2016-2017 Undergraduate Bulletin

Josef Korbel School of International Studies

Office: Anna and John J. Sie International Relations Complex, Suite 2030
Mail Code: 2201 S. Gaylord St. Denver, CO 80208
Phone: (303) 871-4495
Email: baints@du.edu
Web Site: http://www.du.edu/korbel/programs/bachelors

We interact with the global community in a thousand different ways every day. We connect with friends near and far via computer and phone. We view updates on elections and currency crises, we track the spread of diseases and civil unrest, and we even follow the latest in music and dance from blogs and videos posted by people around the world. We do this using devices designed by international teams and built with materials and components from dozens of countries. We are part of a truly globalized planet. 

The sheer volume and the speed of trans-border movement of people, products and data mean that no country or individual exists as an island isolated from international forces. Our interdependence is a fact of life. The challenges of the 21st century are great: from controlling weapons of mass destruction to minimizing the impacts of climate change, from managing borderless trade and investment to tackling entrenched poverty and food insecurity, modern issues require international cooperation and collective solutions. 

The BA program in international studies offers undergraduate students at the University of Denver critical knowledge and skills for succeeding in a world that has gone global. Understanding how global institutions and exchanges work, and bringing an international perspective to one's professional development is a necessity for modern life.  DU’s International Studies curriculum gives students this foundation. Join us to learn about international events that directly affect your life.

Students are required to complete a minimum of 44 credits in international studies to fulfill the major requirements. Students must also choose a specialization within the broad field of international studies. Specialization areas include global political economy and international politics; international development and health; and international organizations, security, and human rights. In addition, students are required to complete an approved study abroad program, as well as attain intermediate proficiency in at least one foreign language. Students should verify detailed requirements with the department.

Graduate Degree Options for Undergraduate International Studies majors

Whether you are following a traditional four-year plan or are moving through your undergraduate degree at an accelerated pace, we offer two pathways for qualified international studies majors to earn a master of arts degree at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies (via the Dual Degree BA/MA Program in INTS or the Priority MA Admission option). Prospective students must be in touch with their advisor early on for planning purposes and must meet normal standards of graduate admission at the time of application. For specific requirements, please contact the BA program in international studies.

International Studies

Bachelor of Arts Major Requirements

(183 credits required for the degree)

44 credits required as follows:

INTS majors must successfully complete the following coursework and requirements:
INTS 1500Contemporary Issues in the Global Economy4
INTS 1700Introduction to International Politics4
INTS 2975Global Issues Research Practicum4
At least three INTS courses in the student's selected area of specialization12
Select at least five additional INTS courses as electives toward the major.20-36
Total Credits44-60

Additional Requirements

Foreign Language Proficiency Requirement

International Studies majors are required to demonstrate intermediate level proficiency in at least one foreign language. This is not necessarily a credit-bearing requirement. Any coursework taken to satisfy the international studies foreign language proficiency requirement will be in addition to the 44 minimum credit hours required for the major.

Study Abroad Requirement
Students are required to complete an approved study abroad program. Coursework must be pre-approved by the department prior to the start of the study abroad program. 

Minor Requirements

20 minimum credits:

INTS minors must successfully complete the following coursework:8
Contemporary Issues in the Global Economy
Introduction to International Politics
Select at least three additional INTS courses as electives toward the minor.12
Total Credits20

Requirements for Distinction in the Major in International Studies

  • Minimum 3.5 cumulative GPA (at the time of application and graduation);
  • Minimum 3.7 major GPA (at the time of application and graduation);
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of all INTS core courses (i.e. INTS 1500, INTS 1700, and INTS 2975, and at least two, 3000 level INTS courses;
  • Submission of Departmental Distinction application, by November 01 of junior year. Applications will be reviewed by the BA Program Committee in INTS and, if accepted, students will be notified prior to the registration period for Spring Quarter of their junior year. The application form is available on our BA Program Portfolio Community site, under the “Distinction in INTS” tab. Failure to apply on time will invalidate a student’s eligibility to participate in the program.

Students accepted to the Departmental Distinction Program must successfully complete the following curriculum in a satisfactory manner in order to achieve distinction in INTS: 

  • INTS 3000 Research Methods & Design (4 credit hours) - Spring Quarter of junior year.
  • INTS 3990 Thesis (4 credit hours) - Fall or Winter Quarter of senior year.

Courses

INTS 1500 Contemporary Issues in the Global Economy (4 Credits)

Introduction to a range of pressing problems and debates in today's global economy, such as global economy, global markets and the global commons. Students will have a good understanding of the policy challenges posed by global economic integration and theoretical frameworks for understanding the functioning of the global economy.

INTS 1700 Introduction to International Politics (4 Credits)

Central concepts and major theories to assist in organizing an understanding of international politics including balance of power, international organizations, foreign policy decision making, and conflict theory; application of current topics.

INTS 2160 Labor in the Global Political Economy (4 Credits)

This course explores and examines the role of labor in different parts of the global economy. According to world systems theory (Wallerstein et al.), there is a global division of labor into three zones: (1) core (essentially the wealthier, high-tech, highly industrialized economies), (2) periphery (generally, but not always those that provide basic food stuffs and unprocessed raw materials to the richer countries), and (3) what is referred to the 'semi-periphery' (countries that have elements of both the core and the periphery, which tend to be 'in the middle' economically, so to speak). In each of these three zones of the global economy, labor tends to function in quite different ways in terms of wages and working conditions, technical pre-conditions (education of the work force), etc. In a similar light, many manufactured products today are not made in one place, but are the products of this global division of labor. Often one part of the manufacturing process begins in one zone, but the refining and final manufacture takes place somewhere else - making the process truly global. The global division of labor is made possible by increasingly cheap transportation costs and cheap sources of energy. Consequently, the course examines the processes of the global division of labor, how it seems to influence global production and its fundamental dynamism (but also instability), as production moves from one part of the world to another.

