2016-2017 Graduate Bulletin

Daniels College General

Office:  Daniels College of Business, Suite 255, 2101 S. University Blvd., Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303.871.3416
Web Site: http://daniels.du.edu/graduate/

Master of Business Administration in General Business

The Daniels College of Business Full-time MBA is a comprehensive 20-month program that immerses students in the study and practice of business. Students will gain the technical expertise and leadership skills required to navigate complex business situations with confidence and integrity.

Daniels has been continuously accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB) since 1923.

Cohort

Cohort program—experience the MBA core classes with the same set of peers to maximize cross-learning, collaboration and networking.

Concentrations/Electives 

Students will have 24 credits to concentrate on a specific business discipline.  These concentrations include: Accounting, Business Analytics, Customized, Finance, Marketing, and Real Estate and the Built Environment.

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the Executive MBA Program

The Daniels Executive MBA (EMBA) at the University of Denver is a highly selective academic program designed for the mid-to-senior level professional. Strategically focused and integrated in approach, the EMBA classroom is a dynamic environment of leaders from a wide array of backgrounds and industries. Although the pace of the EMBA experience is accelerated and academically rigorous, it is offered in an efficient once-a-week format which allows for balance between career, school and personal life.

Daniels has been continuously accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB) since 1923.

Cohort

A cohort MBA program with an integrated, lockstep curriculum of 24 courses (60 credit hours).

Class Schedule

Alternating Fridays and Saturdays once a week, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 18 calendar months.

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the Professional MBA Program

The Daniels Professional MBA (PMBA) is an ideal fit for early- to-mid career professionals. It holds the same quality and rigor as our Full-time MBA with a curriculum focus suited for those with five to nine years of professional work experience. Students in the cohort-based PMBA program are fully employed and enjoy a network of like-experienced peers. Gaining exposure to one another’s industries and challenges is a key benefit of this MBA option, as is the global business travel seminar.

Daniels has been continuously accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB) since 1923.

Cohort

A 24-month, cohort program with a sequential curriculum of 62 lockstep credit hours followed by 8 elective credits.

Evening or Saturday PMBA Class Schedule

We offer two options for completing your PMBA: Two classes per evening, on Mondays and Wednesdays from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., starting either Fall or Spring. Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Fall enrollment only.)

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the One-Year MBA Program

The One-year MBA is an intense, 11-month program for students seeking to immediately build upon their undergraduate business degree to acquire the MBA-level knowledge sought after in today’s competitive marketplace.

The Daniels College of Business is one of the few business colleges that offers a One-year MBA to recent college graduates.

Daniels has been continuously accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB) since 1923.

Cohort

A 56-hour, 11-month, full-time program with 8 credit hours of intensive business review, 12 credit hours of advanced core classes, 12 credit hours of Daniels Compass courses and 24 credit hours of electives in a selected concentration.  Experience the MBA core classes with the same set of peers to maximize cross-learning, collaboration and networking.

Concentrations/Electives

Students will have 24 credits to concentrate on a specific business disciple.  These concentrations include: Accounting, Business Analytics, Customized, Finance, Marketing, Real Estate and the Built Environment. 

Program Start date: August

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION IN GENERAL BUSINESS

Admission Requirements

  • Application fee $100 non-refundable.
  • A minimum two years of work experience is required and three years is recommended. In reviewing your work experience, we consider your achievements, managerial or leadership potential, contributions to the community, personal ethics and values and motivation for a graduate business degree.
  • Official Transcripts: Submit one official transcript from each higher educational institution you attended in officially sealed envelopes. Transcripts that arrive in opened envelopes are not considered official.
  • GMAT or GRE Scores required. Applicants who wish to be considered for merit-based scholarships or graduate assistantships are encouraged to take the GMAT. To have your GMAT or GRE scores reported to Daniels, please use the following codes: GMAT code MZR-GT-43 and the GRE code is 4842.
  • Submit a resume that focuses on your unique strengths and accomplishments.
  • Two letters of recommendation are required from individuals (non-relatives) who can evaluate your academic and/or work performance as well as your potential for success in graduate school. 
  • Two required and one optional essay. Essays are assessed for clarity, organization, conciseness and grammar. Through the essays, you can communicate what you hope to achieve at Daniels and how you will contribute to the Daniels community.
  • Admissions Interview: Applicants are contacted by a Daniels representative to schedule the admissions interview, which will be conducted in person, by phone, or via web cam.
  • Tuition Deposit: If accepted into the program, a $500 deposit is due to reserve your seat. This deposit is non-refundable and is credited toward your first tuition payment.

Language Proficiency

  • Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. Applications will not be processed until the required TOEFL or IELTS score is received. The TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date and are considered official only when received directly from the testing agency and are considered official only when received directly from the testing agency.

  • A minimum of an 88 TOEFL (no less than a 20 on any section) or a minimum of a 6.5 IELTS (no less than 6.0 on any section) is required to apply.
  • Applicants may be exempted from English proficiency test requirements if by the time of matriculation they have earned a baccalaureate degree or higher from a formally-recognized/accredited university where the institution's language of instruction and examination is English. Such applicants may be exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS and the English Language Proficiency Assessment requirement but not from other standardized graduate entrance examinations.
  • Students whose native language is not English and who are required to submit TOEFL/IELTS scores will be assessed by the University of Denver English Language Center (ELC).

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION IN GENERAL BUSINESS IN THE EXECUTIVE MBA PROGRAM

Admission Requirements

  • Application fee $100 non-refundable
  • Ten or more years of professional work and management experience are required. Management is defined as people, project, financial or sales territory management experience, or a combination.
  • GMAT or GRE Scores not required for candidates who have the required work and management experience.
  • Official Transcripts: Submit one official transcript from each higher educational institution you attended in officially sealed envelopes. Transcripts that arrive in opened envelopes are not considered official.
  • Submit a resume that focuses on your unique strengths and accomplishments.
  • Two letters of recommendation are required from individuals (non-relatives) who can evaluate your academic and/or work performance as well as your potential for success in graduate school.
  • Admissions Interview: Applicants are contacted by a Daniels representative to schedule the admissions interview, which will be conducted in person, by phone, or via webcam
  • Tuition Deposit: If accepted into the program, a $500 deposit is due to reserve your seat. This deposit is non-refundable and is credited toward your first tuition payment.

Language Proficiency

  • Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. Applications will not be processed until the required TOEFL or IELTS score is received. The TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date and are considered official only when received directly from the testing agency and are considered official only when received directly from the testing agency.

  • A minimum of an 88 TOEFL (no less than a 20 on any section) or a minimum of a 6.5 IELTS (no less than 6.0 on any section) is required to apply.
  • Applicants may be exempted from English proficiency test requirements if by the time of matriculation they have earned a baccalaureate degree or higher from a formally-recognized/accredited university where the institution's language of instruction and examination is English. Such applicants may be exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS and the English Language Proficiency Assessment requirement but not from other standardized graduate entrance examinations.
  • Students whose native language is not English and who are required to submit TOEFL/IELTS scores will be assessed by the University of Denver English Language Center (ELC).

