2016-2017 Undergraduate Bulletin

Department of Anthropology

Office: Sturm Hall, Room 146 
Mail Code: 2000 E. Asbury Ave. Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-2406
Email: anthropology@du.edu
Web Site: http://www.du.edu/ahss/schools/anthropology/

Anthropology is the study of the origin, history and nature of people and cultures. It explains the relationships among biology, culture and the environments in which people live. Anthropology addresses modern problems, such as the integration of cultural and ethnic diversity, the conduct of international relations, human rights and the management of environmental and cultural resources.

The faculty members of the Department of Anthropology are experts in analyzing human differences in the context of the material (political and economic) conditions of life. They are concerned with the interaction of gender, race, ethnicity, class and other variables in human affairs, and with the consequences of these relationships for social change and development. Drawing on the resources of the Museum of Anthropology, they are concerned with how the material world expresses and sustains human relationships and ways of thinking.

The department has an archaeology lab, ethnology lab and a museum housing collections of archaeological and ethnographic materials. The department also has computer-catalogued collections, working relationships with Denver-area museums and archaeological field opportunities. Students interested in careers in archaeology, cultural anthropology or museum anthropology can find courses designed to meet their needs.

The department provides the Thomas A. Bogard Scholarship for a senior majoring in anthropology and the Ruth Underhill Anthropology Prize for the best senior paper.

Anthropology

Bachelor of Arts Major Requirements

(183 credits required for the degree)

44 credits, including the following:

Anthropology Foundations
ANTH 2000Pioneers of Anthropology4
ANTH 2010Cultural Anthropology4
ANTH 2105Human Nature4
ANTH 2310Fundamentals of Archaeology4
ANTH 2600Museums and Public Culture4
ANTH 3800Capstone Seminar Anthropology4
Select 12 credits in 3000-level courses12
Select eight elective credits (2000/3000)8
Total Credits44

Secondary Major

44 credits. Same requirements as for BA degree.

Minor Requirements

20 credits of anthropology.

REquirements for Distinction in the Major in Anthropology

  • Completion of an honors thesis

Courses

ANTH 1006 Paranormal Archaeology (4 Credits)

This course explores the virtues and limitations of the scientific method for understanding human society and culture. To accomplish this goal it uses selected mysteries and puzzles from the human past that have intrigued, over many years, professional scientists and the general public alike. The course considers a wide variety of topics having anthropological relevance--Bigfoot, the Big Stone Heads of Easter Island, the Great Pyramids of Egypt, the Great Earthen Burial Mounds of North America, and other phenomena--in an effort to sort out hard facts, pure fantasies, and genuine mysteries. This course examines where the more outrageous explanations of mysterious phenomena come from, and investigates why such explanations are of continuing popularity in modern society. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ANTH 1010 Anthropology: Humankind in Context (4 Credits)

This course is a basic one in Anthropology that covers all four major subfields of the discipline including Physical Anthropology (Biological), Archaeology, Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology. It focuses on many aspects of anthropology that have applicability today in understanding our species' place in the world, the development of cultural and biological diversity over time, the growth of complex societies and analyses of contemporary cultures. This class allows us to view ourselves inclusively, taking a broad look at many aspects of our shared humanity on a world-wide basis. This is accomplished by not only studying modern cultures, but also by looking at the history of our species over millions of years. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ANTH 1910 Ancient Worlds (4 Credits)

This particular course uses the field of archaeology to illustrate the perspectives, methods and results of humanistic inquiry. It investigates human belief, creativity and spirituality in what we'll call deep history: the 50,000 years or so between the appearance of modern Homo sapiens and the rise of the first great civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. These aspects of life are examined through the study of human material culture, including portable objects, representational art, architecture, monuments and culturally-modified landscapes. A key underlying concept of the course is that material culture forms a unique narrative or "text" about the past history of humankind. This text is unique because everyone who has ever lived has helped to write it. Students learn how to interpret this text, recognize its multiple authors, and distill its larger social and cultural meaning. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ANTH 1992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

ANTH 2000 Pioneers of Anthropology (4 Credits)

Explores the development of anthropology as a field of study, including important thinkers, ideas and relationships between the discipline and its wider intellectual and societal context.