INTS 2180 Politics of Development (4 Credits)

This course seeks to answer an overarching question that plagues development studies: why are some countries poor while other countries are rich? Furthermore, we ask why poverty is persistent around the world, and how the economic, political, and social structures of a society can improve conditions of poverty within a country. We begin answering these questions by reviewing the history of development, especially development conceived since the 1950s, when the post-war world saw a need to rebuild societies in Europe, up to the present time, when human development became the focus in the decade following the end of the Cold War. The course covers the major documents promoting theories of development, as well as looks at the historical record of the implementation of development policies (noting the divergence between theory and practice). We consider specific case studies in the process of asking why some countries are poor and others are rich, Furthermore, we are concerned with the role of country policies and implementation practices, with the impact of international organizations (multilateral development organizations), and the influence of bilateral foreign aid, on development progress or decline within countries.

INTS 2235 Gender and International Relations (4 Credits)

The study of gender and international relations (IR) is multi-faceted and complex. Both in theory and in practice, gender inheres in all aspects of IR – from globalization, to development, to security and human rights. Conversely, the ideas and processes that comprise the international political realm directly impact the everyday lives of women and men all over the world. What is it like to be a woman in post-Taliban Afghanistan? Why is homosexuality taboo in Iran, but not in many other parts of the world? Did Soviet communism really promote gender equality? These are only a few of the questions that are addressed over the ten weeks of the course. After an introductory discussion of the broad implications of gender for international political issues and vice-versa, we embark upon a quest to unravel the ways in which gender identities and sexualities come to be defined and practiced in different times and places, while simultaneously considering how these same identities constitute the contexts in which they are situated. At each stop along the way, we will endeavor to discover the mechanisms through which gender and sexuality are constructed, and reflect critically upon what these diverse constructions mean for the lived realities of men and women in different parts of the world.

INTS 2270 Sustainable Energy (4 Credits)

This course examines the political and policy problems, national and international, involved in trying to create a sustainable energy system. The class begins by learning about how to think about energy as a system, how it is made up of interlinked technological, political, social, and economic components. After discussing what is unsustainable about the current system, the class delves into the challenges of changing the system to a more sustainable one. In addition to learning about some alternative energy technologies, the class studies how different countries, and international agreements, are trying to push the system into a new direction. This field is moving very rapidly. For that reason, students learn about diverse sources of information on energy and energy and energy policy, form mass media to think tank and government reports to more traditional journal articles and books.

INTS 2320 European Union (4 Credits)

Some observers argue that European economic integration is quickly leading to the creation of a European super-state for the first time in history. Using approaches from both international and comparative political economy, this course will examine the extent to which this is true. Four issue areas to explore are the introduction of a common currency (the Euro), trade, the welfare state and European Union enlargement. Throughout, the course will address whether changes in European economic arrangements in fact lead to cross-national harmonization, or whether the political consequences are rather new manifestations of national styles.

INTS 2370 Globalization and the Knowledge Economy (4 Credits)

Much has been made of a new “knowledge economy” in which human capital has ascended to prominence over the traditional components of capital and labor. Further, the concept of “economic globalization” captures the realities of increasing interactions but exaggerates the notion of a single world economy connecting all producers, distributors, and consumers. In this class we examine the meaningful yet variable processes of increased knowledge diffusion and economic interaction to identify clusters of innovation, indicative of the knowledge economy. We then assess the applicability of globalization on a sector/ industry basis to identify ongoing transformations and future implications for knowledge development.

INTS 2380 Comparative Development Strategies (4 Credits)

The course is comparative in nature, discussing the development of the First World in contrast to those development paths now being advocated for and implemented by the Third World. Are developing countries really constrained in the ability to implement the sorts of policies common in the First World during the late 18th and 19th centuries? What are the differences and similarities between First World development theory and practice, and Third World development theory and practice? What are the implications of these comparisons for development policy today?.

INTS 2430 History of the Middle East (4 Credits)

This course treats the emergence of the modern Middle East in the modern period, roughly from the late 18th century to the present and examines the following topics: reformist attempts to meet the European challenge; the age of colonialism; the rise of nationalism; development strategies of socialism and capitalism; the impact of Israeli and Palestinian nationalism; the petroleum factor; the Islamic revolution in Iran; Saddam Hussein's Iraq; the Gulf War and the war on terror.

INTS 2468 Resolving Conflict by Negotiation (4 Credits)

Social conflict is a national and global issue often expressed in violent ways culminating in shootings, civil war, and international terrorism. It is easier to escalate conflict than diffuse it, and easier to fight rather than negotiate, situations that often lead to frustration and insecurity for disputants. This course examines approaches and mechanisms of conflict resolution within the context of personal, cultural, and political barriers to understand why parties continue to fight or manage to solve their differences through settlement and reconciliation, and teaches techniques of conflict resolution, essential skills for progress and prosperity in the modern world.

INTS 2470 Crime & International Politics (4 Credits)

What constitutes a crime in one location may constitute a personal right, a survival strategy or legitimate business opportunity in another. So how then does one address criminality in a global society? This course explores the roots of transnational crime and both domestic and international response to criminal networks. Topics include corruption, the drug trade, and human trafficking.

INTS 2490 Introduction to Global Health (4 Credits)

This class is an introduction to the field of global health and explores relationships between social, political, cultural, and economic conditions of mostly low and middle-income countries and their impact on health and health services. We will spend some time covering health issues in high-income countries as well. A major focus of the course is the evolution of primary health care and alternative strategies in global health. Topics addressed include: maternal and child health, nutrition, the rise of non-communicable diseases, water and sanitation, community engagement, global health agencies, and funding sources. The course presents an overview of the multiple factors that influence global health and emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to global health challenges.