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION IN GENERAL BUSINESS IN THE PROFESSIONAL MBA PROGRAM

Admission Requirements

  • Application fee $100 non-refundable
  • GMAT or GRE Scores required. All applicants who wish to be considered for merit-based scholarships must submit a GMAT score. To have your GMAT or GRE scores reported to Daniels, please use the following codes: GMAT code MZR-GT-43 and the GRE code is 4842.
    • The PMBA selection committee will consider GMAT waiver requests from candidates who meet one of the following standards (on a case-by-case basis): 
      • Identified as a high-potential employee by your company and have some combination of the above factors.
      • A business or quantitative undergraduate background.
      • Significant work experience.
  • Official Transcripts: An undergraduate degree from a regionally accredited college or University is required. Submit one official transcript from each higher educational institution you attended in officially sealed envelopes. Transcripts that arrive in opened envelopes are not considered official.
  • Submit a resume that focuses on your unique strengths and accomplishments.
  • Two letters of recommendation are required from individuals (non-relatives) who can evaluate your academic and/or work performance as well as your potential for success in graduate school.
  • Two required and one optional essay. Essays are assessed for clarity, organization, conciseness and grammar. Through the essays, you can communicate what you hope to achieve at Daniels and how you will contribute to the Daniels community.
  • Admissions Interview: Applicants are contacted by a Daniels representative to schedule the admissions interview, which will be conducted in person, by phone, or via web cam.
  • PMBA applicants are commonly identified as early career, high potential employees. In reviewing your work experience we consider your achievements, managerial or leadership potential, contributions to community, personal ethics and values and motivation for a graduate business degree. The average PMBA student has about six years of professional work experience, although the range is generally three to nine years.
  • Tuition Deposit: If accepted into the program, a $500 deposit is due to reserve your seat. This deposit is non-refundable and is credited toward your first tuition payment.

Language Proficiency

  • Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. Applications will not be processed until the required TOEFL or IELTS score is received. The TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date and are considered official only when received directly from the testing agency and are considered official only when received directly from the testing agency.

  • A minimum of an 88 TOEFL (no less than a 20 on any section) or a minimum of a 6.5 IELTS (no less than 6.0 on any section) is required to apply.
  • Applicants may be exempted from English proficiency test requirements if by the time of matriculation they have earned a baccalaureate degree or higher from a formally-recognized/accredited university where the institution's language of instruction and examination is English. Such applicants may be exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS and the English Language Proficiency Assessment requirement but not from other standardized graduate entrance examinations.
  • Students whose native language is not English and who are required to submit TOEFL/IELTS scores will be assessed by the University of Denver English Language Center (ELC).

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION IN GENERAL BUSINESS IN THE ONE-YEAR MBA PROGRAM

Admission Requirements

  • Application fee $100 non-refundable
  • GMAT or GRE Scores required. Applicants who wish to be considered for merit-based scholarships or graduate assistantships are encouraged to take the GMAT. To have your GMAT or GRE scores reported to Daniels, please use the following codes: GMAT code MZR-GT-43 and the GRE code is 4842.
  • An undergraduate business degree from any AACSB-accredited university is a prerequisite. Enrollment in the One-Year MBA must begin within one year of undergraduate graduation.
  • Official Transcripts: Submit one official transcript from each higher educational institution you attended in officially sealed envelopes.
  • Submit a resume that focuses on your unique strengths and accomplishments.
  • Two letters of recommendation are required from individuals (non-relatives) who can evaluate your academic and/or work performance as well as your potential for success in graduate school.
  • Two required and one optional essay. Essays are assessed for clarity, organization, conciseness and grammar. Through the essays, you can communicate what you hope to achieve at Daniels and how you will contribute to the Daniels community.
  • Admissions Interview: Applicants are contacted by a Daniels representative to schedule the admissions interview, which will be conducted in person, by phone, or via web cam.
  • Tuition Deposit: If accepted into the program, a $500 deposit is due to reserve your seat. This deposit is non-refundable and is credited toward your first tuition payment.

Language Proficiency

  • Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. Applications will not be processed until the required TOEFL or IELTS score is received. The TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date and are considered official only when received directly from the testing agency and are considered official only when received directly from the testing agency.

  • A minimum of an 88 TOEFL (no less than a 20 on any section) or a minimum of a 6.5 IELTS (no less than 6.0 on any section) is required to apply.
  • Applicants may be exempted from English proficiency test requirements if by the time of matriculation they have earned a baccalaureate degree or higher from a formally-recognized/accredited university where the institution's language of instruction and examination is English. Such applicants may be exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS and the English Language Proficiency Assessment requirement but not from other standardized graduate entrance examinations.

  • Students whose native language is not English and who are required to submit TOEFL/IELTS scores will be assessed by the University of Denver English Language Center (ELC).

Master of Business Administration in General Business

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
MBA 4110Enterprise Challenge2
MBA 4120Strategic Transitioning from Uncertainty to Risk2
MBA 4130Corporate Financial Reporting2
MBA 4140Ethics in Practice2
MBA 4150Understanding Your Market2
MBA 4160Opportunities with Data Skills I2
MBA 4170Navigating the Global Economy2
MBA 4210Foundations I2
MBA 4220High Performance Management I2
MBA 4230Managing Cost Information2
MBA 4235Profit Planning and Measuring Performance2
MBA 4280Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies I2
MBA 4285Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies II2
MBA 4290Economics for Decision Making2
MBA 4310Experiencing Strategic Management through Corporate Challenges2
MBA 4340Creating Sustainable Entrprise2
MBA 4360Opportunities w/ Data Skill II2
MBA 4410Global Challenge I2
MBA 4415Global Challenge Trip2
MBA 4470International Business Theory in Practice2
MBA 4490Global Macroeconomics2
MBA 4510Global Challenge II2
MBA 4540Business, Government and Society2
MBA 4550Strategic Marketing Decision-Making2
MBA 4670Global Issues2
MBA 4980MBA Internship4
MBA 4620Leadership Capstone: Integration and Transition2
Elective requirements
Students will complete 24 credits in 4000-level general business courses.24
Total Credits80

Minimum number of credits required: 80

Master of Business Administration in General Business with a Concentration in Accounting

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
MBA 4110Enterprise Challenge2
MBA 4120Strategic Transitioning from Uncertainty to Risk2
MBA 4130Corporate Financial Reporting2
MBA 4140Ethics in Practice2
MBA 4150Understanding Your Market2
MBA 4160Opportunities with Data Skills I2
MBA 4170Navigating the Global Economy2
MBA 4210Foundations I2
MBA 4220High Performance Management I2
MBA 4230Managing Cost Information2
MBA 4235Profit Planning and Measuring Performance2
MBA 4280Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies I2
MBA 4285Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies II2
MBA 4290Economics for Decision Making2
MBA 4310Experiencing Strategic Management through Corporate Challenges2
MBA 4340Creating Sustainable Entrprise2
MBA 4360Opportunities w/ Data Skill II2
MBA 4410Global Challenge I2
MBA 4415Global Challenge Trip2
MBA 4470International Business Theory in Practice2
MBA 4490Global Macroeconomics2
MBA 4510Global Challenge II2
MBA 4540Business, Government and Society2
MBA 4550Strategic Marketing Decision-Making2
MBA 4670Global Issues2
MBA 4980MBA Internship4
MBA 4620Leadership Capstone: Integration and Transition2
Elective requirements
24 credits in electives/concentration courses required.24
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 of the 24 elective credits must be completed in 4000 level ACTG courses to complete a concentration. Must work directly with the ACTG Department on course selection.
Total Credits80

Minimum number of credits required: 80

Master of Business Administration in General Business with a Concentration in Business Analytics

