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Advanced Social Work Practice: Western Colorado Program

The Advanced Social Work Practice concentration prepares social workers to practice across the continuum of services that are provided in rural areas. Social workers interested in advanced social work practice are prepared to provide social work services at a micro, mezzo or macro level across a wide range of populations and settings to meet the needs of their community.  Additionally, social workers intervene in social justice issues impacting local populations through educational, management, program development, advocacy and policy work. This concentration emphasizes culturally responsive practice needed for the increasing diversity in communities locally and nationally.

Students engage in field education in a variety of settings such as community service and government agencies, health and hospice agencies, residential facilities, schools, child welfare settings and more.  Clients include individuals, families, groups and communities.  These placements can offer opportunities to gain skills in clinical interventions, care management, group work, program and policy development, advocacy, and administration.

Certificate in Animal-Assisted Social Work

Students enrolled in this certificate program are required to complete 15 hours of concentration year field internship (five in each of three quarters) in a program or agency that either offers animal-assisted social work or is interested in developing it. Students must include a plan for integrating the specific requirements of the certificate into those of the internship on the Individualized Field Education Plan (IFEP). The internship must fulfill the requirements of the concentration practice track, as well as those of the certificate.

LatinX Social Work Certificate

Students enrolled in this certificate program are required to complete 15 hours of concentration year field internship (five in each of three quarters) in a program or agency offering the opportunity to work with Latino/a clients and use Spanish at least 30% of the time. Students must include a plan for integrating the specific requirements of the certificate into those of the internship on the Individualized Field Education Plan (IFEP). The internship must fulfill the requirements of the concentration practice track, as well as those of the certificate.

Certificate of Specialization in School Social Work

Students enrolled in this certificate program are required to complete 15 hours of concentration year field internship (five in each of three quarters) in a school setting in the State of Colorado and with supervision by a school social worker. Students must include a plan for integrating specific requirements of the certificate into those of the internship on the Individualized Field Education Plan (IFEP). The internship must fulfill the requirements of the concentration practice track, as well as those of the certificate. 


Accreditation

Since 1933, our MSW program has been accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on Post-Secondary Accreditation.

CSWE accreditation signifies that our MSW program meets nationally accepted standards in eight areas:

- mission, goals and objectives
- curriculum
- governance, structure and resources
- faculty
- student professional development
- non-discrimination and human diversity
- program renewal
- program assessment and continuous improvement

All CSWE programs measure and report student learning outcomes. Students are assessed on their mastery of the competencies that comprise the accreditation standards of the Council on Social Work Education. These competencies are dimensions of social work practice that all social workers are expected to master during their professional training. A measurement benchmark is set by the social work programs for each competency. An assessment score at or above that benchmark is considered by the program to represent mastery of that particular competency. Read GSSW's Student Learning Outcomes.

Doctor of Philosophy in Social Work

Application Deadlines

  • Fall 2018 Priority Deadline: January 15, 2018
  • Fall 2018 Final Submission Deadline: July 1, 2018

Admission Requirements

  • Online admission application
  • $65.00 Application Fee
  • University Minimum Degree and GPA Requirements
  • Transcripts: One official transcript from each post-secondary institution.
  • Master's degree
  • GRE: The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required. Scores must be received directly from the appropriate testing agency by the deadline. The institution code for the University of Denver is 4842.
  • Letters of Recommendation: Three (3) letters of recommendation are required. Letters should be submitted by recommenders through the online application.
  • Personal Statement: The PhD Admission Committee considers your Statement of Professional and Educational Intent to be a significant part of your application. Respond openly and honestly to each section. The average statement length is approximately seven pages. Please double-space your statement. The Statement of Professional and Educational Intent must be written solely by you, the applicant, without the use of an editor. (Computer grammar/spelling checks and self-editing are permitted.)
  • Résumé: The résumé (or C.V.) should include all educational achievements, relevant work experience, research and/or volunteer work.
  • Writing Sample: Submit a sample of your writing completed within the past five years. This may be a published article, a manuscript prepared for publication, a re-worked paper from a graduate program or a newly prepared sample. The writing sample should demonstrate scholarship, command of literature, critical thinking and research skills. The paper must be a minimum of ten pages, but preferably 10 - 18 pages, and must explore a topic relevant to social work knowledge. In evaluating this sample, we will examine evidence of scholarly writing skills, incorporation of relevant literature, mastery of research methods, analytic acuity, clarity of discussion and implications for social work.
  • Prerequisites: Doctoral students are expected to enter the program with a basic proficiency in descriptive and inferential statistics. This knowledge is necessary for several of the required doctoral courses. If you lack this required statistical proficiency, you should plan to take a basic statistics course before enrolling at GSSW.

Additional Standards for Non-Native English Speakers

Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. The minimum TOEFL/IELTS/CAE test score requirements for the degree program are:

  • Minimum TOEFL Score (paper-based test): 587
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (internet-based test): 95
  • Minimum IELTS Score: 8.0
  • Minimum CAE Score: 200
  • English Conditional Admission Offered: No, this program does not offer English Conditional Admission.
  •  

Read the English Language Proficiency policy for more details.

Read the English Conditional Admission (ECA) policy for more details.

Read the Required Tests for GTA Eligibility policy for more details.

Additional Standards for International Applicants

Per Student & Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) regulation, international applicants must meet all standards for admission before an I-20 or DS-2019 is issued, [per U.S. Federal Register: 8 CFR § 214.3(k)] or is academically eligible for admission and is admitted [per 22 C.F.R. §62]. Read the Additional Standards For International Applicants policy for more details.

Financial Aid

There are many different options available to finance your education. Most University of Denver graduate students are granted some type of financial support. Our Office of Financial Aid is committed to helping you explore your options.

Master of Social Work

Application Deadlines

  • Fall 2018 Priority Deadline: January 15, 2018
  • Fall 2018 Final Submission Deadline: July 1, 2018

Admission Requirements

  • Online admission application
  • $65.00 Application Fee
  • University Minimum Degree and GPA Requirements
  • Transcripts: One official transcript from each post-secondary institution.
  • Letters of Recommendation: Two (2) letters of recommendation are required. Letters should be submitted by recommenders through the online application.
  • Essay: The Admission Committee considers your Career Goals Statement to be an essential part of your application. While factors such as cumulative grade point average and social work-related experience are important, your rationale for entering the social work profession, your self-awareness, creativity, critical thinking and writing skills are major factors that committee members consider when reviewing your application. Respond openly and honestly to each section. The average statement length is approximately five pages; submissions exceeding seven pages are discouraged. Please double-space your statement, use a font size of no less than 12, and put your name in the upper right corner of each page. Answer questions 1-5. Answering question 6 is optional. Prior to writing your essay, review the NASW Code of Ethics. Questions:
  1. Rationale: Identify significant factors that influenced your decision to pursue a Master of Social Work (MSW) degree and how you intend to use it in the future. (1-2 paragraphs)
  2. Social Work Values and Ethics: Describe your understanding of the social work profession and its core values. Compare your own values with the professional social work values, any potential value based or ethical conflicts you might experience and how you plan to address or reconcile these conflicts (whether it be in the classroom, field, in future practice, or in any other areas). (1 page)
  3. Personal & Professional Attributes and Liabilities: Describe any cultural, economic, or social challenges and opportunities that have provided you with a unique perspective about social work issues. What insights have you gained from these experiences about how to maintain professional judgment and performance during times of distress? (1 page)
  4. Employment and Volunteer Experiences: Discuss the relationship between your educational, employment, and volunteer experiences and what qualities equip you for the social work profession. Describe your experiences and feelings about working with populations different from your own. (1 page)
  5. Work Life Balance: Explain your plan for managing your graduate education. Consider how you will balance work, family and other responsibilities with the required courses, homework, and internship responsibilities. (2-3 paragraphs)
  6. Optional: Please address any special academic or other considerations that you would like GSSW to consider in the review of your application.
  • Résumé: The résumé (or C.V.) should include all educational achievements, relevant work experience, research and/or volunteer work.
  • Prerequisites: A minimum of 20 semester hours or 30 quarter hours in undergraduate course work in the arts and humanities, social/behavioral sciences and biological sciences. For each liberal arts course taken to fulfill this requirement, students must earn a grade of "C" (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) or better. In addition, you must have completed at least one course in English composition or present evidence of testing out of the English composition requirement.

Additional Standards for Non-Native English Speakers

Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. The minimum TOEFL/IELTS/CAE test score requirements for the degree program are:

  • Minimum TOEFL Score (paper-based test): 587
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (internet-based test): 95
  • Minimum IELTS Score: 7.0
  • Minimum CAE Score: 185
  • English Conditional Admission Offered: No, this program does not offer English Conditional Admission.
  •  

Read the English Language Proficiency policy for more details.

Read the English Conditional Admission (ECA) policy for more details.

Read the Required Tests for GTA Eligibility policy for more details.

Additional Standards for International Applicants

Per Student & Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) regulation, international applicants must meet all standards for admission before an I-20 or DS-2019 is issued, [per U.S. Federal Register: 8 CFR § 214.3(k)] or is academically eligible for admission and is admitted [per 22 C.F.R. §62]. Read the Additional Standards For International Applicants policy for more details.

Financial Aid

There are many different options available to finance your education. Most University of Denver graduate students are granted some type of financial support. Our Office of Financial Aid is committed to helping you explore your options.

Master of Social Work Advanced Standing (Main Campus and Four Corners programs)

Application Deadlines

  • Summer 2019 Priority Deadline: December 15, 2018
  • Summer 2019 Final Submission Deadline: June 1, 2019

Admission Requirements

  • Online admission application
  • $65.00 Application Fee
  • University Minimum Degree and GPA Requirements
  • Transcripts: One official transcript from each post-secondary institution.
  • Letters of Recommendation: Two (2) letters of recommendation are required. Letters should be submitted by recommenders through the online application.
  • Essay: The Admission Committee considers your Career Goals Statement (essay) to be an essential part of your application. While factors such as cumulative grade point average and social work-related experience are important, your rationale for entering the social work profession, your self-awareness, creativity, critical thinking and writing skills are major factors that committee members consider when reviewing your application. Respond openly and honestly to each section. The average statement length is approximately five pages; submissions exceeding seven pages are discouraged. Please double-space your statement, use a font size of no less than 12, and put your name in the upper right corner of each page. Answer questions 1-5. Answering question 6 is optional. Prior to writing your essay, review the NASW Code of Ethics. Questions:
  1. Rationale: Identify significant factors that influenced your decision to pursue a Master of Social Work (MSW) degree and how you intend to use it in the future. (1-2 paragraphs)
  2. Social Work Values and Ethics: Describe your understanding of the social work profession and its core values. Compare your own values with the professional social work values, any potential value based or ethical conflicts you might experience and how you plan to address or reconcile these conflicts (whether it be in the classroom, field, in future practice, or in any other areas). (1 page)
  3. Personal & Professional Attributes and Liabilities: Describe any cultural, economic, or social challenges and opportunities that have provided you with a unique perspective about social work issues. What insights have you gained from these experiences about how to maintain professional judgment and performance during times of distress? (1 page)
  4. Employment and Volunteer Experiences: Discuss the relationship between your educational, employment, and volunteer experiences and what qualities equip you for the social work profession. Describe your experiences and feelings about working with populations different from your own. (1 page)
  5. Work Life Balance: Explain your plan for managing your graduate education. Consider how you will balance work, family and other responsibilities with the required courses, homework, and internship responsibilities. (2-3 paragraphs)
  6. Optional: Please address any special academic or other considerations that you would like GSSW to consider in the review of your application.
  • Résumé: The résumé (or C.V.) should include all educational achievements, relevant work experience, research and/or volunteer work.
  • Prerequisites: A minimum of 20 semester hours or 30 quarter hours in undergraduate course work in the arts and humanities, social/behavioral sciences and biological sciences. For each liberal arts course taken to fulfill this requirement, students must earn a grade of "C" (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) or better. In addition, you must have completed at least one course in English composition or present evidence of testing out of the English composition requirement.

Additional Standards for Non-Native English Speakers

Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. The minimum TOEFL/IELTS/CAE test score requirements for the degree program are:

  • Minimum TOEFL Score (paper-based test): 587
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (internet-based test): 95
  • Minimum IELTS Score: 7.0
  • Minimum CAE Score: 185
  • English Conditional Admission Offered: No, this program does not offer English Conditional Admission.
  •  

Read the English Language Proficiency policy for more details.

Read the English Conditional Admission (ECA) policy for more details.

Read the Required Tests for GTA Eligibility policy for more details.

Additional Standards for International Applicants

Per Student & Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) regulation, international applicants must meet all standards for admission before an I-20 or DS-2019 is issued, [per U.S. Federal Register: 8 CFR § 214.3(k)] or is academically eligible for admission and is admitted [per 22 C.F.R. §62]. Read the Additional Standards For International Applicants policy for more details.

Financial Aid

There are many different options available to finance your education. Most University of Denver graduate students are granted some type of financial support. Our Office of Financial Aid is committed to helping you explore your options.

Master of Social Work (Four Corners)

Application Deadlines

  • Fall 2018 Priority Deadline: May 1, 2018
  • Fall 2018 Final Submission Deadline: August 30, 2018

Admission Requirements

  • Online admission application
  • $65.00 Application Fee
  • University Minimum Degree and GPA Requirements
  • Transcripts: One official transcript from each post-secondary institution.
  • Letters of Recommendation: Two (2) letters of recommendation are required. Letters should be submitted by recommenders through the online application.
  • Essay: The Admission Committee considers your Career Goals Statement (essay) to be an essential part of your application. While factors such as cumulative grade point average and social work-related experience are important, your rationale for entering the social work profession, your self-awareness, creativity, critical thinking and writing skills are major factors that committee members consider when reviewing your application. Respond openly and honestly to each section. The average statement length is approximately five pages; submissions exceeding seven pages are discouraged. Please double-space your statement, use a font size of no less than 12, and put your name in the upper right corner of each page. Answer questions 1-5. Answering question 6 is optional. Prior to writing your essay, review the NASW Code of Ethics. Questions:
  1. Rationale: Identify significant factors that influenced your decision to pursue a Master of Social Work (MSW) degree and how you intend to use it in the future. (1-2 paragraphs)
  2. Social Work Values and Ethics: Describe your understanding of the social work profession and its core values. Compare your own values with the professional social work values, any potential value based or ethical conflicts you might experience and how you plan to address or reconcile these conflicts (whether it be in the classroom, field, in future practice, or in any other areas). (1 page)
  3. Personal & Professional Attributes and Liabilities: Describe any cultural, economic, or social challenges and opportunities that have provided you with a unique perspective about social work issues. What insights have you gained from these experiences about how to maintain professional judgment and performance during times of distress? (1 page)
  4. Employment and Volunteer Experiences: Discuss the relationship between your educational, employment, and volunteer experiences and what qualities equip you for the social work profession. Describe your experiences and feelings about working with populations different from your own. (1 page)
  5. Work Life Balance: Explain your plan for managing your graduate education. Consider how you will balance work, family and other responsibilities with the required courses, homework, and internship responsibilities. (2-3 paragraphs)
  6. Optional: Please address any special academic or other considerations that you would like GSSW to consider in the review of your application.
  • Résumé: The résumé (or C.V.) should include all educational achievements, relevant work experience, research and/or volunteer work.
  • Prerequisites: A minimum of 20 semester hours or 30 quarter hours in undergraduate course work in the arts and humanities, social/behavioral sciences and biological sciences. For each liberal arts course taken to fulfill this requirement, students must earn a grade of "C" (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) or better. In addition, you must have completed at least one course in English composition or present evidence of testing out of the English composition requirement.

Additional Standards for Non-Native English Speakers

Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. The minimum TOEFL/IELTS/CAE test score requirements for the degree program are:

  • Minimum TOEFL Score (paper-based test): 587
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (internet-based test): 95
  • Minimum IELTS Score: 7.0
  • Minimum CAE Score: 185
  • English Conditional Admission Offered: No, this program does not offer English Conditional Admission.
  •  

Read the English Language Proficiency policy for more details.

Read the English Conditional Admission (ECA) policy for more details.

Read the Required Tests for GTA Eligibility policy for more details.

Additional Standards for International Applicants

Per Student & Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) regulation, international applicants must meet all standards for admission before an I-20 or DS-2019 is issued, [per U.S. Federal Register: 8 CFR § 214.3(k)] or is academically eligible for admission and is admitted [per 22 C.F.R. §62]. Read the Additional Standards For International Applicants policy for more details.

Financial Aid

There are many different options available to finance your education. Most University of Denver graduate students are granted some type of financial support. Our Office of Financial Aid is committed to helping you explore your options.

Master of Social Work (Western Colorado Program)

Application Deadlines

  • The Western Colorado MSW program is unavailable for admission beginning in the 2018-19 academic year. The next cohort of two-year students will begin in the fall of 2019.

Admission Requirements

  • Online admission application
  • $65.00 Application Fee
  • University Minimum Degree and GPA Requirements
  • Transcripts: One official transcript from each post-secondary institution.
  • Letters of Recommendation: Two (2) letters of recommendation are required. Letters should be submitted by recommenders through the online application.
  • Essay: The Admission Committee considers your Career Goals Statement (essay) to be an essential part of your application. Other factors such as cumulative grade point average and social work related experience are also important, but who you are, why you wish to enter the social work profession, and how you write and think critically are major factors that committee members consider when reviewing your application. Respond openly and honestly to each section. The average statement length is approximately five pages; submissions exceeding seven pages are discouraged. Please double-space your statement, use a font size of no less than 10.
  • Résumé: The résumé (or C.V.) should include all educational achievements, relevant work experience, research and/or volunteer work.
  • Prerequisites: A minimum of 20 semester hours or 30 quarter hours in undergraduate course work in the arts and humanities, social/behavioral sciences and biological sciences. For each liberal arts course taken to fulfill this requirement, students must earn a grade of "C"—2.0 on a 4.0 scale—or better. In addition, you must have completed at least one course in English composition or present evidence of testing out of the English composition requirement.

Additional Standards for Non-Native English Speakers

Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. The minimum TOEFL/IELTS/CAE test score requirements for the degree program are:

  • Minimum TOEFL Score (paper-based test): 587
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (internet-based test): 95
  • Minimum IELTS Score: 7.0
  • Minimum CAE Score: 185
  • English Conditional Admission Offered: No, this program does not offer English Conditional Admission.
  •  

Read the English Language Proficiency policy for more details.

Read the English Conditional Admission (ECA) policy for more details.

Read the Required Tests for GTA Eligibility policy for more details.

Additional Standards for International Applicants

Per Student & Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) regulation, international applicants must meet all standards for admission before an I-20 or DS-2019 is issued, [per U.S. Federal Register: 8 CFR § 214.3(k)] or is academically eligible for admission and is admitted [per 22 C.F.R. §62]. Read the Additional Standards For International Applicants policy for more details.