ANTH 2006 Lost Tribes and Sunken Continents (4 Credits)

ANTH 2010 Cultural Anthropology (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to cultural anthropology. As one of anthropology’s main sub-fields, cultural anthropology provides conceptual and analytical tools for a comprehensive understanding of culture and its manifestations. It is concerned with the ways in which individual experience is inserted in social and historical contexts, providing meanings to everyday life. We will explore ideas and behaviors related to culture in different societies and social groups. Topics include culture, meaning, development, globalization, experience, kinship, identity, social hierarchy, and conflict. Course material combines introductory readings, academic articles and films with the analysis of journalistic pieces addressing currently important issues. It also combines the study of culture in the United States with that of other countries. Class meetings will consist of lectures to introduce topics and concepts and group discussions to apply the concepts and examine them critically. Students will also work on an ethnographic project. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross-listed with ANTH 4010.

ANTH 2020 Artifacts, Texts, Meaning (4 Credits)

How is it that anthropologists can look at an object in a museum collection and state with confidence what it once was a part of, how it was used, where it came from, how old it is, and even, perhaps, what it meant to the people who made it? What is an anthropological approach to documentation, an important accompaniment to the objects held in museums? In this course, participants learn about the ways anthropologists have approached researching material items and texts (both written and oral), ranging from time-tested techniques to materials science approaches. Each student in the class completes an original research project on an item held in the DU Museum of Anthropology (DUMA) collections. The class involves hands-on work with artifacts, lecture and discussion. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ANTH 2040 Historical Archaeology (4 Credits)

Because it is the archaeology of periods for which there is also written history, historical archaeology is a dynamic and interdisciplinary field. It also has a distinct set of concerns and methods that builds upon, but does not replicate, those of prehistoric archaeology. This course is designed to engage students in the practice of historical archaeology through readings, discussions and the hands-on analysis of archaeological materials. The first class of each week is a discussion of readings in historical archaeology. The readings introduce students to theoretical and methodological issues in the discipline, as well as important case studies. Many of the readings have a North American focus but also address international practice. The second class of each week has a hands-on focus. Backed by readings on historic materials analysis, we discuss and practice the types of research historical archaeologists perform on actual materials, focusing on different material types each week. Students in the course each process and analyze a set of materials excavated from a historic site. Cross-listed with ANTH 4040. Prerequisite: ANTH 2310 or permission of instructor.

ANTH 2060 Human Migration (4 Credits)

This course on transnational migration introduces students to the important theoretical discussions of why and how people migrate and maintain transnational lives. The course examines how migrants change, and in turn bring social, economic and cultural changes to their new destinations as well as to the places that they left behind. Research on transnational migration examines the flows of people, ideas, behaviors, and goods that tie together migrants' communities of origin and destination, and the subsequent creation of new cultures and identities. While the process of transnational migration is not new, the scale of current transnational migration patterns makes today's migration streams different from earlier ones. The lives of migrants today span multiple countries as they maintain social and economic networks across national borders. The ethnographic studies assigned give students an understanding of the changing gender roles and expectations of migrants; the transnational practices migrants carry out to maintain ties to their counties of origin; the maintenance of households in which members are dispersed across borders; and the collective involvement of migrants in the political process and economic development of their countries of origin. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ANTH 2061 Gender, Change, Globalization (4 Credits)

Gender, Change and Globalization introduces students to anthropological approaches to the study of gender and globalization with a focus on social and cultural change. Globalization involves interconnected linkages and flows of commodities, and people and media that are dictated by market demands, facilitated by advanced technologies and regulated by state policies. Difference groups of individuals are located in varying positions within global flows that reflect larger power structures. While globalization brings about uniformity, it also produces differences as people respond to and oppose changes to local cultural practices and economic conditions. The reach of global processes has social and cultural implications for locally established gender ideologies, norms and division of labor. The course presents a survey of cross-cultural variations in gender identities and practices and analyzes how men and women are affected differently by the economic and cultural changes brought about by globalization, such as international development policies, migration and media productions. Contemporary social issues are discussed to explore these transformations and the effects they have on people's everyday lives. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ANTH 2105 Human Nature (4 Credits)

Human biological variation in time and space; investigation of the environmental and cultural impacts on the human organism that have led to the present diversity of the species. A scientific, evolutionary approach to human nature. Required for all anthropology majors.