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
MBA 4110Enterprise Challenge2
MBA 4120Strategic Transitioning from Uncertainty to Risk2
MBA 4130Corporate Financial Reporting2
MBA 4140Ethics in Practice2
MBA 4150Understanding Your Market2
MBA 4160Opportunities with Data Skills I2
MBA 4170Navigating the Global Economy2
MBA 4210Foundations I2
MBA 4220High Performance Management I2
MBA 4230Managing Cost Information2
MBA 4235Profit Planning and Measuring Performance2
MBA 4280Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies I2
MBA 4285Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies II2
MBA 4290Economics for Decision Making2
MBA 4310Experiencing Strategic Management through Corporate Challenges2
MBA 4340Creating Sustainable Entrprise2
MBA 4360Opportunities w/ Data Skill II2
MBA 4410Global Challenge I2
MBA 4415Global Challenge Trip2
MBA 4470International Business Theory in Practice2
MBA 4490Global Macroeconomics2
MBA 4510Global Challenge II2
MBA 4540Business, Government and Society2
MBA 4550Strategic Marketing Decision-Making2
MBA 4670Global Issues2
MBA 4980MBA Internship4
MBA 4620Leadership Capstone: Integration and Transition2
Elective requirements
24 credits in electives/concentration courses required.24
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 of the 24 elective credits must be completed in 4000 level INFO courses to complete a concentration, including:
Survey of Business Analytics
Business Databases
Predictive Analytics
Data Mining and Visualization
Other 4000-level INFO courses could be substituted for INFO 4300 and INFO 4340 with faculty approval.
Total Credits80

Minimum number of credits required: 80

Master of Business Administration in General Business with a Concentration in Business - Customized

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
MBA 4110Enterprise Challenge2
MBA 4120Strategic Transitioning from Uncertainty to Risk2
MBA 4130Corporate Financial Reporting2
MBA 4140Ethics in Practice2
MBA 4150Understanding Your Market2
MBA 4160Opportunities with Data Skills I2
MBA 4170Navigating the Global Economy2
MBA 4210Foundations I2
MBA 4220High Performance Management I2
MBA 4230Managing Cost Information2
MBA 4235Profit Planning and Measuring Performance2
MBA 4280Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies I2
MBA 4285Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies II2
MBA 4290Economics for Decision Making2
MBA 4310Experiencing Strategic Management through Corporate Challenges2
MBA 4340Creating Sustainable Entrprise2
MBA 4360Opportunities w/ Data Skill II2
MBA 4410Global Challenge I2
MBA 4415Global Challenge Trip2
MBA 4470International Business Theory in Practice2
MBA 4490Global Macroeconomics2
MBA 4510Global Challenge II2
MBA 4540Business, Government and Society2
MBA 4550Strategic Marketing Decision-Making2
MBA 4670Global Issues2
MBA 4980MBA Internship4
MBA 4620Leadership Capstone: Integration and Transition2
Elective requirements
24 credits in electives/concentration courses required.24
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 of the 24 elective credits must be completed in 4000 level Graduate courses approved by Advisor for specified customized concentration.
Total Credits80

Minimum number of credits required: 80

Master of Business Administration in General Business with a Concentration in Finance

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
MBA 4110Enterprise Challenge2
MBA 4120Strategic Transitioning from Uncertainty to Risk2
MBA 4130Corporate Financial Reporting2
MBA 4140Ethics in Practice2
MBA 4150Understanding Your Market2
MBA 4160Opportunities with Data Skills I2
MBA 4170Navigating the Global Economy2
MBA 4210Foundations I2
MBA 4220High Performance Management I2
MBA 4230Managing Cost Information2
MBA 4235Profit Planning and Measuring Performance2
MBA 4280Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies I2
MBA 4285Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies II2
MBA 4290Economics for Decision Making2
MBA 4310Experiencing Strategic Management through Corporate Challenges2
MBA 4340Creating Sustainable Entrprise2
MBA 4360Opportunities w/ Data Skill II2
MBA 4410Global Challenge I2
MBA 4415Global Challenge Trip2
MBA 4470International Business Theory in Practice2
MBA 4490Global Macroeconomics2
MBA 4510Global Challenge II2
MBA 4540Business, Government and Society2
MBA 4550Strategic Marketing Decision-Making2
MBA 4670Global Issues2
MBA 4980MBA Internship4
MBA 4620Leadership Capstone: Integration and Transition2
Elective requirements
24 credits in electives/concentration courses required.24
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 of the 24 elective credits from either Corporate Finance or Investments:
Corporate Finance Courses
Financial Planning & Analysis
Strategic Finance
In addition, choose two courses from the following:
Enterprise Risk Management
Advanced Business Valuation
Capital Expenditure Analysis
Investment Banking and External Financing
Investment Courses
Financial Investments and Markets
Security Analysis and Valuation
In addition, choose two courses from the following:
Quantitative Methods in Stock Selection
Financial Risk Management Strategies
Portfolio Management and Risk Analytics
Marsico Investment Fund I
Marsico Investment Fund II
Derivatives
Fixed Income Analysis
Total Credits80

Minimum number of credits required: 80

Master of Business Administration in General Business with a Concentration in Marketing

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
MBA 4110Enterprise Challenge2
MBA 4120Strategic Transitioning from Uncertainty to Risk2
MBA 4130Corporate Financial Reporting2
MBA 4140Ethics in Practice2
MBA 4150Understanding Your Market2
MBA 4160Opportunities with Data Skills I2
MBA 4170Navigating the Global Economy2
MBA 4210Foundations I2
MBA 4220High Performance Management I2
MBA 4230Managing Cost Information2
MBA 4235Profit Planning and Measuring Performance2
MBA 4280Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies I2
MBA 4285Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies II2
MBA 4290Economics for Decision Making2
MBA 4310Experiencing Strategic Management through Corporate Challenges2
MBA 4340Creating Sustainable Entrprise2
MBA 4360Opportunities w/ Data Skill II2
MBA 4410Global Challenge I2
MBA 4415Global Challenge Trip2
MBA 4470International Business Theory in Practice2
MBA 4490Global Macroeconomics2
MBA 4510Global Challenge II2
MBA 4540Business, Government and Society2
MBA 4550Strategic Marketing Decision-Making2
MBA 4670Global Issues2
MBA 4980MBA Internship4
MBA 4620Leadership Capstone: Integration and Transition2
Elective requirements
24 credits in electives/concentration courses required24
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 of the 24 elective credits must be completed from the Digital Marketing or Brand Management tracks below:
Digital Marketing Courses
Social Media Marketing
Mobile Marketing
Search Engine Marketing
Tech in Marketing: Design Tools and Digital Foundations
Brand Management Courses
Customer Experience Management
Marketing Research & Analytics
Brand Management
In addition, choose one course from the following:
Social Media Marketing
Mobile Marketing
Search Engine Marketing
Tech in Marketing: Design Tools and Digital Foundations
Total Credits80

Minimum number of credits required: 80

Master of Business Administration in General Business with a Concentration in Real Estate and the Built Environment