INTS 2500 International Health and Development (4 Credits)

Health and development are held to be symbiotic in the production of economic and human well-being. However, the concept of health varies across context, institutions, geographies, and scale. This course will focus on the meaning, measurement, financing and delivery of ‘health care’ and the interaction of human well-being with other aspects of development. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

INTS 2700 Topics in Intn'l Studies (4 Credits)

INTS 2701 Topics in Int'l Studies (4 Credits)

INTS 2702 Topics in Int'l Studies (4 Credits)

INTS 2703 Topics in Int'l Studies (4 Credits)

INTS 2704 Topics in Int'l Studies (4 Credits)

INTS 2708 Contemporary US Foreign Policy (4 Credits)

When the United States first won its independence, its leaders sought to avoid at all costs the countless problems awaiting any country engaging in foreign affairs. Indeed, John Quincy Adams, in 1821, warned the United States of the dangers of "going abroad in search of monsters to destroy." In September of 2002, however, as American forces occupied one country and prepared to invade another, the Bush Administration released its National Security Strategy of the United States, which states: "To contend with uncertainty and to meet the many challenges we face, the United States will require bases and stations within and beyond Western Europe and Northeast Asia, as well as temporary access arrangements for long-distance deployment of U.S. forces." How did we go from isolation to empire? In this course, we will attempt to answer this question by exploring the progression of American foreign policy from its emergence out of isolation to its current stage of interventionist superpower. We will also identify and discuss key issues that are driving America's conduct abroad as well as evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the given policies addressing these important issues. By the end of the class, students should have a solid knowledge of the major themes and developments in the history of American foreign policy as well as the ability to reflect critically upon on-going foreign policy debates.

INTS 2715 Introduction to Comparative Politics (4 Credits)

This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems throughout the world. In the years following World War II, social scientists traveled extensively to newly decolonized regions of the world to examine societies there. Many found conditions so distinct from those of the western world that they warranted new models of political development. The distinguishing of development patterns in remote regions from those of western nations became the origin of modern comparative politics. The course considers both the impact of internal and external variables on political development. Internal or "domestic" variables include ideology, geography, economics and culture, while external variables include "globalization" and international conflict. Class includes understanding and critique of models of political development including classical liberal, authoritarian, communist, post-communist, "late" development, and social democratic models. It also includes discussion of possible new models in light of globalization and other factors.

INTS 2930 Latin American Culture, Politics and Society: A Contemporary Approach (4 Credits)

This course is dedicated to a search for the cultural and social continuity that can inform and transcend the economic and political disunity and fragmentation of the Latin American world. Despite the huge historical obstacles related to the long authoritarian traditions of the Pre-Colombian and Iberian Empires, a genuine rediscovery of cultural and social values can provide Latin America with the necessary economic and political convergence to implement successfully models of development related to its own cultural actuality.

INTS 2975 Global Issues Research Practicum (4 Credits)

Designed for mid-level international studies majors, this class aims to deepen students' historical and contemporary knowledge of global relations and dynamics, refine understandings of important ideas and concepts, and further develop key skills integral to continued success in the Department and the field more generally. Specifically, students will learn foundational social science research methods and skills early in the quarter. Students will then apply these skills to a variety of projects in several topical areas. The course further focuses on a core set of skills necessary for continued student success in international relations: research, writing, presentation and inter-personal communication, and critical thinking. The course is organized around in-depth historical case studies, each of which exposes key events and processes in global history. The cases are also chosen to illuminate concepts, ideas, dynamics, and patterns in international relations that continue to surface in contemporary global affairs and debates, and have ongoing relevance looking forward into the 21st century. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 2992 Directed Study (1-8 Credits)

INTS 3000 Research Methods & Design (4 Credits)

This course is designed for advanced International Studies majors, including Department Distinction, that intend to write a thesis in INTS. It introduces students to the fundamental elements of social science research and will serve as a workshop to complete a literature review and write a research proposal. The basis of any scientific investigation is the research proposal in which you formulate a question and design a process by which you will explore that question through a systematic collection and analysis of evidence. The design process is the same whether you are writing a short class research paper, or are conducting a major research project, such as a thesis. The manner in which evidence is gathered and analyzed, however, will vary based upon the research question, research goals, and resources. We will therefore go through the process of research design. Because international studies provides multiple methods of inquiry, we will also explore quantitative and qualitative methods that may be used to gather and analyze evidence. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700. Must be an INTS major and receive departmental permission.

INTS 3014 Illicit Markets (4 Credits)

This course explores the relation between illicit networks, security and the state in the global economy. We study the links between what is considered formal and informal, and legal and illegal, in order to examine what official views obscure in everyday relations of transnational activities. The material largely examines illegal practices from the ground up from the perspectives of everyday civilians, communities, and those involved in extra-legal activities. We begin with a critical examination of the categories of "illegal," "illicit," "the state," and "corruption." We reveal these categories as cultural and political constructs rather than as pre-existent neutral categories of analysis. Some questions we ask are: Who applies these definitions? How have they changed and what interests do they serve? Are distinctions between "illegal" and "illicit" useful, or do they obscure the power of the state to determine legitimacy? Are some activities inherently illegal? Moreover, we explore the impacts of state security and militarization efforts on extra-legal networks and experiences of insecurity. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3015 Social Movements: Latin America and South Asia (4 Credits)

Latin America is the site of important movements to constitute new collective identities, deepen democracy, chart alternative patterns of development, and re-organize the international system. Some of the most important impulses for these efforts come from below, in the form of social movements that articulate the demands and the dreams of excluded populations. This course addresses major theories of social movements, including classical, structural, new social movement theories, as well as approaches to contentious politics. These theories have attempted to answer the fundamental questions of what triggers mobilization among excluded groups, how the overcome obstacles to stand up to oppression, what organizational strategies and tactics facilitate their action, and what changes they potentially trigger to basic rights, political institutions, and identities. The course also explores individual cases of social movements, approaching them as struggles against the oppression and exploitation that have faced Latin American people at different moments of history. Among the cases we'll address are workers, peasants, indigenous, women, environmentalists, and advocates for democracy and human rights. We will also explore newly emerging and transnational movements, including those that articulate alternative models of globalization. The course takes an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on economics, sociology, anthropology, and political science. It places special emphasis on the political economy of popular organization, acknowledging the contested nature of development and the ongoing struggle for deeper democracies and more equitable societies. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3020 Introduction to Middle East and Islamic Politics (4 Credits)