ANTH 2200 Native North America (4 Credits)

This class focuses on Native North America and is intended to provide an approach to understanding events and processes that have shaped and continue to influence the Indigenous Peoples of Turtle Island. Emphasis is placed on the period following the creation of the United States and Canada and especially on the latter half of the 20th Century, in which Indians mounted increasingly vocal efforts to retake control of their lives and destinies. These efforts will be seen in the light of colonial history, forced acculturation, struggles over resource ownership and management, internal colonialism, and the challenges of Indians' multiple citizenship of the United States and in one or more domestic dependent sovereign nations. Topics include social change; ecological exploitation; Indians in popular culture; gender issues; the power of ritual; struggles for sovereignty and protection of indigenous homelands; identity, assimilation and ethnic conflict.

ANTH 2310 Fundamentals of Archaeology (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the practice of archaeology--why and how archaeologists recover and analyze their data. By the end of this course, students have an understanding not only of the nature of the archaeological record, but also how models of the past are built and interact with general public knowledge.

ANTH 2400 Social Change in Latin America (4 Credits)

Modern Latin America as part of the contemporary Third World, focusing on the social anthropology of peasant and urban peoples, and how economic development and dependency affect them; emphasis on Mexico, Brazil and the Andean nations.

ANTH 2600 Museums and Public Culture (4 Credits)

A critical introduction to how cultures and peoples are presented in museums, festivals, tourism venues and the popular media. The course introduces students to the historical and contemporary role of museums and anthropology in public culture and the importance of both in civic life.

ANTH 2992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

ANTH 3000 Anthropology of Tourism (4 Credits)

Considers the interaction of host and visitor cultures in foreign tourism. Explores the effects of tourism on the host culture and the expectations of the visitors. Discusses tourism's relationship to development and the various levels of needs of the tourists.

ANTH 3020 Native Religions (4 Credits)

A cross-cultural survey of concepts used to understand and talk about "religion," "the supernatural," and associated behavior among Native peoples of Turtle Island. Topics include healing and techniques of controlling and channeling supernatural power; sacred places and their significance; myths and symbols in their cultural contexts; initiation rites; conceptualizations of male and female deities; and responses of indigenous people to attempted missionization.

ANTH 3030 Digital Anthropology (4 Credits)

Digital Anthropology introduces students to computer technology used in anthropological research. Students study and then produce a number of digital products useful in the analysis and interpretation of museum collections, for archaeological mapping and research, and for the dissemination of anthropological knowledge online. This process covers the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for spatial analysis, three-dimensional imaging programs ranging in scale from broad landscape mapping to detailed digital artifact analysis. In addition, the use of geophysical methods for imaging what is below the surface allows students to produce images of what lies below the ground in archaeological contexts.

ANTH 3040 Anthropologies of Place (4 Credits)

This class is an exploration of the relationship between people and places from an anthropological viewpoint. We concern ourselves with a variety of ideas about place, emphasizing not just how places are used, but how they infuse themselves into the lives, histories and ethics of those who interact with them. The course readings include book-length anthropological case studies interspersed with interdisciplinary readings about place and landscape. The course includes seminar-style discussions of readings, workshops and observations in the field. On several occasions, we take our class on the road, working together to think about how people and place interact. By the end of the class, each student creates his or her own anthropology of a place. Must be junior standing or above.

ANTH 3060 Cultural Narratives (4 Credits)

Human beings are natural storytellers. Whether reciting oral traditions or recounting personal experience, people everywhere use narratives as a way to express and to understand themselves. This course approaches cultural narratives from two angles. First, it explores the ways that anthropologists, usually trained in the social sciences, make use of and study narratives, whether through ethnographic observation, conducting an interview, gathering folklore or archaeological interpretation. Second, the class investigates narratives that, although produced by non-anthropologists, engage with anthropological issues such as kinship, gender, work, tradition and identity. The narratives range broadly from fiction, to poetry, to film. These two approaches are framed by theoretically informed readings about narrativity, both from the social sciences and the humanities. The class involves intensive reading and writing, as it makes use of both discussion and workshop formats. Each student in the course completes a research and writing project culminating in his or her own cultural narrative. Must be junior standing or above.