Financial Aid

There are many different options available to finance your education. Most University of Denver graduate students are granted some type of financial support. Our Office of Financial Aid is committed to helping you explore your options.

Master of Social Work (Online)

Application Deadlines

  • Fall 2018 Priority Deadline: June 8, 2018
  • Fall 2018 Final Submission Deadline: July 27, 2018
  • Winter 2019 Priority Deadline: October 8, 2018
  • Winter 2019 Final Submission Deadline: November 5, 2018
  • Spring 2019 Priority Deadline: January 11, 2019
  • Spring 2019 Final Submission Deadline: February 8, 2019
  • Summer 2019 Priority Deadline: March 29, 2019
  • Summer 2019 Final Submission Deadline: April 26, 2019

Admission Requirements

  • Online admission application
  • $65.00 Application Fee
  • University Minimum Degree and GPA Requirements
    • In order to be considered for admission to MSW@Denver, applicants must hold a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university other than a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW).  Those with a BSW are only eligible to enroll in the advanced standing program.  At this time, our advanced standing MSW program is not offered online.  We do offer the advanced standing program for students with a BSW at three campus locations: Denver, Durango and Glenwood Springs.  Learn more.
  • Transcripts: One official transcript from each post-secondary institution.
  • Letters of Recommendation: Two (2) letters of recommendation are required. Letters should be submitted by recommenders through the online application.
  • Essay: The Admission Committee considers your Career Goals Statement (essay) to be an essential part of your application. Other factors such as cumulative grade point average and social work related experience are also important, but who you are, why you wish to enter the social work profession, and how you write and think critically are major factors that committee members consider when reviewing your application. Respond openly and honestly to each section. The average statement length is approximately five pages; submissions exceeding seven pages are discouraged. Please double-space your statement, use a font size of no less than 10.
  • Résumé: The résumé (or C.V.) should include all educational achievements, relevant work experience, research and/or volunteer work.
  • Prerequisites: A minimum of 20 semester hours or 30 quarter hours in undergraduate course work in the arts and humanities, social/behavioral sciences and biological sciences. For each liberal arts course taken to fulfill this requirement, students must earn a grade of "C"—2.0 on a 4.0 scale—or better. In addition, you must have completed at least one course in English composition or present evidence of testing out of the English composition requirement.

Additional Standards for Non-Native English Speakers

Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. The minimum TOEFL/IELTS/CAE test score requirements for the degree program are:

  • Minimum TOEFL Score (paper-based test): 587
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (internet-based test): 95
  • Minimum IELTS Score: 7.0
  • Minimum CAE Score: 185
  • English Conditional Admission Offered: No, this program does not offer English Conditional Admission.
  •  

Read the English Language Proficiency policy for more details.

Read the English Conditional Admission (ECA) policy for more details.

Read the Required Tests for GTA Eligibility policy for more details.

Additional Standards for International Applicants

Per Student & Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) regulation, international applicants must meet all standards for admission before an I-20 or DS-2019 is issued, [per U.S. Federal Register: 8 CFR § 214.3(k)] or is academically eligible for admission and is admitted [per 22 C.F.R. §62]. Read the Additional Standards For International Applicants policy for more details.

Financial Aid

There are many different options available to finance your education. Most University of Denver graduate students are granted some type of financial support. Our Office of Financial Aid is committed to helping you explore your options.

Certificates

Overall Requirements for Admission to Certificate Programs

Students who wish to be considered for admission to any one of the two academic certificate programs must:

  • successfully complete the foundation curriculum at GSSW or be admitted to the MSW program as an advanced standing student.
  • be in good standing in both academics and field.
  • declare intention to complete certificate on Course Planning Worksheet according to established deadlines.
  • be willing and able to attend all classes required for the certificate at the time these classes are offered.
  • be willing and able to meet all academic requirements for their concentration and practice track, as well as for the certificate program.
  • meet any additional eligibility requirements listed within the individual certificate descriptions below.

Animal-Assisted Social Work Certificate

Students who wish to be considered for admission to the Animal-Assisted Social Work Certificate program (AASW) may be in any concentration at GSSW and are required to:

  • meet the general requirements for admission to certificate programs listed in the introductory section.
  • complete the introductory course (SOWK 4795) prior to taking SOWK 4796 and SOWK 4797.
  • be willing to attend extracurricular, experiential AASW activities offered by the Institute for Human-Animal Connection (IHAC).
  • integrate AASW concepts into their concentration year field placement. It is not required to have a therapy animal or therapy animal-in-training to fulfill this requirement and the field site does not need to be a traditional AASW site.

Latinx Social Work Certificate

Students who wish to be considered for admission to the Latinx Social Work Certificate program should contact the certificate coordinator for more information. Students are also required to:

  • complete the Latinx Social Work Certificate application.
  • submit a copy of their current Resume/Curriculum Vitae.
  • schedule a meeting with the certificate coordinator.
  • demonstrate, at minimum, an Intermediate-Mid Level of proficiency in Spanish.  An online proficiency test is offered at GSSW for applicants.
  •  

Doctor of Philosophy in Social Work

University policy requires a minimum of 135 quarter hours beyond a baccalaureate for the doctor of philosophy degree in social work. Up to 60 quarter hours toward this requirement may be credited for “A” or “B” work completed as part of a master’s degree conferred through an accredited school of social work.

Minimum number of credits required beyond the MSW: 75
Minimum number of credits required beyond MA in related field: 90

Coursework Requirements

FIRST YEAR 1
Fall
Seminar in Professional Social Work Issues
Introduction to Advanced Quantitative Research Methods
Introduction to Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
Statistical Methods 2
Social Science Theory and the Philosophy of Science
Winter
Seminar in Professional Social Work Issues
Qualitative Data Analysis
Correlation and Regression
Elective (3-6 credits) 3
Spring
Seminar in Professional Social Work Issues
Mixed Methods Research in Social Work
Multivariate Analysis
Elective (3-6 credits) 3
SECOND YEAR
Fall
Social Welfare Policy Analysis and Development
Social Work Theory in Research and Practice
Pedagogy in Social Work Education
Elective (3-6 credits) 3
Winter
Quantitative Methods for Assessing Social Interventions
Social Work Knowledge Integration and Publication
Teaching Practicum
Elective (3-6 credits) 3
Spring
Electives (8-15 credits) 3

Non-Coursework Requirements

  • Research Methods and Statistics Qualifying Exam Requirement
    To ensure that students have the necessary foundation in research methodology and statistical analysis to support their successful completion of their doctoral program and to meet skill set expectations of new faculty members, the Ph.D. program requires successful completion of a Research Methods and Statistics Qualifying Exam at the end of the first year of study.
    Typically the exam will be scheduled approximately one to two weeks after the end of the spring quarter of the first year. The exam is taken by all students on the same date as established by the Associate Dean for Doctoral Education. The exam covers content from required research methods and statistics courses taken during the first year of study in the doctoral program. The exam is taken using an identifier code rather than the student name so that faculty grading the exam is unable to discern which student’s tests are being graded. Each exam consists of three sections:  Methods Part 1 (mixed methods research), Methods Part 2 (intervention research methods) and Statistics. Each section is graded by at least two members of the Ph.D. Program Committee as either Pass or Fail. Should a student fail any section of the research methods and statistics qualifying exam, they may elect to take the failed section(s) of the exam one more time during the summer preceding the fall quarter of the second year. Should the student fail the section(s) of the exam a second time, they will be terminated from the program. The exam may include multiple-choice, brief answer, essay or other types of questions common in graduate examinations. 

  • Comprehensive Examination
    The comprehensive examination in the Ph.D. Program in the Graduate School of Social Work consists of a written paper that focuses on a selected problem of importance for social work. An oral examination is also required. During the oral exam, the student’s written paper will be reviewed by a three person faculty committee (the advisor and two readers). The student will submit a comprehensive examination proposal by August 15th of the second year of study and complete the examination process by the end of their third year of study to be eligible for program funding.
    All students are expected to have successfully passed their comprehensive exam by the end of their fourth year in the program. Failure to have done so will result in termination from the program.
  • Dissertation
  • Oral Defense

Master of Social Work with A Concentration in Aging Services and Policy

The minimum credits required for the MSW degree is 90 (60 for advanced standing students). 

Foundation Curriculum *

Two-Year Program
Fall
Professional Development Seminar
Clinical Social Work Skills
Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Theory and Practice
Integrated Social Work Practice for Social Justice
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Foundation Field Internship
Winter
Clinical Social Work Theory and Practice
Community and Macro Social Work Theory and Practice
Social Policy Analysis, Advocacy, and Practice
Evidence for Practice
Foundation Field Internship
Spring
Foundation Field Internship
Begin elective & concentration classes; see concentration curriculum below
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 39
Advanced Standing Program
Advanced Standing Seminar
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Evidence for Practice
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 9

*Foundation curriculum plans refer to full time students; part time students should refer to MSW Handbook for information about course planning.

Aging Services and Policy Concentration Curriculum 

THEORY FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
Evolving Perspectives and Trends in Aging
METHODS/SKILLS (9 credits required)
Care Management Skills and Resources to Promote Community Living
AND AT LEAST TWO OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES REQUIRED:
Assessment of Mental Health and Drug Use in Adults
Leadership and Supervision Skills
Integrated Health Care: Models and Practice
Social Work Assessment and Intervention in Aging
Wellness Promotion and Intervention Across the Lifespan
Existential Social Work Practice
Social Work Practice in Health Care
Mind-Body Connections and Social Work Practice
Grief and Loss Across the Lifespan
POLICY & PROGRAM ADVOCACY (3 credits required)
Aging Policy
RESEARCH (6 credits required)
Methods for Evaluating Practice and Programs
and Applied Practice Evaluation Research (must be taken in sequence; research conducted in student's field placement)
VALUES FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
AT LEAST ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES REQUIRED:
Critical Race Theory Praxis and Social Work
Disproportionality and Disparities Across Systems: The Impact on Children and Youth
Intergenerational Justice
Restorative Approaches in Social Work Practice
Social Work Practice with LGBTQIA Communities
Spirituality and Social Work
Disrupting Privilege through Anti-Oppressive Practice
Disability Studies
Culturally Responsive Practice with LatinX
Global Relations and Poverty in Mexico
Social Development in Latin America
Social Work in Kenya: Context, Conservation, Empowerment, Sustainability
Global Cultural Perspectives: Consensus and Conundrums
Bosnia in Transition: The Social Work Response
Social Work and Social Justice in South Africa
Historical Trauma and Healing
Feminisms in Social Work Practice
Human Trafficking: Prevention, Intervention, and Support of Its Victims
Human Sexuality
Contemporary Global Issues
Experimental Class (Cultural Connectedness: A Journey into Native American Country)
Topics in Social Work (as approved, titles vary)
INTERNSHIP (15 credit minimum required)
Concentration Field Internship (appropriate internships are chosen in consultation with the Field Team)
CAPSTONE (0 credits required)
Capstone (required in final quarter of program)
ELECTIVES (12 credits required)
FACULTY RECOMMENDATIONS
Theory for Practice courses
Family Systems Theories for Social Work Practices
Evolving Perspectives and Trends in Health and Wellness
Community and Organizational Change: Theory for Practice
Policy and Program Advocacy courses
Health Care Policy
ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES OF PARTICULAR RELEVANCE
Advanced Skills for Working with Military Families
Solution Focused Brief Therapy
Cognitive Behavioral Therapies
Interpersonal Approaches to Counseling
Trauma Informed Assessment and Interventions
Trauma and Recovery in Social Work Practice (not offered after spring 2017)
Interventions for Responses to Trauma (not offered after fall 2017)
Suicide Assessment and Interventions
In addition to electives above, students may take courses from other concentration areas OR up to 10 credits of coursework from other DU graduate programs with the approval of the advisor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR CONCENTRATION CURRICULUM: 51-52

Master of Social Work With a Concentration in Children and Youth: Risks and Positive Development

The minimum credits required for the MSW degree is 90 (60 for advanced standing students). 

Foundation Curriculum *

Two-Year Program
Fall
Professional Development Seminar
Clinical Social Work Skills
Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Theory and Practice
Integrated Social Work Practice for Social Justice
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Foundation Field Internship
Winter
Clinical Social Work Theory and Practice
Community and Macro Social Work Theory and Practice
Social Policy Analysis, Advocacy, and Practice
Evidence for Practice
Foundation Field Internship
Spring
Foundation Field Internship
Begin elective & concentration classes; see concentration curriculum below
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 39
-
Advanced Standing Program
Advanced Standing Seminar
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Evidence for Practice
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 9

*Foundation curriculum plans refer to full time students; part time students should refer to MSW Handbook for information about course planning.

Children and Youth: Risks and Positive Development Concentration Curriculum 

THEORY FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
Building Resilience: Healthy Development in Childhood and Adolescence
METHODS/SKILLS (9 credits required)
Practice Elements in Interventions with Children and Youth
AND AT LEAST TWO COURSES FROM EITHER OF THE FOLLOWING LISTS:
Promotion and Prevention Focus
Positive and Community Youth Development
Preventing Behavioral Health Problems in Children and Youth
Experimental Class (Groups for Children and Adolescents)
Treatment Focus
Assessment of Mental Health in Children and Adolescents
Prevention & Treatment of Adolescent Substance Abuse
Child and Adolescent Trauma
Mental Health Interventions with Children
School Social Work Interventions
Prevention and Treatment of Juvenile Delinquency and Youth Violence
Experiential Therapy
Experimental Class (Groups for Children and Adolescents)
POLICY & PROGRAM ADVOCACY (3 credits required)
Policies and Programs for Children and Youth
RESEARCH (6 credits required)
Methods for Evaluating Practice and Programs
and Applied Practice Evaluation Research (must be taken in sequence; research conducted in student's field placement)
VALUES FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
AT LEAST ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES REQUIRED:
Critical Race Theory Praxis and Social Work
Disproportionality and Disparities Across Systems: The Impact on Children and Youth
Intergenerational Justice
Restorative Approaches in Social Work Practice
Social Work Practice with LGBTQIA Communities
Spirituality and Social Work
Disrupting Privilege through Anti-Oppressive Practice
Disability Studies
Culturally Responsive Practice with LatinX
Global Relations and Poverty in Mexico
Social Development in Latin America
Social Work in Kenya: Context, Conservation, Empowerment, Sustainability
Global Cultural Perspectives: Consensus and Conundrums
Bosnia in Transition: The Social Work Response
Social Work and Social Justice in South Africa
Historical Trauma and Healing
Feminisms in Social Work Practice
Human Trafficking: Prevention, Intervention, and Support of Its Victims
Human Sexuality
Contemporary Global Issues
Experimental Class (Cultural Connectedness: A Journey into Native American Country)
Topics in Social Work (as approved, titles vary)
INTERNSHIP (15 credit minimum required)
Concentration Field Internship (appropriate internships are chosen in consultation with the Field Team)
CAPSTONE (0 credits)
Capstone (required in final quarter of program)
ELECTIVES (12 credits required)
FACULTY RECOMMENDATIONS
Theory for Practice courses
Child Maltreatment: Causes and Developmental Consequences
Family Systems Theories for Social Work Practices
Policy and Program Advocacy courses
Family Policies and Services
Law of Family and Child
ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES OF PARTICULAR RELEVANCE
Advanced Skills for Working with Military Families
Solution Focused Brief Therapy
Domestic Violence
Existential Social Work Practice
Mind-Body Connections and Social Work Practice
Cognitive Behavioral Therapies
Suicide Assessment and Interventions
In addition to electives above, students may take courses from other concentration areas OR up to 10 credits of coursework from other DU graduate programs with the approval of the advisor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR CONCENTRATION CURRICULUM: 51-52

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Child Welfare

The minimum credits required for the MSW degree is 90 (60 for advanced standing students). 

Foundation Curriculum *

Two-Year Program
Fall
Professional Development Seminar
Clinical Social Work Skills
Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Theory and Practice
Integrated Social Work Practice for Social Justice
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Foundation Field Internship
Winter
Clinical Social Work Theory and Practice
Community and Macro Social Work Theory and Practice
Social Policy Analysis, Advocacy, and Practice
Evidence for Practice
Foundation Field Internship
Spring
Foundation Field Internship
Begin elective & concentration classes; see concentration curriculum below
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 39
-
Advanced Standing Program
Advanced Standing Seminar
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Evidence for Practice
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 9

*Foundation curriculum plans refer to full time students; part time students should refer to MSW Handbook for information about course planning.

Child Welfare & Child Maltreatment Concentration Curriculum 

THEORY FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
Child Maltreatment: Causes and Developmental Consequences
METHODS/SKILLS (9 credits required)
Child Welfare Practice: Assessment & Intervention
AND AT LEAST TWO OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES REQUIRED:
Assessment of Mental Health in Children and Adolescents
Leadership and Supervision Skills
Practice Elements in Interventions with Children and Youth
Substance Use Interventions
Child and Adolescent Trauma
Mental Health Interventions with Children
Solution Focused Brief Therapy
Forensic Orientation in Social Work Practice: Assessment and Interventions with High-Risk Offenders
Domestic Violence
Preventing Behavioral Health Problems in Children and Youth
Cognitive Behavioral Therapies
Grief and Loss Across the Lifespan
Trauma Informed Assessment and Interventions
POLICY & PROGRAM ADVOCACY (3 credits required)
Child Welfare Policies and Services
RESEARCH (6 credits required)
Methods for Evaluating Practice and Programs
and Applied Practice Evaluation Research (must be taken in sequence; research conducted in student's field placement)
VALUES FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
AT LEAST ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES REQUIRED:
Critical Race Theory Praxis and Social Work
Disproportionality and Disparities Across Systems: The Impact on Children and Youth
Intergenerational Justice
Restorative Approaches in Social Work Practice
Social Work Practice with LGBTQIA Communities
Spirituality and Social Work
Disrupting Privilege through Anti-Oppressive Practice
Disability Studies
Culturally Responsive Practice with LatinX
Global Relations and Poverty in Mexico
Social Development in Latin America
Social Work in Kenya: Context, Conservation, Empowerment, Sustainability
Global Cultural Perspectives: Consensus and Conundrums
Bosnia in Transition: The Social Work Response
Social Work and Social Justice in South Africa
Historical Trauma and Healing
Feminisms in Social Work Practice
Human Trafficking: Prevention, Intervention, and Support of Its Victims
Human Sexuality
Contemporary Global Issues
Experimental Class (Cultural Connectedness: A Journey into Native American Country)
Topics in Social Work (as approved, titles vary)
INTERNSHIP (15 credit minimum required)
Concentration Field Internship (appropriate internships are chosen in consultation with the Field Team)
CAPSTONE (0 credits)
Capstone (required in final quarter of program)
ELECTIVES (12 credits required)
FACULTY RECOMMENDATIONS
Theory for Practice Courses
Building Resilience: Healthy Development in Childhood and Adolescence
Family Systems Theories for Social Work Practices
Intersections of Mental Health, Substance Use and, Trauma
Policy and Program Advocacy Courses
Policies and Programs for Children and Youth
Immigration Policies and Services
Mental Health and Substance Use Policies
Health Care Policy
Law of Family and Child
ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES OF PARTICULAR RELEVANCE
Assessment of Mental Health and Drug Use in Adults
Positive and Community Youth Development
Advanced Skills for Working with Military Families
Solution Focused Brief Therapy
School Social Work Interventions
Existential Social Work Practice
Experiential Therapy
Interpersonal Approaches to Counseling
Suicide Assessment and Interventions
In addition to electives above, students may take courses from other concentration areas OR up to 10 credits of coursework from other DU graduate programs with the approval of the advisor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR CONCENTRATION CURRICULUM: 51-52

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Family Systems

The minimum credits required for the MSW degree is 90 (60 for advanced standing students). 

