2016-2017 Undergraduate Bulletin

Languages and Literatures

Office:  Sturm Hall, Room 391 
Mail Code: 2000 E. Asbury Ave. Denver, CO 80208
Phone:  303-871-2662
Email:  langlit@du.edu
Web Site: http://www.du.edu/ahss/langlit

The Department of Languages and Literatures provides instruction in an array of languages and literatures at the basic and advanced levels. Programs are designed to immerse students in the speech and thought of other nations and in their cultural and literary heritages.

Our mission is to educate by developing and refining linguistic and intellectual abilities that permit our students to engage with us in advancing scholarly inquiry, in cultivating critical and creative thought that recognizes thinking other than what they take for granted and in generating knowledge that at once discovers, respects and transcends differences. Only through an understanding of the language and culture of other countries can barriers of misunderstanding and conflict be broken down. Our aim, therefore, is to give a language major or minor more than a glimpse from the outside at another way of life: it is to give a second identity, a “second heart” or “second soul.” The active partnerships that this enables students to establish with non-Anglophone regional and global communities will contribute a toward sustainable common good of national, hemispheric and worldwide scope.

Major and minor programs are offered in French, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish. Minors are available in Chinese and Japanese as well and, by tutorial arrangements, in Hebrew and Latin. Undergraduate offerings also include course work in Arabic and (tutorial) classical Greek. The overwhelming majority of our students take advantage of DU’s unique Cherrington Global Scholars program to study abroad at universities in Europe and Latin America, East Asia and Africa. DU maintains bilateral exchange relationships with the University of Tübingen and the University of Bologna and also participates in the International Student Exchange Program that permits study at scores of universities worldwide.

Not only in classes taught by experienced, dedicated teacher-scholars who use innovative teaching techniques, but also outside the classroom, our undergraduates experience a strong sense of enthusiasm and community both among themselves and with their instructors. Senior faculty are involved at every level of instruction as well as in student advising and mentoring.

Alumni of the department have pursued diverse international careers immediately upon graduation or have undertaken post-graduate studies, often with fellowships (e.g., Fulbright, Guggenheim), in a variety of academic and professional fields. Among institutions to which they have recently gone are American University, George Washington University, Michigan State University, the University of New Mexico,  the University of Pittsburgh, SUNY-Buffalo and the University of Colorado at Boulder; they have also gone overseas to attend the University of Oxford and to Germany with the US Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange Program (CBYX) . Others have gone on to earn advanced degrees in DU’s own excellent graduate schools (business or law, international studies, social work and education).  Opportunities for public sector, private sector and NGO careers on five continents are as boundless as an educated student linguist’s ambitions.

Chinese

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 24 credits of approved courses above CHIN 2001.  Four credits must be CHIN 3300 or above, or equivalent from study in China. CHIN 1516 Contemporary China in Literature and Films, which partially fulfills the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement, can be used for credit toward the minor. Students who study abroad in China are strongly encouraged to enroll in a Chinese course (CHIN 3300 or above) upon their return.

French

Bachelor of Arts Major Requirements

(183 credits required for the degree)

44 credits of approved courses beyond FREN 1003.

Required courses include FREN 2400, a 2000-level literature class, a culture class at the 2000 or 3000 level, two 3000-level literature classes and a 3000-level grammar or language skills class.  Credits earned through the Cherrington Global Scholar Program from classes that have been approved by the French study abroad advisor are counted as DU credits toward a French major/minor. Students who have returned from studying abroad are required to take a minimum of one FREN course at DU for the major.

Secondary Major Requirements

44 credits. Same requirements as for BA degree.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 24 credits of approved courses beyond FREN 1003. For the emphasis in literature, required courses include FREN 2400, a 2000-level literature class, a 2000-level culture class and a 3000-level literature class.  Credits earned through the Cherrington Global Scholar Program from classes that have been approved by the French study abroad advisor are counted as DU credits toward a French major/minor. Minors who choose to study abroad are strongly encouraged to enroll in a French course upon their return.

French Culture and Civilization

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 24 credits of approved courses beyond FREN 1003.  Requirements include FREN 2400, a 2000-level culture class, a 2000-level literature class, and a 3000-level culture class. Credits earned through the Cherrington Global Scholar Program from classes that have been approved by the French study abroad advisor are counted as DU credits toward a French major/minor. Minors who choose to study abroad are strongly encouraged to enroll in a French course upon their return.

German

Bachelor of Arts Major Requirements

(183 credits required for the degree)

44 credits of approved courses beyond GERM 1003.

Four of these 44 credits must be from GERM 1416. No fewer than eight of these 44 credits must be from 3000-level courses. Students may count one additional course in English on German culture, history or literature toward the major. Students majoring in German are encouraged to study abroad in Germany. Majors who choose to study abroad in Germany are strongly encouraged to enroll in a German course upon their return.

Secondary Major Requirements

44 credits. Same requirements as for BA degree.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 24 credits of approved courses beyond GERM 1003. Four of these 24 credits must be from GERM 1416. Students who minor in German are encouraged to study abroad in Germany. Minors who choose to study abroad in Germany are strongly encouraged to enroll in a German course upon their return.

Hebrew

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 20 credits of study beyond HEBR 1003.

Italian

Bachelor of Arts Major Requirements

(183 credits required for the degree)

44 credits of approved courses beyond ITAL 1003.

Four of these 44 credits must be from ITAL 2500 or ITAL 3010. No fewer than eight of these 44 credits must be from 3000-level Italian topics courses. Students may count one course taught in English on Italian culture, history or literature toward the major. Students who major in Italian are encouraged to study abroad in Italy. Credits earned from classes in Italy that have been approved by the faculty are counted as DU credits toward an Italian major. Majors who choose to study abroad in Italy are strongly encouraged to enroll in an Italian course upon their return.

Secondary Major Requirements

44 credits. Same requirements as for BA degree.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 24 credits of approved courses beyond ITAL 1003. No fewer than four of these 24 credits must be from a course in Italian at the 3000 level. Students may count one course taught in English on Italian culture, history or literature toward the minor. Students who minor in Italian are encouraged to study abroad in Italy. Credits earned from classes in Italy that have been approved by the faculty are counted as DU credits toward the Italian minor. Minors who choose to study abroad in Italy are strongly encouraged to enroll in an Italian course upon their return.

Japanese

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 24 credits of approved courses. 20 credits must be language classes beyond JAPN 2001.  One course must be JAPN 1416 Postwar Japan: Changing Perspectives in Literature and Culture, and one a four-credit language course at the 3000 level. 

Latin

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 20 credits of study beyond LATN 1003.

Russian

Bachelor of Arts Major Requirements

(183 credits required for the degree)

44 credits of approved courses beyond RUSS 1003.

Requirements include two 3000-level courses and RUSS 3101; students are encouraged to take either RUSS 1416 or RUSS 2416 for credit in the major. Study abroad in Russia through the Cherrington Global Scholars Program and a service learning/internship in Denver’s Russian-speaking community, though not required, are strongly encouraged. The number of credits earned through these experiences is established by agreement with faculty in Russian and is subject to institutional requirements.

Secondary Major Requirements

44 credits. Same requirements as for BA degree.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 24 credits of approved courses beyond RUSS 1003, including one 3000-level course; students are encouraged to take either RUSS 1416 or RUSS 2416 for credit in the minor. Study abroad in Russia through the Cherrington Global Scholars Program and a service learning/internship in Denver’s Russian-speaking community, though not required, are strongly encouraged. The number of credits earned through these experiences is established by agreement with faculty and is subject to institutional requirements.

Spanish

Bachelor of Arts Major Requirements

(183 credits required for the degree)

44 credits of approved courses above the level of SPAN 2001.

Required courses include SPAN 2100, SPAN 2300, SPAN 2350, and SPAN 3990. SPAN 3990 must be taken at DU and a student must have senior standing and have taken a minimum of 12 credits at the 3000 level prior to enrolling in this course.

Secondary Major Requirements

44 credits. Same requirements as for BA degree.

Minor Requirements

A minimum of 24 credits of courses above the level of SPAN 2001 including SPAN 2100, SPAN 2300, SPAN 2350. A minimum of four credits must be at the 3000 level.

Requirements for Distinction in the Major in French

  • Minimum 3.2 cumulative GPA 
  • Minimum 3.6 major GPA 
  • Completion of a thesis written in French

Requirements for Distinction in the Major in German

Requirements needed

Requirements for Distinction in the Major in Italian

  • Minimum 3.5 cumulative GPA 
  • Minimum 3.5 major GPA 
  • Completion of a thesis

Requirements for Distinction in the Major in Russian

  • Minimum 3.3 cumulative GPA 
  • Minimum 3.7 major GPA 
  • Completion of a thesis written in Russian

Requirements for Distinction in the Major in Spanish

  • Minimum 3.6 cumulative GPA 
  • Minimum 3.3 major GPA 
  • Completion of a thesis 

Arabic Courses

ARAB 1001 Elementary Arabic (4 Credits)

Basics of Modern Standard Arabic. Three quarter sequence.