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
MBA 4110Enterprise Challenge2
MBA 4120Strategic Transitioning from Uncertainty to Risk2
MBA 4130Corporate Financial Reporting2
MBA 4140Ethics in Practice2
MBA 4150Understanding Your Market2
MBA 4160Opportunities with Data Skills I2
MBA 4170Navigating the Global Economy2
MBA 4210Foundations I2
MBA 4220High Performance Management I2
MBA 4230Managing Cost Information2
MBA 4235Profit Planning and Measuring Performance2
MBA 4280Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies I2
MBA 4285Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies II2
MBA 4290Economics for Decision Making2
MBA 4310Experiencing Strategic Management through Corporate Challenges2
MBA 4340Creating Sustainable Entrprise2
MBA 4360Opportunities w/ Data Skill II2
MBA 4410Global Challenge I2
MBA 4415Global Challenge Trip2
MBA 4470International Business Theory in Practice2
MBA 4490Global Macroeconomics2
MBA 4510Global Challenge II2
MBA 4540Business, Government and Society2
MBA 4550Strategic Marketing Decision-Making2
MBA 4670Global Issues2
MBA 4980MBA Internship4
MBA 4620Leadership Capstone: Integration and Transition2
Elective requirements
24 credits in electives/concentration courses required.24
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 of the 24 elective credits must be completed in 4000 level REBE courses to complete a concentration, including:
Real Estate Courses
Income Property Finance
Real Estate Financial Analysis
Select two courses from the following:
Income Property Investment
Income Property Valuation and Appraisal
Property Development and Feasibility
Property Development Courses
Income Property Finance
Property Development and Feasibility
Planning, Entitlements, and Public Finance
Const Project Management
Integrated Project Delivery Courses
Preconstruction Integration and Planning
Lean Construction Project Management
Design Management and Schedule Control
Cost Modeling and Trend Management
Total Credits80

Minimum number of credits required: 80

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the Executive MBA Program

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
XMBA 4102Business & Economic Context2.5
XMBA 4340Executive Leadership I2.5
XMBA 4330Financial Accounting2.5
XMBA 4350Executive Leadership II2.5
XMBA 4341Power and Influence2.5
XMBA 4332Accounting/Financial Reporting2.5
XMBA 4331Foundations of Financial Analysis2.5
XMBA 4360Strategic Marketing2.5
XMBA 4333Statistical Decision Analysis2.5
XMBA 4351Innovation2.5
XMBA 4336Financial Decision Making2.5
XMBA 4231Achieving Stategic Advtg II2.5
XMBA 4337Strategic Finance2.5
XMBA 4720Executive Business Law2.5
XMBA 4334Strategic Management of Costs2.5
XMBA 4342Human Capital Management2.5
XMBA 4353Global Business I2.5
XMBA 4362Strategic Management2.5
XMBA 4354Global Business II2.5
XMBA 4365Entrepreneurship2.5
XMBA 4361Customer Relationship Management2.5
XMBA 4355Sustainability2.5
XMBA 4343The Discipline of Execution2.5
XMBA 4364Business Data & Analytics2.5
Total Credits60

Minimum number of credits required: 60

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the Professional MBA Program

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
BUS 4610The Essence of Enterprise4
BUS 4620Ethics for the 21st Century Professional4
FIN 4740Managerial Microeconomics2
FIN 4750Managerial Macroeconomics2
ACTG 4610Financial Accounting and Reporting4
FIN 4630Managerial Finance4
MBA 4610Law and Public Policy4
MKTG 4100Marketing Concepts4
MGMT 4240Global Business Imperative4
STAT 4610Business Statistics4
ACTG 4660Strategic Cost Management4
EVM 4355Entrepreneurial Mindset4
INFO 4250Data Driven Decision Making4
MGMT 4625Managing Human Capital6
MGMT 4545Leadership, Team, and Career Development2
MGMT 4690Strategic Management4
BUS 4600Professional MBA Capstone Project4
Elective requirements
8 credits in 4000 level courses8
Total Credits70

Minimum number of credits required: 70

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the Professional MBA Program with a Concentration in Accounting

Core coursework requirements
BUS 4610The Essence of Enterprise4
BUS 4620Ethics for the 21st Century Professional4
FIN 4740Managerial Microeconomics2
FIN 4750Managerial Macroeconomics2
ACTG 4610Financial Accounting and Reporting4
FIN 4630Managerial Finance4
MBA 4610Law and Public Policy4
MKTG 4100Marketing Concepts4
MGMT 4240Global Business Imperative4
STAT 4610Business Statistics4
ACTG 4660Strategic Cost Management4
EVM 4355Entrepreneurial Mindset4
INFO 4250Data Driven Decision Making4
MGMT 4625Managing Human Capital6
MGMT 4545Leadership, Team, and Career Development2
MGMT 4690Strategic Management4
BUS 4600Professional MBA Capstone Project4
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 credits must be completed in 4000-level ACTG courses to complete a concentration. Must work directly with the ACTG Department on course selection.16
Total Credits78

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the Professional MBA Program with a Concentration in Business Analytics

Core coursework requirements
BUS 4610The Essence of Enterprise4
BUS 4620Ethics for the 21st Century Professional4
FIN 4740Managerial Microeconomics2
FIN 4750Managerial Macroeconomics2
ACTG 4610Financial Accounting and Reporting4
FIN 4630Managerial Finance4
MBA 4610Law and Public Policy4
MKTG 4100Marketing Concepts4
MGMT 4240Global Business Imperative4
STAT 4610Business Statistics4
ACTG 4660Strategic Cost Management4
EVM 4355Entrepreneurial Mindset4
INFO 4250Data Driven Decision Making4
MGMT 4625Managing Human Capital6
MGMT 4545Leadership, Team, and Career Development2
MGMT 4690Strategic Management4
BUS 4600Professional MBA Capstone Project4
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 credits must be completed in 4000-level INFO courses to complete a concentration, including:16
Survey of Business Analytics
Business Databases
Predictive Analytics
Data Mining and Visualization
Other 4000-level INFO courses could be substituted for INFO 4300 and INFO 4340 with faculty approval.
Total Credits78

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the Professional MBA Program with a Concentration in Business - Customized

Core coursework requirements
BUS 4610The Essence of Enterprise4
BUS 4620Ethics for the 21st Century Professional4
FIN 4740Managerial Microeconomics2
FIN 4750Managerial Macroeconomics2
ACTG 4610Financial Accounting and Reporting4
FIN 4630Managerial Finance4
MBA 4610Law and Public Policy4
MKTG 4100Marketing Concepts4
MGMT 4240Global Business Imperative4
STAT 4610Business Statistics4
ACTG 4660Strategic Cost Management4
EVM 4355Entrepreneurial Mindset4
INFO 4250Data Driven Decision Making4
MGMT 4625Managing Human Capital6
MGMT 4545Leadership, Team, and Career Development2
MGMT 4690Strategic Management4
BUS 4600Professional MBA Capstone Project4
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 credits must be completed in 4000-level graduate courses approved by Advisor for specified customized concentration. 16
Total Credits78

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the Professional MBA Program with a Concentration in Finance

Core coursework requirements
BUS 4610The Essence of Enterprise4
BUS 4620Ethics for the 21st Century Professional4
FIN 4740Managerial Microeconomics2
FIN 4750Managerial Macroeconomics2
ACTG 4610Financial Accounting and Reporting4
FIN 4630Managerial Finance4
MBA 4610Law and Public Policy4
MKTG 4100Marketing Concepts4
MGMT 4240Global Business Imperative4
STAT 4610Business Statistics4
ACTG 4660Strategic Cost Management4
EVM 4355Entrepreneurial Mindset4
INFO 4250Data Driven Decision Making4
MGMT 4625Managing Human Capital6
MGMT 4545Leadership, Team, and Career Development2
MGMT 4690Strategic Management4
BUS 4600Professional MBA Capstone Project4
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 credits from either Corporate Finance or Investments:16
Corporate Finance Courses
Financial Planning & Analysis
Strategic Finance
In addition, choose two courses from the following:
Enterprise Risk Management
Advanced Business Valuation
Capital Expenditure Analysis
Investment Banking and External Financing
Investment Courses
Financial Investments and Markets
Security Analysis and Valuation
In addition, choose two courses from the following:
Quantitative Methods in Stock Selection
Financial Risk Management Strategies
Portfolio Management and Risk Analytics
Marsico Investment Fund I
Marsico Investment Fund II
Derivatives
Fixed Income Analysis
Total Credits78