ANTH 3070 Folklore and Cultural Heritage (4 Credits)

Folklore and Cultural Heritage is the study of the expressive behaviors and practices that constitute the ordinary, everyday life of communities. Folklore includes the intangible cultural heritages of all peoples, for example, the artistic expression reflected in stories and storytelling, music, dance, legends, oral history, proverbs, jokes, popular beliefs, customs, dialects and ways of speaking. Everyone has folklore and participates in the "folklore process." Prerequisite: introductory social science course. Cross-listed with ANTH 4070.

ANTH 3080 Memory and Memorialization (4 Credits)

The course focuses on how social groups represent, experience and commemorate the remembered past; it explores issues of construction of memory, particularly how representations of the past- and its materialization through monuments, ruins, and landscapes- are connected with issues of institutionalized perceptions of national, ethnic, racial and religious identity. Furthermore, it discusses concepts such as "authenticity," "tradition," and "modernity" in the interpretation of cultural heritage and how the interpretation of the past and of culture depend on context (political and historical), experience and point of view. The course aims to develop an interdisciplinary approach to memory and to methodologies and empirical research.

ANTH 3110 The Cultured Ape (4 Credits)

This course is an examination of human evolutionary psychology. Evolutionary Psychology deals with how contemporary human behavior is constrained by our heritage as evolved primates. It questions the standard social science and mainstream anthropological model of humans as "blank slates" who are primarily shaped by their social and cultural environments. In other words, Evolutionary Psychology views humans as "cultured apes.

ANTH 3130 The Archaeology of Gender (4 Credits)

This course examines the ways archaeology can contribute to the study of gender through investigations of the deep through recent past. The class will include readings on gender theory, the uses of archaeological data and specific case studies of engendered lives in the past. Cross listed with GWST 3130.

ANTH 3135 Feasting, Fasting and Food: The Anthropology of Food (4 Credits)

Feasting, Fasting and Food focuses on foodways and food culture. Food and its acquisition and preparation are tied to the historical, social and cultural lives of all peoples. By drawing on historical sources, ethnography and a number of anthropological perspectives, we look at foodways as symbols of identify, culinary tourism, food work as trade or profession, the study of food as art and theater, and food and memory. Prerequisite: ANTH 2010.

ANTH 3170 Applied Heritage Management (4 Credits)

Considers the role of archaeology in preservation and the management of cultural resources in terms of legislation, ethics and practical application, with emphasis of the utility, necessity and reality of doing archaeology today in the public sector. Site report writing, governmental regulations and the business side of archaeology are stressed. Archaeological information from site reports and artifact analysis are compiled and presented in a digital format. Prerequisite: ANTH 2310.

ANTH 3200 Human Origins and Evolution (4 Credits)

Examines the fossil record for human evolution from 6 million years ago to the origin of modern Homo sapiens, including current theories, evidence and controversies. Considers the historical and sociological contexts of human evolutionary studies, popular myths and misconceptions, and alternative scenarios for the future evolution of the human species.

ANTH 3225 Human Rights in Latin America (4 Credits)

This course aims to provide students with an overview of human rights issues and how they have evolved in recent Latin American history, from the military dictatorships of the authoritarian period to contemporary challenges faced in the region’s democracies. It also aims to place human rights concerns in a broader sociopolitical context. Many of today’s human rights issues are rooted in the past, but others respond to new and emerging challenges. In this class, we will explore the roots and contemporary realities of human rights movements in Latin America. The examination of these topics should allow us to pose broader questions about the meaning of human rights in a globalized world, the efficacy of international instruments for rights enforcement, and the complex challenges that linger in the aftermath of authoritarianism and state-sponsored terror.

ANTH 3255 Ancient North America (4 Credits)

This course examines the history of American Indian cultures from their earliest archaeological traces on this continent up to and including contact with European explorers and colonists.

ANTH 3290 Art and Anthropology (4 Credits)

Study of the concept of art and its multiple roles in society from a cross-cultural and historical perspective. Commodification of culture through tourism and the global art market; arts of resistance and survival; and cultural expression and community development.

ANTH 3310 Indigenous Environment (4 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to particular environmental issues that affect indigenous peoples, including subsistence and economic issues; sacred lands; cultural property dilemmas; and the impact that use of traditional cultural properties by others--including nation-state governments, corporations and tourists--have on indigenous peoples' cultural and social integrity. Particular focus is on one of these issues--travel and particularly "ecotravel" and "ecotourism.