ARAB 1002 Elementary Arabic (4 Credits)

Basics of Modern Standard Arabic. Three quarter sequence.

ARAB 1003 Elementary Arabic (4 Credits)

Basics of Modern Standard Arabic. Three quarter sequence.

ARAB 1992 Directed Study (1-4 Credits)

ARAB 2001 Intermediate Arabic (4 Credits)

Continued study of Arabic language with an enhanced cultural component. Two quarter sequence. Prerequisite: ARAB 1003 or equivalent.

ARAB 2002 Intermediate Arabic (4 Credits)

Continued study of Arabic language with an enhanced cultural component. Two quarter sequence. Prerequisite: ARAB 2001 or equivalent.

ARAB 2100 Conversation & Composition (4 Credits)

This is the third quarter of the second year. Intensive practice in oral skills and grammar review. Writing, discussion and reading based on a topic or topics in Arabic language and culture. Increased attention paid to writing skills. Prerequisite: ARAB 2002, equivalent, or permission of instructor.

ARAB 3700 Topics in Arabic (1-4 Credits)

ARAB 3701 Topics in Arabic (1-4 Credits)

ARAB 3702 Topics in Arabic (1-4 Credits)

ARAB 3703 Topics in Arabic (1-4 Credits)

ARAB 3704 Topics in Arabic (1-4 Credits)

ARAB 3991 Independent Study (1-5 Credits)

Chinese Courses

CHIN 1001 Elementary Chinese (4 Credits)

Part one of an introductory three-quarter sequence of courses in standard (Mandarin) modern Chinese, aimed at building a solid foundation in all aspects: pronunciation (especially tones), basic grammar, syntax, vocabulary and writing in characters.

CHIN 1002 Elementary Chinese (4 Credits)

Part two of an introductory three-quarter sequence of courses in standard (Mandarin) modern Chinese, aimed at building a solid foundation in all aspects: pronunciation (especially tones), basic grammar, syntax, vocabulary and writing in characters.

CHIN 1003 Elementary Chinese (4 Credits)

Part three of an introductory three-quarter sequence of courses in standard (Mandarin) modern Chinese, aimed at building a solid foundation in all aspects: pronunciation (especially tones), basic grammar, syntax, vocabulary and writing in characters.

CHIN 1516 Contemporary China in Literature and Films (4 Credits)

This course investigates, through critically examining the representative literary and filmic texts produced by Chinese as well as foreign writers and filmmakers, the many complicated aspects of some much-talked about issues. This includes the diminishing rural life and landscape, urbanization, migration/dislocation, the changing roles of women, social equality, as well as the balancing act of preserving tradition, the environment, and economic development. The in-depth examination and diverse approaches this course applies enables students to gain greater understanding of not only the challenges that contemporary China has raised, but also the complexities of the increasingly globalized world in which we are living. Cross listed with ASIA 1516. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

CHIN 1992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

CHIN 2001 Intermediate Chinese (4 Credits)

A three quarter sequence of courses continues to build students’ basic skills and to advance them to intermediate level proficiency. Prerequisite: CHIN 1003, equivalent, or permission of instructor.

CHIN 2002 Intermediate Chinese (4 Credits)

A three quarter sequence of courses continues to build students’ basic skills and to advance them to intermediate level proficiency. Prerequisite: CHIN 2001, equivalent, or permission of instructor.

CHIN 2003 Intermediate Chinese (4 Credits)

A three quarter sequence of courses continues to build students’ basic skills and to advance them to intermediate level proficiency. Prerequisite: CHIN 2002, equivalent, or permission of instructor.

CHIN 2100 Advanced Intermediate Chinese (4 Credits)

This single-quarter course is one of the transitional courses from intermediate Chinese to advanced Chinese. The course materials, while continuing from the CHIN 2001-2002-2003 sequence, give students more opportunities to synthesize vocabulary and grammatical patterns they have learned from previous courses. The introduction of major grammatical patterns is completed by the end of this course. Prerequisite: CHIN 2003, equivalent, or permission of instructor.

CHIN 2301 Chinese Conversation and Composition I (4 Credits)

This single quarter course is particularly designed to develop further students' speaking and writing skills beyond intermediate level. Prerequisite: CHIN 2100, equivalent, or permission of instructor.

CHIN 2302 Chinese Conversation and Composition II (4 Credits)

This single quarter course is particularly designed to develop further students' speaking and writing skills beyond intermediate level. Prerequisite: CHIN 2100, equivalent, or permission of instructor.

CHIN 2992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

CHIN 3101 Conversation and Composition I (4 Credits)

This single quarter course is particularly designed to develop further students’ speaking and writing skills. Prerequisite: CHIN 2003, equivalent, or permission of instructor.

CHIN 3102 Advanced Conversation and Composition (4 Credits)

This course aims to develop all skills to high levels of proficiency. Emphasis is placed on speaking and writing. Greater facility in writing Chinese characters and competence in composing simple essays is expected. Prerequisite: CHIN 3101, equivalent, or permission of instructor.

CHIN 3300 Chinese Society in Transition (4 Credits)

Through studying selected texts and focusing on topics about various aspects of Chinese society in transition, this class aims at strengthening and further developing students’ overall skills, in particular, skills of reading comprehension, presenting information and one’s opinions, and debating with other people. Prerequisite: CHIN 3102, equivalent, or permission of instructor.

CHIN 3400 Chinese Cinema and Chinese Society (4 Credits)

This advanced class is designed to strengthen and to develop further students’ overall Chinese proficiency and in-depth understanding of the contemporary societies of greater China, including mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, by means of studying the representative Chinese language films produced in these three areas. Prerequisite: CHIN 2003, equivalent, or permission of instructor.

CHIN 3500 Advanced Reading in Modern Chinese Literature (4 Credits)

This course requires students to read closely and examine critically the many sophisticated and subtle cultural, historical and linguistic aspects of the selected literary works of various genres in modern Chinese literature. Prerequisite: CHIN 3400, equivalent, or permission of instructor.

CHIN 3601 Business Chinese I (4 Credits)

Advanced reading course designated for students who have an advanced level of Chinese language proficiency or who are in their fourth year of a Chinese language curriculum either at the undergraduate or graduate level. Prerequisite: CHIN 3300, equivalent, or permission of instructor.

CHIN 3650 Chinese-English Translation I (4 Credits)

This seminar is designed for students with advanced-level proficiency in Chinese and English to learn basic translation theories and to develop fundamental skills in translating, from Chinese to English and vice versa, texts which primarily deal with general social needs and everyday communications. Prerequisite: CHIN 3300 or above, equivalent, or permission of instructor.

CHIN 3700 Topics in Chinese Cultural Studies (4 Credits)

Advanced studies of selected topics on Chinese cultural studies. Prerequisite: CHIN 3300, equivalent, or instructor approval.

CHIN 3991 Independent Study (1-5 Credits)

CHIN 3992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

French Courses

FREN 1001 Français élémentaire (4 Credits)

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary with emphasis on oral skills; introduction to French and Francophone cultures. First quarter in a three quarter sequence.

FREN 1002 Français élémentaire (4 Credits)

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary with emphasis on oral skills; introduction to French and Francophone cultures. Second quarter in a three quarter sequence. Prerequisite: FREN 1001 or equivalent.

FREN 1003 Français élémentaire (4 Credits)

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary with emphasis on oral skills; introduction to French and Francophone cultures. Third quarter in a three quarter sequence. Prerequisite: FREN 1002 or equivalent.

FREN 1992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

FREN 2001 Français du deuxième degré (4 Credits)

Grammatical structures, conversation and reading of cultural and literary materials. First quarter of a three quarter sequence. Prerequisite: FREN 1003 or equivalent.

FREN 2002 Français du deuxième degré (4 Credits)

Grammatical structures, conversation and reading of cultural and literary materials. Second quarter of a three quarter sequence. Prerequisite: FREN 2001 or equivalent.

FREN 2003 Français du deuxième degré (4 Credits)

Grammatical structures, conversation and reading of cultural and literary materials. Third quarter in a three quarter sequence. Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or equivalent.

FREN 2020 Langue, Culture, Film: L'Identité (4 Credits)

This course studies the idea of identity in francophone culture, looking specifically at the relationship of self and others. Five French-language films serve as the basis for oral practice, grammar review, composition and cultural study. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisites: FREN 2003 and at least one additional course above that level.

FREN 2021 Langue, Culture, Film: les Français et leur histoire (4 Credits)

This course studies the way in which historical films represent both the past and the time period during which they were made. We examine foundational myths of the middle ages, the French Revolution, the Resistance during WWII, the Algerian war and colonialism. Five French-language films serve as the basis for oral practice, grammar review, composition and cultural study. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisites: FREN 2003 and at least one additional course above that level.