Foundation Curriculum *

Two-Year Program
Fall
Professional Development Seminar
Clinical Social Work Skills
Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Theory and Practice
Integrated Social Work Practice for Social Justice
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Foundation Field Internship
Winter
Clinical Social Work Theory and Practice
Community and Macro Social Work Theory and Practice
Social Policy Analysis, Advocacy, and Practice
Evidence for Practice
Foundation Field Internship
Spring
Foundation Field Internship
Begin elective & concentration classes; see concentration curriculum below
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 39
-
Advanced Standing Program
Advanced Standing Seminar
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Evidence for Practice
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 9

*Foundation curriculum plans refer to full time students; part time students should refer to MSW Handbook for information about course planning.

Family Systems Practice Concentration Curriculum 

THEORY FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
Family Systems Theories for Social Work Practices
METHODS/SKILLS (9 credits required)
Multisystemic Social Work Practice and Advocacy with Families
AND AT LEAST TWO COURSES FROM THE FOLLOWING LIST REQUIRED:
Assessment of Mental Health and Drug Use in Adults
Assessment of Mental Health in Children and Adolescents
Integrated Health Care: Models and Practice
Prevention & Treatment of Adolescent Substance Abuse
Child Welfare Practice: Assessment & Intervention
Substance Use Interventions
Child and Adolescent Trauma
Mental Health Interventions with Children
Relationship Therapy (highly recommended)
Advanced Clinical Social Work Practice with Families (highly recommended)
Advanced Skills for Working with Military Families
Solution Focused Brief Therapy
Forensic Orientation in Social Work Practice: Assessment and Interventions with High-Risk Offenders
Domestic Violence
Grief and Loss Across the Lifespan
Suicide Assessment and Interventions
POLICY & PROGRAM ADVOCACY (3 credits required)
Family Policies and Services
RESEARCH (6 credits required)
Methods for Evaluating Practice and Programs
and Applied Practice Evaluation Research (must be taken in sequence; research conducted in student's field placement)
VALUES FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
AT LEAST ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES REQUIRED:
Critical Race Theory Praxis and Social Work
Disproportionality and Disparities Across Systems: The Impact on Children and Youth
Intergenerational Justice
Restorative Approaches in Social Work Practice
Social Work Practice with LGBTQIA Communities
Spirituality and Social Work
Disrupting Privilege through Anti-Oppressive Practice
Disability Studies
Culturally Responsive Practice with LatinX
Global Relations and Poverty in Mexico
Social Development in Latin America
Social Work in Kenya: Context, Conservation, Empowerment, Sustainability
Global Cultural Perspectives: Consensus and Conundrums
Bosnia in Transition: The Social Work Response
Social Work and Social Justice in South Africa
Historical Trauma and Healing
Feminisms in Social Work Practice
Human Trafficking: Prevention, Intervention, and Support of Its Victims
Human Sexuality
Contemporary Global Issues
Experimental Class (Cultural Connectedness: A Journey into Native American Country)
Topics in Social Work (as approved, titles vary)
INTERNSHIP (15 credit minimum required)
Concentration Field Internship (appropriate internships are chosen in consultation with the Field Team)
CAPSTONE (0 credits)
Capstone (required in final quarter of program)
ELECTIVES (12 credits required)
FACULTY RECOMMENDATIONS
Theory for Practice courses
Child Maltreatment: Causes and Developmental Consequences
Building Resilience: Healthy Development in Childhood and Adolescence
Evolving Perspectives and Trends in Health and Wellness
Intersections of Mental Health, Substance Use and, Trauma
Community and Organizational Change: Theory for Practice
Policy and Programs Advocacy courses
Child Welfare Policies and Services
Policies and Programs for Children and Youth
Immigration Policies and Services
Mental Health and Substance Use Policies
Health Care Policy
Aging Policy
Law of Family and Child
ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES OF PARTICULAR RELEVANCE
Leadership and Supervision Skills
Practice Elements in Interventions with Children and Youth
Social Work Assessment and Intervention in Aging
Administration and Management Practice and Skills
Preventing Behavioral Health Problems in Children and Youth
School Social Work Interventions
Existential Social Work Practice
Cognitive Behavioral Therapies
Interpersonal Approaches to Counseling
Trauma Informed Assessment and Interventions
In addition to electives above, students may take courses from other concentration areas OR up to 10 credits of coursework from other DU graduate programs with the approval of the advisor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR CONCENTRATION CURRICULUM: 51-52

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Health and Wellness

The minimum credits required for the MSW degree is 90 (60 for advanced standing students). 

Foundation Curriculum *

Two-Year Program
Fall
Professional Development Seminar
Clinical Social Work Skills
Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Theory and Practice
Integrated Social Work Practice for Social Justice
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Foundation Field Internship
Winter
Clinical Social Work Theory and Practice
Community and Macro Social Work Theory and Practice
Social Policy Analysis, Advocacy, and Practice
Evidence for Practice
Foundation Field Internship
Spring
Foundation Field Internship
Begin elective & concentration classes; see concentration curriculum below
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 39
-
Advanced Standing Program
Advanced Standing Seminar
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Evidence for Practice
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 9

*Foundation curriculum plans refer to full time students; part time students should refer to MSW Handbook for information about course planning.

Health and Wellness Concentration Curriculum 

THEORY FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
Evolving Perspectives and Trends in Health and Wellness
METHODS/SKILLS (9 credits required)
Social Work Practice in Health Care
AND AT LEAST TWO OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES REQUIRED:
Assessment of Mental Health and Drug Use in Adults
Assessment of Mental Health in Children and Adolescents
Integrated Health Care: Models and Practice
Positive and Community Youth Development
Social Work Assessment and Intervention in Aging
Mental Health Interventions with Children
Wellness Promotion and Intervention Across the Lifespan
Care Management Skills and Resources to Promote Community Living
Solution Focused Brief Therapy
Mind-Body Connections and Social Work Practice
Experiential Therapy
Grief and Loss Across the Lifespan
Trauma Informed Assessment and Interventions
POLICY & PROGRAM ADVOCACY (3 credits required)
Health Care Policy
RESEARCH (6 credits required)
Methods for Evaluating Practice and Programs
and Applied Practice Evaluation Research (must be taken in sequence; research conducted in student's field placement)
VALUES FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
AT LEAST ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES REQUIRED:
Critical Race Theory Praxis and Social Work
Disproportionality and Disparities Across Systems: The Impact on Children and Youth
Intergenerational Justice
Restorative Approaches in Social Work Practice
Social Work Practice with LGBTQIA Communities
Spirituality and Social Work
Disrupting Privilege through Anti-Oppressive Practice
Disability Studies
Culturally Responsive Practice with LatinX
Global Relations and Poverty in Mexico
Social Development in Latin America
Social Work in Kenya: Context, Conservation, Empowerment, Sustainability
Global Cultural Perspectives: Consensus and Conundrums
Bosnia in Transition: The Social Work Response
Social Work and Social Justice in South Africa
Historical Trauma and Healing
Feminisms in Social Work Practice
Human Trafficking: Prevention, Intervention, and Support of Its Victims
Human Sexuality
Contemporary Global Issues
Experimental Class (Cultural Connectedness: A Journey into Native American Country)
Topics in Social Work (as approved, titles vary)
INTERNSHIP (15 credit minimum required)
Concentration Field Internship (appropriate internships are chosen in consultation with the Field Team)
CAPSTONE (0 credits)
Capstone (required in final quarter of program)
ELECTIVES (12 credits required)
FACULTY RECOMMENDATIONS
Theory for Practice courses
Evolving Perspectives and Trends in Aging
Social-Ecological Resilience and One Health: Connecting Human and Environmental Wellbeing
Community and Organizational Change: Theory for Practice
Policy and Program Advocacy courses
Mental Health and Substance Use Policies
Aging Policy
ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES OF PARTICULAR RELEVANCE
Substance Use Interventions
Existential Social Work Practice
Cognitive Behavioral Therapies
Interpersonal Approaches to Counseling
Suicide Assessment and Interventions
In addition to electives above, students may take courses from other concentration areas OR up to 10 credits of coursework from other DU graduate programs with the approval of the advisor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR CONCENTRATION CURRICULUM: 51-52

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Mental Health

The minimum credits required for the MSW degree is 90 (60 for advanced standing students). 

Foundation Curriculum *

Two-Year Program
Fall
Professional Development Seminar
Clinical Social Work Skills
Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Theory and Practice
Integrated Social Work Practice for Social Justice
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Foundation Field Internship
Winter
Clinical Social Work Theory and Practice
Community and Macro Social Work Theory and Practice
Social Policy Analysis, Advocacy, and Practice
Evidence for Practice
Foundation Field Internship
Spring
Foundation Field Internship
Begin elective & concentration classes; see concentration curriculum below
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 39
-
Advanced Standing Program
Advanced Standing Seminar
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Evidence for Practice
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 9

*Foundation curriculum plans refer to full time students; part time students should refer to MSW Handbook for information about course planning.

Mental Health Concentration Curriculum 

THEORY FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
Intersections of Mental Health, Substance Use and, Trauma
METHODS/SKILLS (9 credits required)
Assessment of Mental Health and Drug Use in Adults
Assessment of Mental Health in Children and Adolescents
Suicide Assessment and Interventions
AND AT LEAST ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES REQUIRED:
Integrated Health Care: Models and Practice
Practice Elements in Interventions with Children and Youth
Substance Use Interventions
Child and Adolescent Trauma
Mental Health Interventions with Children
Solution Focused Brief Therapy
Cognitive Behavioral Therapies
Interpersonal Approaches to Counseling
Trauma Informed Assessment and Interventions
Experimental Class (Groups for Children and Adolescents)
POLICY & PROGRAM ADVOCACY (3 credits required)
Mental Health and Substance Use Policies
RESEARCH (6 credits required)
Methods for Evaluating Practice and Programs
and Applied Practice Evaluation Research (must be taken in sequence; research conducted in student's field placement)
VALUES FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
AT LEAST ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES REQUIRED:
Critical Race Theory Praxis and Social Work
Disproportionality and Disparities Across Systems: The Impact on Children and Youth
Intergenerational Justice
Restorative Approaches in Social Work Practice
Social Work Practice with LGBTQIA Communities
Spirituality and Social Work
Disrupting Privilege through Anti-Oppressive Practice
Disability Studies
Culturally Responsive Practice with LatinX
Global Relations and Poverty in Mexico
Social Development in Latin America
Social Work in Kenya: Context, Conservation, Empowerment, Sustainability
Global Cultural Perspectives: Consensus and Conundrums
Bosnia in Transition: The Social Work Response
Social Work and Social Justice in South Africa
Historical Trauma and Healing
Feminisms in Social Work Practice
Human Trafficking: Prevention, Intervention, and Support of Its Victims
Human Sexuality
Contemporary Global Issues
Experimental Class (Cultural Connectedness: A Journey into Native American Country)
Topics in Social Work (as approved, titles vary)
INTERNSHIP (15 credit minimum required)
Concentration Field Internship (appropriate internships are chosen in consultation with the Field Team)
CAPSTONE (0 credits)
Capstone (required in final quarter of program)
ELECTIVES (12 credits required)
FACULTY RECOMMENDATIONS
Theory for Practice courses
Family Systems Theories for Social Work Practices
Evolving Perspectives and Trends in Health and Wellness
Policy and Program Advocacy Courses
Health Care Policy
ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES OF PARTICULAR RELEVANCE
Care Management Skills and Resources to Promote Community Living
Existential Social Work Practice
Mind-Body Connections and Social Work Practice
Grief and Loss Across the Lifespan
In addition to electives above, students may take courses from other concentration areas OR up to 10 credits of coursework from other DU graduate programs with the approval of the advisor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR CONCENTRATION CURRICULUM: 51-52

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Organizational Leadership and Policy Practice

The minimum credits required for the MSW degree is 90 (60 for advanced standing students). 

Foundation Curriculum *

Two-Year Program
Fall
Professional Development Seminar
Clinical Social Work Skills
Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Theory and Practice
Integrated Social Work Practice for Social Justice
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Foundation Field Internship
Winter
Clinical Social Work Theory and Practice
Community and Macro Social Work Theory and Practice
Social Policy Analysis, Advocacy, and Practice
Evidence for Practice
Foundation Field Internship
Spring
Foundation Field Internship
Begin elective & concentration classes; see concentration curriculum below
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 39
-
Advanced Standing Program
Advanced Standing Seminar
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Evidence for Practice
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 9

*Foundation curriculum plans refer to full time students; part time students should refer to MSW Handbook for information about course planning.

Organizational Leadership and Policy Concentration Curriculum 

THEORY FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
Community and Organizational Change: Theory for Practice
METHODS/SKILLS (9 credits required)
Leadership and Supervision Skills
AND AT LEAST TWO OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES REQUIRED:
Positive and Community Youth Development
Grassroots Organizing for Social Justice
Administration and Management Practice and Skills
Poverty and Community Economic Development
Planning and Program Development
Social Policy Advocacy
Resource Development and Fundraising
International Social Development
POLICY & PROGRAM ADVOCACY (3 credits required)
Policy Development & Analysis
RESEARCH (6 credits required)
Methods for Evaluating Practice and Programs
and Applied Practice Evaluation Research (must be taken in sequence; research conducted in student's field placement)
VALUES FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
AT LEAST ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES REQUIRED:
Critical Race Theory Praxis and Social Work
Disproportionality and Disparities Across Systems: The Impact on Children and Youth
Intergenerational Justice
Restorative Approaches in Social Work Practice
Social Work Practice with LGBTQIA Communities
Spirituality and Social Work
Disrupting Privilege through Anti-Oppressive Practice
Disability Studies
Culturally Responsive Practice with LatinX
Global Relations and Poverty in Mexico
Social Development in Latin America
Social Work in Kenya: Context, Conservation, Empowerment, Sustainability
Global Cultural Perspectives: Consensus and Conundrums
Bosnia in Transition: The Social Work Response
Social Work and Social Justice in South Africa
Historical Trauma and Healing
Feminisms in Social Work Practice
Human Trafficking: Prevention, Intervention, and Support of Its Victims
Human Sexuality
Contemporary Global Issues
Experimental Class (Cultural Connectedness: A Journey into Native American Country)
Topics in Social Work (as approved, titles vary)
INTERNSHIP (15 credit minimum required)
Concentration Field Internship (appropriate internships are chosen in consultation with the Field Team)
CAPSTONE (0 credits)
Capstone (required in final quarter of program)
ELECTIVES (12 credits required)
FACULTY RECOMMENDATIONS
Theory for Practice courses
Social-Ecological Resilience and One Health: Connecting Human and Environmental Wellbeing
Economic Theory and Social Work
Policy and Program Advocacy courses
Child Welfare Policies and Services
Policies and Programs for Children and Youth
Family Policies and Services
Immigration Policies and Services
Mental Health and Substance Use Policies
Health Care Policy
Aging Policy
ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES OF PARTICULAR RELEVANCE
Human Security: Intervention Strategies for Economic & Social Development
Conflict Resolution in Social Work Practice
In addition to electives above, students may take courses from other concentration areas OR up to 10 credits of coursework from other DU graduate programs with the approval of the advisor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR CONCENTRATION CURRICULUM: 51-52

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Sustainable Development and Global Practice

The minimum credits required for the MSW degree is 90 (60 for advanced standing students). 

Foundation Curriculum *

Two-Year Program
Fall
Professional Development Seminar
Clinical Social Work Skills
Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Theory and Practice
Integrated Social Work Practice for Social Justice
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Foundation Field Internship
Winter
Clinical Social Work Theory and Practice
Community and Macro Social Work Theory and Practice
Social Policy Analysis, Advocacy, and Practice
Evidence for Practice
Foundation Field Internship
Spring
Foundation Field Internship
Begin elective & concentration classes; see concentration curriculum below
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 39
-
Advanced Standing Program
Advanced Standing Seminar
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Evidence for Practice
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 9

*Foundation curriculum plans refer to full time students; part time students should refer to MSW Handbook for information about course planning.

Sustainable Development and Global Practice Concentration Curriculum 

THEORY FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
Social-Ecological Resilience and One Health: Connecting Human and Environmental Wellbeing
METHODS/SKILLS (9 credits required)
Human Security: Intervention Strategies for Economic & Social Development
Social and Environmental Impact Assessments
AND AT LEAST ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES REQUIRED:
Poverty and Community Economic Development
Planning and Program Development
Resource Development and Fundraising
International Social Development
POLICY & PROGRAM ADVOCACY (3 credits required)
Immigration Policies and Services
Global Policies and Programs for Sustainable Development
RESEARCH (6 credits required)
Methods for Evaluating Practice and Programs
and Applied Practice Evaluation Research (must be taken in sequence; research conducted in student's field placement)
VALUES FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
Global Cultural Perspectives: Consensus and Conundrums
INTERNSHIP (15 credit minimum required)
Concentration Field Internship (appropriate internships are chosen in consultation with the Field Team)
CAPSTONE (0 credits)
Capstone (required in final quarter of program)
ELECTIVES (12 credits required)
FACULTY RECOMMENDATIONS
Theory for Practice courses
Community and Organizational Change: Theory for Practice
Economic Theory and Social Work
Policy and Program Advocacy courses
Policy Development & Analysis
Values for Practice courses
Critical Race Theory Praxis and Social Work
Disproportionality and Disparities Across Systems: The Impact on Children and Youth
Intergenerational Justice
Restorative Approaches in Social Work Practice
Social Work Practice with LGBTQIA Communities
Spirituality and Social Work
Disrupting Privilege through Anti-Oppressive Practice
Disability Studies
Culturally Responsive Practice with LatinX
Global Relations and Poverty in Mexico
Social Development in Latin America
Social Work in Kenya: Context, Conservation, Empowerment, Sustainability
Bosnia in Transition: The Social Work Response
Social Work and Social Justice in South Africa
Historical Trauma and Healing
Feminisms in Social Work Practice
Human Trafficking: Prevention, Intervention, and Support of Its Victims
Human Sexuality
Contemporary Global Issues
Experimental Class (Cultural Connectedness: A Journey into Native American Country)
Topics in Social Work (as approved, titles vary)
Students may take courses from other concentration areas and/or up to 10 credits of coursework from other DU graduate programs with the approval of the advisor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR CONCENTRATION CURRICULUM: 51-52

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Mental Health and Trauma: MSW@Denver

The minimum credits required for the MSW degree is 90. 