ANTH 3320 Medical Anthropology (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to medical anthropology. As a professional and academic field, medical anthropology provides conceptual and analytical tools for a comprehensive understanding of health, illness and healing. It is concerned with the ways in which individual experience is inserted in social and historical contexts and it explores ideas and behaviors related to health in different societies and social groups, as well as the ways in which different groups organize their resources to face health-related needs in the context of their social and economic realities.

ANTH 3330 Human Rights of Indg Peoples (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the concept and definition of "indigenous peoples." It covers the history of resistance, revitalization, and assertion of sovereignty by Indigenous peoples, and why the United Nations felt it necessary to adopt a "Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples" in 2007. It covers how indigenous identities and indigenous rights issues do or do not "fit" with internationally accepted definitions of human rights. The course will concentrate on the intersection of indigenous autonomy with globalization, neo-liberal ideologies, and nation-state policies. Case studies focus on Iroquois, Crees, Mayans, Mapuche, Zapatistas, Maoris, and Sami.

ANTH 3350 Latin American Archaeology (4 Credits)

Covers the prehistory of the Western Hemisphere south of the Mexico-U.S. border, from initial colonization of the hemisphere by Paleo-Indian people, to the origins of agriculture and the rise of civilization. Olmec, Mayan, Aztec, Chavin, Moche and Inca cultures are covered in detail.

ANTH 3360 Cross-Cultural Perspective: Women (4 Credits)

Confronts question about women's lives and women's status in a global perspective. It addresses issues such as why women have been subordinate to men in so many cultures, how one actually measures dominance and subordination, and whether there is some biological basis for gender inequality. Broad theoretical questions on the status of women are discussed and form the basis for the analytical inquiry which follows. Cross-listed with ANTH 4360.

ANTH 3370 Sex, Class and Race in Latin America (4 Credits)

This course uses an intersectional approach to the study of sex, class and race in Latin America. Intersectionality aims at understanding the interlocking relation between sex, class, race and other aspects, and how these are rooted in historical and social structures, and are reproduced and resisted through individual and collective experience. In this course we will aim at understanding such history, culture and peoples with a special emphasis on examining their heterogeneity, and aiming at understanding how such heterogeneity is also related with social inequality. We will also examine some contemporary issues such as women's rights, indigenous movements, human rights, migrations, and economy with an emphasis on their manifestations at the intersections of sex, class, and race.

ANTH 3380 Women and Development (4 Credits)

A case study approach to understanding women's status and the problems of combining productive and reproductive responsibilities in developing countries. Cross-listed with ANTH 4380, INTS 3390.

ANTH 3390 Geoarchaeology (4 Credits)

Use of geological methods to interpret archaeological sites, ancient landscape reconstruction, study of environmental change and habitation.

ANTH 3430 Visions, Utopias and Messiahs (4 Credits)

Ghost dance, peyote religion, cargo cults, peasant revolution, charismatic leaders, messianic movements in cross-cultural perspectives; roles played by cultural systems, historical circumstances and social conditions in generating social movements.

ANTH 3470 Applied Anthropology (4 Credits)

The practical application of cross-cultural knowledge and awareness to the solution of social and cultural problems. Ethnographic methodologies, a review of the history of applied anthropology and a consideration of the ideological and ethical components of applied anthropology are covered.

ANTH 3485 Anthropology and Underdevelopment (4 Credits)

Anthropological approach to some of the developing world's most pressing social problems and how anthropologists can make a relevant contribution in confronting, studying and changing the nature of underdevelopment.

ANTH 3500 Culture and The City (4 Credits)

Examines the past and future of the city as a human built environment that reflects and reproduces social, political, economic, and cultural forces and ideals. Begins with the origin of cities in antiquity and ends with contemporary urban landscapes. Analysis is sensitive to both the technologies and aesthetics of urban form. Emphasis is on the possibilities for urban redesign to meet the problems of 21st century city life.

ANTH 3510 The Ancient City (4 Credits)

The archaeological study of ancient cities around the world is a booming and controversial area of research. This course investigates what we know about the nature of the earliest cities in the great original cradles of civilization: Mesopotamia, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Our focus is on how the first cities were planned, built, and experienced by citizens.

ANTH 3540 The Nature of Language (4 Credits)

Language as social, psychological, cultural phenomenon; relationship between cultures, semantics; language as medium of cultural unification; relationship between dialects, social structure.