FREN 2023 Langue, Culture, Film: Paris - mythe et réalité (4 Credits)

This course studies the way in which historical films represent both the past and the time period during which they were made. We examine foundational myths of the Middle Ages, the French Revolution, the Resistance during WWII, the Algerian war, and colonialism. Five French-language films serve as the basis for oral practice, grammar review, composition and cultural study. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisites: FREN 2003 and at least one additional course above that level.

FREN 2100 Ecrire, lire et parler (4 Credits)

Writing, discussion and reading based on a topic or topics in French and Francophone cultures. Close attention paid to paper-writing skills. Prerequisite: FREN 2003 or equivalent.

FREN 2200 Le Monde du travail (4 Credits)

Study of professional and commercial culture in France and within the European Union, along with socio-cultural issues and concerns relative to 21st-century work environment. Development of proficiency in work-related vocabulary, communication skills, as well as sensitivity to work-life balance; class, gender, and ethnicity issues in the workplace. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisites: FREN 2003 and one course above that level.

FREN 2400 Conversation et composition (4 Credits)

Intensive practice in spoken and written French. All aspects of the course, including vocabulary acquisition, phonetics, structural review, compositions, readings, oral presentations and comprehension exercises are presented through a topical approach to everyday French and Francophone life, literature, and contemporary issues. Prerequisite: FREN 2003 or equivalent.

FREN 2500 Introduction à la littérature (4 Credits)

Introduction to critical analysis and appreciation of literary texts in French. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisites: FREN 2003 and one course above that level.

FREN 2501 La Nature el l'Environnement (4 Credits)

What does French literature have to say about nature? When was the first poem lamenting the loss of a forest written in France? How are novelists today responding to and imagining our changing environment? While serving as an introduction to French literature, this course focuses on themes related to nature, the environment, and humanity’s ways of understand and relating to them. The readings may include nature poetry, works of fiction in which the natural world strongly influences its human inhabitants, or futuristic fictional worlds in which the normal places occupied by humans and animals seem to be confused or upended. This course many be taken in addition to other courses in the 25-series. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: FREN 2400 or its equivalent.

FREN 2600 Culture contemporaine (4 Credits)

A study of the political, economic, educational, social, and religious institutions of present-day France, as well as its relations with the United States and the European Union. Prerequisite: FREN 2400.

FREN 2701 Sujets spéciaux (4 Credits)

Selected topics in French or Francophone literature and/or culture. May be repeated for credit. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisites: FREN 2003 and one course above that level.

FREN 2992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

FREN 2997 Internship Abroad (1-4 Credits)

A business or community experience related to French language or culture. Opportunity to work with business or community organizations. Prerequisite: FREN 2003 or above.

FREN 3110 La Grammaire à l'oeuvre (4 Credits)

Our most advanced language course, students perfect their knowledge of French grammar in all of its intricacies. Written and oral practice. Prerequisites: FREN 2003 and two courses above that level.

FREN 3150 L’Art de la traduction: français-anglais et vice versa (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the art of translating/transposing a given text from one language into another without betraying the author's original intent. We read, analyze and discuss in class contemporary literary and journalistic texts originally written in French, and we translate them into English. We, as well, do the same with texts originally written in English. We also read together, analyze, and discuss in class theoretical texts on the art and techniques of translating. Prerequisites: FREN 2003 and two courses above that level.

FREN 3500 Voltaire et Rousseau (4 Credits)

French Enlightenment including Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau. Prerequisite: FREN 2500 or equivalent.

FREN 3502 Siècle de Louis XIV (4 Credits)

An analytical study of seventeenth-century French theatre in its three greatest exemplars: the tragedies of Corneille and Racine and the comedies of Moliere. Prerequisite: FREN 2500.

FREN 3505 Masques du moi (4 Credits)

Qui suis-je??? The question of self, identity, and discovering "who I am" has haunted many writers. Just as a painting can be a "self-portrait," novels, stories, poems, and films seem to look for the deepest truth about the self as well as acknowledging how hard it is to find it! This class is a study of writers (or filmmakers) who ask who they are and who they appear to be to others. Whether they write about their families, their childhoods, their dreams, or their cultural or historical identity, whether they seem to be recounting the "true" facts of their lived experience or mixing in some fictions, they are all engaged in fashioning a story of the self. Join us as we explore versions of the self. The class is conducted all in French and emphasizes discussion, writing, and critical thinking. Prerequisite: FREN 2500 or another Introduction to Literature course, or the equivalent.

FREN 3507 Auteures françaises (4 Credits)

A comprehensive and analytical study of women authors of France from the Middle Ages to the present. Prerequisite: FREN 2500.

FREN 3600 Civilisation française (4 Credits)

An intensive overview of the history, art, music, and literature of France from the Roman era to the present. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: FREN 2400.

FREN 3603 Civilisation - Sujets spéciaux (4 Credits)

An intensive analysis of French Society and its cultural manifestations in arts and letters in the seventeenth century. Prerequisite: FREN 2400.

FREN 3701 Séminaire (4 Credits)

Selected authors, literary movements and genres in French-speaking world. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: FREN 2500.

FREN 3810 Littérature francophone I (4 Credits)

Literatures of French expression from Africa, the Caribbean, Belgium, Canada and Switzerland. Prerequisite: FREN 2500.

FREN 3890 Théâtre contemporain (4 Credits)

Development of modern theatre in the contemporary French-speaking world. Prerequisite: FREN 2500.

FREN 3980 Internship (1-4 Credits)

FREN 3991 Independent Study (1-4 Credits)

FREN 3992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

FREN 3998 Undergraduate Honors Thesis (1-4 Credits)

German Courses

GERM 1001 Elementary German (4 Credits)

Basic speech patterns, grammar and syntax; emphasis on oral skills; introduction to German culture. First quarter of three quarter sequence.

GERM 1002 Elementary German (4 Credits)

Basic speech patterns, grammar and syntax; emphasis on oral skills; introduction to German culture. Second quarter of three quarter sequence.

GERM 1003 Elementary German (4 Credits)

Basic speech patterns, grammar and syntax; emphasis on oral skills; introduction to German culture. Third quarter of three quarter sequence.

GERM 1416 German Civilization: History, Politics, and Culture (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to intellectual and cultural currents in German civilization from the Enlightenment to the present, emphasizing the arts in the context of history and philosophy from the late 18th century to around the mid-20th century. Readings include excerpts from such thinkers as Kant, Fichte, Marx, Nietzsche, Weber, as well as poetry and short fictional works by Heine, Jünger, Remarque, Borchert, and others. The readings are supplemented by films that students are expected to have watched at the beginning of each week. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

GERM 2001 Intermediate German (4 Credits)

Vocabulary expansion and grammar review, conversation, readings of cultural and literary materials. Prerequisite: GERM 1003 or equivalent. First quarter of three quarter sequence.

GERM 2002 Intermediate German (4 Credits)

Vocabulary expansion and grammar review, conversation, readings of cultural and literary materials. Prerequisite: GERM 2001 or equivalent. Second quarter of three quarter sequence.

GERM 2003 Intermediate German (4 Credits)

This course challenges students to continue expanding their vocabulary in German and to increase their fluency in speaking, listening and reading. Students are expected to demonstrate a growing awareness of - and sensitivity to - German culture and express their ideas in a manner consistent with advanced language work. Prerequisite: GERM 2002 or equivalent.

GERM 2022 German Cinema: An Introduction to German Culture, History, and Politics through Film (4 Credits)

This is an introduction to 20th- and 21st-century German culture, history, and politics through film analysis. Studying the most famous and influential films in the history of German cinema, students explore a wide range of topics (including political propaganda, national identity, multiculturalism, terrorism, education and youth, the arts, gender, and class) and investigate how a popular culture medium like film can capture the political, social, and economic atmosphere in society. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

GERM 2100 Conversation and Composition (4 Credits)

Intensive practice in oral skills, reading and writing. Prerequisite: GERM 2003 or equivalent.

GERM 2350 German Film (4 Credits)

Analysis of selected films centered on major themes in the humanities. Prerequisite: GERM 2003 or equivalent.

GERM 2701 Topics in German Literature (4 Credits)

Selected authors or movements in literature of the German-speaking world. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: GERM 2003 or equivalent.

GERM 2800 Advanced German Grammar and Composition (4 Credits)

This course offers an in-depth review of advanced grammar structures. Review of grammar in context, as well as practice in composition. Prerequisite: GERM 2100 or equivalent.

