2016-2017 Undergraduate Bulletin

International LLC (ILLC)

 

Courses

ILLC 2007 The International Experience (1,2 Credit)

ILLC academic seminars are restricted to International Living and Learning Community students only. These 2-credit seminars are offered in the fall, winter and spring quarters. An interdisciplinary team of DU faculty select the courses annually. Two of the goals of these classes are to (1) Provide students with a fundamental set of critical knowledge skills that facilitate learning about diverse cultures, lifestyles and customs; (2) Strengthen student curiosities associated with intercultural issues through collaborative, experiential learning and collective inquiry. Course topics change each quarter and vary from year to year. ILLC seminar topics have included international film, intercultural communication, service learning, women of the world, human rights, and global social problems.

ILLC 2008 The International Experience (1,2 Credit)

ILLC academic seminars are restricted to International Living and Learning Community students only. These 2-credit seminars are offered in the fall, winter and spring quarters. An interdisciplinary team of DU faculty select the courses annually. Two of the goals of these classes are to (1) Provide students with a fundamental set of critical knowledge skills that facilitate learning about diverse cultures, lifestyles and customs; (2) Strengthen student curiosities associated with intercultural issues through collaborative, experiential learning and collective inquiry. Course topics change each quarter and vary from year to year. ILLC seminar topics have included international film, intercultural communication, service learning, women of the world, human rights, and global social problems.

ILLC 2009 The International Experience (1,2 Credit)

ILLC academic seminars are restricted to International Living and Learning Community students only. These 2-credit seminars are offered in the fall, winter and spring quarters. An interdisciplinary team of DU faculty select the courses annually. Two of the goals of these classes are to (1) Provide students with a fundamental set of critical knowledge skills that facilitate learning about diverse cultures, lifestyles and customs; (2) Strengthen student curiosities associated with intercultural issues through collaborative, experiential learning and collective inquiry. Course topics change each quarter and vary from year to year. ILLC seminar topics have included international film, intercultural communication, service learning, women of the world, human rights, and global social problems.

ILLC 2100 Globalization: A View from Costa Rica (4 Credits)

Globalization" is a widely used word these days; however, there is little agreement on what it means. The diverse use of "globalization" may range from utopian to dystopian, from a losing proposition for some to the winning streak for the others, from the "civilizing power of free markets" to the "barbarism of state-controlled markets," from clash of civilizations to cosmopolitan ethics, from universally accepted values to honoring unique beliefs cherished by individuals, from protecting the rights of smaller countries to embracing a global order of a world government, from euphoric optimism to debilitating pessimism, from a melting pot of cultures to a loss of cultural identity--the list goes on and on. For all practical purposes though, globalization can be defined as the intensification of economic, political, legal, social and cultural interconnectedness across international borders (Paul, Roy and Mukhopadhyay, Journal of International Marketing, 2006). In this course, we examine this definition of globalization firsthand, by visiting Costa Rica. Costa Rica provides a perfect opportunity for studying the phenomenon of globalization. It is a close, sage and friendly country, yet quite different from the U.S. We learn about the similarities and dissimilarities in cultural, political, legal, social public policy, and economic systems that exist between Costa Rica and the U.S. We investigate the impact of globalization in Costa Rica and compare that with our experience in the U.S. Course activities include visits to local businesses, service learning projects with local schools and environmental groups, and guest speeches by government officials.

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