ANTH 3550 Africa: Peoples and Cultures (4 Credits)

Survey course in the anthropology of Africa designed to explore the diversity of African people and cultures. The course examines issues of contemporary life in the continent as well as the way it has been portrayed by the media, anthropologists, historians, and writers. Topics such as geography, history, society, politics, religion, ethnicities, and material culture of different regions are central to the discussion.

ANTH 3620 Ethnoarchaeology (4 Credits)

Ethnography has often been used as an illustrative device to animate archaeological remains, or to develop models of human behavior, regardless of the geographic and chronological distance between the ethnographic and the archaeological data. This course addresses different perspectives and theories concerning the use of ethnoarchaeology to complement archaeological information. It aims to define the role of ethnoarchaeology in the study of human past; to establish an agenda of issues to which their use is relevant; and to provide a critical overview of major approaches to the use of ethnographic analogies and historical information in archaeology.

ANTH 3630 Archaeological Method and Theory (4 Credits)

This class presents methods for gathering archaeological data in the laboratory and then using a variety of theoretical approaches in its interpretation. Students gather archaeological data using museum collections from a variety of sites. Those artifacts include stone tools and ceramics as well as other environmental data and architectural information in a variety of environmental and landscape contexts. For each site studied students are presented with a body of theoretical literature from which to interpret these data. A variety of interpretative methods can potentially be chosen for each site, and in most cases there is no right answer, only answers that can be supported by the data collected and interpreted using the theoretical constructs read. All students are required to write up complete site reports for each project including all raw data collected in the analysis and theoretical approaches used in interpretation.

ANTH 3650 Dynamics of Culture Change (4 Credits)

Considers culture change and the agents of change. Focuses on changes in indigenous cultures around the world resulting from colonialism 1850-1950, forced acculturation, the tension between worldwide economic development and human rights, and the changing nature of the post-colonial world.

ANTH 3660 Anthropological Theory, Method and Context (4 Credits)

History and development of particular schools of thought, paradigms, methods and methodologies that characterize contemporary anthropology. Intellectual, artistic developments, world-wide sociopolitical and economic processes that shaped much of anthropological thinking of the times. Research methods in reconstruction of human history and qualitative ethnolographical research.

ANTH 3661 Museums and their Visitors (4 Credits)

This course is designed to be a comprehensive introduction to museums and their approaches to serving visitors, primarily through exhibitions and education. It examines current research and museum practice as it relates to the museum as an environment for meaningful visitor experiences and learning. The course is organized around the following core issues: (1) What do visitor experiences look like in a museum context? (2) How do museums design for different audience types? (3) What do we learn from assessing visitors' experiences? (4) How do objects, ideas and spaces affect visitor learning and experiences? Cross listed with ARTH 3661.

ANTH 3680 Quantitative Methods-Anthropology (4 Credits)

The use of statistics in all branches of anthropology; data screening; parametric and nonparametric statistics. Prerequisite: any course in basic statistics.

ANTH 3701 Topics in Anthropology (4 Credits)

Specialized topics in anthropology. Check with the Department of Anthropology or the Schedule of Classes for further information; open to students who are non-majors; may be repeated for credit.

ANTH 3702 Topics in Anthropology (4 Credits)

Specialized topics in anthropology. Check with the Department of Anthropology or the Schedule of Classes for further information; open to students who are non-majors; may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ANTH 1010.

ANTH 3703 Topics in Anthropology (4 Credits)

Specialized topics in anthropology. Check with the Department of Anthropology or the Schedule of Classes for further information; open to students who are non-majors; may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ANTH 1010.

ANTH 3741 Introduction to Conservation (4 Credits)

Introduction to physical properties of materials found in museum artifacts and specimens. Discusses preventative conservation principles and methods.

ANTH 3742 Museum Exhibit Development (4 Credits)

Introduces general principles of planning, development, production and evaluation of museum exhibits. Explores design elements and methods of evaluation. Students have the opportunity to do exhibit mockups and exhibit evaluation.

ANTH 3743 Managing Collections (4 Credits)

Principles and methods regarding acquisition, documentation, conservation and accessibility of collections. Law, registration methods, computerization, policy, development, ethics and preventive conservation are also discussed.