GERM 3125 Einigkeit, Recht, Freiheit: German Culture & Society 1815-1871 (4 Credits)

The course examines the impact and aftermath of the French Revolution, Napoleon Bonaparte, and the Wars of Liberation on those German states that until 1806 formed the "Holy Roman Empire of German Nation." The Congress of Vienna in 1815 greatly simplified the political division of Germany, preparing the eventual economic and political unification of Germany in 1871. We trace issues such as freedom, restoration, revolution, and reaction, as well as the rise of socialism. The course closes with the ascent of Otto von Bismarck and German unification in 1871. Prerequisite: GERM 2100 or equivalent, or another 2000-level GERM class beyond 2003.

GERM 3225 Das Kaiserreich: German Culture & Society 1871-1918 (4 Credits)

This course analyzes how, under the leadership of Prussia and Bismarck, Germany emerged as a nation and world power in the late 19th century. We investigate the interplay of politics and culture at a time when German society experienced rapid and drastic changes from an agrarian-based economy to modern industrial capitalism under nationalist tutelage. We study a variety of cultural manifestations and responses to, among other things, industrialization and social reform, urbanization, socialism, Germanization policies, "Kulturkampf" with the Catholic Church, and German colonialism under William II to contextualize the eruption of Europe into World War I that marked, in 1918, the end of the Empire. Prerequisite: GERM 2100 or equivalent, or another 2000-level GERM class beyond 2003.

GERM 3325 Die Weimarer Republik: German Culture & Society 1918-1933 (4 Credits)

This course analyzes how violence, economic and political volatility, technology, and changing moral codes affected German society and culture (literature, visual arts, film and music) from the onset of the First World War to the rise of Nazism. Germany's first experiment in democracy, the Weimar Republic, can be viewed both as a prelude to Fascism (and therefore a failure) and as a period of radical socio-cultural change, experimentation, and even progress. This course is taught primarily in German, but occasionally we discuss particular texts in English. Prerequisite: GERM 2003 or equivalent.

GERM 3425 Nachkriegsdeutschland: German Culture & Society 1945-1990 (4 Credits)

This course introduces the student to crucial aspects of the immediate postwar years: Germany's 'Stunde Null"; denazification & reeducation; occupation; 'Americanization' of Germany; 'Berliner Blockade'; the divided memory in East and West Germany; democracy in Germany; the Cold War and 'Berliner Mauer.' Via film, literature, and historical studies we explore how both Germanies (East and West) dealt with the legacy of World War II and the Holocaust. During the first third of the course we have a close look at the concerns of the immediate postwar years 1945-49. Most Germans considered these years of occupation, hunger, homelessness, and despair in a vastly destroyed homeland as much worse than the war that preceded them. Then we investigate critiques of the so-called 'normalization' of Germany's internal and external affairs between the founding of two separate German states and the ensuing 'economic miracle' in West Germany (1949-61). Finally, we trace the development of this 'divided nation' until collapse and reunification in 1989/90. Prerequisite: GERM 2100 or equivalent, or another 2000-level GERM class beyond 2003.

GERM 3525 Die Berliner Republik: German Culture & Society 1990-today (4 Credits)

For roughly two decades, Germany, a once divided nation in the heart of Europe held responsible for two World Wars, has been re-united. Forty years of division between West and East Germany--a division exacerbated by their respective geopolitical roles in the Cold War--left their mark on what many intellectuals considered a 'cultural nation' in spite of their political separation. Our class examines the pains and gains of twenty years of unity. We analyze various political, historical, but mostly cultural developments (and debates) that have accompanied and, at times, questioned this unification. Prerequisite: GERM 2003 or equivalent.

GERM 3625 Business German--From Culture-Shock to Cross-Cultural Competence (4 Credits)

This course is designed to enhance the students' speaking, reading and writing skills, in addition to helping them build a strong foundation in business vocabulary. Course objectives include acquiring skills in cross cultural communication, teamwork, business management, and creating a business plan. German grammar is covered on a need be basis. This course prepares students to perform and contribute while in a German-speaking business environment. Prerequisite: GERM 2100 or equivalent, or another 2000-level GERM class beyond 2003.

GERM 3701 Topics in German Literature (1-4 Credits)

Selected authors, literary movements and genres in German-speaking world. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: GERM 2100 or equivalent, or another 2000-level GERM class beyond 2003.

GERM 3991 Independent Study (1-5 Credits)

GERM 3995 Independent Research (1-10 Credits)

GERM 3997 Internship in German (1-4 Credits)

GERM 3998 Honors Thesis in German (1-5 Credits)

Greek Courses

GREK 1001 Elementary Greek (Classical) (4 Credits)

Available only as tutorial with permission of instructor.

GREK 1002 Elementary Greek (Classical) (4 Credits)

Available only as tutorial with permission of instructor.

GREK 1003 Elementary Greek (Classical) (4 Credits)

Available only as tutorial with permission of instructor.

GREK 1416 Myths of Greece & Rome (4 Credits)

Introduction to the goddesses and gods, heroes and heroines, and not a few monstrosities from popular tradition, literature, and visual arts of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Activities include imaginative and creative assignments. No prerequisite. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

GREK 1916 Comedy Old and New (4 Credits)

Reading and discussion of and experiment with comedies from ancient Rome and even more ancient Greece. We begin, however, with modernizations in American-musical form, and end with our own product in 21st-century emulation. Students' participation, even broad clownish histrionics, required. Students must also be eager to laugh--knowlingly and intelligently, of course.

GREK 1992 Directed Study (1-4 Credits)

GREK 3991 Independent Study (1-5 Credits)

Hebrew Courses

HEBR 1001 Elementary Hebrew (4 Credits)

Introduction to classical grammar, syntax and modern speech patterns. Three quarter sequence.

HEBR 1002 Elementary Hebrew (4 Credits)

Introduction to classical grammar, syntax and modern speech patterns. Three quarter sequence.

HEBR 1003 Elementary Hebrew (4 Credits)

Introduction to classical grammar, syntax and modern speech patterns. Three quarter sequence.

HEBR 2001 Intermediate Hebrew (4 Credits)

Continuation of language study with emphasis on the living language of contemporary Israel. Three-quarter sequence. Prerequisite: HEBR 1003 or equivalent.

HEBR 2002 Intermediate Hebrew (4 Credits)

Continuation of language study with emphasis on the living language of contemporary Israel. Three-quarter sequence. Prerequisite: HEBR 1003 or equivalent.

HEBR 2003 Intermediate Hebrew (4 Credits)

Continuation of language study with emphasis on the living language of contemporary Israel. Three-quarter sequence. Prerequisite: HEBR 1003 or equivalent.

HEBR 2745 Israeli Television and Cinema: Representing Cultural Diversity in Israeli Life (4 Credits)

The course goals are three-fold: a) to facilitate students' communicative competence in Hebrew across the interpretive, interpersonal and presentational modes through constant immersion in Hebrew, b) to expand students' knowledge and understanding of Israeli society and culture while interacting solely in Hebrew, and c) to help students develop a lifelong interest in learning the Hebrew language and its culture. Screening of Israeli films is a central part of the course. All the films are in Hebrew. The course is not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Cross listed with JUST 2745. Prerequisite: HEBR 2003 or equivalent.

HEBR 3010 Aspects of Modern Hebrew: Readings, Films, Songs, and Discussion (4 Credits)

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Intermediate Hebrew. It facilitates communicative competence in Hebrew across interpretive, interpersonal and presentational modes through constant immersion in Hebrew. It also expands knowledge of Israeli culture while interacting solely in Hebrew. This course is not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Cross listed with JUST 3010. Prerequisite: HEBR/JUST 2003.

HEBR 3701 Hebrew Readings (1-4 Credits)

Selected authors or genres in Hebrew literature. Prerequisite: JUST/HEBR 2003 or equivalent, or instructor's permission.

HEBR 3991 Independent Study (1-5 Credits)

HEBR 3992 Directed Study (1-4 Credits)

Italian Courses

ITAL 1001 Elementary Italian (4 Credits)

Elementary Italian is a 3-part communicative sequence in Italian. It is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of Italian. The objective of the sequence is to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking skills through communicative in-class activities and at-home assignments. Elementary Italian also includes the study of contemporary Italian culture, which serves as the basis both for at-home work and in-class discussion.

ITAL 1002 Elementary Italian (4 Credits)

Elementary Italian is a 3-part communicative sequence in Italian. It is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of Italian. The objective of the sequence is to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking skills through communicative in-class activities and at-home assignments. Elementary Italian also includes the study of contemporary Italian culture, which serves as the basis both for at-home work and in-class discussion.

ITAL 1003 Elementary Italian (4 Credits)

Elementary Italian is a 3-part communicative sequence in Italian. It is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of Italian. The objective of the sequence is to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking skills through communicative in-class activities and at-home assignments. Elementary Italian also includes the study of contemporary Italian culture, which serves as the basis both for at-home work and in-class discussion.