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the Professional MBA Program with a Concentration in Marketing

Core coursework requirements
BUS 4610The Essence of Enterprise4
BUS 4620Ethics for the 21st Century Professional4
FIN 4740Managerial Microeconomics2
FIN 4750Managerial Macroeconomics2
ACTG 4610Financial Accounting and Reporting4
FIN 4630Managerial Finance4
MBA 4610Law and Public Policy4
MKTG 4100Marketing Concepts4
MGMT 4240Global Business Imperative4
STAT 4610Business Statistics4
ACTG 4660Strategic Cost Management4
EVM 4355Entrepreneurial Mindset4
INFO 4250Data Driven Decision Making4
MGMT 4625Managing Human Capital6
MGMT 4545Leadership, Team, and Career Development2
MGMT 4690Strategic Management4
BUS 4600Professional MBA Capstone Project4
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 credits must be completed from the Digital Marketing or Brand Management tracks below:16
Digital Marketing Courses
Social Media Marketing
Mobile Marketing
Search Engine Marketing
Tech in Marketing: Design Tools and Digital Foundations
Brand Management Courses
Customer Experience Management
Marketing Research & Analytics
Brand Management
In addition, choose one course from the following:
Social Media Marketing
Mobile Marketing
Search Engine Marketing
Tech in Marketing: Design Tools and Digital Foundations
Total Credits78

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the Professional MBA Program with a Concentration in Real Estate and the Built Environment

Core coursework requirements
BUS 4610The Essence of Enterprise4
BUS 4620Ethics for the 21st Century Professional4
FIN 4740Managerial Microeconomics2
FIN 4750Managerial Macroeconomics2
ACTG 4610Financial Accounting and Reporting4
FIN 4630Managerial Finance4
MBA 4610Law and Public Policy4
MKTG 4100Marketing Concepts4
MGMT 4240Global Business Imperative4
STAT 4610Business Statistics4
ACTG 4660Strategic Cost Management4
EVM 4355Entrepreneurial Mindset4
INFO 4250Data Driven Decision Making4
MGMT 4625Managing Human Capital6
MGMT 4545Leadership, Team, and Career Development2
MGMT 4690Strategic Management4
BUS 4600Professional MBA Capstone Project4
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 credits must be completed in 4000 level REBE courses to complete a concentration, including:16
Real Estate Courses
Income Property Finance
Real Estate Financial Analysis
Select two courses from the following:
Income Property Investment
Income Property Valuation and Appraisal
Property Development and Feasibility
Property Development Courses
Income Property Finance
Property Development and Feasibility
Planning, Entitlements, and Public Finance
Const Project Management
Integrated Project Delivery Courses
Preconstruction Integration and Planning
Lean Construction Project Management
Design Management and Schedule Control
Cost Modeling and Trend Management
Total Credits78

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the One-Year MBA Program

Degree Requirements

Core Coursework Requirements
MBA 4050Bus Innovation Challenge I4
MBA 4060Bus Innovation Challenge II4
BUS 4610The Essence of Enterprise4
BUS 4620Ethics for the 21st Century Professional4
BUS 4630Creating Sustainable Enterprises4
MBA 4205Strategic Career Management4
MBA 4690Enterprise Solutions4
MGMT 4280Business Design4
Elective requirements
24 credits in electives/concentration courses required.24
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 of the 24 elective credits must be completed in 4000 level concentration courses to fulfill a concentration. The additional 8 credits may be 4000-level business electives or additional concentration courses
Total Credits56

Minimum number of credits required: 56

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the One-Year MBA Program with a Concentration in Accounting

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
MBA 4050Bus Innovation Challenge I4
MBA 4060Bus Innovation Challenge II4
BUS 4610The Essence of Enterprise4
BUS 4620Ethics for the 21st Century Professional4
BUS 4630Creating Sustainable Enterprises4
MBA 4205Strategic Career Management4
MBA 4690Enterprise Solutions4
MGMT 4280Business Design4
Elective requirements
24 credits in electives/concentration courses required.24
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 of the 24 credits must be completed in 4000 level ACTG courses to complete a concentration.
Total Credits56

Minimum number of credits required: 56

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the One-Year MBA Program with a Concentration in Business Analytics

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
MBA 4050Bus Innovation Challenge I4
MBA 4060Bus Innovation Challenge II4
BUS 4610The Essence of Enterprise4
BUS 4620Ethics for the 21st Century Professional4
BUS 4630Creating Sustainable Enterprises4
MBA 4205Strategic Career Management4
MBA 4690Enterprise Solutions4
MGMT 4280Business Design4
Elective requirements
24 credits in electives/concentration courses required.24
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 of the 24 elective credits must be completed in 4000 level INFO courses to complete a concentration, including:
Survey of Business Analytics
Business Databases
Predictive Analytics
Data Mining and Visualization
Other 4000-level INFO course could be substituted for INFO 4300 and INFO 4340 with faculty approval.
Total Credits56

Minimum number of credits required: 56

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the One-Year MBA Program with a Concentration in Business - Customized

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
MBA 4050Bus Innovation Challenge I4
MBA 4060Bus Innovation Challenge II4
BUS 4610The Essence of Enterprise4
BUS 4620Ethics for the 21st Century Professional4
BUS 4630Creating Sustainable Enterprises4
MBA 4205Strategic Career Management4
MBA 4690Enterprise Solutions4
MGMT 4280Business Design4
Elective requirements
24 credits in electives/concentration courses required.24
Concentration requirements
Requires a minimum of 16 of the 24 credits in advisor-approved concentration courses.
Total Credits56

Minimum number of credits required: 56

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the One-Year MBA Program with a Concentration in Finance

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
MBA 4050Bus Innovation Challenge I4
MBA 4060Bus Innovation Challenge II4
BUS 4610The Essence of Enterprise4
BUS 4620Ethics for the 21st Century Professional4
BUS 4630Creating Sustainable Enterprises4
MBA 4205Strategic Career Management4
MBA 4690Enterprise Solutions4
MGMT 4280Business Design4
Elective requirements
24 credits in electives/concentration courses required.24
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 of the 24 elective credits must be completed in 4000 level FIN courses to complete a concentration, including:
Financial Investments and Markets
Security Analysis and Valuation
Portfolio Management and Risk Analytics
Financial Planning & Analysis
Capital Expenditure Analysis
Financial Modeling
Multinational Financial Management
Topics in Finance
Marsico Investment Fund I
Marsico Investment Fund II
Marsico Investment Fund III
Managerial Microeconomics
Managerial Macroeconomics
Derivatives
Strategic Finance
Investment Banking and External Financing
Fixed Income Analysis
Total Credits56

Minimum number of credits required: 56

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the One-Year MBA Program with a Concentration in Marketing