ANTH 3750 Ethnographic Methods (4 Credits)

In this course, students study the art and science of ethnographic research methods, conduct quarter-long field research projects, and write practice ethnographies. The course requires students to apply the American Anthropological Association's Code of Ethics in their research and to write Institutional Review Board applications for their projects. Course readings include texts on ethnographic methods as well as controversial and exemplary ethnographic publications for student dissection and debate.

ANTH 3790 Field Methods in Archaeology (4 Credits)

Introduces basic methods of archaeological survey, excavation, artifact collection strategies and field interpretation. Students learn to create field maps and cross-sectional drawings of archaeological phenomena. Cross-listed with ANTH 1790. Prerequisite: ANTH 2310.

ANTH 3791 Critical Perspectives in Museum Studies (4 Credits)

This course critically explores museums and heritage complexes as sites of cultural production and consumption at different historical moments and in diverse cultural and national settings. Special attention is given to contemporary issues, debates, and approaches in the context of museum anthropology and heritage studies. The term museum is used to include a wide range of heritage projects that do not rely only on the traditional institution established to collect, conserve and exhibit material culture, but includes intangible heritage, historic built environment and event natural environment that was used and marked by human action.

ANTH 3800 Capstone Seminar Anthropology (4 Credits)

This seminar brings anthropology to bear on a topic of special significance. It assesses grasp of the key concepts, theories and insights of anthropology, and critically reflects on the nature and history of the discipline. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

ANTH 3875 Research Methods in Anthropology (4 Credits)

This course offers an in-depth introduction to anthropological research methods with the aim of providing students with the tools necessary to design a coherent research proposal. Starting with the notion that anthropological research is a scientific endeavor, the course offers knowledge and skills that allow for a systematic application of qualitative and quantitative methods to respond to research questions. Students will learn when and how to use one method, as well as the implications of doing it. Students will also learn how to critically read research reports that use qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods. The course is organized in two portions. The qualitative portion will focus on a detailed exploration of the continuum that goes from posing a research question, choosing a methodology, carrying it on, and reporting the results. The quantitative portion is concentrated on collecting numerical data, methods of which are often based on a qualitative understanding of people. Quantitative analysis will present tools used to take readings, acquire data, observations, and other information necessary to test hypotheses about people, cultures and how we can understand them from their material remains. The purpose of the quantitative part of the class is to determine what is statistically significant and what ideas about people are supportable using the scientific method. This course is required for all anthropology graduate students, and suggested for advanced undergraduates who are working on senior theses, and have an interest in anthropological research. The course is also open to non-anthropology students interested in anthropological research.

ANTH 3880 Culture, Ecology, Adaptation (4 Credits)

This course is organized around these concepts: "ecology," "adaptation," "landscape," "technology," "artifact," and "architecture." The course focuses on defining and examining adaptation and the role of culture and technology in achieving adaptations, or in not achieving them. This focus will be especially pursued with respect to the concept of landscape--that is, culturally defined physical space--and the cultural artifacts that interpret and modify it in the course of human adaptation to its ecological components.

ANTH 3890 Context of Material Culture (4 Credits)

Examines how material culture both reflects and actively structures political, economic and cultural life. Considers the relationship between people and their material culture (portable objects, non-portable objects, buildings, socially-created landscapes) in Western, non-Western, ancient, and contemporary cultural contexts. Reading materials draw from the fields of ethnology, archaeology, folklore, geography, history, art and architecture.

ANTH 3980 Internship (1-8 Credits)

ANTH 3981 Museum Internship (1-6 Credits)

ANTH 3990 Summer Field School-Archaeology (4-6 Credits)

Archaeological excavation, survey and recordings; analysis and conservation of artifacts in the field.

ANTH 3991 Independent Study (1-15 Credits)

ANTH 3992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

ANTH 3995 Independent Research (1-10 Credits)

Faculty

Lawrence Conyers, Professor and Department Chair, PhD, University of Colorado Boulder

Alejandro Ceron Valdes, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Washington

Bonnie Clark, Associate Professor, PhD, University of California, Berkeley

Richard Clemmer-Smith, Professor, PhD, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Tracy Ehlers, Associate Professor, Emerita, PhD, University of Colorado

Esteban Gomez, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of California, Berkeley

Christina Kreps, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Oregon

James LaVita, Professor, PhD, University of Texas, Austin

Sarah Nelson, Professor, Emerita, PhD, University of Michigan

Dean Saitta, Professor, PhD, University of Massachusetts Amherst

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