ITAL 2001 Intermediate Italian (4 Credits)

Intermediate Italian is a 2-part intermediate communicative sequence in Italian. It is designed for students who have completed Italian 1003 or the equivalent. The aim of the course is further to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking skills through communicative in-class activities and at-home assignments. The sequence presents new grammatical and vocabulary functions as well as review patterns already presented in the elementary sequence. Intermediate Italian also includes the study of contemporary cultural and literary readings that will serve as the basis both for at-home work and in-class discussion. Prerequisite: ITAL 1003 or equivalent.

ITAL 2002 Intermediate Italian (4 Credits)

Intermediate Italian is a 2-part intermediate communicative sequence in Italian. It is designed for students who have completed Italian 1003 or the equivalent. The aim of the course is further to develop listening, reading, writing and speaking skills through communicative in-class activities and at-home assignments. The sequence presents new grammatical and vocabulary functions as well as review patterns already presented in the elementary sequence. Intermediate Italian also includes the study of contemporary cultural and literary readings that will serve as the basis both for at-home work and in-class discussion. Prerequisite: ITAL 1003 or equivalent.

ITAL 2005 Reading and Conversation (4 Credits)

In Reading and Conversation, students learn the ease of expression in Italian through the intermediate-level reading of cultural and literary materials and through the study of vocabulary. Readings and contemporary issues are discussed in class. Prerequisite: ITAL 2002 or equivalent.

ITAL 2201 20th-Century History and Culture (4 Credits)

This course provides a historical and cultural approach to 20th-century Italy. Students refine their critical thinking skills as well as substantially develop their argumentative skills. This course centers on selected authors, literary movements, genres and historical and contemporary cultural phenomena in Italy. Topics may include film, TV, poetry, short stories, fascism and the resistance movement, Italian women, etc. Each week a new decade is discussed in a historical context and supplemented with cultural artifacts that are either centered on the decade in question or produced during the period. This course is taught in English. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ITAL 2355 Images of Rome in Literature & Film (4 Credits)

The city of Rome has been a major protagonist on the stage of history for several millennia. In 2,500 years of existence, Rome has seen more of the world’s history unfold at its doorsteps than any other capital in the western world. It has been the site of the building and the expansion of a vast and powerful Empire, the center of a major world religion, and a magnet for the arts throughout the centuries. This course focuses on late 19th- and 20th-Century Rome from the point of view of selected works of Italian literature (poetry, short stories, and novels or selections from novels) and films in which the city of Rome plays a prominent role. Students demonstrate the ability to identify, interpret, and analyze the connections between the texts and films. This course is taught in English. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ITAL 2500 Introduction to Italian Literature (4 Credits)

Introduction and overview of Italian literature from13th century to present; works representing major authors, periods, themes and forms. Prerequisite: ITAL 2005, equivalent, or instructor’s permission.

ITAL 3010 Advanced Conversation and Composition (4 Credits)

This course continues to refine students’ oral and written skills while enhancing their cultural awareness. Concepts, such as contemporary Italian politics, economy, and gastronomy, are introduced through authentic texts. Specific emphasis is placed on written skills--providing students with the necessary writing skills for continued study in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL 2005, equivalent, or instructor’s permission.

ITAL 3201 19th-Century History and Culture I (4 Credits)

This course aims to provide a historical and cultural approach to 19th-century Italy, while improving students' Italian language skills. The course centers on selected authors, literary movements, genres and historical and contemporary cultural phenomena in Italy. Topics may include Italian unification, the historical novel, film adaptation, industry vs. nature, etc. Prerequisite: ITAL 2005 or equivalent.

ITAL 3350 Italy through Cinema (4 Credits)

This film course enhances students' knowledge of Italian culture, politics and the economy. Prerequisite: ITAL 2005, equivalent or instructor's permission.

ITAL 3701 Topics in Italian Studies (4 Credits)

Selected authors, literary movements, genres, and historical and contemporary cultural phenomena in Italy. Recent topics have included Nord-Sud: Viaggi in Italia, Italian City in Literature and Film, Italian Contemporary Novel, Identità a tavola, Teatro del ‘700, Il fantastico, Love and War in the Renaissance, Performance of Italian Theatre, Boccaccio e la novella, Poeti del romanticismo, Dante. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ITAL 2005, equivalent, or instructor’s permission.

ITAL 3702 Topics in Italian Studies (1-4 Credits)

Selected authors, literary movements, genres, and historical and contemporary cultural phenomena in Italy. Recent topics have included Nord-Sud: Viaggi in Italia, Italian City in Literature and Film, Italian Contemporary Novel, Identità a tavola, Teatro del ‘700, Il fantastico, Love and War in the Renaissance, Performance of Italian Theatre, Boccaccio e la novella, Poeti del romanticismo, Dante. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ITAL 2005, equivalent, or instructor’s permission.

ITAL 3703 Topics in Italian Studies (1-4 Credits)

Selected authors, literary movements, genres, and historical and contemporary cultural phenomena in Italy. Recent topics have included Nord-Sud: Viaggi in Italia, Italian City in Literature and Film, Italian Contemporary Novel, Identità a tavola, Teatro del ‘700, Il fantastico, Love and War in the Renaissance, Performance of Italian Theatre, Boccaccio e la novella, Poeti del romanticismo, Dante. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ITAL 2005, equivalent, or instructor’s permission.

ITAL 3991 Independent Study (1-5 Credits)

ITAL 3995 Independent Research (1-10 Credits)

ITAL 3998 Undergraduate Honors Thesis (1-5 Credits)

This course will guide students who are majoring in Italian in the selection of a topic for their honors thesis, research materials, and individual meetings with the professor(s) directing the thesis.

Japanese Courses

JAPN 1001 Elementary Japanese (4 Credits)

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills; introduction to Japanese culture. First quarter of three quarter sequence.

JAPN 1002 Elementary Japanese (4 Credits)

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills; introduction to Japanese culture. Second quarter of three quarter sequence.

JAPN 1003 Elementary Japanese (4 Credits)

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills; introduction to Japanese culture. Third quarter of three quarter sequence.

JAPN 1026 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (4 Credits)

This course provides a basic linguistic knowledge of Japanese language, including the history of Japanese, Japanese phonetics and phonology (sounds), morphology (word form), syntax (sentence form), semantics (meanings), pragmatics (meaning and context) and sociolinguistics/variations.

JAPN 1216 Popular Culture of Japan (4 Credits)

In this course we examine and analyze the emergence of particular forms of mass-produced culture, or culture for mass consumption, in Japan from the early modern period to the present. Using a variety of cultural materials enjoyed from the early modern period (1600-1868,) during which Japanese society underwent extensive urbanization, secularization, and cultural commodification, through to the present, the course focuses on overarching themes: media and information technology (woodblock printing, newspapers, and the internet); entertainment and gender (the all-male kabuki theatre and all-female Takarazuka revue); commodified romance; fiction (illustrated fiction, manga, and novels); anime and television fandom; healer-bots and cyborgs. No knowledge of Japanese required. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

JAPN 1416 Postwar Japan: Changing Perspectives in Literature and Culture (4 Credits)

This course explores a range of Japanese cultural perspectives from the end of the Second World War to the present. The main focus is on the analysis and interpretation of Japanese literary texts, but during the course students also examine film, visual art, and other cultural products within a historical framework, to lead to a deeper understanding of the influences and events that have shaped both contemporary Japan and the wider world. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

JAPN 1616 Samurai and Merchants: Cultures of Tokugawa Japan (4 Credits)

Introduction to the cultures of Tokugawa, Japan, focusing on the tension between the samurai and merchant classes, the images they construct of self and other, and the morals and mores of their respective worlds. As well as examining Tokugawa fiction, drama, and other cultural artifacts, this course also considers later representation of the period and of its people in twenty- and twenty-first-century text, cinema, and television to understand the importance of contemporary influences on historical representation. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

JAPN 1816 Classical Japanese Literature (4 Credits)

The course covers one thousand years of Japanese writing, including a myth-history detailing the origins of Japan, the development of the rich poetic tradition, female diaries, the classic The Tale of Genji, medieval tales of wars and hermits, the nô drama, and the haiku and travel diaries. It will focus on such key binaries as orality and literacy, poetry and prose, native and foreign, popular and high-brow, and masculine and feminine. The course will also stress principles of literary analysis and interpretation. No knowledge of Japanese required. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

JAPN 1992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

JAPN 2001 Intermediate Japanese (4 Credits)

Continuing study of complex grammatical structures, vocabulary expansion and reading skills. Prerequisite: JAPN 1003 or equivalent. First quarter of three quarter sequence.

JAPN 2002 Intermediate Japanese (4 Credits)

Continuing study of complex grammatical structures, vocabulary expansion and reading skills. Prerequisite: JAPN 1003 or equivalent. Second quarter of three quarter sequence.