Mental Health and Trauma Curriculum

Quarter 1 (8 credits)
Clinical Social Work Skills
Integrated Social Work Practice for Social Justice
Introduction to the Graduate Internship
Quarter 2 (10 credits)
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Theory and Practice
Foundation Seminar
Foundation Field Internship
Quarter 3 (10 credits)
Clinical Social Work Theory and Practice
Evidence for Practice (*)
Foundation Seminar
Foundation Field Internship
Quarter 4 (11 credits)
Community and Macro Social Work Theory and Practice
Social Policy Analysis, Advocacy, and Practice
Foundation Seminar
Foundation Field Internship
Quarter 5 (9 credits)
Foundation Field Internship
BEGIN ELECTIVE & CONCENTRATION COURSES
Assessment of Mental Health Across the Lifespan
Intersections of Mental Health, Substance Use and, Trauma
Quarter 6 (11 credits)
Concentration Seminar
Mental Health and Health Care Policy
Cognitive Behavioral Therapies
Concentration Field Internship
Quarter 7 (11 credits)
Concentration Seminar
Leadership and Supervision Skills
Methods for Evaluating Practice and Programs
Concentration Field Internship
Quarter 8 (10 credits)
Concentration Seminar
Trauma Informed Assessment and Interventions
Applied Practice Evaluation Research
Concentration Field Internship
Quarter 9 (10 credits)
Disproportionality and Disparities Across Systems: The Impact on Children and Youth
Integrated Health Care: Models and Practice
Concentration Field Internship
Capstone
Minimum Number of Credits Required90
 

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Advanced Social Work Practice (Four Corners Program)

The minimum credits required for the MSW degree is 90 (60 for advanced standing students).  Not all elective courses will be offered to every cohort of students.

Foundation Curriculum *

Two-Year Program
Fall
Clinical Social Work Skills
Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Theory and Practice
Integrated Social Work Practice for Social Justice
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Foundation Seminar
Foundation Field Internship
Winter
Clinical Social Work Theory and Practice
Community and Macro Social Work Theory and Practice
Social Policy Analysis, Advocacy, and Practice
Evidence for Practice
Foundation Seminar
Foundation Field Internship
Spring
Foundation Seminar
Foundation Field Internship
Begin elective & concentration classes; see concentration curriculum below
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 42
-
Advanced Standing Program
Advanced Standing Seminar
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Evidence for Practice
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 9

*Foundation curriculum plans refer to full time students; part time students should refer to MSW Handbook for information about course planning.

Advanced Social Work Practice Concentration Curriculum (Four Corners Program)

THEORY FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
Family Systems Theories for Social Work Practices
METHODS/SKILLS (9 credits required)
Assessment of Mental Health and Drug Use in Adults
Integrated Health Care: Models and Practice
Planning and Program Development
POLICY & PROGRAM ADVOCACY (3 credits required)
Native Peoples Practice: History and Policy
RESEARCH (6 credits required)
Methods for Evaluating Practice and Programs
and Applied Practice Evaluation Research (must be taken in sequence; research conducted in student's field placement)
VALUES FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
AT LEAST ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES REQUIRED:
Critical Race Theory Praxis and Social Work
Disproportionality and Disparities Across Systems: The Impact on Children and Youth
Intergenerational Justice
Restorative Approaches in Social Work Practice
Social Work Practice with LGBTQIA Communities
Spirituality and Social Work
Disrupting Privilege through Anti-Oppressive Practice
Disability Studies
Social Work and Social Justice in South Africa
Culturally Responsive Practice with LatinX
Global Relations and Poverty in Mexico
Social Development in Latin America
Social Work in Kenya: Context, Conservation, Empowerment, Sustainability
Global Cultural Perspectives: Consensus and Conundrums
Bosnia in Transition: The Social Work Response
Historical Trauma and Healing
Feminisms in Social Work Practice
Human Trafficking: Prevention, Intervention, and Support of Its Victims
Human Sexuality
Contemporary Global Issues
Experimental Class (Cultural Connectedness: A Journey into Native American Country)
Topics in Social Work (as approved, titles vary)
INTERNSHIP (15 credit minimum required)
Concentration Field Internship
CONCENTRATION SEMINAR (3 credits required)
Concentration Seminar (offered as 1 credit course each quarter for fall, winter and spring)
CAPSTONE (0 credits required)
Capstone (required final quarter of program)
ELECTIVES (6-9* credits required)
Students may take any other offered course not counting for the areas listed above. Elective options vary based on availability.
Students may take up to 10 elective credits from other DU graduate programs with approval of advisor & Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.
Students must take sufficient electives to meet minimum requirements for the degree (90 credits for the two year program; 60 for advanced standing).
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR CONCENTRATION CURRICULUM: 49/52*

Master of Social Work with a Concentration in Advanced Social Work Practice (Western Colorado Program)

The minimum credits required for the MSW degree is 90 (60 for advanced standing students).  Not all elective courses will be offered to every cohort of students.

Foundation Curriculum *

Two-Year Program
Fall
Clinical Social Work Skills
Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Theory and Practice
Integrated Social Work Practice for Social Justice
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Foundation Seminar
Foundation Field Internship
Winter
Clinical Social Work Theory and Practice
Community and Macro Social Work Theory and Practice
Social Policy Analysis, Advocacy, and Practice
Evidence for Practice
Foundation Seminar
Foundation Field Internship
Spring
Foundation Seminar
Foundation Field Internship
Begin elective & concentration classes; see concentration curriculum below
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 42
-
Advanced Standing Program
Advanced Standing Seminar
Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective
Evidence for Practice
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 9

*Foundation curriculum plans refer to full time students; part time students should refer to MSW Handbook for information about course planning.

Advanced Social Work Practice Concentration Curriculum (Western Colorado)

THEORY FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
Family Systems Theories for Social Work Practices
METHODS/SKILLS (9 credits required)
Assessment of Mental Health and Drug Use in Adults
Integrated Health Care: Models and Practice
Planning and Program Development
POLICY & PROGRAM ADVOCACY (3 credits required)
Immigration Policies and Services
RESEARCH (6 credits required)
Methods for Evaluating Practice and Programs
and Applied Practice Evaluation Research (must be taken in sequence; research conducted in student's field placement)
VALUES FOR PRACTICE (3 credits required)
Contemporary Social Work Issues in Western Colorado
INTERNSHIP (15 credit minimum required)
Concentration Field Internship (appropriate internships are chosen in consultation with the Field Team & on-site Coordinator)
CONCENTRATION SEMINAR (3 credits required)
Concentration Seminar (offered as 1 credit course each quarter for fall, winter and spring)
CAPSTONE (0 credits required)
Capstone (required in final quarter of program)
ELECTIVES (6-9 credit minimum required)
Students may take any other offered course not counting for the areas listed above. Elective options vary based on availability.
Students may take up to 10 elective credits from other DU graduate programs with approval of advisor & Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.
Students must take sufficient electives to meet minimum requirements for degree (90 credits for two year program; 60 credits for advanced standing).
FACULTY RECOMMENDATIONS
Values for Practice Courses
Critical Race Theory Praxis and Social Work
Disproportionality and Disparities Across Systems: The Impact on Children and Youth
Intergenerational Justice
Restorative Approaches in Social Work Practice
Social Work Practice with LGBTQIA Communities
Spirituality and Social Work
Disrupting Privilege through Anti-Oppressive Practice
Disability Studies
Culturally Responsive Practice with LatinX
Global Relations and Poverty in Mexico
Social Development in Latin America
Social Work in Kenya: Context, Conservation, Empowerment, Sustainability
Bosnia in Transition: The Social Work Response
Social Work and Social Justice in South Africa
Historical Trauma and Healing
Feminisms in Social Work Practice
Human Trafficking: Prevention, Intervention, and Support of Its Victims
Human Sexuality
Contemporary Global Issues
Experimental Class (Cultural Cconnectedness: A Journey into Native American Country)
Topics in Social Work (as approved, titles vary)
TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR FOUNDATION CURRICULUM: 49/52*

Certificate in Social Work with a Concentration in Animal-Assisted Social Work

Field Internship Requirements

Students enrolled in this certificate program are required to complete 15 hours of concentration year field internship (five in each of three quarters) in a program or agency that either offers animal-assisted social work or is interested in developing it. Students must include a plan for integrating the specific requirements of the certificate into those of the internship on the Individualized Field Education Plan (IFEP). The internship must fulfill the requirements of the concentration practice track, as well as those of the certificate.

Coursework Requirements

Within their course of study, AASW Certificate program students must include the following courses:

SOWK 4795Integration of Animals Into Therapeutic Settings3
SOWK 4796Animal Assisted Social Work Practice3
SOWK 4797Issues for Evidence-Supported Animal Assisted Social Work3
SOWK 4970Concentration Field Internship15

LatinX Social Work Certificate

Program Requirements

Students enrolled in this certificate program are required to complete fifteen hours of concentration year field internship (five in each of three quarters) in a program or agency offering the opportunity to work with Latinx clients and use Spanish at least 30% of the time. Students must include a plan for integrating the specific requirements of the certificate into those of the internship on the Individualized Field Education Plan (IFEP). The internship must fulfill the requirements of the concentration practice track, as well as those of the certificate.

Coursework Requirements

SOWK 4749Culturally Responsive Practice with LatinX3
SOWK 4750Critical Perspectives on the Latinx Context3
SOWK 4757Social Work and Latino/a Cultures: An Intensive Practice and Spanish Immersion Course3
SOWK 4753Social Development in Latin America3
SOWK 4970Concentration Field Internship15

Certificate of Specialization in School Social Work

The school microsystem is a unique work environment for the social worker.  It is a venue that is dynamic and continually changing. Because of the school's central location in the lives of students, the school social worker has the ability to access and to bridge to the peer network, family network, teachers, school administration, neighborhood network, community resources, and the legal system. For some students, the school can be an oasis or a refuge from problems that they are facing outside of school. Other students may keenly feel that the school is a place of humiliation, frustration, or isolation. For both these groups of students--those that adore or loathe school-- their relationship with their school social worker can have a pivotal role in their lives and their families.

The School Social Work certificate discusses the many roles that the School Social Worker may have, and effective techniques for being successful in those many roles. It examines the laws that impact service delivery in the school system. Additionally, it gives students an advanced understanding of school-based assessment and how these assessments fit into the fabric of the school, and by extension, the life of the student and family. 

This certificate also addresses the need for students who wish to be School Social Workers to learn and demonstrate culturally responsive interpersonal skills, techniques, and strategies to effectively work with linguistically and culturally diverse students, families, and communities. It helps students apply social work ethics and values within the framework of a school microsystem. 

School settings are one of the largest providers of employment to GSSW alumni. As many school districts in Colorado move to a mental health provider model--where the mental health provider can be a school psychologist or school social worker--the School Social Work Certificate provides the advanced training that social workers need to be competitive in this field. 

Course Requirements9
Law of Family and Child
School Social Work Interventions
School Social Work Assessment and Realities
Field Requirements 115
Concentration Field Internship
Total Credits24

Courses

SOWK 4000 Professional Development Seminar (1 Credit)

The Professional Development Seminar prepares students to develop a reflective practice and to make connections between applicable lived experience and the learning process, emphasizing professional social work identity. The course provides a supplement to the foundation curriculum and an opportunity for students to discuss their professional growth as social workers. The seminar provides opportunities to reflect on social work values and ethics, populations served, and the many fields and career pathways of social work practice. In conjunction with the foundation curriculum, key ethical issues and requirements are discussed so that students can deepen their understanding of ethics in practice with consideration of local, national, and global contexts. The course also gives an opportunity to reflect on their learning styles, participation in group work and the developmental process of practice. The ideas of conscious use of self and self-care concepts will be explored through a variety of learning modalities.

SOWK 4001 Clinical Social Work Skills (3 Credits)

This foundation course focuses on basic skills for micro social work practice with individuals and small groups. The framework of intentional interviewing teaches students to think critically about applying the skills for engagement, assessment and intervention. Attention focuses on use of these skills with clients from multiple social identities (e.g. ethnic, racial, sexual orientation, gender affiliation) and the pitfalls of practitioner micro-aggressions. An active learning approach requires students to participate in role-play exercises both in and outside of class. Students digitally record some of those exercises and share them with the class and instructor.

SOWK 4003 Clinical Social Work Theory and Practice (3 Credits)

This foundation course helps students develop a multi-dimensional assessment and intervention framework for clinical social work practice. This course builds upon knowledge of human behavior in the social environment and adds a focus on theories of change - at the individual and family level. The course is grounded in empirical information about the importance of relationship skills, across a variety of classic and modern approaches to intervention. We use a social work lens to emphasize the importance of context in client lives, including their socioeconomic status, cultural history, and experiences of oppression. Since no single theory captures the totality of human experiences, we integrate a variety of intervention techniques from multiple human behavior theories and ground them in a social work framework for ethical and effective clinical practice.

SOWK 4006 Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Theory and Practice (3 Credits)

This foundation course provides an overview of theoretical frameworks for understanding human behavior from a social work perspective. Theories reviewed include the developmental stages across the life cycle in terms of psychological, cognitive, moral, spiritual, identity and social development. Students apply a biopsychological assessment across the life span. The course emphasizes a social work perspective and key frameworks for social work, with an emphasis on the person in environment and systems theory as they describe diverse individual behavior in relation to social class, race and ethnicity, age, gender orientation, sexual orientation, and other multicultural backgrounds. The course aims to develop students' foundational understanding of how theories are used to promote relationship development with diverse individuals and to guide interventions across all system levels. Students may test out of this course and substitute an advanced course in human development, with advisor approval, if they have already successfully completed an equivalent course in human development.

SOWK 4007 Community and Macro Social Work Theory and Practice (4 Credits)

This foundation course provides students with a foundational level understanding of macro social work practice and roles. The course builds upon knowledge of human behavior in the social environment, and adds theories of change to understand diverse communities and social service networks and the relationship of local, national and global interventions. The course introduces students to empirically supported models and emerging interventions that address macro level social issues. Students complete community/organizational assessments and also participate in work groups to learn how to engage, assess, and intervene in communities and organizations.

SOWK 4020 Integrated Social Work Practice for Social Justice (4 Credits)

This foundation course focuses on professional development and identity for social work practice. The course emphasizes values, ethics and ethical decision making in the context of the history of the profession. Students are introduced to person-in-environment, critical theory and empowerment perspectives and apply these concepts to current field of practice and social work roles. Through integration of field placement experiences, students analyze and apply social work frameworks and generalist practice theories to current social justice challenges and diverse contexts that social workers face.

SOWK 4050 Introduction to the Graduate Internship (1 Credit)

The Introduction to the Graduate Internship seminar prepares students to enter the profession of social work at a graduate level. The course provides an overview of social work values and ethics, populations served, and issues that concern social workers. Through engagement in the course content, students will complete a readiness for field assessment, including their personal and professional motivations to join the profession and serve diverse communities. Students will be exposed to the social work profession’s signature pedagogy, field education, and the stages of experiential learning. The course will also help students develop learning goals for field education and identify potential internship sites.

SOWK 4120 Social Policy Analysis, Advocacy, and Practice (3 Credits)

This foundation course analyzes contemporary societal needs and problems, as well as the historical and current context of U.S. social welfare programs and policies. It presents frameworks used to define social problems and analyze social problems, and introduces students to the policy-making process and the role of policy in service delivery with special emphasis on programs designed to aid the poor and the policies that shape them. The course is designed to help social workers advocate for policies within the social welfare system that advance social well-being and fulfill their ethical obligations to improve social conditions and promote social justice.

SOWK 4132 Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective (3 Credits)

This foundation course examines the phenomena of power, privilege and oppression and their effect on individuals, families and communities in the context of the values of social and economic justice and the social work profession. The course is intended to increase awareness of the intersectionality of multiple oppressions with a focus on race/ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status and sexual orientation. Students will gain a beginning self-awareness to identify the influence of personal biases and values that impact practice with diverse groups.

SOWK 4150 Foundation Seminar (1-2 Credits)

Required seminar format used to facilitate the integration of the foundation field practicum and the professional foundation course content; emphasis on linking classroom learning with practice in the field, integrating theory with professional practice; field practicum situations and issues used for discussion and deliberation. Co-requisite: SOWK 4950.

SOWK 4201 Evidence for Practice (3 Credits)

This foundation course focuses on developing student skills in identifying, analyzing, and applying empirical evidence in order to inform their social work practice. The course introduces students to studies designed to examine the effectiveness of interventions. The course aids students in developing a familiarity with basic research concepts such as research design, internal validity and external validity, so that they may critique the utility of evidence for practice. Students also engage in critically examining available evidence for biases and relevance for the diverse array of clients, populations, and contexts with which they work.

SOWK 4232 Critical Race Theory Praxis and Social Work (3 Credits)

An advanced multicultural social work practice course, this uses the fundamentals of Critical Race Theory (CRT) as a framework for contextualizing and intervening with client systems at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. This course is a values elective for all concentrations. CRT is used as a framework to examine, critique, and challenge the way that race and racism is unwittingly sustained and perpetuated by traditional social work approaches to the amelioration of personal and social ills. Through this course, students learn the central tenets of CRT, how to evaluate traditional social work practice using these tenets, and begin to design to design a professional social work practice that uses CRT tenets as a foundation for micro-, mezzo-, and macro-level interventions. This course is offered within the concentration curriculum as a Values for Practice course to assist in the training and preparation of social workers practicing with historical underrepresented and marginalized clients and communities of color. Students develop skills and techniques grounded in anti-oppressive culturally grounded social work practice.

SOWK 4235 Disproportionality and Disparities Across Systems: The Impact on Children and Youth (3 Credits)

This course will explore the interrelatedness of institutional racism and discrimination across major social systems within the U.S., focusing on the historical context of current racial disproportionalities and disparities in youth service systems such as child welfare, juvenile justice, mental health, education, and health. Using a critical lens, the course is designed to help students analyze how policy decisions have long-range impact on generations; specifically for children and youth of color. Students will have the opportunity to apply this critical lens to their current field placement and the youth populations they serve. As an elective course, the class is open to all GSSW students; however, students concentrating in child welfare, children and youth, and families are especially encouraged to take the course.