The contemporary politics of the Middle East cannot be understood without some debate of the West's relationship with the region and the associated view of the Orient that grew out of this relationship. In light of this reality, the state system that has emerged in the region since the demise of colonialism forms a suitable framework in which to understand the major themes of this course. The first major theme to be discussed is the impact of colonialism on the region, particularly in the latter half of the nineteenth century and first half of the twentieth century. In this section of the course we explore the nature of political rule and government and the prevailing economic motive behind this imperial and colonial relationship. The second theme of this course explores political ideologies, both secular and religious. A historical overview of this development will be explored in the context of current theories of nationalism posited by authors such as Benedict Anderson, Eric Hobsbawm and Ernest Gellner. The final section of this course briefly explores the theme of democratization and its discontents in the Middle East. The focus is on recent debates about democratization that have been promoted from outside the region as a means of combating tyranny within the region, particularly the perceived anti-democratic nature of political Islam. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3025 Current Issues in Human Security (4 Credits)

This course surveys the various debates, concepts, and issues clustered around human security. Human security is a relatively new concept that challenges the traditional, state-centric approach of "national" security. A more inclusive term, human security includes economic, environmental, and social concerns such as poverty, climate change, crime, and disease in addition to the traditional focus on conflict and political violence. This course will explore the development of human security as a term, focusing particularly on the emergence of human security as a category of global governance. It will also investigate a range of issues that challenge human security. Students will engage with these issues through assigned readings, class discussion, policy assessment, and in-depth case studies. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3040 Technology & Development (4 Credits)

From the classic works of Adam Smith and Karl Marx to contemporary analyses by noted development economists Jeffrey Sachs and William Easterly, the role of technology in fostering economic growth and wider well being is firmly established. As the application of embodied knowledge, technology enables increased productivity, as well as new capabilities, goods, and services. While the role of technology in promoting human advancement is well established, the specific processes required for the effective development and use of technologies is less understood. Further, technological development varies considerably between developed and developing contexts with persistent inequalities hindering basic needs for billions.

INTS 3075 Security Research and Policy Analysis (4 Credits)

The objective of this course is to improve the skills that any security professional, be they in the academic and/or the policy communities, needs to successfully address complex national and international security questions. These skills include the ability to analyze and assess the work of others in the field critically, the ability to construct and execute the analysis and research necessary to address real world security questions, and the ability to articulate results, both in written and oral form, to a high professional standard. By developing an understanding of research method and design, students will have the foundational skills necessary to conduct security analysis. By both reading the work of other with a critical eye toward their method/design and seeking to use method/design to address real world security questions themselves, as well as being tasked to present the results of these efforts, students should complete the course in a much better position to both complete their short term academic goals and to participate in the security community after graduation. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3080 United States and the Middle East: Special Relationships (4 Credits)

The Middle East has been a focus of U.S. interests since the 19th century, from encounters with the Barbary pirates to the founding of major universities, such as the American University of Beirut. Until World War II, these interests were primarily private in nature, with little involvement by the governments of the countries involved. Private relationships, however, laid the groundwork for the strategic and economic alliances of the post-War period. U.S. involvement in the development of the Saudi oil industry, for example, went well beyond commercial bonds, as ARAMCO engineers, with U.S. government approval, constructed much of the Saudi infrastructure. The U.S. invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq have added two comparatively new, and extremely complex, relationships to the traditional ones. This class examines the nature of U.S. special relationships in the Middle East, with emphasis on five countries: pre- and post-revolutionary Iran, Saudi Arabia, Israel, Jordan, and Egypt. It then evaluates how these relationships continue to have an impact on regional affairs, particularly on Iraq and Afghanistan. During the course of the class, students should gain an overview of the historical record, as well as an appreciation of how the Middle East has served in the past as a crucible for the interplay of external interests. In addition, students should acquire a detailed knowledge of the studied countries, enabling them to present a paper and an oral presentation on likely outcomes in the Middle East over the next decade. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3120 Global Social Movements (4 Credits)

It is not only the economy that has become 'global' in the past 600 or so years. So have the social movements that spring out of the contradictions in the system. In some cases these social movements are the result of developments in one country (French, Russian Revolutions). But there is also a phenomenon of movements of a world-wide character that emerge more or less at the same time all over the world. These movements are not particularly new. One can cite the anti-slavery movements of the late 18th century and early 19th century and the anti-colonial movements of the 20th century as examples. More recently, there are a series of social movements that are global in character--the environmental movement, the peace (anti-nuclear, anti-war) movement, the movement to combat AIDS, and many human rights movements (Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch), which are international in character. Some of the interesting theoretical questions concerning social movements include the following: What are the factors in the global economy that trigger global social movements? What is 'the social chemistry' that results in the creation of a global social movement? Why is it that global social movements seem to have an almost organic quality about them (they are born, mature, grow old and often die)? How have the powers-that-be responded to global social movements across time (absorption, repression, etc.)? What determines the success, the failure of a global social movement? What seem to be the direction/characteristics of global social movements today? This course examines such questions and more. It explores a few 'universal' movements, either because they happened across the world at about the same time (revolution of 1848, 1968) or because, like the French or Russian Revolutions, they started in one place but spread because they were global in character. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3130 International Relations Theory (4 Credits)

This course examines the important classical, behavioral, and post-behavioral theories of international relations, and the nature of theory in international relations. Topics include the role normative theory; levels of analysis, structure-agent relationships, and concepts of foreign policy behavior and decision making; utopian/neo-liberal and realist/neo-realist theory, and democratic peace theory; theories of power and its management; theories of integration, cooperation, conflict, war, and geopolitical and ecological/environmental relationships; constructivism; systems theory; regime analysis; the relationship between theory and the international system in the early 21st century; traditional and contemporary paradigms of the international system. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3140 Russian Identity (4 Credits)