JAPN 2003 Intermediate Japanese (4 Credits)

Continuing study of complex grammatical structures, vocabulary expansion and reading skills. Prerequisite: JAPN 1003 or equivalent. Third quarter of three quarter sequence.

JAPN 2100 Conversation and Composition I (4 Credits)

Intensive practice in oral skills, grammar review, reading and writing. Prerequisite: JAPN 2003 or equivalent.

JAPN 2600 Conversation & Composition II (4 Credits)

Intermediate training in speaking, reading and writing. Prerequisite: JAPN 2100 or equivalent.

JAPN 2992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

JAPN 3100 Advanced Conversation & Composition (4 Credits)

Advanced-intermediate training in speaking, reading and writing. Prerequisite: JAPN 2600 or equivalent.

JAPN 3701 Topics in Japanese Culture (4 Credits)

Selected topics in Japanese culture. Texts and films in both Japanese and English, with a focus on modern and contemporary Japanese culture. Prerequisite: JAPN 3100 or equivalent. May be repeated for credit.

JAPN 3991 Independent Study (1-5 Credits)

JAPN 3992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

Latin Courses

LATN 1001 Elementary Latin (4 Credits)

Essentials of classical Latin grammar and vocabulary. Three quarter sequence.

LATN 1002 Elementary Latin (4 Credits)

Essentials of classical Latin grammar and vocabulary. Three quarter sequence.

LATN 1003 Elementary Latin (4 Credits)

Essentials of classical Latin grammar and vocabulary. Three quarter sequence.

LATN 1991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

LATN 1992 Directed Study (1-4 Credits)

LATN 2001 Intermediate Latin (2-4 Credits)

Close reading and translation of a major classical Roman author or genre each term. Three quarter sequence. Prerequisite: LATN 1003 or equivalent.

LATN 2002 Intermediate Latin (2-4 Credits)

Close reading and translation of a major classical Roman author or genre each term. Three quarter sequence. Prerequisite: LATN 1003 or equivalent.

LATN 2003 Intermediate Latin (2-4 Credits)

Close reading and translation of a major classical Roman author or genre each term. Three quarter sequence. Prerequisite: LATN 1003 or equivalent.

LATN 3991 Independent Study (1-5 Credits)

Prerequisite: LATN 2003 or equivalent.

Russian Courses

RUSS 1001 Elementary Russian (4 Credits)

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills; introduction to Russian culture. First quarter of three quarter sequence.

RUSS 1002 Elementary Russian (4 Credits)

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills; introduction to Russian culture. Second quarter of three quarter sequence. Prerequisite: RUSS 1001 or permission of instructor.

RUSS 1003 Elementary Russian (4 Credits)

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills; introduction to Russian culture. Third quarter of three quarter sequence. Prerequisite: RUSS 1002 or permission of instructor.

RUSS 1416 Introduction to Russian Culture: Evil and the Supernatural (4 Credits)

What is evil? Where does it come from and what place does it have in our world? What, if anything, are we supposed to do about it? We examine how Russian writers wrestle with these thorny questions, and how they engage in a dialogue with the Russian folk tradition and the Orthodox church--two rich resources for thinking about and coping with evil. We read world-famous Russian classics such as Dostoevsky, Pushkin, Gogol, and Bulgakov, as well as Russian folk tales, writings produced by Russian Orthodox clergy, and recent critical studies that represent a broad range of approaches to the problem of evil. No knowledge of Russian is necessary; all class discussion, readings, and writing are in English. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with RUSS 2416.

RUSS 1613 Introduction to Russian Culture and Civilization (4 Credits)

This course surveys Russia's cultural past and present. Although it touches on aspects of Soviet Culture, the main emphasis is what has been called the "real Russian Culture," eclipsed for seventy years under the communist regime. The course surveys the various attitudes of Russian thinkers and authors towards the question of national identity and national destiny. Examples of Russian high culture (literature, art, film, music) and Russian religious faith (Orthodoxy) are discussed alongisde daily life and folkloric beliefs. The course includes several significant Russian films. Knowledge of Russian language and history is not required. The course format consists of lectures, slides, video and audio presentations, as well as whole-class and small-group discussions. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RUSS 1917 Russian Revolution in Literature and History (4 Credits)

The course introduces students to the literature and history of the Russian revolution of 1917. Students examine how Russian literature helped pave the way for the revolution and how literature and film helped Russians make sense of the radical transformation of their society. Students gain insight into the reciprocal relationship of literature and politics, learning how literature shaped the revolutionary movement and how the revolution inspired new forms of artistic expression. All course materials in English translation. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. No Prerequisites.

RUSS 1922 The Soviet Experiment in Literature and Film (4 Credits)

Architects of the Soviet experiment claimed to create a radically new type of society and person, superior to all that came before. What were the defining features and founding myths of the Soviet identity, as propagandized by the government? How did this imagined identity clash with realities of life in the USSR? What cultural figures opposed the official discourse, and what artistic modes of resistance did they develop? To explore these questions, we read fiction and poetry by authors central to defining and contesting the Soviet experiment, including Maiakovski, Gladkov, Ginzburg, Pelevin, Dovlatov, and Petrushevskaya, and watch ground-breaking films by Vertov, Tarkovsky, Daneliya and others. All materials are in English. No prior knowledge of Russian literature or culture is required. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RUSS 1992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

RUSS 2001 Second Stage Russian (4 Credits)

Review of grammar, development of all language and cultural skills. Prerequisite: RUSS 1003 or equivalent. First quarter of two quarter sequence.

RUSS 2002 Second Stage Russian II (4 Credits)

Review of grammar, development of all language and cultural skills. Prerequisite: RUSS 2001 or equivalent. Second quarter of two quarter sequence.

RUSS 2110 Russian in a Cultural Context (4 Credits)

Continued development of Russian language and cultural skills with focus on all aspects of Russian culture, particularly Russian literature. Prerequisite: RUSS 2002 or equivalent.

RUSS 2116 Russian 19th-Century Novel: Society, Identity, and the Rise of Prose Fiction (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to classical Russian novels by world-famous authors, including Pushkin, Lermontov, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. Students develop an ability to interpret each work with a dual focus on text and context. Students deepen their appreciation of literary texts as works of art through learning to read closely and focusing on literary devices such as the narrator's voice, plot, structure, and figurative language. Students also learn to relate novels to their historical and cultural context, the better to understand how Russian writers responded to their country's intractable problems that included a crisis of cultural identity, the injustices of serfdom, and debates about women's place in society. All readings in English translation. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. No prerequisites.

RUSS 2416 Russian Classics in the Original: Evil and the Supernatural (4 Credits)

What is evil? Where does it come from and what place does it have in our world? What - if anything - are we supposed to do about it? We examine how Russian writers wrestle with these thorny questions, and how they engage in a dialogue with the Russian folk tradition and the Orthodox church - two rich resources for thinking about and coping with evil. We read world-famous Russian Classics such as Dostoevsky, Pushkin, Gogol, and Bulgakov, as well as Russian folk tales, writings produced by Russian Orthodox clergy, and recent critical studies that represent a broad range of approaches to the problem of evil. Readings and writing in Russian. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with RUSS 1416. Prerequisite: RUSS 2110 or equivalent. May not be taken with or after RUSS 1416.

RUSS 2917 Russian Revolution in Literature and History (4 Credits)

The course introduces students to the literature and history of the Russian revolution of 1917. Students examine how Russian literature helped pave the way for the revolution and how literature and film helped Russians make sense of the radical transformation of their society. Students gain insight into the reciprocal relationship of literature and politics, learning how literature shaped the revolutionary movement and how the revolution inspired new forms of artistic expression. Students develop their Russian reading and writing skills. Selected readings and all essays in Russian. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: RUSS 2110 or instructor approval. May not be taken after or together with RUSS 1917.

RUSS 2992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

RUSS 3101 Advanced Conversation & Composition (4 Credits)

Continued improvement of Russian language skills in areas of style and syntax. Prerequisite: RUSS 2110 or equivalent. First quarter of two quarter sequence.

RUSS 3300 Short Russian Prose (4 Credits)

An advanced conversation and composition course based on Russian prose. Prerequisite: RUSS 3101 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

RUSS 3500 Structure of Russian (4 Credits)

Linguistic study of how Russian vocabulary building and Russian grammar operate. Prerequisite: RUSS 3101 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

RUSS 3650 Soviet and Post Soviet Cinema (4 Credits)

Film course concentrating on the works of Andrei Tarkovskii. Open to non-Russian speaking students. Prerequisite: RUSS 3500 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

RUSS 3701 Topics in Russian Literature (4 Credits)

Selected topics, authors and movements in medieval, Russian, Soviet and post-Soviet literature. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: RUSS 3500 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

RUSS 3850 Working with Russian Media (4 Credits)

Multimedia course emphasizing new media in Russian culture and society. Prerequisite: RUSS 3500 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

RUSS 3991 Independent Study (1-5 Credits)

RUSS 3992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

RUSS 3995 Independent Research (1-5 Credits)

RUSS 3997 Russian: Learn Through Service (1-5 Credits)

Internship and/or service learning for credit with local organizations in the Russian-speaking community. Must be approved by both Russian faculty and organization participating.