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
MBA 4050Bus Innovation Challenge I4
MBA 4060Bus Innovation Challenge II4
BUS 4610The Essence of Enterprise4
BUS 4620Ethics for the 21st Century Professional4
BUS 4630Creating Sustainable Enterprises4
MBA 4205Strategic Career Management4
MBA 4690Enterprise Solutions4
MGMT 4280Business Design4
Elective requirements
24 credits in electives/concentration courses required.24
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 of the 24 elective credits must be completed in 4000 level MKTG courses to complete a concentration, including:
Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) Courses
Integrated Marketing Communication
Brand Management
Integrated Marketing Communication Campaign
Foundations of Digital Marketing
Social Media Marketing
Mobile Marketing
Search Engine Marketing
Customer Experience Management (CEM) Courses
Customer Experience Management
Customer Experience Management Integration
Brand Management
Integrated Marketing Strategy (IMS) Courses
Consumer Behavior
Marketing Research & Analytics
Product and Service Innovation
International Marketing
Advanced Marketing Strategy
Supply Chain Management (SCM) Courses
Global Transportation Systems
Marketing Channels & Logistics
Strategic Sourcing
Supply Chain Management
Managing Exports
Additional courses
Sports & Entertainment Marketing
Topics in Marketing
Total Credits56

Minimum number of credits required: 56

Master of Business Administration in General Business in the One-Year MBA Program with a Concentration in Real Estate and the Built Environment

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
MBA 4050Bus Innovation Challenge I4
MBA 4060Bus Innovation Challenge II4
BUS 4610The Essence of Enterprise4
BUS 4620Ethics for the 21st Century Professional4
BUS 4630Creating Sustainable Enterprises4
MBA 4205Strategic Career Management4
MBA 4690Enterprise Solutions4
MGMT 4280Business Design4
Elective requirements
24 credits in electives/concentration courses required.24
Concentration requirements
A minimum of 16 of the 24 elective credits must be completed in 4000 level REBE courses to complete a concentration, including:
Real Estate Courses
Income Property Finance
Real Estate Financial Analysis
Select two courses from the following:
Income Property Investment
Income Property Valuation and Appraisal
Property Development and Feasibility
Property Development Courses
Income Property Finance
Property Development and Feasibility
Planning, Entitlements, and Public Finance
Const Project Management
Integrated Project Delivery Courses
Preconstruction Integration and Planning
Lean Construction Project Management
Design Management and Schedule Control
Cost Modeling and Trend Management
Total Credits56

Minimum number of credits required: 56

Accounting Courses

ACTG 4155 Accounting Information Technology Systems and Business Environment (4 Credits)

The course will give students a basic understanding of how to develop a beginning-to-intermediate AIS system. Process flowcharts and entity-relationship diagrams will be used to document the system in Microsoft Visio. The course will explore the database structure used in various accounting IT systems. Students will be Microsoft Access certified by the end of the course. The course will also cover the IT topics contained in the BEC portion of the CPA exam.

ACTG 4176 Accounting Data Analytics (4 Credits)

In this course, students explore overarching trends in big data and the impact to accounting and auditing fields while also gaining hands on experience working with business data sets. In today’s information world, accountants must be well equipped to understand and utilize the vast and varying data systems that feed a company’s decision making process. This course allows students to develop big data skills by learning the SQL language to query data from mock clients. Students execute Computer Assisted Auditing Techniques (CAATs) using both the SQL language as well was the audit data mining tool, IDEA. Students simulate the process to request client data files, load complex data sets, design and execute query procedures and summarize results for management.

ACTG 4201 Financial Accounting for Management (2 Credits)

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of financial accounting and reporting with an emphasis on the needs of the user, both internal and external. The goal is to enable the student to become a knowledgeable reader and user of financial statements.

ACTG 4220 Financial Actg & Analysis (4 Credits)

Cross-listed with ACTG 3230.

ACTG 4222 Understanding Financial Statements (4 Credits)

At the conclusion of this course the student should understand: (1) management decisions that impact published financial statements, (2) the fundamentals of interpretation and analysis of financial statements, (3) economic and ethical issues relating to financial reporting, and (4) management attempts to enhance reported operating results. The course addresses the needs of managers and analysts, hence does not cover promulgated financial reporting rules in depth. The financial reporting topics expand on material presented in introductory Accounting and Finance courses. The focus is on the substance of the reported information. This course is not an approved elective for the MACC degree. Cross listed with ACTG 3220.

ACTG 4240 Topics & Cases in Financial Accounting (4 Credits)

This course develops a greater awareness of contemporary accounting issues, focusing on financial reporting. The course is designed to enhance each student’s ability to identify, discuss, and resolve open-ended problems (i.e., those having no single “correct” answer) faced by accounting professionals. Each student must commit to being an active participant in the class discussions. Through the use of numerous cases involving all aspects of financial reporting, students identify issues, conduct authoritative research, then present and defend their conclusions using both oral and written presentation formats. Students also write an original research paper on a topic of their choice.

ACTG 4281 Intermediate Financial Accounting I (4 Credits)

The focus of this course is the foundation and content of published financial statements. Specifically it covers the following broad topics: (1) Conceptual Framework of Financial Reporting; (2) Financial Statements and Related Disclosures; (3) Assets: Recognition and Measurement; and (4) Liabilities: Recognition and Measurement. Common to each of the topics is an emphasis on reading GAAP and applying GAAP guidance to fact patterns. At the conclusion of the course, students should be aware of the proper accounting treatment for many common situations; moreover, students should be fully comfortable interpreting GAAP literature to address scenarios involving assets, liabilities, and income that were not specifically covered in the class.

ACTG 4282 Intermediate Financial Accounting II (4 Credits)

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Financial Accounting. The focus of this course is the application of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles to complex business transactions. In this final course of the sequence, we finish our examination of the balance sheet by exploring the issues involved with stockholders’ equity, followed by in-depth study of some of the most complex accounting issues, including revenue recognition, accounting for income taxes, pensions and post-employment benefits, leases, and accounting changes and errors.

ACTG 4284 Consolidated Financial Statements (2 Credits)

This course introduces the student to the preparation of financial statements in compliance with GAAP when the reporting entity has investments in other entities that are other than passive investments. This module explores the financial reporting issues relating to partial or full ownership of one business entity by another. It includes use of the equity method as well as issues involved in reporting the financial results of consolidated entities, both at and subsequent to acquisition or formation.

ACTG 4285 Accounting for Foreign Operations (2 Credits)

Topics covered in this course include the financial statement impact of doing business in a foreign currency, having foreign subsidiaries or operations, and certain hedging activities.

ACTG 4340 Topics & Cases in Managerial Accounting (4 Credits)

This course focuses upon innovative forensic, management control, productivity and business valuation approaches used by forensic and managerial accountants. Such strategies and techniques are evaluated through classroom discussion of cases and related articles.

ACTG 4354 Cost Accounting (4 Credits)

Accounting information in manufacturing enterprises, standard costs, and budgets. Open to students not having ACTG 3354 or equivalent. Prerequisite: MBA 4110, MBA 4111, or equivalent.

ACTG 4400 Taxation for Business and Investment Planning (4 Credits)

Social awareness & ethics uses a fresh integrated approach to applying the basic fundamentals of marketing to complex and evolving scenarios involving social change and insight, cultural trends and topics, and tricky, often emotional, ethical situations. This course also helps students learn skills in a safe environment and leverage their experience and knowledge to investigate business situations and opportunities in a thoughtful and sophisticated manner. This course develops a student’s ability to make sound business planning decisions using real information from the external environment. This course will combine business ethics’ overarching intent to protect employees, the environment, and their customers with marketing ethics’ principles of honesty, fairness, responsibility, and respect. As part of this, students will learn about and apply Daniels Fund Initiate Principles: http://www.danielsfund.org/_Assets/files/Ethics%20Initiative%20Principles.pdf.