Russia, it has been said, is "a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma." Embroiled in perpetual change and uncertainty, Russia has, for centuries, attempted to forge an identity that is uniquely its own. Through an exploration of literature, film, and select academic and political writings, we will endeavor in this course to unravel the complex and ever-changing dynamics of Russian identity, considering the implications of this constructed identity for both domestic and international political processes. Taking a historical approach, we will look in particular at the ways in which categories of analysis such as class, religion, gender, and ethnicity have played into constructions of the nation, and investigate the ways in which these constructions have been carefully resisted in both historical and contemporary contexts. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3171 Political Economy of the European Union (4 Credits)

Some observers argue that European economic integration is quickly leading to the creation of a European super-state for the first time in history. Using approaches from both international and comparative political economy, this course examines the extent to which this is true. To unpack the debate, we explore four issue areas, including the introduction of a common currency (the Euro); the Common Agricultural Policy and global trade; European Union enlargement; and the evolutions of a common defense policy. Throughout, the course addresses whether changes in the European economic arrangements in fact lead to cross-national harmonization, or whether the political consequences are rather new manifestations of national styles. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3210 Political Violence and its End (4 Credits)

This course centers on the nature, character, strategies and termination of the range of forms political violence -- violence used to achieve political ends be it by states, the international community, or non-state actors -- takes in the early 21st century. After a general discussion of the lexicon of security, force, war, and war termination, each of the five forms of political violence are explored beginning with a discussion of the fundamentals, an exploration of the current context and character of the form centering on a leading book on the subject, and then a discussion of counter-strategies and broader political/societal considerations. The course ends with a similar three part discussion of the political/military realities and necessities of violence termination. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3245 Population, Politics and Development (4 Credits)

This course examines past and future global population trends, with an eye on the theories, techniques and abuses of limiting population growth beginning with the early 20th Century Eugenics movement and the Birth Control movement of the same period, looking at its evolution in the post-World War II period. In the post-WW II period, we look at the factors leading to the postwar population explosion, finishing off with current and future trends. Throughout the course, we explore how population theories have been connected to economic development and GNP, and how it has affected, or tried to affect, global demographic patterns. Along the way, we study the Eugenics movement in the U.S. and Nazi Germany, the post-war attempts at birth control as a result of new technologies and some of the more famous studies: post-World War II sterilization campaigns in Puerto Rico, the birth control movements in China and India, and recent cases of sterilization abuse (Native Americans in the 1870s, Peru under Fugimori). We end by looking at the different predictions for population growth in the coming decades. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3310 Disasters, Hazards & Response (4 Credits)

While we have substantial literature on how countries and communities respond to internal natural and manmade disasters, we know much less about international response. Through concentration on a number of important catastrophes, students focus on the variables that explain how and why the international community responds to disaster with both vigor and, in some cases, little interest. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3385 Migrants and Refugees: Humanity on the Move (4 Credits)

This course begins with the pre-history and history of human migrations and moves to cover the era of European colonization and forced dispersal (and in some cases aggregation) of peoples in the Americas, Southeast Asia, and Africa. The "contemporary" (i.e., post-WWII) era then covers not only the movements of peoples from Central Africa, Southeast Asia, the Balkans, and elsewhere, but will highlight the achievements of immigrants and refugees in such areas as technology, the arts, and the field of human rights. Issues of ethnicity, nationalism, and political diasporas will bring the contemporary era to a close. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3390 Gender and Development (4 Credits)

This course looks at issues of international development from the dual perspectives of gender analysis and cultural anthropology. While it is heavily based on political economy and assumptions about dependency and underdevelopment, it takes a strong micro-level, case study approach as well. That is to say, while we are concerned about policy issues, we expand our analysis to the women and their families whose day-to-day existence is at the heart of the topics. Finally, we engage in gender training workshops to learn lessons of facilitation and participatory change in grassroots development. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3485 The Role of Religion in International Affairs (4 Credits)

The role of religion in international affairs was largely unexplored by scholars prior to September 11, 2001 when religiously based acts of terrorism shook the world. Since that time there has been an increased interest in examining religion in terms of its’ impact on the international system. Is religion a force for good or evil within the international system? How influential is religion in international politics? Does religion matter or is it merely background noise in our study of the international system? In short, this course examines the role of religion in international affairs with an eye toward understanding political violence, political economy and conflict resolution in terms of religion and religious actors. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3520 Environment, Security and Conflict (4 Credits)

This class examines the intersection between the environment and security, and the ways in which “green” issues can lead to international conflict, either as underlying causes or as catalysts. The class looks at a variety of broadly defined environmental factors, including competition for scarce resources and environmental degradation that occur both naturally (e.g., desertification) and by the hand of man (e.g., the contamination of soil because of munitions, land mines, etc.). It considers the potential for weather modification as both a means of cooperation and as a military tool. We pay particular attention to an overriding environmental concern: water and its ownership, management and use. A continual determinant of internal and external policy, water has the potential for becoming either a fundamental political weapon or a means for cooperation that could provide a basis for wide-ranging regional stability. Additional, we look at the significance of oil as a natural resource and as a security issue, regionally and internationally. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3530 Feeding the World: The Politics and Economics of World Food and Agriculture (4 Credits)

This course asks students to critically explore contemporary debates about the global food and farming system with an eye to understanding its structure, operation, ideological basis, and impacts on people around the world. Of special interest in the course is the manner in which the global food and farming system both creates and aggravates global inequalities. Students focus partly on theories of and ideas about the role of agriculture in the economy, society and the development process, the appropriate structure and orientation of agricultural production and distribution, the role of the state in directing food production and distribution, and the nature of justice for farmers and eaters. Students further engage a spectrum policy debates and case studies that particularly illustrate the workings of the global food and farming system and the harsh contradictions that underpin it. Among other topics, students are exposed to debates about food prices, hunger and famine, obesity, commercial production and agribusiness, the peasantry and subsistence farming, biotechnology, free agricultural trade, fair trade, agricultural pollution and agriculturally-induced climate change. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3540 Contemporary China (4 Credits)