SOWK 4240 Intergenerational Justice (3 Credits)

This course engages students in the conversation, scholarship, and social work practice issues related to how social justice is promoted across age groups and generational cohorts (i.e., baby boomers, generation X, millennial generation). While looking at debates for how families, local communities, states, and nations link age to power, decision-making, funding, and access to resources, the course also examines what within age group issues of injustice and inequality persist. Topics include: generational equity in terms of government budgets and debt, intergenerational issues related to sustainability and ecological justice, age-based versus need-based service delivery models, interventions to address intergenerational conflicts within families, and best practices in intergenerational social service models. This course is designed as a seminar course for social work students from any concentration to explore values related to social justice as they play out across all levels of practice.

SOWK 4245 Restorative Approaches in Social Work Practice (3 Credits)

This course applies the conceptual framework, strategies, and benefits of restorative approaches to social worker roles and responsibilities. This course is designed to help students develop a historical and theoretical understanding of restorative approaches, build restorative-based skills that can be used in a variety of roles, and apply restorative approaches to a variety of client population systems, settings, and needs. Ethical dilemmas, cultural competence, and decision-making in restorative approaches, and the impact this has on oppressed populations, will be discussed. This course fulfills the Values for Practice requirement, and is a general elective with relevance to all social work concentrations. Prerequisite: SOWK 4132.

SOWK 4250 Concentration Seminar (1 Credit)

This course is taken (by distance education students only) concurrently with the concentration year field practicum and the concentration year required courses. The purpose of this course is to integrate the concentration field experience and concentration year course work to prepare students for employment as professional social workers. This is also an evolving seminar co-created between faculty and students. Clinical issues and skill development at a more advanced clinical level is integrated into the seminar format as well as topics the student and faculty members agree upon that will enhance their first year learning.

SOWK 4260 Contemporary Social Work Issues in Western Colorado (3 Credits)

In this hybrid seminar course, students will learn about the disproportionate burdens of environmental injustices in communities across the Western Slope of Colorado. From a social justice and human rights perspective, students will critically explore, analyze and discuss current environmental health disparities and relevant social work interventions. Students will review environmental health and environmental justice theories and perspectives as they bear on place-based case studies from the region. Students will use contemporary media and relevant web 2.0 platforms, including social media to demonstrate understanding of applied e-advocacy social work practice while exploring such case studies.

SOWK 4299 Advanced Standing Seminar (3 Credits)

The seminar reviews knowledge, skills and values that form the basis of GSSW concentration year curricula in clinical practice, community practice and policy practice. The seminar combines content planned by instructors with individualized guided study and planning for field instruction based on student self-assessments. Prerequisite: Admission to advanced standing program.

SOWK 4301 Advanced Social Work Practice Skills (3 Credits)

This advanced social work practice skills course focuses on the importance of language and social identities and their influence on social work practice across client systems. A social justice, empowerment and reflexive framework challenges students to think critically about applying the skills for engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation in micro, mezzo, and macro practice settings. Attention focuses on use of these skills with individuals, groups, and communities from multiple social identities (e.g., ethnic, racial, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, rural/urban) and the repercussions of practitioner micro-aggressions. An active learning approach requires students to: 1) participate in role-play exercises, 2) digitally record demonstration of advanced skills and share them with the class and instructor, 3) use the supervisory relationship to engage in reflexive self-assessment and practice skill adjustments based on that assessment. Prerequisite: SOWK 4001 Clinical Social Work Skills Lab or SOWK 4299 Advanced Standing Seminar.

SOWK 4305 Child Maltreatment: Causes and Developmental Consequences (3 Credits)

This course examines theory and research concerning causes and developmental consequences of child maltreatment, as well as theory and research concerning attachment and the developmental consequences of separation and loss that often follow intervention in child maltreatment.

SOWK 4315 Building Resilience: Healthy Development in Childhood and Adolescence (3 Credits)

This course provides students with knowledge of child and adolescent development with a particular focus on resilience. At each stage of development, risk factors that are deleterious to development, and protective factors that promote healthy development, will be discussed. Along with basic information about theories of resiliency, students will also gain a good working knowledge of cognitive behavior theory.

SOWK 4320 Family Systems Theories for Social Work Practices (3 Credits)

This course introduces systems theory as it is applied to family contexts which may include traditional therapeutic settings, home-based practices, parenting approaches, family religious/spiritual strength and conflict, and transgenerational family processes. Emphasis is given to the integration of theory, practice, and skill development. Students will also explore family organization and development and family subsystems, as they apply to assessment, case conceptualization, and intervention from a family systems perspective with clients, individuals, couples, families, organizations, constituencies, and communities. This course analyzes intersecting issues of power, privilege, and oppression, and requires that students examine their own personal characteristics, preferences, experiences, biases, predispositions, and affective reactions that influence the professional relationship.

SOWK 4325 Evolving Perspectives and Trends in Health and Wellness (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of the theories that inform social work practice in the field of health and wellness. Health as a concept is examined for its understanding and meaning in multiple practice settings, communities and cultures. While addressing evolving trends and ethics in health care practice settings, a range or topics are covered including systems perspectives and thinking, the intersection of health and mental health, wellness and prevention, social ecology of health promotion, client and person centered care, care management and health care disparities.

SOWK 4330 Assessment of Mental Health and Drug Use in Adults (3 Credits)

Focuses on the assessment of psychological, social and biological contributors to mental health disorders in adults and the use of this assessment as a guide for treatment/clinical interventions. Examines the strengths and weaknesses of the DSM-IV classification system in terms of social work values and ethics. Examines symptoms, theories of etiology, treatment interventions and prognosis within each diagnostic category, and reviews a variety of assessment tools in the context of gender, ethnicity, cultural diversity, sexual orientation and historically oppressed and/or disadvantaged populations.

SOWK 4334 Assessment of Mental Health in Children and Adolescents (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the assessment of psychological, social and biological contributors to mental health disorders in children and adolescents and the use of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) as a guide for mental health assessment. The course examines the strengths and weaknesses of the DSM-5 classification system for children and adolescents, especially in the context of culture and social work values. It examines symptoms, theories of etiology, and prognosis within each diagnostic category and reviews diagnostic challenges in the context of gender, ethnicity, cultural diversity, sexual orientation and historically oppressed and/or disadvantaged children and adolescents.

SOWK 4338 Assessment of Mental Health Across the Lifespan (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the assessment of psychological, social and biological contributors to mental health disorders in children, youth, adults, and older adults and the use of this assessment as a guide for treatment/clinical interventions. It examines the strengths and weaknesses of the DSM-5 classification system in the context of social work values and ethics. It examines symptoms, theories of etiology, treatment interventions and prognosis within each diagnostic category and reviews a variety of assessment tools in the context of gender identity and expression, ethnicity, cultural diversity, sexual orientation and historically oppressed and/or disadvantaged population.

SOWK 4340 Leadership and Supervision Skills (3 Credits)

This course examines the application of leadership and supervision theories to practice settings in communities, organizations and policy contexts. A focus is placed on leadership roles and an examination of leadership styles, with an emphasis on the skills of transformational leadership and supervision. Topics covered include team leadership and supervision, one to one supervision skills, managing conflict, personnel management, and cross cultural work.

SOWK 4345 Intersections of Mental Health, Substance Use and, Trauma (3 Credits)

This course is an advanced theory for practice course with builds upon foundation courses in HUman Behavior in the Social Environment (HBSE) and clinical theories, and covers conceptualization, dynamics of, and interventions in mental health, substance use, and trauma. The course examines the independent and intersecting theory bases of mental health, trauma and substance use approaches. It also explores recent evidence about individual and environmental risks associated with these conditions and evidence about both specific therapeutic interventions and the importance of common relational factors. Social workers make up one of the largest professional groups working with clients living with mental health concerns, and bring a unique person-in-environment and strengths perspective to that work, which fits well with a recovery philosophy. Clinical frameworks and interventions common across these fields, such as harm reduction, motivational interviewing, self-determination theory, and the transtheoretical model of changes are presented, and students are introduced to integrative approaches that show promise in responding to client conditions.

SOWK 4350 Evolving Perspectives and Trends in Aging (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of how theories of aging inform the role of social workers with older adults and their families across a range of service settings, including emerging fields of practice. The course examines multiple perspectives on the late life adult years, spanning the period from middle adulthood and on into late life, including: historical, biological, psychological, social, cross-cultural, and spiritual theories and related empirical evidence. While addressing evolving trends, the importance of difference, and ethical implications the topical issues include: work and retirement; economic status; residence and housing location; education and learning styles; interpersonal relationships with partners, families, and peers; creativity, spirituality, and religiosity; political beliefs and ideologies (including the formation, maintenance and alteration of prejudice and racism); the experience of chronic illness, disability, and death; and wisdom attained during adulthood and aging.

SOWK 4360 Social-Ecological Resilience and One Health: Connecting Human and Environmental Wellbeing (3 Credits)

Social-Ecological Resilience and One Health: Connecting Human and Environmental Wellbeing is a required theory for practice course in the Sustainable Development and Global Practice Concentration. This course builds on an innovative social ecology perspective that emphasizes coupled social-ecological systems and the integrated model of One Health as necessary theoretical frameworks for understanding the inter-connectedness of human health, wellbeing and resilience with that of other species and the natural environment. This course reviews and analyzes theoretical concepts and models for contextualizing the important social and ecological issues impacting our global environment as well as the societal implications of global environmental change. Using an integrated social science approach that highlights sustainable development as a paradigm that acknowledges the interdependence and interconnection between humans and the more-than-human world, social workers practicing in local and global communities will be prepared to implement effective, strengths-based solutions to support sustainable development and capacity-building efforts at various scales. This course will promote critical thinking and develop a knowledge base for sustainability and resilience oriented prevention and intervention strategies, environmental awareness, sense of belonging in a social-ecological community, adaptation and advocacy.

SOWK 4370 Community and Organizational Change: Theory for Practice (3 Credits)

This course presents key theoretical frameworks for students to be informed and innovative in responding to changing community, organizational and societal contexts. Theories of social change are presented that can assist social work leaders in promoting positive social change in the lives of vulnerable populations through the development of policy, community interventions and human services organizations. Students apply theories to understanding organizational change and innovation and the promotion of social and economic justice through community and policy practice.

SOWK 4375 Economic Theory and Social Work (3 Credits)

Human rights, urbanization, poverty, housing, gender inequality, care of children, poverty, indebtedness, racial and/or ethnic discrimination, and cultural conflicts are challenging the United States and nations throughout the world. This course introduces students to economic theories to develop broader conceptualization of local, national, and global social problems and possible intervention strategies. An understanding of economic theory provides a foundation for studying the emergence and maintenance of diverse social policies to address these problems. The course explores Neoclassical, Behavioral, and Microeconomic concepts of economic efficiency and the corresponding consequences to marginalized and oppressed populations.

SOWK 4401 Integrated Health Care: Models and Practice (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of the knowledge, skills and theory of integrated health care social work practice, where physical and behavioral health services are most often provided in a primary care medical environment. Students will learn roles/functions of the behavioral health professional and their effectiveness as a member of the collaborative care team. Incorporating knowledge of evidence-based practice models of care and behavior change theory, they will increase their practice abilities to effectively work at an advanced level of skill as an integrated care behavioral health provider. Strategies and skills in patient engagement, motivational enhancement and advocacy will be taught through case studies and group activities. Cultural competency and effective care planning in an integrated healthcare environment will be emphasized.

SOWK 4410 Prevention & Treatment of Adolescent Substance Abuse (3 Credits)

This course examines causal factors and theories that seek to explain why some adolescents develop problems with alcohol and other drugs. Effective substance abuse prevention and treatment approaches are identified at the individual, family, school and community level.

SOWK 4412 Practice Elements in Interventions with Children and Youth (3 Credits)

This course offers an integrative framework of theory and research to intervene with children and adolescents in school, family, and community-based agencies. Interventions include both direct work with children and collaborative/conjoint work with parents. Techniques include common elements across empirically-supported interventions such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, behavioral treatment, client centered treatment, social skills training, and parent management training. Intervention strategies are described across four primary problem areas common among children/adolescents: anxiety, depression, disruptive behavior, and attention deficit disorder. For each of these problem areas, intervention techniques are demonstrated, practiced in class, implemented in field placements, and monitored for client progress. The use of empirically-supported interventions is discussed from a multidimensional perspective with consideration for cultural context and adaptations necessary for particular client groups.

SOWK 4416 Foster Care and Permanency Planning (3 Credits)

This course presents strategies for culturally competent assessment and intervention with children who are in foster care, adoption, or with their families. It focuses on permanency planning, involving extended families in making case decisions and caring for children, family reunification, relinquishment of children for adoption, termination of parental rights, preparing children and parents for adoption or guardianship, working with young adults nearing emancipation, and providing post-adoption/guardianship services. Prerequisites: SOWK 4305 and SOWK 4600 or permission of the instructor.

SOWK 4418 Child Welfare Practice: Assessment & Intervention (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of the continuum of care of child welfare practice from entry to exit. The course uses an evidence-based approach taking a comprehensive look at child welfare services through a culturally responsive and multi-systemic lens. It presents strategies for culturally competent assessment and intervention with children, youth, and families involved with the child welfare system focusing on engaging families in assessment, service, and permanency planning. The course is required for students in the child welfare track. The prerequisites are SOWK 4305 (Child Maltreatment: Causes and Developmental Consequences) and SOWK 4600 (Child Welfare Policy and Services, or permission from the instructor.

SOWK 4420 Multisystemic Social Work Practice and Advocacy with Families (3 Credits)

This course facilitates the development of family systems practice skills with clients, individuals, couples, families, organizations, constituencies, and communities. This course focuses on the development of multisystemic strategies and techniques utilizing family systems theory as part of the ongoing process of engagement, assessment, and preliminary interventions. It emphasizes the integration of research, theory, and practice through experiential learning and skill building. Students will learn strategies and techniques through role play demonstrations practicing intake/assessment/goal setting, preliminary intervention development, and professional documentation. Students will be asked to discuss their own “use of self” development throughout the class and reflect on personal bias, cultural bias, assumptions, values and affective reactions that may influence the relationship with client systems or constituencies. Prerequisite: SOWK 4320.

SOWK 4425 Positive and Community Youth Development (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of the "community and positive youth development" approach to providing social services to children and adolescents. Many services for young people focus on negative outcomes such as behavior problems, pregnancy, violence, drug abuse, and truancy. These services are supposed to "fix" the small minority of kids who are "broken" in some way. The community and positive youth development perspective stresses that all youth need a variety of supports and opportunities to develop into healthy, contributing adults. This course considers how such an approach to social service delivery can be applied across different organizational settings (e.g., schools, government agencies, and non-profits) to promote the well-being of American youth from diverse cultural backgrounds.

SOWK 4430 Substance Use Interventions (3 Credits)

There is widespread recognition that substance use is one of America's most pressing social problems. Social workers increasingly find themselves attempting to help individuals and families resolve substance use problems, as well as directly or indirectly related issues. This course introduces students to current and emerging substance use treatment approaches so they can conduct their practices from an informed perspective.

SOWK 4435 Grassroots Organizing for Social Justice (3 Credits)

This course examines grassroots approaches to community organizing and social change for social justice. Topics include: power and empowerment theory, insider/outsider considerations, development of critical consciousness and popular education techniques for organizing, history and genealogy of community organizing and social movements related to social work, direct action tactics and strategies, arts-based organizing, campaign development, and ethics and skills for working with diverse communities.

SOWK 4445 Social Work Assessment and Intervention in Aging (3 Credits)

This course focuses on biological, neurological, psychological, social, spiritual, and environmental aspects of late life as a foundation for the delivery of assessments and interventions to older adults. This course presents information on demographic projections, population trends, and theoretical perspectives that inform gerontological social work practice. This class additionally focuses on the unique nature of social work with this diverse population including a continuum of care services for older adults, interdisciplinary nature of helping services, dynamic nature of aging for multiple vulnerable older adults such as those facing institutionalized oppression, and specific attention to elder wellness.

SOWK 4454 Child and Adolescent Trauma (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to the common concepts (general theory and foundational knowledge), components (intervention and treatment elements) and skills (practitioner skills) underlying evidence-based treatment for children and adolescents who have experienced trauma. Trauma is broadly defined, and includes children and adolescents exposed to traumatic events including, but not limited to natural disasters, war, abuse and neglect, medical trauma, witnessing interpersonal crime (e.g. intimate partner violence), and other traumatic events. The course highlights the role of development, culture, and empirical evidence in trauma-specific interventions with children, adolescents, and their families. It addresses the level of functioning of primary care giving environments and assesses the capacity of the community to facilitate restorative processes. The course focuses on assessment and intervention as a foundation for subsequent learning about treatment. This course incorporates the new National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) core curriculum on child trauma (CCCT). The course conveys the crucial evidence-based concepts, components, and skills designed by NCTSN to strengthen competency in assessment, referral, and treatment.

SOWK 4465 Human Security: Intervention Strategies for Economic & Social Development (3 Credits)

Human security is a new paradigm for understanding complex global vulnerabilities. Human security goes way beyond traditional notions of national security and highlights the security of the individual rather than that of the nation state. Human security uses a person, entitlement and human rights centered view of security. It is essential for national, regional and global stability and sustainability. In defining human security, the United Nations stressed "the right of all people to live in freedom and dignity, free from poverty and despair," and recognized that "all individuals, in particular vulnerable people, are entitled to freedom from fear and freedom from want, with an equal opportunity to enjoy all their rights and fully develop their human potential" (A/RES/60/1). "Human security aims at ensuring the survival, livelihood and dignity of people in response to current and emerging threats - threats that are widespread and cross cutting. Such threats are not limited to those living in absolute poverty or conflict" (UN-OCHA). Today, the impacts of natural disasters, climate change and other forms of environmental change, and global economic crises, among others, are considered to threaten human security in developing as well as developed countries. The increasing numbers of internal violent conflicts, forced migration, natural disasters and environmental degradation have resulted in national and international security failings that reflect the challenges of the post-Cold War security environment. The failure of mainstream development models to generate growth, particularly in Least Developed Countries (LDCs), or to deal with the consequences of complex new threats (e.g., HIV/AIDS, climate change, social and economic inequality) reinforced the sense that international institutions and states are not organized to address such problems in an integrated way. Social workers focusing on human, social and economic issues in global settings will use various human development strategies and other capacity-building approaches in practice. This course develops students' skills in human and social development strategies, sustainable livelihood and conflict management strategies, and other capacity-building community strategies, and fosters a solid understanding of the programmatic and practical requirements for human security in a global context.

SOWK 4500 Mental Health Interventions with Children (3 Credits)

This course offers an integrative framework of theory and research to understand and intervene in the major mental health problems experienced by children. Interventions include both direct work with children and collaborative/conjoint work with parents. Techniques include play therapy, cognitive-behavioral interventions, psychopharmacology, and crisis intervention for suicide. Children's development is considered from a multidimensional perspective, including cultural context, risk and protective factors, and the development of psychopathology.