RUSS 3998 Honors Thesis (1-4 Credits)

Spanish Courses

SPAN 1001 Beginning Spanish (4 Credits)

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 1002 Beginning Spanish (4 Credits)

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 1003 Beginning Spanish (4 Credits)

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 1500 Understanding Contemporary Spain (4 Credits)

This course examines the key political, social and cultural issues at play in contemporary Spanish society. Via the analysis of various texts –historical, sociological, literary, filmic—this course will familiarize students with the key issues that define Spanish society today. The themes that will be the primary focus of class discussions and assignments include national vs. regional identities, gender roles, multiculturalism, Spain and the European Union and the legacy of the Franco dictatorship. Students will also read short stories by contemporary Spanish authors that address these same themes in order to have the opportunity to analyze and interpret artistic representations of thekey issues at play in Spanish society today. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

SPAN 1992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

SPAN 2001 Intermediate Spanish (4 Credits)

Grammatical structures, close rapid conversation, reading of cultural and literary materials. Prerequisite: SPAN 1003 or equivalent. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 2002 Intermediate Spanish (4 Credits)

Grammatical structures, close rapid conversation, reading of cultural and literary materials. Prerequisite: SPAN 1003 or equivalent. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 2003 Intermediate Spanish (4 Credits)

Grammatical structures, close rapid conversation, reading of cultural and literary materials. Prerequisite: SPAN 1003 or equivalent. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 2100 Conversation and Composition (4 Credits)

Intensive practice in written and oral skills, grammar review, and introduction to Spanish thought and cultural patterns. Prerequisite: SPAN 2003 or equivalent.

SPAN 2300 Iberian Culture & Civilization (4 Credits)

Intensive study of culture of Spain; manifestations of culture found in history, art, architecture, music, literature, and politics of early and modern Spain. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or equivalent.

SPAN 2350 Latin American Culture and Societies (4 Credits)

An introductory and interdisciplinary course on the political, historical, and cultural dynamics that have shaped Latin America, the Caribbean and U.S. Latinos. An examination of the political and intellectual movements and economic forces embedded in relations of power from pre-Colombian civilizations, colonialism, independence, nation building, and imperialism to the struggle for democracy. Analysis of diverse cultural practices such as literature, music, film, and visual art within a national and transnational context. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or equivalent.

SPAN 2400 Latino Cultures in the United States (4 Credits)

Interdisciplinary study of Latino contemporary issues in the United States incorporating aspects of the distinct socio-historical, political, economic, and cultural dynamics that have contributed to the shaping, development and increasing prominence of Latino communities. Includes an examination of how Latino cultural forms and practices intersect with socio-historical, economic, and political forces as a framework for understanding the Mexicano/Chicano, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican and other Latino communities embedded in the very fabric of what constitutes the United States. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 2992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

SPAN 3010 Latino Presence in the United States (4 Credits)

An interdisciplinary survey about Mexican Americans (Chicanos) from 1845 to the present. Lectures, readings and discussions provide an overview of influences that continue to shape the culture, character, history, and literature of Chicanos in the United States. A major focus is an exploration of the various ways in which Chicanos have struggled to achieve social change and equality. Culture, ethnicity, language, education, immigration, economics, political action, oppression and discrimination, and current events are also included through readings of representative works including narrative, poetry, theater, and essay. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or 2400 or equivalent.

SPAN 3110 Critical View of Latin America through Film (4 Credits)

This course is designed from an analytical perspective to provide a cultural and historical overview of Latin America. The class begins with feature films and documentaries that focus on the Conquest, exploration and colonization, and continues with contemporary issues of cultural, socio-economic, and philosophical relevance. Analytical focus on indigenous issues, religion, race relations, women’s issues, economic and socio-political concerns as students develop a more complete appreciation of the complex world which is Latin America. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3120 Mexican Film: Historical and Cultural Representation (4 Credits)

A critical perspective on Mexican reality by examining the role of cinema as a means of cultural, historical, ideological, economic and/or political expression. The focus is on Mexican film production in relation to three important periods: the Silent Cinema, the Golden Age in Mexican film, and the Contemporary Era or “new cinema” movement. In addition to feature films, documentaries connect the evolution of Mexican cinema with specific historical and cultural periods. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3200 Eroticism and Nation in the Latin American Novel (4 Credits)

A study of the foundational fictions of Latin America and their twentieth-century rewriting. Nineteenth-century novels showcasing the interplay of sentimental love, eroticism, class struggle, and political agendas in the formative years of the Latin American nations are analyzed and contrasted with twentieth-century narratives where such nation (and narrative) building is put to question. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3230 Musicalized Literature (4 Credits)

Introduction to musicalized literature: a study of literary texts that provoke in the reader a sense of being related to music or prompt a "musical" experience while reading. The course focuses on various Latin American narrative texts whose relation with songs or genres of popular music is more or less explicit. The analysis aims first to illuminate their musical aspects, but also addresses other angles (social, historical, political). Basic information about several genres of popular music is provided in order to facilitate comprehension. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3250 Latin America Since the Conquest (4 Credits)

An exploration of literary strategies in relation to power and domination rooted in the conquest of Latin America through the present. The focal point is the shaping of a vertical power structure by colonial and postcolonial powers such as Spain, England, France and the United States. The course examines the function of literature in sustaining as well as resisting violence, economic exploitation, identity, and the denial of humanity. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3280 Creative Writing in Spanish (4 Credits)

Writing means the production of thoughts and the elaboration of perspectives that enable the writer to construct and deconstruct reality. It is working conscientiously and methodically with language to expand the boundaries of knowledge in imaginative ways through a subjective and critical perspective. This course explores these notions through theory, textual analysis, and practice. It combines literary readings of Latino/a and Latin American writers with compositional theory and literary criticism. The student will understand the creative writing process and what makes a piece successful. Prerequisite: at least one 3000 level course or equivalent.

SPAN 3290 Literature and Human Rights in Latin America (4 Credits)

An analysis of human rights literature from the 16th century to the present within a historical, national and transnational context. A critical perspective on power in relation to political memory, collective violence, the diasporic experience, authoritarianism, official cultural discourses, consequences of globalization and social transformation, among other contested spaces. An exploration of colonial and neocolonial legacy and a testimony of the violence experienced by women, indigenous and other ethnic communities, and immigrants, among others, in areas such as Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Central America, and the United States. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3300 Travel Narratives (4 Credits)

Travel accounts, rather than candid and unbiased testimonies about places and people, are challenging texts that require critical analysis. This class offers an overview of the evolution of travel narratives, from the times of the Grand Tour to contemporary accounts representing cross-cultural interactions between Spaniards and their ‘others’. Travelogues by authors such as Washington Irving, Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, Julio Camba and Juan Goytisolo. Prerequisite: SPAN 2300 or equivalent.

SPAN 3310 Piety and Eroticism in Spain (4 Credits)

Cultural manifestations such as mysticism and eroticism often appearing side-by-side in early Spanish culture, art, literature, sculpture, etc.; wide use of cancioneros or early song-poetry books and manuscripts. Prerequisite: SPAN 2300 or equivalent.

SPAN 3320 Class and Gender in 19th-Century Spain (4 Credits)

Spain underwent social and political revolutions during the nineteenth century from which new values emerged. Through the analysis of literary, political and cultural texts from the late nineteenth-century, students explore the changed view of gender and class identity. Students will read and critically examine several works by prominent authors of the Spanish Realist tradition, including Benito Pérez Galdós, Leopoldo Alas (Clarín) and Emilia Pardo Bazán. Prerequisite: SPAN 2300 or equivalent.

SPAN 3330 Rebels, Lovers and Outlaws in Spanish Romanticism (4 Credits)

This course studies the literary and cultural tropes of Spanish Romanticism. Themes discussed include the rebellion against an unjust social order, the portrayal of marginal social groups and the creation of subjectivity in the Spanish Romantic tradition. The literary genres studied are drama, essay and poetry; the primary authors include Larra, Zorrilla, Espronceda, Bécquer, and de Castro. Prerequisite: SPAN 2300 or equivalent.

SPAN 3333 The Fertile Friendship: Bunuel, Lorca, Dali and Spanish Surrealism (4 Credits)

An interdisciplinary study of the relationships of three Spanish artists (Salvador Dalí, Federico García Lorca and Luis Buñuel) and the development of Surrealism in Spain. Through the intriguing intersections of the life and art of the painter, the poet, and the filmmaker, a better understanding of this fascinating artistic movement is achieved. Prerequisite: SPAN 2300 or equivalent.