This course provides an overview of the rise of China and its likely future course, focusing on five essential components: (i) the Legacy of the Past in which we examine the legacies from the Imperial, warlord, Guomindang and Maoist traditions; (ii) the Chinese Economic Boom, which examines the massive, and even unprecedented, Chinese economic boom unleashed by Deng Xiamping's Four Modernizations in 1978; (iii) Chinese Politics: Democracy, Nationalism, and Foreign Policy, in which we cover the People's Republic of China's path toward great power status, which differs dramatically from the path followed by the West. In this section we look at issues of democracy, nationalism, and foreign policy as crucial to understanding China today; (iv) Chinese Culture Today, explores the rapid modernization of Chinese culture in the last two decades, with emphasis on pop culture, commercial culture and movies; and (v) Rural China, in which we consider the lives and the future of the majority of the Chinese population that still lives in the countryside but is undergoing massive transformation. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3560 Globalization and International Security (4 Credits)

Globalization moved a long time ago from social science to omnipresent buzz word, but with increased usage has not always come increased understanding. Globalization is the increased participation, and consciousness of that participation, by individuals in global, that is to say trans-regional or transnational, networks. Today's globalization is made possible in large part by dramatic and continuing changes in technology, but its impacts are social, economic, political, and potentially military changes in perception, in scale, in magnitude, and in threat. This course specifically concentrates at the intersection of global networks, the technology that makes them possible today and tomorrow, and current political and military security challenges to include national and internal state security, global terrorism, global insurgency, and cyber warfare. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3565 The Human Dimensions of Globalization (4 Credits)

This course explores the effects of neoliberal globalization on the lives of individuals and their communities. In an increasingly interconnected world, how do everyday people and communities negotiate the opportunities, dislocation, and/or disjunctures engendered by neoliberal globalization? Does globalization contribute to increasing global homogeneity or des it restructure difference and inequality in new ways? We explore how a ground-up view of globalization can highlight some of its contradictory effects. We discuss how globalization influences increasing inequality, restructures individual and group identities, as well as the relation between globalization and migration. From a ground-up perspective, we attune to growing global connections to understand how transnational commodity circuits intersect with individual lives and communities. We ask: How are commodity chains also cultural objects that shape, and are shaped by, how we see the world? Moreover, we pay attention to the development of grassroots networks and social movements that forge connections across borders to channel and/or challenge the current trajectory of globalization. We also find it imperative to understand the affective dimension-how do human beings think about their emotional relationships, families, and identities in relation to changing global dynamics? A central question we ask is: As everyday life becomes increasingly commoditized, how do people cope, find support and value, and reveal alternative ways of conceptualizing how we can all connect to one another? Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3575 Agriculture & Rural Development (4 Credits)

This course addresses major political, economic, environmental, and social aspects of agriculture and rural development in low- and middle-income countries. This includes the analysis of national agriculture and food policies, as well as systems of food production, consumption, and marketing at the local, national, and international levels. We will examine the nature of food markets and the operation of agricultural commodity and factor markets and assess agriculture's contribution to economic growth, employment, and the improvement of welfare in regions with widespread rural poverty. The central role of environmental sustainability for agricultural development will be addressed from local and global perspectives, with particular focus on the complex interactions between international goals for sustainable development, agricultural modernization strategies of low- and middle-income countries, and the social and economic development prospects of small farmers and agricultural wage workers. Using a broad range of country case studies, we will use mainstream and heterodox approaches to analyze structural change in largely agriculture-based societies and those with large rural populations. The course will enable students to understand global trends or rural development and agrarian change and assess agriculture policy in low- and middle-income countries. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3590 Politics in Africa: A Theoretical Approach with a Comparative Perspective (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to basic concepts and arguments in the study of contemporary African politics. The focus is on the politics in Africa post-independence. The course emphasizes theory in a comparative perspective as a way to understand politics in Africa. The basic question is whether politics differ so much in Africa as to be in a category by itself or is it simply a variation on patterns, habits, and institutions found in other regions and countries in the world? The course goal is to provide students with important concepts so as to gain a better understanding of processes in Africa and the problems that in some fashion or other account for the continent's current marginality in the world and persistent underdevelopment. In addition, the course exposes students to the application and usefulness of general theories of development in comparative politics. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3600 International Monetary Relations (4 Credits)

We investigate the operation and evolution of today's international monetary system; the course will investigate both the politics and economics of international monetary negotiations, and will examine several key public policy debates that concern governments and investors around the world. The course will be an introduction to these timely and important issues, and will be organized around lecture, class debates, and discussion. Prerequisites: ECON 1020, INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3621 Comparative Democracies in Western Europe (4 Credits)

This course is a comparative study of democratic governments in Western Europe and how these polities are structured and function, particularly with regard to the regulation of conflict. Democracy is the institutionalization of conflict, but democratic regimes vary with regard to the ways that they structure the arenas within which conflict is expressed. Presidential vs. parliamentary systems, as well as fragmented multi-party systems vs. majoritarian two-party systems, for example, are extremely important distinctions that have important consequences for the nature of politics within a society. So, too, are the nature of political parties and the dynamics of party systems and the shape and structure of the public opinion and major political attitudes. The study of Western Democratic polities, however, requires some retrospective historical analysis of the nature of the conflicts emerging since the creation of the Modern States. Many of the present conflicts in Contemporary Democratic Regimes are still legacies from the long lasting and conflictual emergence of the contemporary States. We also spend some time in analyzing retrospectively. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3630 Global Environment (4 Credits)

The linkages between social change, economic change and alterations to ecosystems have been apparent, if not overtly acknowledged, throughout history. It was not until 1987, however, with the publication of Our Common Future, that such linkages were couched in terms of development and explicitly placed on the international development agenda. The idea appears simple--environmental change, patterns of social change and economic development, social and political factors operate together and impact local, national, regional and global ecosystems. But impacts of the change in any one sector are seldom confined within national boundaries. How then does one address environmental issues across different regulatory, political, institutional and geographic scales? This course examines the connectivity between diverse elements of our planet's ecosystem, explores how a change in one element can have immediate and long-term impacts across local and global territory, and looks at strategies to create greater harmony across environmental, social, political and economic interests. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3660 States in Transition and European Integration (4 Credits)