SOWK 4501 Wellness Promotion and Intervention Across the Lifespan (3 Credits)

This course prepares students to critically analyze the determinants of wellness across the life span, across socio-economic boundaries and across cultures in order to promote wellness in the everyday lives we lead both personally and as social workers in a community. An emphasis will be placed on the research and application of knowledge and skills to increase social worker awareness of the distinctions between health and wellness and to promote wellness in the quality of life in a community. This course builds students' skills and strategies to enhance wellness needs within a community. Strategies include using developmental models, researching current policies, and implementing wellness assessment tools in order to create interventions for communities.

SOWK 4505 Relationship Therapy (3 Credits)

This course focuses on assessment, problem/solution path identification, intervention strategies and outcome evaluation in counseling heterosexual, gay and lesbian couples. Identifies common relationship patterns and explores intervention strategies including behavioral, strategic, structural, narrative, transpersonal and feminist. Also covered are issues such as conflict management, relationship enhancement, intimacy, power and control, domestic abuse, infidelity and divorce. Students will analyze the intersecting issues of oppression: sexism, racism, classism, heterosexism and ageism.

SOWK 4520 Advanced Clinical Social Work Practice with Families (3 Credits)

This course is an advanced skill-based course that extends students' knowledge and application of family systems therapy. The course engages the activate participation of students in role-play scenarios and the discussion and deconstruction of actual cases enhancing their developing skills as family therapists-in-training. In this course, students have the opportunity to plan and implement an entire course of treatment for a family. This allows the development of a conceptual understanding of family therapy practice, treatment skills and interventions, and utilization of self-as-therapist that influences the therapeutic system. Students have multiple opportunities to practice family interventions and receive feedback from both classmates and the instructor through the use of the clinical family therapy methods of ‘live supervision’ and ‘reflecting teams’. Students will experience the connection between theory and practice and learn to integrate multiple theories. Issues related to transference, culture based countertransference, resistance, and working with involuntary clients are discussed. Advanced Clinical Social Work Skills with Families builds on the family systems theory and practice applications learned in the required family systems concentration courses and expands students’ opportunity to apply theory to cases in diverse practice and client situations. An emphasis is placed on the development of personal theory, professional development, and therapeutic change/outcome as it relates to common factors in family therapy. This course also builds upon SOWK 4505: Relationship Therapy and aspects unique to couple’s therapy. Required prerequisites: SOWK 4320 and SOWK 4420.

SOWK 4521 Advanced Skills for Working with Military Families (3 Credits)

The class is designed to give students an understanding of the issues military families face and how to apply that understanding to clinical interventions with military families. It also investigates individual service member concerns, spousal/partner relationships, and family dynamics surrounding deployment, active duty, and returning home permanently or between deployments.

SOWK 4523 Care Management Skills and Resources to Promote Community Living (3 Credits)

Many individuals and their families of all ages cope with physical and mental health conditions that impede their ability to live in the community. A vast array of formal and informal resources, public programs, and privately funded services can promote community living. Social workers often provide care management to enhance access, coordinate care, and ensure equality of these long-term services and supports. This course will develop students' skill at care management and knowledge of resources, including resources for persons with developmental disabilities, chronic mental health conditions, physical disabilities, and age-related functional impairments.

SOWK 4525 Administration and Management Practice and Skills (3 Credits)

This course examines the application of leadership and supervision theories to practice settings in communities, organizations and policy contexts. A focus is placed on leadership roles and an examination of leadership styles, with an emphasis on the skills of transformational leadership and supervision. Topics covered include team leadership and supervision, one to one supervision skills, managing conflict, personnel management, and cross cultural work.

SOWK 4530 Poverty and Community Economic Development (3 Credits)

This is an advanced community practice class focused on poverty, low-income neighborhoods and local economic development. The class begins with a thorough review of the scholarly literature related to poverty, sustainability, and the concentration of poverty in low-income neighborhoods. Then, public and private responses to poverty are examined. The class focuses on both governmental policies and programs supported by the private sector. Next, the class turns to local responses to the concentration of poverty in low-income neighborhoods. The class focuses on the interdisciplinary nature of programs and interventions aimed at community economic development in low-income neighborhoods.

SOWK 4535 Planning and Program Development (3 Credits)

This course prepares students to engage in strategic planning and program development roles and practice within a social work community, organizational, or policy practice setting. Students in this course gain knowledge in the principles of planning, social enterprise, the engagement of stakeholders in planning processes, community collaboration and the elements of designing and implementing programs. Students have the opportunity to put this knowledge base into practice by developing a comprehensive program proposal applying the skills of strategic thinking, planning, critically evaluating research informed practice and practice informed research. In addition, students engage in communicating professional judgment in both written and oral formats.

SOWK 4540 Advanced Skills for Working with Military Families (3 Credits)

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the issues military families face and how to apply that understanding to clinical interventions with military families. It also investigates individual service member concerns, spousal/partner relationships, and family dynamics surrounding deployment, active duty, and returning home permanently or between deployments.

SOWK 4545 Social Work Practice with LGBTQIA Communities (3 Credits)

This values course will facilitate students’ exploration of their own perceptions, biases, and belief systems with regards to the broad topic of LGBTQIA identities and communities. A values perspective encourages students to reflect on their personal, professional, cultural and political perceptions of these identities. This course will explore the social construction of sexual orientation and gender identity, examine the idea of binaries, engage in historical analysis of LGBTQIA histories, and will familiarize students with legal and societal barriers and challenges facing members of the LGBTQIA community. Students will learn definitions around these identities, learn more about the spectrum of sexual orientation and gender, and utilize critical theoretical perspectives. Students will engage in critical dialogue around the representation of LGBTQIA people in our culture and media. Utilizing a person-in-environment perspective, students will look at the Social Work Code of Ethics as it relates to LGBTQIA individuals, explore various facets of self-determination, social justice, dignity and worth of a person, the role of family, friends and community, and how power, privilege and oppression may impact the lives of LGBTQIA people. Lastly, students will synthesize this information to envision how their social work practice will be inclusive of LGTBQIA individuals and communities, including those who hold other marginalized identities. Prerequisite: SOWK 4132.

SOWK 4555 Spirituality and Social Work (3 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a nondiscriminatory framework of knowledge to respond competently and ethically to populations with diverse spiritual perspectives and religious cultures in social work practice. This social justice-informed course underlines and respects the diversity of all spiritualities with special attention to spiritual populations historically marginalized and neglected by Eurocentric assumptions common to social work. This course builds on the generalist approach of our foundation curriculum and integrates theories of multiculturalism, human development, and identity development while exploring how individuals view spirituality and religion as they move through the life cycle. Drawing on the work of Edward Canda, Ken Pargament and Froma Walsh, the course will explore definitions of spirituality and religion, survey methods of approaching spiritually sensitive bio-psycho-social assessments, and examine culturally and spiritually sensitive social work interventions. Class activities will emphasize dialogue, reflection, exploration and experiential learning in order to develop a balanced framework for navigating spiritually and religion in practice settings with individuals, groups, families, communities and organizations. In this course, students will gain self-awareness and learn how their own cultural and spiritual perspectives have shaped their worldview and professional sense of self. It is assumed that students enrolling in this course will bring an interest in learning about the many facets of spirituality. As such, students will be asked to explore their own ideology of spirituality as it relates to their professional identity and practice effectiveness. Prerequisite: SOWK 4132.

SOWK 4565 Social and Environmental Impact Assessments (3 Credits)

Social and environmental impact assessments are important tools for analyzing and managing both the intended and unintended consequences of development projects on human and ecological systems in order to bring about a more equitable and sustainable social ecological system. This class incorporates an understanding of the history and concepts of the three levels of impact assessments (micro, mezzo, and macro) into the research process that is the core of social impact assessments. Students prepare and evaluate social ecological impact assessments through learning to identify and define problems, select theoretical frameworks appropriate to the problem, identify research questions, design a study appropriate for the identified questions, gather and analyze data, and write the final assessment. Particular attention is paid to assessing the effects of interventions on vulnerable populations. Other topics will focus on the practical aspects of project team selection and management, timelines, and the communication of findings to stakeholders.

SOWK 4600 Child Welfare Policies and Services (3 Credits)

This course examines contemporary U.S. child welfare policies in historical perspective, focusing on prevention, report and investigation of child abuse and neglect, as well as family preservation, out-of-home care, adoption and services for troubled adolescents. Also evaluated are the impact of policies and proposals for change in policies, considering empirical evidence, values and ethics. Provides a framework to analyze policy choices and encourages students to advocate for needed policy changes. Prerequisite: SOWK 4120 or SOWK 4299.

SOWK 4605 Poverty: Policies and Services (3 Credits)

The United States poverty rate declined steadily from the 1950s through the 1970s, decreasing from 22% of the population in the late 1950s to 12% in the late 1970s. Poverty rates have fluctuated since then with current rates standing at approximately 15% or 46 million people. More than 16 million children, 22% of all children, live in families with incomes below the federal poverty line. The course begins by considering the federal poverty measure and competing definitions of poverty. Key programs and policies meant to alleviate poverty, such as government transfer programs (including cash and noncash welfare, earnings supplements, and social insurance programs), education and training programs, and support services are examined. Course content is applied to practice scenarios to enhance student knowledge of poverty programs, eligibility criteria and application processes. Critical discussions of these programs will inform analysis of alternative approaches to poverty reduction and economic self-sufficiency.

SOWK 4610 Policies and Programs for Children and Youth (3 Credits)

This course examines the history and evolution of social policies and programs targeting high-risk youth. Students will seek to critically analyze the effects of current and recent policies in the context of youth offending and other adolescent problem behaviors. Prerequisite: SOWK 4120 or SOWK 4299.

SOWK 4630 Family Policies and Services (3 Credits)

Identifies challenges contemporary American families are experiencing and presents strategies for developing policies and services to meet these challenges. Examines specific policies and services that most affect families, as well as broader questions concerning power and its distribution, allocation of resources and the role of government in promoting individual and family well-being. Prerequisite: SOWK 4120 or SOWK 4299.

SOWK 4635 Immigration Policies and Services (3 Credits)

This course identifies challenges for immigrants and presents strategies for developing policies and services to meet these challenges. It not only examines specific policies and services that most affect immigrants but also considers broader questions concerning power and its distribution, allocation of resources, and the role of government in promoting individual and family well-being. This is a concentration policy course for all concentrations.

SOWK 4640 Mental Health and Substance Use Policies (3 Credits)

This course provides a comprehensive understanding of policies related to mental health and/or substance use, their historical antecedents, and the socio-political forces that influence their development. This course also introduces students to emerging controversies concerning these policies.

SOWK 4645 Health Care Policy (3 Credits)

This policy course provides an overview of health care policy as it is relevant to social work practice in multiple health and behavioral care settings. With the advent of health care reform and the implementation and operationalization of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), there are rapidly changing policy issues related to this innovative integration and delivery of health care services. Students in this course critically analyze the practice of policy in this new and quickly evolving service arena. This course explores key health policy strategies to foster integrated delivery system development and sustainability in line with health policy goals to reduce cost of care, improve population health and improve quality of integrated care services, with special emphasis on the integration of primary care, behavioral health services and wellness/health promotion initiatives. Strategies for students to influence policies and promote change in the interest of the individual/family/community, agency/organization and the communities they serve are presented. Critical thinking skills in developing and analyzing proposals to improve integrated health policy are encouraged. The course builds on policy content offered in the professional foundation year and links policy to practice and research skills.

SOWK 4650 Aging Policy (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of social policy and service delivery issues in gerontology. It includes a critical review of rapidly developing policy issues, as well as an overview of U.S. health care and social service delivery systems serving older adults. The course encourages students to participate in critical analysis of issues and to develop and analyze innovative proposals to improve policy and programs for older adults. This course fulfills the policy requirement for the Aging Services and Policy concentration.

SOWK 4655 Mental Health and Health Care Policy (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of social policy and service delivery issues in mental health and health care, with emphasis on achieving quality and addressing disparities. It includes a critical review of United States’ historic and developing policy issues, as well as mental health and health care financing and delivery systems and other key issues in the field. Students will participate in critical analysis of issues and will examine various proposals to improve mental health and health care policy and programs. Prerequisite: SOWK 4120 Social Policy Analysis, Advocacy and Practice, or SOWK 4299 Advanced Standing Seminar.

SOWK 4660 Social Policy Advocacy (3 Credits)

Facilitates student learning within policy-making arenas. Students are paired with health and social service agencies and coalitions to assist in agenda-setting, legislative research, and issue-advocacy development and implementation in the state legislature and bureaucracy.

SOWK 4665 Global Policies and Programs for Sustainable Development (3 Credits)

In the 21st century, more international cooperation will be required to confront transnational problems, many of which arise from globalization. From infectious diseases to civil conflicts that spill across borders, from global financial crises to protecting the world’s natural systems and resources, there are many modern issues that require enhanced global cooperation and collective solutions. Global Policies and Programs for Sustainable Development considers transnational problems that cannot be solved by national governments alone, and examines policy systems (or “regimes”) and global governance approaches that have emerged to manage global issues, such as: finance, trade, human rights, migration, health, environmental change, national and human security, and disaster reduction and response. Overall, this course focuses on understanding and connecting global policy trends, and examines their inter-relatedness with globalization and their impact on human and social development. Global Policies and Programs for Sustainable Development gives students the opportunity to study, analyze, and understand specific global policy initiatives, their development, and implementation. Devising effective strategies to address global problems is necessary because these problems can impede social and economic development, tear at the fabric of societies, and even undermine regional and international stability. The goal of this course is to train students to understand the essential components of global policies in both the public and private sectors and to prepare them to initiate policy reforms to accomplish innovative and effective outcomes. This course also will address the development of policy in the context of social work values and ethics. Global policy regimes will be analyzed from multiple viewpoints. Readings, case studies, and discussion will address policies within international organizations (e.g., United Nations, World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and specialized agencies such as the World Health Organization) with applications for developed, transitional, and developing countries. The course will emphasize an analytical approach for understanding the impact of global policies on programs, services, and development at large.

SOWK 4670 Policy Development & Analysis (3 Credits)

Focuses on the development and analysis of social welfare policy. Reviews the structure of the policy-making and implementation process, and examines perspectives on the definition of social problems and approaches to the development and analysis of social welfare policies. Students apply the perspectives and frameworks as they analyze a specific social problem and policy directed toward it, identify needed change in policy, select place and strategy for change in policy, and communicate knowledge to central actors in the policy-making and implementation process. Prerequisite: SOWK 4120 or SOWK 4299.

SOWK 4680 Native Peoples Practice: History and Policy (3 Credits)

This course is designed as the background to practice with Native Peoples. It will explore the relationship between theory and practice, socio-economic, political, and health issues, and the dynamics of changes in reservation and urban Native communities. Historical trauma, federal policies, impacting Native people, and laws and regulations that impact social service delivery will be reviewed. Social services delivery systems will be analyzed with the uniqueness of the cultural parameters of tribal communities. Guest lecturers from tribal communities may partner with faculty to teach the course. Prerequisites: SOWK 4299 and SOWK 4132.

SOWK 4700 Solution Focused Brief Therapy (3 Credits)

This course is a methods/skills course that provides students with the opportunity to gain knowledge and skills in the contextual stance and core interventions of the evidence-based approach, Solution-Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT). Students gain an understanding of how this approach works, and the ability to use this approach in a variety of settings including with clients struggling with chronic mental illness, trauma, and substance misuse, as well as with children and adolescents, couples and families, in community development, and supervision. This course addresses competencies and practice behaviors in advanced clinical settings including Families, Child Welfare, Children and Youth, Mental Health and Health.

SOWK 4705 Forensic Orientation in Social Work Practice: Assessment and Interventions with High-Risk Offenders (3 Credits)

Presents and applies a framework for assessing and intervening with offender populations. This risk and containment framework takes a community safety and victim-centered perspective and focuses on assessing and intervening with multiple systems surrounding offenders. The framework is then applied to specific interventions with domestic violence abuse offenders and with adult and adolescent sexual offenders.

SOWK 4710 Domestic Violence (3 Credits)

This is a concentration year practice elective focusing on understanding, assessing, and intervening with domestic violence, understood as violence occurring in the context of intimate relationships. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the theoretical understanding and practice skills necessary to establish a beginning competence in assessing and intervening with domestic violence and in developing community, systemic, and policy responses.

SOWK 4712 Law of Family and Child (3 Credits)

Examines legal principles and procedures relevant to social work practice with families and children: structure and operation of the American legal system, principles to follow in conducting legal research, basic principles of constitutional law and law related to juvenile delinquency, child protection, child adoption, education and domestic relations. Covers legal aspects of social work practice including licensing, confidentiality and professional liability.

SOWK 4713 Preventing Behavioral Health Problems in Children and Youth (3 Credits)

Behavioral health problems in childhood and adolescence take a heavy toll on millions of lives. These problems range widely – from anxiety and depression to alcohol, tobacco, and drug abuse; delinquent and violent behavior; dropping out of school; and risky sexual activity and unwanted pregnancies. SOWK 4713 presents an overview of practices and policies aimed at preventing behavioral health problems in young people. Emphasis is placed on developing the practice and policy skills that are necessary to deliver preventive interventions and programs in schools, families, and communities. Students will select an effective program, learn the skills necessary to deliver the program, and then implement the program in a classroom setting. Class content will emphasize the importance of increasing the role of social work practitioners and social work values in the interdisciplinary field of prevention practice.

SOWK 4715 School Social Work Interventions (3 Credits)

Designed to give students the ability to identify, understand and apply the varied roles of school social worker. Examines politics of education, the educational organizational structure, special education law and process, collaborative teamwork with school and community professionals and intersystem case coordination. Emphasis placed on meeting the needs of special education populations through assessment, intervention and evaluation and on preventive programs for children and youth at risk for school failure, truancy and dropping out.

SOWK 4718 School Social Work Assessment and Realities (3 Credits)

This concentration course is the third in the School Social Work Certification. Both SOWK 4715 (School Social Work Interventions) and SOWK 4712 (Social Work and the Law) are prerequisites for this class. The class provides advanced skills in assessment pertinent to the school ecosystem. It also juxtaposes these skills with field trips to several schools to interact with School Social Workers in a variety of settings and work roles to understand how these assessments are used in the school setting. The course emphasizes the written tasks and social work skills that School Social Workers need to perform on a regular basis, as well as how these skills are used to help the student, family, and school environment. Prerequisites: SOWK 4712 and SOWK 4715.

SOWK 4720 Prevention and Treatment of Juvenile Delinquency and Youth Violence (3 Credits)

Examines causal factors and theories that seek to explain why some adolescents engage in delinquent conduct and/or violent behavior. Effective delinquency and violence prevention and treatment approaches are identified at the individual, family, school and community levels.