ACTG 4410 Federal Income Taxation (4 Credits)

The course is designed for graduate accounting students that wish to study federal income taxation. This is the first course in taxation, which introduces the federal taxation system, the importance of tax authorities, the concepts of gross income and tax deductions and the tax implications of common property transactions. The course generally focuses on property transactions, but the taxation of individuals is emphasized with an objective of students being able to properly prepare complex individual tax returns.

ACTG 4462 Corporate and Partnership Taxation (4 Credits)

The course is designed for graduate accounting, finance or other business students in their study of advanced topics in federal income taxation. This is the second course in taxation which concentrates on taxation of corporations, limited liability corporations, S corporations and partnerships.

ACTG 4520 Forensic Accounting and Auditing (4 Credits)

Students will have an opportunity to learn, study, and discuss practical aspects of accounting as it is used to detect and prosecute fraud. Students will be exposed to improprieties, common fraud schemes, illegalities, and harassments.

ACTG 4551 Auditing (4 Credits)

This course is designed to provide you with a thorough understanding of auditing and related attest services. This includes gaining requisite knowledge about AICPA (U.S. GAAS) and PCAOB auditing standards and how they are applied in conducting a financial statement audit. Application of these standards applies to planning an audit, the risk assessment process including gaining an understanding of internal control, gathering and evaluating evidence, sampling, and issuing an audit report.

ACTG 4552 Advanced Auditing (4 Credits)

This course is designed to build on the foundation of auditing knowledge developed in ACTG 4551 and apply that knowledge to specific accounts and assertions in a financial statement audit. Students also examine selected SEC enforcement actions and discuss what audit procedures may have been beneficial to prevent the misstatement. Prerequisite: ACTG 4551 or ACTG 3551.

ACTG 4557 Fair Value Auditing (4 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to expose students to the accounting, economic and valuation concepts and challenges that are relevant to auditing fair value measurements and disclosures in financial statements. The role of the FASB, PCAOB, SEC and other standards setters on fair value accounting and measurements are explored. Prerequisite: ACTG 4551 or ACTG 3551.

ACTG 4575 Accounting Information System Risk, Control and Audit (4 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to engage students in topics covering the risk, audit and control of Accounting Information Systems. It is no longer possible to “audit around” an IT system. Today’s accounting professionals must possess a strong understanding of accounting information system risks and controls. This course will cover both 1) auditing of the IT controls that support an accounting information system and 2) using auditing and data mining tools to assist in financial statement audit techniques.

ACTG 4607 Not-for-Profit & Governmental Accounting (4 Credits)

The course will focus on Not-for-Profit (NFP) and Governmental (Govt) financial accounting standards and practices employed by governmental and nonprofit organizations. Upon successful completion of the course, students will master the fundamentals of financial reporting of various kinds of governmental accounting and nonprofit organizations. Social, environmental, and ethical issues are addressed in this course. The content of Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting will be linked to sustainability, leadership and governance.

ACTG 4610 Financial Accounting and Reporting (4 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the financial statements issued by companies to external parties, such as shareholders and creditors. The course covers the fundamentals of accounting, from recording economic events in the accounting records to the preparation of the company’s financial statements. In addition, the course examines major transaction categories, accounting policy choices of business firms and their financial statement implications, as well as the content of publicly-traded companies’ Form 10-K annual reports.

ACTG 4620 Accounting Ethics (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the idea of community and the ethical and social relationships of accounting leaders and business organizations in their communities. The course focus is on the role of the accounting professional and the unique and special responsibilities associated with that role. This is examined by analyzing a variety of issues that students will face during their careers. The goal is to provide students with generalized understanding and skills that can be employed in dealing with other issues that emerge directly relate to the state Code of Professional Conduct applicable to CPAs, the Code provisions are discussed and analyzed.

ACTG 4660 Strategic Cost Management (4 Credits)

Strategic cost management methods and practices focus on how to help the firm succeed in contemporary business. Topics in the course include balanced scorecard, cost-volume-profit analysis, target costing, standard costing, and management control. The course will enable students to apply strategic thinking to management planning, decision-making, and management reporting.

ACTG 4700 Graduate Seminar in Accounting (1-17 Credits)

ACTG 4701 Special Topics in Accounting (1-5 Credits)

ACTG 4702 Special Topics in Accounting (1-5 Credits)

ACTG 4703 Special Topics in Accounting (1-5 Credits)

ACTG 4704 Special Topics in Accounting (1-5 Credits)

ACTG 4705 Topics in Accounting (1-4 Credits)

ACTG 4710 Managing the Family Business (4 Credits)

Family enterprises have a tremendous impact on our local, national and global economies. Today, the definition of the family enterprise extends beyond just the business entity. It includes family offices, family “banks,” family councils, trusts, and family foundations, just to name a few. Further, what happens in, and how decisions are made by, family enterprise affects not only the active family members but other key stakeholders such as inactive family members, in-laws, non-family managers and employees, professional advisors, customers, suppliers and competitors. This course gives students insight into the universe of possibilities that families, enterprises and their advisors face when engaged in systemic transition planning. This highly interdisciplinary course is appropriate for anyone who intends to work in or with family enterprises. This includes family members, accountants, attorneys, estate planners, financial or wealth managers, family office professionals, insurance consultants, business advisors, management consultants, organizational and leadership development experts, international business professionals, psychologists, social workers, and family therapists.

ACTG 4740 Valuation and Modeling (4 Credits)

The ultimate purpose of the course is to improve professional decision-making skills. Professional decisions are made using a combination of judgment and analysis. Even skilled professionals (in any field) will make incorrect decisions when working with incorrect or insufficient information. Thus, one key to improving decision-making is improving analytical insights and skills. This course emphasizes the definition, construction, uses and limitations of popular financial models and instruments. Further, the class focuses on how the instruments are used, why they are used and how decisions to use such instruments and tools/techniques to value them are made.

ACTG 4750 Valuing a Business (4 Credits)

This course explores all major aspects of business valuation. Students not only study valuation theory, they appraise an actual business and draft a valuation report in compliance with the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants Statement on Standards for Valuation Services (SSVS) and Reporting Standards of the National Association of Certified Valuation Analysts (NACVA). Prerequisite: ACTG 3068 or ACTG 4282.

ACTG 4760 CEOs and Corporate Governance (4 Credits)

This course examines the current and pressing issue of corporate governance, in its ethical, legal, and social dimensions. Students read the latest views of scholars and experts and gain the perspectives of corporate CEOs and other organization leaders. Topics explored include the history of various governance models, public policy on corporate governance, corporate board functions and responsibilities, the dynamics between CEOs and boards, ethical leadership and corporate culture, ethics and compliance programs, executive liability, nonprofit corporate governance, board and audit committee responsibilities, restructuring and governance, executive compensation problems and solutions, shareholder activism, and corporate governance reforms. Cross-listed with LGST 4760.

ACTG 4795 Graduate Research Sem-Actg (1-17 Credits)

ACTG 4880 Internship - Graduate (0-4 Credits)

Hours and times arranged by student.

ACTG 4991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

Hours and times arranged by student.

ACTG 4992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

Business Core Courses

BUS 4101 Base Camp Self and Team Training (0 Credits)

The Base Camp is the launch event for the new MS Management program. During the one-week Base Camp, students will become familiar with other members of their cohort, work on their team skills, get to know themselves better both as individuals as well as potential managers. In this week students will take a battery of tests to help them explore their strengths and limitations both individually and as members of a team. Students will work with the staff of the Daniels Career Center to establish their career goals, polish their job search portfolios, and create LinkedIn professional profiles. They will also recognize the importance of personal branding and professional projection in dealing with colleagues, other professionals, and potential employers.