This course examines states in transition in Europe and on its periphery. The central question the course asks is why, looking across the post-communist world, many states have joined the European Union and also the North Atlantic Treaty Organizations, while many others have held on to authoritarian means or rule or have been party to armed conflict. While Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and the Baltic States have acclimated themselves to many European Union rules relatively smoothly, Hungary has become the least democratic state in the Union. At the same time, Georgia, Ukraine and Russia are embroiled in protracted and in some ways interrelated conflicts, with democratic consolidation either seriously compromised or not even on the agenda. This course examines these diverging trends, drawing on a range of international relations and comparative politics approaches to explain highly variable outcomes across the region. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3670 Sustainable Development and Tourism (4 Credits)

In 2006, a record 846 million tourists travelled internationally spending US $733 billion in their travels. This course explores the motivation behind developing the tourism industry, especially in low and middle income regions, and examines the diverse outcomes of the same. The central question we address is whether or not tourism is a viable means of creating and sustaining improvements in the quality of life for host communities. Case studies include eco-tourism, island tourism, medical tourism, and sex tourism. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3692 Conflict Resolution (4 Credits)

Ending conflict is one of the great dreams and great challenges facing the global community today. This course examines approaches to mitigating and ending inter- and intra-state conflict. This course looks at the short and long term diplomatic and military strategies used to end conflict, and then explores the social, economic, and psychological tools available not only to end hostilities, but to build lasting peace. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3701 Topics in Int'l Studies (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3702 Topics in Int'l Studies (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3703 Topics in Int'l Studies (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3705 Topics in Int'l Studies (1-5 Credits)

Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3708 Topics in Int'l Studies (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3731 Comparative Health Care Policy (4 Credits)

Regardless of who we are, where we live, and what we believe, we are all born, we all age, and at various points in time, we all get sick thus making health a universal concern and a universal human right. While our concern about health may be universal, the experience of sickness and health is not. The reality of limited human and fiscal resources for health care provision creates a diverse landscape of choice and outcomes. Globally, nations are confronting a health care crisis as policy makers consider trade-offs between differing paradigms of public responsibility and resource allocation. A central concern for public policy is thus, "At what cost, health?" It is with this in mind that we explore dominant models of health care financing and delivery. We first look at the ethical, philosophical, and economic questions that underpin public healthcare policy. We then explore the specific models of health care financing and delivery currently used in the United States. Next, we compare the principles and mechanisms of health care in the U.S. to those in the United Kingdom. We conclude by examining pluralistic health care (and change) in the context of resource-poor nations. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3762 Contemporary Russia (4 Credits)

This course will offer an understanding of the politics, economics and society in transition in contemporary Russia. A review of the Soviet past is incorporated, but it will concentrate mainly on understanding the dynamics of the post-Soviet era. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3775 Introduction to International Law (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the basic principles and structures of international law, the history and development of the international legal system, the sources of international law, the interplay between the laws of nation-states and international legal principles, the roles play by multistate organizations, including the United Nations, regional customs unions and non-state actors such as non-governmental organizations and multinational corporations. This course will map out rules and methods of international legal agreement, treaty and contract interpretation and dispute resolution and the principles of state immunity and responsibility. Finally, this course will focus on the major areas in which international law is made and relied upon, and disputed, including criminal proceedings, international trade and commerce, international human rights, environmental policy, and this use of force. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3780 The Ethical Foundations of the Global Economy (4 Credits)

This course explores the ethics that underlie the most pressing debates today in global economic policymaking. Most people know that economists typically endorse the policy of "free trade," or the outcome of "economic growth." Indeed, economists advocate these so often that it seems self-evident that these are obviously desirable. But why is this so? What is the ethical grounding for the economist's stance on these matters? Unfortunately, economists themselves don't often explore the ethical foundations that underlie their policy perspectives. They typically write as if these foundations are obviously correct and beyond doubt. But in fact, the ethical foundations of economics are hotly contested--both within economics and in philosophy and other disciplines. This course is intended to help students make ethical sense of contemporary global economic policy debates. To that end, we move back and forth between abstract theoretical debates (in economics and philosophy) and concrete, applied policy matters. For instance, we examine the current debate over "free trade" versus "fair trade." We see why most advocates for labor, women's and human rights and most environmentalists demand fair trade, and why most neoclassical economists reject these claims and instead advocate free trade. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3795 The Ethical Foundations of Global Economic Policy (4 Credits)

Most people know that most economists endorse free trade, or economic growth. But why, in the economist’s view, is trade or growth, good? And are economists right in holding these views? This course investigates the ethics that underlie the most pressing debates today in global economic policy-making. It begins with mainstream, neoclassical economics, tracing its ethical basis to classical utilitarianism, and exploring how its ethical commitments lead neoclassical economists to particular policy conclusions (like its embrace of economic growth). The course then turns to alternative approaches to economics that embrace egalitarianism on the one hand, and libertarianism on the other. In each case, we subject the ethical foundations to critical examination. We will find that the most pressing policy debates today often reflect the existence of distinct ethical frameworks. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3820 United Nations (4 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to the United Nations and related agencies and programs. It examines the background and institutional arrangements of the UN System but gives special attention to the activities of the UN designed to advance peace and security. Case studies of UN responses to recent crises in Asia, Africa, Europe and the Western Hemisphere will be included. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3850 Foreign Aid, Debt and Development (4 Credits)

This course analyzes third world debt relief including the role of major powers, the World Bank and IMF in creating debt and the relationship between debt relief and poverty alleviation. The effects of debt relief upon globalization issues are also covered. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3900 Global Humanitarianism (4 Credits)