SOWK 4721 Existential Social Work Practice (3 Credits)

The problems facing people can be understood in the context of situations and meanings they give to them. This course seeks to identify useful ways to clarify and validate the client's unique "world view", bypassing the many dangers and misuses of diagnostic categorization and empowering clients in relation to themselves and problem definition.

SOWK 4723 Social Work Practice in Health Care (3 Credits)

This course is designed to explore and develop advanced social work knowledge and skills in order to practice social work in diverse health care settings. It includes examination of the social work role on interdisciplinary teams, health care terminology, setting-specific assessment and interventions and comprehensive social work services for acute and chronically ill patients. It emphasizes social work values and ethics in relation to health care practice.

SOWK 4725 Mind-Body Connections and Social Work Practice (3 Credits)

This course teaches skills for implementing mind-body techniques, models for wellness assessments, and evidence-based mind-body strategies for intervention in client and community problems. An evidence-based approach creates a foundation for: 1) understanding the mind-body connection that influences an individual’s and community’s physical, emotional, and social well-being and 2) the most efficacious methods for mind-body social work practice skills. Research evidence demonstrates that mind-body strategies are helpful for an array of concerns such as, military personnel with PTSD, adults with emotional regulation issues, academic concerns of stressed-urban youth, community mobilization, and emancipatory practice.

SOWK 4726 Experiential Therapy (3 Credits)

This course provides students with knowledge and skills to facilitate experiential-based therapy with children, youth, families and couples with a focus on environmentally sound practices. This is considered a service learning class since we are partnering with nature. Please wear comfortable clothes and comfortable closed toed shoes for all classes and bring a water bottle.

SOWK 4727 Experiential Therapy in Nature (3 Credits)

SOWK 4727 is a methods/skills course which provides students with knowledge and skills to facilitate experiential therapy with groups with a focus on environmentally sound practices in the outdoors.

SOWK 4730 Cognitive Behavioral Therapies (3 Credits)

This course examines major cognitive behavioral therapies (CBT) suggesting methods focusing on clients' problem-solving abilities, building on client strengths, targeting specific thought patterns that impede clients from reaching goals, and assessing outcomes in terms of changes in thinking and behavior. Theory is applies to individuals, dyads, families, and groups. Additionally, this course examines relevant research suggesting both indication and counter-indications of approaches.

SOWK 4732 Disrupting Privilege through Anti-Oppressive Practice (3 Credits)

This course, building on the theoretical foundation in SOWK 4132 Multicultural Social Work Practice, examines the barriers to the professional use of self as an ally to historically disenfranchised groups, both in the context of day-to-day relationships with clients as well as in the context of community and macro-level interventions. The course is intended to assist in understanding the personal, situational, structural, and cultural influences that impede justice-oriented social work practice. The course supports students in developing strategies, skills, and approaches to anti-oppressive practice. Anti-oppressive social work practice is a range of practice approaches that adopt a critical and structural perspective on issues of social inequality, oppression, power, privilege, and domination. It encompasses approaches such as feminist, anti-racist, Afrocentric, disability practice, and critical social work frameworks to name a few (Campbell, 2003). It attends to both process and outcome (Dominelli, 1998), and links the provision of individual assistance to people from marginalized groups with involvement in social movements corresponding to the marginalization (Carniol, 2000). "The [anti-oppressive] framework enables links to be made between individual action and social structures. It informs practice by enabling the worker to evaluate differences that exist at an individual level and within society and how these impact on each other. It provides the means of making accurate assessments by taking into account the inequalities that texture the lives of those denied access to society's resources because of their defined social status and the exclusionary practices of the dominant system. It demands that we consistently engage in the process of critical self examination, which in turn enables us to engage in the process of change." (Dalrymple and Burke, 1995, p. 18).

SOWK 4735 Interpersonal Approaches to Counseling (3 Credits)

This course is an elective course which utilizes the interpersonal models of psychotherapy and neurobiology, drawing upon psychodynamic theories and techniques. The course examines traditional and contemporary psychotherapy theories and techniques. Interpersonal interventions are grounded within the values, ethics and standards of practice for clinical social work.

SOWK 4737 Assmnt & Interven w/Adolescent (3 Credits)

Examines adolescence as a major developmental life cycle stage and the reciprocal relationships between gender, race, ethnicity, family development, peer group, neighborhood and the adolescent's physical, intellectual, social and sexual development, as they contribute to identity formation. Presents individual, group, family and programbased intervention approaches, ranging from least to most intensive and restrictive. Prerewuisite: completion of foundation year course work or permission of adviser and instructor.

SOWK 4741 Grief and Loss Across the Lifespan (3 Credits)

This course is designed to prepare students to understand social work roles and practice (engagement, assessment, intervention and evaluation) in working with those experiencing loss across the life span. Whether the loss is related to health or functioning, family system, developmental stage or an actual death, this course prepares students to be culturally responsive to diverse perspectives and bereavement needs. Students will learn theoretical models of grief and loss and how to effectively evaluate the needs of grieving individuals, families, communities and their support systems.

SOWK 4742 Disability Studies (3 Credits)

This values course will facilitate students’ exploration of their own perceptions, biases, and belief systems with regards to the broad topic of disability. A values perspective encourages students to reflect on their personal, professional, cultural and political perceptions of the epistemology of the notion of disability. This course will explore the social construction of concepts of ableism and identity, engage in historical analysis of disability (both domestically and internationally), and familiarize students with pertinent legislation/policies that impact persons with disability (PWD). Students will learn definitions of disability, come to know more about the spectrum of disability and utilize critical theoretical perspectives. The study of disability includes persons with disability (PWD), including the broad range of categorizations related to mental health, physical health, and cognitive ability. Students will engage in critical dialogue around the representation of PWD in our culture. Utilizing a person-in-environment perspective, students will look at the Social Work Code of Ethics as it relates to PWD and explore various facets of self-determination, independent living, relationships and sexuality, and the role of family, power and privilege in the lives of persons with disabilities. Prerequisite: SOWK 4132.

SOWK 4749 Culturally Responsive Practice with LatinX (3 Credits)

Addresses immigration issues, as well as intervention and theoretical approaches for Latinx populations. Covers the selection of interventions and strategies for cross-cultural use in adequately addressing the needs of Latinx. A required course for the Latinx Social Work Certificate.

SOWK 4750 Critical Perspectives on the Latinx Context (3 Credits)

This course provides a framework for culturally relevant social work services designed to meet the needs of the Latinx community. This is a social work content course taught in Spanish. Students acquire core principles grounded in an understanding of social justice, privilege, and oppression including the interconnection between human and civil rights, globalization, immigration and poverty. Students will expand their oral and written Spanish expression as they learn about cultural, social and political theory. Students learn aspects of Mexican culture, community development, historical patterns of oppression, spirituality, and the role of indigenous movements. As a result of this course, students understand how to advocate for nondiscriminatory cultural, social and economic practices within a Latinx context and experience. It is designed for students in all concentrations who have an interest in understanding issues facing the Latinx community. Prerequisite: Initial placement is based on minimum language proficiency test results at the intermediate-advanced level. Further placement determination will consist of a comprehensive evaluation to ascertain oral and written proficiency. Enrollment in this course may be limited to Latinx Certificiate students.

SOWK 4751 Global Relations and Poverty in Mexico (3 Credits)

Provides a mixture of experiential and academic learning based on the community-learning model of Paulo Friere. Taught in Cuernavaca, Mexico, the course covers Mexican culture, community development, historical patterns of oppression, spirituality and liberation theology, global economics and policy, and the role of indigenous movements. Includes discussion on the relationship between poverty in Mexico and the US, and implication for social workers. A required course for the Social Work with Latinos/as Certificate.

SOWK 4752 Trauma Informed Assessment and Interventions (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of multi-system level definitions of traumatic experience—historical, individual, interpersonal, family, organizational, and community. The emphasis is on social work practice that is culturally responsive, growth-oriented, and strengths based, in which the study of trauma is approached from a theoretical base that perceives the trauma response as a "response" rather than a "disorder." Trauma informed assessment and interventions are examined, incorporating a social justice perspective on historical trauma, poverty, and interpersonal violence. This course promotes the unique contribution social workers offer through the lenses of strength, resilience, and coping as well as commitments to cultural responsiveness and ecological/systems factors. Students will identify how secondary trauma impacts social workers and the importance of professional accountability to self-care and ongoing growth and development.

SOWK 4753 Social Development in Latin America (3 Credits)

Covers social development in South and Central America, with special emphasis on Mexico. Practice-oriented, it is geared towards a knowledge of policy-making in Latin America and on the skills required for local social development. A required course for the Social Work with Latinos/as Certificate.

SOWK 4754 Trauma and Recovery in Social Work Practice (3 Credits)

Provides an overview of multi-system level definitions of trauma experience - historical, individual, interpersonal, family, organizational, community, and global. Also examines various approaches to trauma response theory. Promotes the unique contribution social workers have to offer through lenses of strength, resiliency, and coping as well as commitments to multicultural and systems factors.

SOWK 4755 Interventions for Responses to Trauma (3 Credits)

This course is designed from a strengths perspective, in which the study of trauma is approached from a theoretical base that perceives psychological adjustments after trauma as primarily a "response" rather than a "disorder." Includes information on the integration of cognitive, emotional, and somatic approaches to trauma treatment, as well as consideration of when to use a trauma-informed versus a trauma-focused paradigm. At the community level, the course also includes an introduction to mental health reactions and responses to disaster. Prerequisite: SOWK 4754.

SOWK 4756 Social Work from a Chinese Perspective (3 Credits)

This course provides students with a unique opportunity to learn first in the classroom the social, cultural, historical, political, and economic characteristics of China and how these characteristics shape social work in China. Then students learn by experiencing social work in China. In Beijing, students participate in lectures given by faculty at China Youth University, discussions with social work students, visits to social work organizations, visits to important cultural landmarks and nightly synthesis of new knowledge and experiences. An elective course.

SOWK 4757 Social Work and Latino/a Cultures: An Intensive Practice and Spanish Immersion Course (3 Credits)

This required course for the Social Work with Latinos/as certificate combines academic classroom instruction and experiential and conversational learning. The goal of the course is to enhance the student's Spanish communication and cultural responsively skills through dialogue practice and service in Latin America. Country location for this study abroad course is determined based on yearly certificate objectives and travel advisories. Based on the student's individual skills and interests, and the needs of local field agencies and communities, students become involved in volunteer and service learning opportunities preparing them for their concentration field placement back in the United States where they are expected to demonstrate competency in Spanish. Students will learn to identify cultural differences and similarities in attitudes towards community organizing and mental health care, and social service delivery in order to better address these cultural differences and similarities in the United States. This experience also allows students to learn Spanish within a cultural and professional context. This course is conducted entirely in Spanish.

SOWK 4758 Social Work in Kenya: Context, Conservation, Empowerment, Sustainability (3 Credits)

This course is designed to introduce students to the social, cultural and conservation issues of Kenya and East Africa. This course is field-based with strong emphasis on service learning and direct experiences. Course readings, lectures, classroom discussions, service learning projects and field work in rural Kenya provide participants firsthand experience in the social, cultural, historical, political, environmental, ecological and economic realities that exist in Kenya. This course is open to qualified concentration and advanced standing Graduate School of Social Work students. The course meets on campus for four sessions before traveling to Nairobi, Voi, and Kasigau, Kenya. Due to the intensive nature, remote travel logistics and costs for this course, direct communication with the professors is required. Qualifications include: willingness to sign International Travel Agreement, willingness to receive required medical authorization and immunization, academic good standing, and readiness for the physical and emotional demands of traveling in rural and remote Africa.

SOWK 4759 Global Cultural Perspectives: Consensus and Conundrums (3 Credits)

Social workers increasingly practice in global communities both nationally and internationally. Changes in practice environments demand that social work practitioners are informed citizens of comparative cultures and societies. This course examines the values and ethics of social work practice in a global context of power, privilege and oppression. Course materials and educational experiences are used to challenge students to examine ethical and value-based conundrums when practicing in global settings and to develop practice skills to enhance the health, well-being and sustainability of communities. Through the use of case studies, critical thinking, cultural inventories and reflexivity the course supports and challenges students' personal growth and professional practice.

SOWK 4760 Resource Development and Fundraising (3 Credits)

This course examines strategies and tactics around skill building in fundraising, resource-development strategies, grant-proposal writing, budgeting, and fiscal processes common to not-for-profit or governmental organizations. Topics include resource development and acquisition (fundraising) and discussions on the budget process required resource management for nonprofit organizations.

SOWK 4762 Bosnia in Transition: The Social Work Response (3 Credits)

This course provides students with the unique opportunity to learn firsthand about the social work response in post-war Bosnia through a social justice lens. The social, cultural, historical, political, economic, religious, legal and ethnic characteristics of the former Yugoslavia will be explored as context for studying the genocide that occurred in the l990s. Learning will occur in the classroom at GSSW, followed by travel to Bosnia. Students will be exposed firsthand to the local, national and international efforts toward rebuilding and healing, through lectures provided by faculty at the University of Sarajevo School of Social Work, interaction with Bosnian social work students, visits to NGOs focused on the post-war efforts, visits to sites important during the war, visits to war tribunal sites, and exposure to current legal, economic and human service processes.

SOWK 4763 Social Work and Social Justice in South Africa (3 Credits)

This three-credit course will be conducted in partnership with Educo Africa in Cape Town, South Africa. The course will provide experiential and service learning social work experiences. Course activities will encourage cross cultural learning experiences and increase knowledge pertinent to South Africa’s social, cultural, environmental, political and historical reality. It will expose students to Community Development challenges as well as environmental and social justice issues in a South African context. The goal of the course is to increase personal, community and global leadership potential of social work and social development professionals. This course in partnership to Educo Africa will use a community-based context to increase the effectiveness and expertise of students and will support student’s engagement in program development and building international networks and partnerships.

SOWK 4764 Historical Trauma and Healing (3 Credits)

This course is designed to provide students with a context for practice with communities experiencing historical trauma. We learn about the conceptualization of historical trauma, its impact on communities as well as community responses to it. We also discuss the importance of cultural protective factors, strengths, and culturally relevant models of healing around multigenerational, collective experiences of trauma. A number of practice approaches found useful with communities experiencing historical trauma are presented and discussed. Class format includes presentations, small group discussions, films, poetry, movement, and experiential learning in the community. This course is built upon the concepts of empowerment practice, indigenous models of social work, and narrative theory and practice. We use these perspectives as we explore work around historical trauma in communities. This class provides social work direct practice skills on individual, family, community and policy levels.

SOWK 4765 International Social Development (3 Credits)

Social development is a process of planned instructional change to bring about a better correspondence between human needs and social policies and programs. This class focuses primarily on the developing work with particular emphasis on transitional economies. Practice-oriented, the class is geared toward a knowledge of policy-making for human security and the skills required for local social development.

SOWK 4775 Social Work with Adult Groups (3 Credits)

The course teaches students advanced clinical group work methods and skills with vulnerable and resilient adult clients who are experiencing an array of bio-psycho-social-spiritual problems, and who are seen in mental health, health, and gerontology practice settings. The purpose of group work is to meet the socio-emotional needs of members through mutual aid and support, education, therapy, growth, and socialization. The impact of gender, age, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, social class, ability/disability, and spirituality on group formation and dynamics is addressed. Evidence of practice effectiveness of group methods is examined. Ethical conflicts and dilemmas involved in group work are considered within the framework of social work values and ethics.

SOWK 4780 Conflict Resolution in Social Work Practice (3 Credits)

Covers methods of conflict resolution including negotiation, bargaining and mediation. Applies social work role of mediator to families, divorces and child custody, elder care issues, groups and organizations. Examines frameworks and helps students build skills for conflict resolution in practice. An elective course.

SOWK 4782 Feminisms in Social Work Practice (3 Credits)

This course engages students in the conversation of scholarship and social work practice issues related to social justice and the oppression of women. The course is designed to expand the knowledge of theory, research, policy and practice for working with diverse groups of women in multiple settings. Feminist social work perspectives for social work practice at micro, meso and macro practice levels will be critically examined. Topics include feminist theories, or feminisms, including eco-feminism and womanism, clinical and community feminist practice models, globalization and women, and the value of feminist research. These topics will be informed by knowledge and awareness of intersectionality, oppression and privilege. Prerequisite: SOWK 4132.

SOWK 4784 Suicide Assessments and Interventions (3 Credits)

This course builds students' competencies in assessing suicide risk, planning for safety, and providing counseling to individuals who are thinking about suicide or have made a suicide attempt. This class examines theories of suicide causation, methods of suicide risk assessment, and models of techniques for intervention. Students will learn practices for eliciting sensitive information about troubling thoughts, assessing and documenting a client's level of suicide risk, and using cognitive-behavioral and other methods to help reduce suicide risk.

SOWK 4786 Human Trafficking: Prevention, Intervention, and Support of Its Victims (3 Credits)

This course meets the values for practice requirement and is relevant for students who are interested in trauma, human rights, international issues, prevention of child abuse, intervention with victims of violence, interventions with child abuse, interventions with high-risk youth, and PTSD. This class investigates human trafficking from a social work perspective: prevention, intervention, and support of victims. Additionally, this course investigates regional differences in both labor and sex trafficking. The class also studies how prevention, intervention, and giving support to victims change from different regional (Asian, African, European, and Latin American) perspectives. The course also investigates human trafficking in the US, both with domestic and international victims. Prerequisite: SOWK 4132.

SOWK 4790 Human Sexuality (3 Credits)

Integrates human sexuality in the thinking and practice of social workers. By viewing sexual behavior from the social work perspective, the student is prepared to assume a significant role in helping clients deal with issues of human sexuality. Focuses on clients experiencing sexual dysfunction and on sexually oppressed client groups including the elderly, the homosexually or bisexually oriented, the physically or developmentally challenged and the sexually abused. An elective course.

SOWK 4795 Integration of Animals Into Therapeutic Settings (3 Credits)

Explores the human-animal bond and potential for therapeutic intervention with the animal as teacher, therapist, facilitator and companion in a number of therapeutic settings. Focuses on core skills for social workers seeking to integrate this clinical approach into their practice. A required course for the Animal-Assisted Social Work Certificate.

SOWK 4796 Animal Assisted Social Work Practice (3 Credits)

This course provides a comprehensive examination of approaches to Animal Assisted Social Work (AASW) and emphasizes clinical application skills utilized with a broad array of persons and in a number of therapeutic settings. Students will learn to design, implement and analyze the efficacy of AASW approaches within their chosen area of specialization, providing an opportunity to practice these approaches in their field internships. Students will learn to clearly articulate, assess, and intervene in "link" violence as it relates to social work practices and AASW implications. A required course for the Animal-Assisted Social Work Certificate. Prerequisite: SOWK 4795 or permission of instructor.