SPAN 3400 Spanish Theatre in Performance (4 Credits)

Reading, discussion and performance of plays written in Spanish. The focus will be on improving pronunciation, intonation and dramatic expression as well as providing a better understanding of contemporary theatrical movements in the Spanish speaking world such as teatro del absurdo, teatro posibilista or teatro campesino. The course includes a final performance (in front of a real audience) of the play. Plays by authors such as Susana Torres Molina (argentine), Federico Garcia Lorca (Spain), Emilio Carballido (Mexico), and other authors from the Spanish speaking world. No prior experience in theater is required. Prerequisite: SPAN 2300 or SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3410 Death and Dying in the Medieval, Renaissance & Golden Age (4 Credits)

Attitudes regarding human mortality; presentation and analysis of these attitudes in literature, the arts, historical, philosophical, social and theological sources; classroom discussions complemented by selected readings and media presentations. Prerequisite: SPAN 2300 or equivalent.

SPAN 3420 Contemporary Film in Spain (4 Credits)

Through contemporary Spanish film and essays this course examines the representation of key cultural aspects of Spanish society, such as national and regional identities, immigration, and gender issues. Students critically evaluate the causes, cultural manifestations and consequences of the social themes studied first by reading about them and then by viewing films that consider the same issues. They learn to identify the formal elements of film and develop a critical vocabulary with which they analyze and write about them. Prerequisite: SPAN 2300 or equivalent.

SPAN 3525 Transgressing Borders: Latina Writers in the United States (4 Credits)

An introduction to the written and oral tradition of Latina writers of Mexican heritage in the United States from the 19th century to the present. The course reflects on how Latinas position themselves, and are positioned within the context of history, culture, and society. It includes an exploration of identity construction and transgression, literary and cultural myths, icons, and archetypes, and the geopolitical and symbolic space of writing. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or SPAN 2400 or equivalent.

SPAN 3600 Caribbean Blackness: Conflictive Identity (4 Credits)

Introduces the student to the Caribbean region, particularly examining cultural characteristics of the Spanish speaking Caribbean, with an emphasis on race relations and the contributions of peoples of African descent. The focus is interdisciplinary and includes readings on anthropology, religion, and history among other subjects, together with close readings of literary texts. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3650 The Andean World: Artistic Representations of Power, Resistance and Social Change (4 Credits)

Survey of Andean literature and art created during the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries; artists' portrayals of strategies for resistance and the struggle for social justice in modern Andean society. Study of a wide variety of genres including short stories, novels, testimonials, poetry, essays, songs, visual art and film. Class discussions, theoretical texts and student analyses focus on the central theme of representations of power, resistance and social change in the Andes. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3660 The Fantastic Short Story in Latin America (4 Credits)

Introduction to the genre of the fantastic short story in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Latin American literature. Study of the rise of the short story genre in Latin America and the ways in which we can understand the Fantastic and its relationship to the Gothic and the Magical Real. Assigned readings by authors such as Horacio Quiroga, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortazar, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Carlos Fuentes, Silvina Ocampo and Rosario Ferre. Class discussions, theoretical texts and student analyses focus on a text's themes, literary devices, and writing styles, as well as metatextual and historical references. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3670 Exploring the Amazon: A Literary, Filmic and Ethnographic Journey (4 Credits)

Introduces the student to the Amazonian region of South America and the ways in which this fascinating landscape and the diverse peoples who inhabit it have been portrayed and exploited by "outsider" novelists, filmmakers, explorers, anthropologists, businessmen, and scientists beginning in the sixteenth century. This course also includes a survey of texts selected from the oral traditions of indigenous Amazonian groups such as the Ashanika, Machiguenga, Cashinahua and Ese'eja. Assigned readings underscore the course's interdisciplinary focus and encourage students to hone their course reading and analytical writing skills through the study of anthropological, historical, literary and filmic texts. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3680 Food, Power and Identity in Latin American Literatures and Cultures (4 Credits)

A study of culinary representations and the role of food in Latin American literature, film, culture and politics. Assigned texts include short stories, novels, films and a selection of literary, historical and political essays that relate to food politics and poetics. A review of key food policies and politics throughout colonial and contemporary Latin America reveal legacies of colonial power struggles, as well as the important intersections between food and constructions of identity, nationality, and socioeconomic and cultural emancipation. The course also explores themes such as the art of cooking as a tool for seduction, culinary witchcraft, and contemporary national and regional struggles to achieve food sovereignty in an era of globalization and neoliberal politics. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3702 Topics in Spanish (4 Credits)

Selected topics, genres, authors and/or literary, cultural, sociopolitical, or historical movements in the Spanish-speaking world. Course with same number but with a different topic may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: at least one of SPAN 2300, SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3703 Topics in Spanish (4 Credits)

Selected topics, genres, authors and/or literary, cultural, sociopolitical, or historical movements in the Spanish-speaking world. Course with same number but with a different topic may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: at least one of SPAN 2300, SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3704 Topics in Spanish (4 Credits)

Selected topics, genres, authors and/or literary, cultural, sociopolitical, or historical movements in the Spanish-speaking world. Course with same number but with a different topic may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: at least one of SPAN 2300, SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3705 Topics in Spanish (4 Credits)

Selected topics, genres, authors and/or literary, cultural, sociopolitical, or historical movements in the Spanish-speaking world. Course with same number but with a different topic may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: at least one of SPAN 2300, SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

SPAN 3990 Senior Seminar (4 Credits)

This is the capstone course of the Spanish major and requires students to complete an in depth, scholarly study of a topic or issue pertinent to their seminar's central theme(s). Spanish majors must take a minimum of one senior seminar and this course must be taken at DU once a student has reached senior standing. Prerequisites: SPAN 2300, SPAN 2350 (or equivalent) and at least twelve credits at the 3000 level. A selection of seminar topics includes Latin American Popular Culture, Contemporary Spanish Novel, Pre-Columbian and Colonial Andean Literature and Culture, Puerto Rican Literature and Society, Layqas, Ñakáqs and Saqras: Representations of the ‘Supernatural’ in Quechua Oral Traditions, Latin American Narrative, El Romancero, Contemporary Socio-Political Poetry in Latin America, Latin American Women Poets, and Masterpieces of Latin American Literature.

SPAN 3991 Independent Study (1-4 Credits)

SPAN 3992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

SPAN 3997 Internship in Spanish (1-4 Credits)

SPAN 3998 Honors Thesis (1-10 Credits)

Faculty

Victor Castellani, Associate Professor and Associate Department Chair and Department Chair, PhD, Princeton University

Paula Adamo, Teaching Associate Professor, MA, University of Colorado Denver

Yuki Arita, Teaching Assistant Professor, MA, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Alicia Barrón López, Teaching Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Colorado Boulder

Luc Beaudoin, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Toronto

Miriam Bornstein-Gómez, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Arizona

Angelo Castagnino, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Frédérique Chevillot, Professor, PhD, University of Colorado Boulder

Gustavo Fierros Torres, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, University of Denver

Maha Foster, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, University of Colorado Boulder

Lydia Gil-Keff, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, University of Texas at Austin

James Gilroy, Professor, PhD, Princeton University

Sari Havis, Teaching Associate Professor, MA, University of Kansas

Gabi Kathöfer, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Connecticut

Alison Krögel, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Maryland

Chad Leahy, Assistant Professor, PhD, Brown University

Rachael Liberman, Teaching Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Colorado-Boulder

Sieglinde Lug, Associate Professor, Emerita, PhD, University of California, San Diego

Mamadou Moustapha Ly, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Michigan

Zulema López, Teaching Professor, MA, University of Minnesota

Sergio Macías, Teaching Assistant Professor, MA, University of Colorado Boulder

Salvador Mercado, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Maryland

Jennifer Pap, Associate Professor, PhD, Princeton University

Li Peters, Associate Professor, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles

William Reyes-Cubides, Teaching Assistant Professor, MA, Boston College

Polina Rikoun, Assistant Professor, PhD, Harvard University

Angela Scordo-Polidori, Teaching Professor, PhD, University of Colorado Boulder

Yevgeniy Slivkin, Teaching Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Oscar Somoza, Professor, PhD, University of Arizona

Emily Sposeto, Teaching Assistant Professor, MA, University of Notre Dame

Javier Torre, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Virginia

Kara Traikoff, Teaching Assistant Professor, MA, The Ohio State University

Roberta Waldbaum, Teaching Professor, PhD, University of Denver

Rachel Walsh, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Chicago

Susan Walter, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Virginia

Helga Watt, Associate Professor, Emerita, PhD, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Wilfried Wilms, Associate Professor, PhD, Indiana University

Terri-Jo Woellner, Teaching Professor, MA, University of Vermont

Jun Xu, Teaching Assistant Professor, MA, University of Wisconsin - Madison

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