The purpose of this course is four-fold: (1) to provide an overview of the diverse array of events (both human-caused and natural) that trigger humanitarian responses; (2) to detail the methods used by first- and second-responders, as well as other humanitarians, as they deal with disasters; (3) to detail the methods used by human service professionals as they assist migrants and refugees; and (4) to present the theories and premises essential to social science's analyses of global humanitarianism. Therefore, extremely well-known "bellwether events" such as the 2001 attacks on New York, the 2004 Southeast Asian tsunami and 2005's Hurricane Katrina are covered in depth. Less well-known events, such as New York's "triangle fire," the Bhopal gas explosion and the Longmont, Colorado airliner bombing are also considered. Events associated with warfare, especially the forcible displacement of refugees, are essential. Class lectures and readings are grounded in understandings of human rights, community development and social service. Humanitarian intervention (that is, civil-military cooperation in relief) is considered in places as diverse as East Timor and Romania. Another key to the course is the discussion of "practitioner profiles," i.e., the careers of humanitarians working in various settings worldwide, and the discussion of "institutional profiles," i.e., the operations of organizations such as the Red Cross and FEMA. Overseas case studies (Bosnia, Sudan, Ethiopia, El Salvador, Indonesia and the U.S.) are also used. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3952 Human Rights in the Global World (4 Credits)

This course will examine the nature, utility and effectiveness of international efforts to define, promote and protect human rights. Particular attention will be given to activities of the United Nations and related programs and agencies. The roles of governments, regional intergovernmental organizations and nongovernmental organizations will also be explored. Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3980 Internships in International Studies (0-4 Credits)

Experience is an important asset when applying for any job. As you will find after graduation, the job market is incredibly competitive, and becoming more so. Gaining real world experience during college will make you a much stronger candidate when seeking that first position after graduation. Through INTS 3980, you have the opportunity to earn between 0 and 5 quarter credit hours for internships of 100 hours or more. The internship portfolio facilitates a student's academic, professional, and personal growth by providing documentation and representation of the internship experience. Elements of the portfolio will help bridge academic experience with career possibilities, and provides an opportunity for self-reflection through your experience. Analysis of your internship will help identify areas of success and points where you could improve overall. The objective of all aspects is to enable you to be more competitive in a global job market. Internships require departmental approval and must be undertaken during the quarter in which you register for credit. The BA program in INTS will not award credit retroactively for internships completed prior to the quarter in which students are registered. Prerequisites: Must be an INTS major and receive departmental permission.

INTS 3990 Thesis (4 Credits)

The thesis project is an original contribution to the understanding of issues relevant to international studies and to at least one of the concentration areas in international studies. The thesis must feature original research; that is, it must critically investigate a theoretically informed hypothesis, using sources to support an evaluation of the research question. The thesis must show clearly the following elements: excellent critical thinking and writing quality, coherent presentation, and adherence to the general guidelines set forth by the faculty advisor. Prerequisites: Must be an INTS major and receive departmental permission.

INTS 3991 Independent Study (1-8 Credits)

In-depth study of a particular issue under the guidance of a professor. Prerequisite: prior agreement with department and permission from registrar.

INTS 3992 Directed Study (1-8 Credits)

Faculty

Jonathan Adelman, Professor, PhD, Columbia University

Kevin Archer, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, University of Denver

Deborah Avant, Professor, PhD, University of California, San Diego

Sasha Breger Bush, Lecturer, PhD, University of Denver

Erica Chenoweth, Professor, PhD, University of Colorado Boulder

Tamra d'Estree, Associate Professor, PhD, Harvard University

Claude d'Estree, Teaching Professor, JD, Northeastern University

George DeMartino, Professor, PhD, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Sachin Desai, Teaching Associate Professor, MA, University of Denver

Jack Donnelly III, Professor, PhD, University of California, Berkeley

Rachel Epstein, Professor, PhD, Cornell University

Gilbert Escamilla, Lecturer, PhD, University of Texas at San Antonio

Tom Farer, Professor, JD, Harvard University

Karen Feste, Professor, PhD, University of Minnesota

Rebecca Galemba, Visiting Assistant Professor, PhD, Brown University

Alan Gilbert, Professor, PhD, Harvard University

Arthur Gilbert, Associate Professor, PhD, Tufts University

David Goldfischer, Associate Professor, PhD, University at Buffalo - State University of New York

Ilene Grabel, Professor, PhD, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Lewis Griffith III, Teaching Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Denver

Sarah Hamilton, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Kentucky

Nader Hashemi, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Toronto

Cullen Hendrix, Associate Professor, PhD, University of California, San Diego

Lynn Holland, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles

Barry Hughes, Professor, PhD, University of Minnesota

Micheline Ishay, Professor, PhD, Rutgers University

Sandy Johnson, Teaching Professor, PhD, Tulane University

Devin Joshi, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Washington

Oliver Kaplan, Assistant Professor, PhD, Stanford University

Haider Khan, Professor, PhD, Cornell University

Randall Kuhn, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Pennsylvania

Frank Laird, Associate Professor, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

David Levine, Professor, Emeritus, PhD, Yale University

Heather Perkins, Teaching Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Colorado Boulder

Leah Persky, Teaching Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Rob Prince, Lecturer, MS, University of Colorado Boulder

Chen Reis, Associate Professor, JD, Columbia University

Martin Rhodes, Professor, PhD, University of Oxford

Dale Rothman, Associate Professor, PhD, Cornell University

Tom Rowe, Associate Professor, PhD, University of California, Berkeley

Aaron Schneider, Associate Professor, PhD, University of California, Berkeley

Timothy Sisk, Professor, PhD, George Washington University

Joseph Szyliowicz, Professor, PhD, Columbia University

Robert Uttaro, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, University of Florida

Paul Viotti, Associate Professor, PhD, University of California, Berkeley

Karin Wedig, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of London

Ted Zerwin, Associate Professor of the Practice of Non-Profit Management, MSW, University of Denver

Suisheng Zhao, Professor, PhD, University of California, San Diego

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