SOWK 4797 Issues for Evidence-Supported Animal Assisted Social Work (3 Credits)

This course is designed to take students into an evidence-supported exploration and understanding of methods for incorporating specific animals and animal assisted interventions in the context of current social work practice. The course examines the capacities of different species for work with diverse goals and populations in animal interactions and introduces components critical to animals' well-being. Emphasis is placed on case formulation and experiential learning methods that link goal-specific human-animal interactions that impact measureable client behavioral changes. The course focuses on the explicit identification of how the animal will move clients toward goals and identifying outcomes and indicators of such change. Special attention is given to the development of animal selection, handling, evaluation, and management skills necessary for development as a social worker with competency in the incorporation of animals in evidence-based practice. Prerequisite: SOWK 4795.

SOWK 4890 Contemporary Global Issues (1-3 Credits)

The complexities of sustainable development and global practice require an understanding of current developments and events at a global scale. This course is designed to support student learning by providing a dynamic review and exploration of contemporary global issues with a focus on approaches and competencies for global social work practice. This course encourages students to understand the myriad geo-cultural, political, socio-economic, and environmental dimensions involved in current global developments and events. Examining issues of governance, local and regional laws, as well as human rights and social justice issues to include those of race, religion and ethnic influence can expand understanding of the unique considerations of various countries and world regions. Particular emphasis is laid on human security, poverty alleviation and humanitarian concerns, conflict/post conflict response, human rights, human and social development, migration and refugee activity, civil society and environmental sustainability. In this course, efforts are made to incorporate historical understanding, research-driven knowledge, expert experience-based insight, and field-tested skills and resources to examine possible solutions, policy, and response. Social workers focusing on human, social, economic and ecological issues in global settings must be equipped to evaluate, analyze and respond to current global issues with a coherent understanding of major value and policy frameworks such as the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This course develops students' global reach and readiness as global citizens and social workers by engaging students in a year-long in-depth exploration of current events shaping issues and unfolding events globally.

SOWK 4900 Methods for Evaluating Practice and Programs (1-3 Credits)

Provides students with strategies for evaluating social work practice at multiple system levels. Prerequisite: SOWK 4201 or admission to advanced standing program.

SOWK 4901 Applied Practice Evaluation Research (3 Credits)

Provides students with the opportunity to conduct a practice evaluation project in their field setting. Prerequisite: SOWK 4900.

SOWK 4950 Foundation Field Internship (1-15 Credits)

This required practicum provides foundation students with the opportunity to integrate social work theory and practice for effective professional intervention at clinical and community levels. Prerequisite or Corequisites: SOWK 4020, SOWK 4001, SOWK 4132.

SOWK 4960 Concentration Field Internship: Clinical (1-18 Credits)

Concentration students participate in planned clinical practice experience that integrates classroom theory, the learning of practice skills and the continued development of social work attitudes, ethics and values in the clinical practice setting. Prerequisite: completion of foundation year course work and field practicum.

SOWK 4961 Concentration Field Internship: Community (1-18 Credits)

Concentration students participate in planned community practice experience that integrates classroom theory, the learning of practice skills and the continued development of social work attitudes, ethics and values in the community practice setting. Prerequisite: completion of foundation year course work and field practicum.

SOWK 4965 International Field Practicum (0-18 Credits)

This international course fulfills partial requirement for a student’s concentration year practicum. In an international social work setting, the practicum provides students with the opportunity to integrate social work theory and practice for effective professional intervention at clinical and community levels.

SOWK 4970 Concentration Field Internship (0-18 Credits)

Concentration students participate in planned practice experience that integrates classroom theory, the learning of practice skills and the continued development of social work attitudes, ethics, and values. Prerequisite for 2-year students: successful completion of foundation-year course work and field internship. Prerequisite for students with advanced standing: successful completion of advanced standing prerequisite courses and BSW-year internship. Field must be taken concurrently with concentration-year course work, or after core concentration course work. Concentration-year field requires a minimum of 20 hours a week experience at the assigned field agency. Any deviation from this standard requirement must be approved by the Director of Field Education.

SOWK 4971 Experimental Class (3 Credits)

Experimental courses allow GSSW to provide a wide variety of course offerings that respond to current issues and themes in the profession as they arise, as well as providing specialized courses that relate to the interests and areas of expertise of our faculty. All experimental courses are offered as electives open to all students. Prerequisite: determined by each instructor.

SOWK 4990 Topics in Social Work (1-4 Credits)

This topics course provides students with the opportunity to learn content appropriate to graduate social work education that is not currently incorporated into the standard MSW curriculum. Given the ever-changing nature of social work practice, theory, and research, topics of importance emerge each year that have particular relevance for a period of time or may be new emergent topics that will have relevance for the future of the discipline of social work. As such, this course provides a mechanism through which courses may be offered on a one-time basis. Topics may be related to social work practice, theory, or research. Topics vary from term to term and may be limited by program administrators, faculty, or by student interest.

SOWK 4992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

A permanent catalog course delivered on an individual basis when the course is not offered that term. Directed studies are approved under extenuating circumstances to provide an opportunity to complete a required course. Prerequisite: approval of instructor and MSW Director. Credit hours vary according to the catalog course taken.

SOWK 4999 Capstone (0-1 Credits)

This course is a 0-1 credit (Pass-Fail) required course in which students document their work through the development of an individual portfolio. Students are asked to upload artifacts (papers, presentations and field accomplishments) from both classroom and field internship that demonstrate how they have met the CSWE foundation and concentration specific EPAS competencies and practice behaviors. Students complete a reflection statement on their learning as it relates to the EPAS competencies.

SOWK 5000 Seminar in Professional Social Work Issues (2 Credits)

Examines the dilemmas and challenges confronting the social work profession and social work education. Examines the nature of professional education, the nature of the profession itself and the forces internal and external to the profession that have an impact upon practice and education. Required.

SOWK 5101 Social Welfare Policy Analysis and Development (3 Credits)

Applies analytical techniques to development of social welfare policy stressing the ability to formulate a policy hypothesis (i.e., a statement, in testable form, of a basic premise undergirding a policy position) and to reach conclusions based on analysis of empirical evidence related to the policy hypothesis. Required.

SOWK 5110 Introduction to Advanced Quantitative Research Methods (3 Credits)

This required doctoral course introduces students to quantitative approaches to conducting social research. The course includes material related to measurement, sampling, research design, data collection, and data analysis. While each of these topics encompasses technical issues to be mastered by doctoral students, the logic and underlying rationale of these research methods is of prime importance in this course. A second component of the course requires students to define and begin to develop a substantive area of intended study and research during their enrollment in the doctoral program. Elements of articulating a substantive research area and steps toward defining key research questions in a topical area are reviewed. Aspects of conducting literature reviews leading to the articulation of a substantive research area are discussed in class sessions.

SOWK 5111 Quantitative Methods for Assessing Social Interventions (3 Credits)

Social work researchers are in a unique position to contribute to knowledge about the causes of individual and societal problems and to test interventions that seek to prevent or ameliorate such problems. A variety of qualitative and quantitative research methods are used to advance knowledge about etiological factors contributing to individual and social problems and to assess the outcomes of specific social policies and practice strategies. This course presents a detaile3d examination of quantitative methods and designs that are useful in assessing the effects of social interventions. Measurement, sampling and design issues in generating and testing research questions and hypothesis are explored. Experimental, quasi-experimental, and survey research designs are assessed and applied to practice and policy issues and problems. Special emphasis is placed on developing skills necessary to conduct intervention research. Cognate students may be permitted on a case by case basis, space permitting.

SOWK 5120 Introduction to Advanced Qualitative Research Methods (3 Credits)

This course provides a substantive doctoral-level review of content on qualitative research methods and strategies. It is developed for students from social science disciplines. The content includes the nature of the method, the epistemological implications and assumptions, and appropriate applications. Student learning and evaluation includes the experience of developing a research proposal based on qualitative methodology and conducting data collection for a mini-research project. This class a prerequisite for SOWK 5121, Qualitative Data Analysis. This course is required for social work doctoral students. Students from other departments may register with permission from the professor.

SOWK 5121 Qualitative Data Analysis (3 Credits)

The focus of this course is on data analysis and interpretation, demonstration of the science of the analysis, and presentation of findings in oral and written forms. Students are expected to conduct qualitative analyses on textual data they collected as part of SOWK 5120 or as a result of some other qualitative data collection experience. Over the course of the term students learn to code and analyze their data, interpret findings, orally present those findings, and write a final paper in which they demonstrate a rigorous engagement with qualitative data analysis and the literature relevant to their topic. This course is for SOWK PhD students only. Cognate students may be permitted on a case by case basis, space permitting.

SOWK 5130 Mixed Methods Research in Social Work (3 Credits)

This course introduces doctoral students to mixed methods research in social work and the social sciences. Students explore mixed methods as a third research paradigm that strategically combines both quantitative and qualitative methods within a single inquiry. The course encourages students to actively reflect on previous quantitative and qualitative research training. Specific topics for the course include: history and language of mixed methods research; relevant paradigms and epistemological debates; mixed methods design and research questions; and analysis and dissemination consideration. SOWK PhD students only. Cognate Students will be allowed to register on a case by case basis, space permitting.

SOWK 5201 Statistical Methods (5 Credits)

Examines the use and interpretation of statistics in educational and human services research, including descriptive and inferential statistics. Required.

SOWK 5202 Correlation and Regression (4 Credits)

Examines correlational and multiple regression research designs and their application to social work and social science problems. This course is for SOWK PhD students only. Cross-listed with RMS 4911, SOWK 5952. Prerequisite: SWOK 5201.

SOWK 5203 Multivariate Analysis (5 Credits)

Provides a conceptual understanding of common multivariate statistical techniques as applied to research in social work and the social sciences. Prerequisite: SOWK 5201.

SOWK 5300 Social Science Theory and the Philosophy of Science (3 Credits)

This foundation doctoral level course introduces traditional issues and recent developments in the philosophy of science, and provides an overview of social science theory and theoretical frameworks. It examines philosophical questions on scientific inquiry and the consequences modern science imposes on our basic understanding of knowledge and nature. The course analyzes and critiques the social-and-behavioral-science foundations that undergird the social work knowledge base and current social work theories. There are no prerequisites for this course. This course is required to social work doctoral students.

SOWK 5301 Social Work Theory in Research and Practice (3 Credits)

This course builds on SOWK 5300, Philosophy of Science and Social Work Theory, to examine how theories, conceptual frameworks, perspectives, and models are used specifically within social work research, education, and practice. This course explores how theories are used in research and in social work interventions on individual, family, group, organizational, community, and policy levels. The course analyzes and critiques the social work knowledge base and the current state of social work theories. This course is required for social work doctoral students. Prerequisite: SOWK 5300.

SOWK 5401 Quantitative Research Methods (4 Credits)

Focuses on basic elements of quantitative social research methods: measurement, sampling, research designs, data collection and data analysis. Emphasizes logic and underlying rationale, as well as technical issues. Prior understanding of computer-based statistical analysis is helpful. Required.

SOWK 5403 Advanced Social Welfare Policy Analysis (3 Credits)

Applies analytical techniques to development of social welfare policy stressing the ability to formulate a policy hypothesis (i.e., a statement, in testable form, of a basic premise undergirding a policy position) and to reach conclusions based on analysis of empirical evidence related to the policy hypothesis. This course is for SOWK PhD students only.

SOWK 5405 Qualitative Data Analysis (4 Credits)

Provides an understanding of analysis methods used to draw meaning from qualitative data, methods that must be practical, applicable and understandable to other observers. Prepares students to use a systematic, scientific process of analysis that captures the meaning of data while avoiding research self-delusion and unreliable or invalid conclusions. Topics include data collection, data reduction, data display, and conclusion drawing and verification. Methods include application of computer software. Prerequisite: SOWK 5402. Required.

SOWK 5450 Social Work Knowledge Integration and Publication (3 Credits)

This required doctoral course introduces students to integrating knowledge for social work scholarship through the use of tolls that support academic argumentation and exposition. It provides students with the skills, expertise, and readiness necessary to compose a number of scholarly documents, including academic publications and the dissertation proposal. The course focuses on the preparation and writing of the comprehensive examination proposal as an example of such documents. The major product of the class is a paper designed to meet the requirements of the comprehensive examination proposal. Advisors and mentors participate in class presentations and critiques as a part of preparing the student for their ongoing scholarship.

SOWK 5500 Pedagogy in Social Work Education (3 Credits)

This foundation course examines philosophies, theories, and pedagogical models that are utilized in social work education. It explores how various perspectives shape the approaches and techniques used and how these in turn impact classroom effectiveness and issues of classroom management. The course incorporates concepts and develops skills based on evidence-based teaching. This course is a required course for social work students and has no prerequisite. This course is for SOWK PhD students only.

SOWK 5700 Teaching Practicum (3 Credits)

This 3-hour required course provides classroom instruction and teaching opportunities designed to prepare doctoral students for faculty positions in undergraduate and graduate level social work education. Students work with a faculty mentor to pursue practicum placements that match their substantive interests. Students are expected to devote approximately 8 hours to the practicum per week. Restricted to Ph.D. students only.

SOWK 5950 Multivariate Analysis (5 Credits)

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to common multivariate statistical analyses. Provides a conceptual understanding of common multivariate statistical techniques as applied to research in education and the social sciences. Cross listed with RMS 4913. Prerequisite: SOWK 5930.

SOWK 5952 Correlation and Regression (4 Credits)

Examines correlation and multiple regression research designs and their application to educational and social science problems. Cross listed with RMS 4911. Prerequisite: SOWK 5930. Required.

SOWK 5990 Special Topics (1-3 Credits)

This special topics course provides students with the opportunity to learn content appropriate to graduate social work education that is not currently incorporated into the standard PhD curriculum. Given the ever-changing nature of social work practice, theory, and research, topics of importance emerge each year which have particular relevance for a period of time or may be new emergent topics that will have relevance for the future of the discipline of social work. As such, this course provides a mechanism through which courses may be offered on a one-time basis. Topics may be related to advanced social work theory, pedagogy, or research. Topics vary from term to term and may be initiated by program administrators, faculty, or by student interest.

SOWK 5991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

This is an opportunity for students to undertake special study in a defined area of interest with faculty consultation.

SOWK 5995 Independent Research-Thesis (1-10 Credits)

SOWK 6991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

Students undertake special study in a defined area of interest with faculty consultation. By arrangement.

SOWK 6995 Dissertation Research (1-18 Credits)

The formal mechanism for undertaking the dissertation, providing for faculty support through the appointment of a dissertation committee. By arrangement.

Faculty

Catherine Alter, Professor, Emerita, PhD, University of Maryland

Inna Altschul, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Michigan

Yoli Anyon, Associate Professor, PhD, University of California, Berkeley

Anamika Barman-Adhikari, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Southern California

Jennifer Bellamy, Associate Professor, PhD, Columbia University

Ramona Beltran, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Washington

Kimberly Bender, Professor, DSW, University of Texas at Austin

Karen Bensen, Associate Professor of the Practice of Social Work, MSW, University of Denver

Sarah Bexell, Visiting Clinical Associate Professor, PhD, Georgia State University

Denise Breinig-Glunz, Clinical Assistant Professor, MSW, Smith College

Daniel Brisson, Associate Professor, PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Jesse Burne, Assistant Professor of the Practice of Social Work, MSW, Columbia University

Marian Bussey, Associate Professor, Emerita, PhD, University of Texas at Arlington

Kerry Causey, Clinical Assistant Professor, MSW, California State University, Long Beach

William Cloud, Professor, PhD, University of Denver

Enid Cox, Professor, Emerita, DSW, Columbia University

Jean East, Professor (retired), PhD, University of Denver

Wanda Ellingson, Professor of the Practice of Social Work, MSW, University of Minnesota

Rachel Forbes, Assistant Professor of the Practice of Social Work, MSW, Monmouth University

Stacey Freedenthal, Associate Professor, PhD, Washington University in St. Louis

Anthony Fulginiti, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Southern California

Lorena Gaibor, Clinical Assistant Professor, MSW, Rutgers University

Donny Gerke, Assistant Professor, PhD, Washington University in St. Louis

Brian Gonzales, Assistant Professor, MSW, University of Denver

Jennifer Greenfield, Assistant Professor, PhD, Washington University in St. Louis

Michele Hanna, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Texas at Austin

Leslie Hasche, Associate Professor, PhD, Washington University in St. Louis

Amy S. He. , Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Southern California

Sue Henry, Professor, Emerita, DSW, University of Denver

Jeffrey Jenson, Professor, PhD, University of Washington

Kathryn Johnson, Clinical Associate Professor, MSW, University of Denver

James "Jim" Jorgensen, Professor, Emeritus, MSW, University of Denver

John Kayser, Professor, Emeritus, PhD, University of Denver

Suzanne E. U. Kerns, Research Associate Professor , PhD, University of Southern Carolina

Johnny Kim, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Texas at Austin

Donald "Don" Krill, Professor, Emeritus, MSW, University of Denver

Walter LaMendola, Professor, Emeritus, PhD, University of Minnesota

Julie Anne Laser-Maira, Associate Professor, PhD, Michigan State University

Nancy Lucero, Research Associate Professor, PhD, University of Denver

Lena Lundgren, Professor, PhD, University of Chicago

Susan Manning, Professor, Emerita, PhD, University of Denver

Amanda Moore McBride, Professor, PhD, University of Chicago

Jae McQueen, Associate Professor of the Practice of Social Work, MSW, University of Denver

Pamela Metz, Associate Professor, Emerita, EdD, University of Colorado

Julianne Mitchell, Clinical Associate Professor, MSW, University of Denver

James Moran, Professor, Emeritus, PhD, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Kevin Morris, Research Associate Professor, PhD, University of Chicago

Nicole Nicotera, Professor, PhD, University of Washington

Kathleen Ohman, Professor, Emeritus, PhD, University of Illinois

Deb Ortega, Professor, PhD, University of Washington

Lynn Parker, Professor, Emerita, PhD, University of Denver

Ruth Parsons, Professor, Emerita, PhD, University of Denver

Ann Petrila, Professor of the Practice of Social Work, MPA, University of Denver

Andreas Rechkemmer, Professor, PhD, Free University-Berlin

Shauna Rienks, Research Assistant Professor, PhD, Washington University, St. Louis

Kate Ross, Associate Professor of the Practice of Social Work, PhD, University of Denver

Michele Sienkiewicz, Professor of the Practice of Social Work, MSW, Fordham University

Shannon Sliva, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Texas, Arlington

Michael Talamantes, Clinical Associate Professor, MSW, University of Texas at Austin

Heather Taussig, Professor, PhD, San Diego State University/University of California, San Diego

Philip Tedeschi, Clinical Professor, MSW, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Stephen von Merz, Clinical Associate Professor, MSW, University of Denver

Eugene Walls, Professor, PhD, University of Notre Dame

James Herbert Williams, Professor, PhD, University of Washington

Judith Wise, Professor, Emerita, PhD, Bryn Mawr College

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