BUS 4102 Base Camp Program Launch Team Challenge (0 Credits)

The Base Camp is the launch event for the new MS Management program. During the one-week Base Camp, students will work in teams to create business ideas, develop the ideas, prepare a business plan, and professionally present and pitch to a panel of judges consisting of academics and business professionals. Teams will compete with each other in the Base Camp Launch Challenge.

BUS 4310 Business Communication for Accounting Professionals (4 Credits)

This course emphasizes critical communications skills for future accounting, tax, auditing and consulting professionals. The course develops written communication skills including but not limited to technical writing, reporting the results of research and explaining complex issues. Oral communication assignments include formal presentations, development of debate skills and boardroom presence. Assignments incorporate business etiquette and teambuilding.

BUS 4330 International Business (2 Credits)

BUS 4444 Global Bus, Governance & CSR (4 Credits)

In an increasingly globalized world, civil society, states and businesses are trying to discern how to govern business conduct across the borders of nation-states. Many of the issues our society faces today—global financial crises, environmental degradation, and corruption, to name a few—are impossible to tackle within a given country. Instead, these issues require collaboration and coordination across a variety of actors spread around the globe. Within this framework, businesses are aware of increased pressure to behave responsibly and adopt a corporate social responsibility (CSR) approach to their conduct. Yet, businesses are unsure how to integrate these goals into their business strategy and engage meaningfully with stakeholders. Likewise, governments recognize the importance of having business at the table, but do not have a clear understanding of how to best engage with the private sector. The response to this conundrum is a focus on global governance, which refers broadly to the way in which global affairs are managed. After a brief overview of economic trends and trajectories around the globe, the course will focus on global governance as a mechanism for change. The class will first explore the opportunities and shortcomings of global governance efforts. The class will build on this scholarship by discussing the role business plays in global governance mechanisms. As society has become aware of, and is acutely concerned with, business conduct, the role of the manager and business strategy in these realms has also changed. Students will analyze these trends and study their implications for government, business, or civil society strategy and practice. The final portion of the course will focus on specific issue areas, including: human rights, labor standards, the natural environment, corruption, and microfinance.

BUS 4445 International Business: Strategy and Practice (4 Credits)

This course focuses on applied issues in international business. Students will learn to think strategically about international business issues, and will in turn be able to apply that thinking to best practices. The following subject areas will be covered: country selection, entry mode theory, exporting, born-global businesses, organizational structures internationally, negotiation, consumption, culture and demand. Other potential topics include global supply chain management/sourcing, country of origin effects, etc. This course focuses on applied issues in international business. Students will learn to think strategically about international business issues, and will in turn be able to apply that thinking to best practices. The following subject areas will be covered: country selection, entry mode theory, exporting, born-global businesses, organizational structures internationally, negotiation, consumption, culture and demand. Other potential topics include global supply chain management/sourcing, country of origin effects, etc.

BUS 4600 Professional MBA Capstone Project (4 Credits)

The Capstone Project enables the practical application of organizational leadership and management competencies necessary to demonstrate mastery of the core content of the Professional MBA program and provide students with a material edge in the development of their professional capabilities. The capstone Project effectively integrates Daniels' desired learning outcomes and professional work experiences and applies them to "real-world" business challenges, problems and dilemmas, to support the development and presentation of proposed solutions for the client enterprise.

BUS 4610 The Essence of Enterprise (4 Credits)

Today's business environment is increasing characterized by complex questions without clear black and white answers that span well beyond the historically narrow focus on the enterprise. Managers of tomorrow must be equipped with analytical and conceptual skills that allow them to see connections between social and environmental challenges and opportunities from local to global levels and how they interact and influence enterprise level value creation and innovation in a responsible manner. This course provides a perspective, i.e. worldview, that appropriately places the enterprise in the context of an interconnected world where success, organizationally and personally, is determined by how well one applies the necessary functional skills and organizational understanding to opportunities and challenges framed by globalization, both shared and disparate values, and the need for creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurial spirit. This course draws on the history of business practice and leadership to provide a foundation for personal self-discovery and professional direction.

BUS 4615 Leading at the Edge (2 Credits)

Connects values, globalization, and innovation through a mix of classroom and outdoor experiential learning formats. The course is a two credit hour complement to The Essence of Enterprise course. Using the metaphor of the 10th Mountain Division, the course builds a foundation for learning at Daniels through introductory looks at leadership, team building, and creative problem solving. Through metaphor and experience, the course bonds the cohorts to each other and enhance self confidence to succeed under difficult and changing conditions. The 10th Mountain Division was created out of a global crisis and trained at Camp Hale Colorado, located between Leadville and Vail, during the 1940s. This experience resulted in fourteen patents, including predecessors to the snow cat, snowmobile, and various other forms of outdoor equipment. Following WWII, members of the 10th were responsible for building the country's most famous ski resorts, such as Aspen and Vail, along with the 10th Mountain Hut System. Individual members became successful businessmen, social entrepreneurs, and civil servants forming companies such as NIKE, leading organizations like the Sierra Club, and founding the Colorado Outdoor Education Center (where training for this course takes place). The group is renowned for exemplary leadership, passion, team dynamics, innovation, and ethics within a global environment.

BUS 4620 Ethics for the 21st Century Professional (4 Credits)

A fundamental purpose is to engage students in ongoing reflection and dialogue about their responsibilities as managers and leaders. Of particular emphasis are the ethical, professional and social responsibilities of managers and leaders, especially as it relates to numerous stakeholders and communities. This course focuses on the idea of "community" and the social relationships of managers and business organizations in their communities. Roles and responsibilities of managers and business firms are examined by analyzing a variety of issues that managers will face during their careers. These specific issues will be examined in terms of their legal, public policy, and ethical dimensions. The goal is to provide students with generalized understanding and skills that can be employed in dealing with other issues that may emerge in their business careers. Cross-listed with ACTG 4620.

BUS 4630 Creating Sustainable Enterprises (4 Credits)

A sustainable enterprise is defined as any human endeavor with integrity in three interconnected dimensions (environmental, cultural, and economic) and whose collective actions meet the needs of the enterprise and its stakeholders today without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. The fundamental purpose of this course is to help prepare students for careers in which success requires a worldview that extends beyond the enterprise level in order for managers to create sustainable cultural, social, and financial value for the organization and society in a responsible manner.

BUS 4635 Global Enterprise Challenges (2 Credits)

As students complete the integration of material from the Compass sequence, this class provides an opportunity for the students to extensively apply the material through: case analysis, presentation, critique of other presentations, and integration of MBA Compass material and first year MBA Core material as appropriate.

BUS 4640 Innovation Design & Execution (4 Credits)

In the last century, the technologies of the industrial age (telegraph, railroads, electricity, radio, telephone, television, automobiles, airplanes, computers) have dramatically altered not only the way business is conducted, but the way we live and learn. These technologies have also enabled undesirable and unintended consequences: urban sprawl, global warming, terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, stress, obesity. Where is technology taking us? In this course, students look at innovation, creativity, entrepreneurship and design, and the role each can play in creating a better business world, a business world less driven by science fiction than inspired by social fiction, a business world which begins to shift from an industrial age of ever more encompassing technology to a creative economic environment based less on stuff and more on people and their needs.

BUS 4700 Special Topics in Business (1-4 Credits)

BUS 4701 Special Topics in Business (1-6 Credits)

BUS 4702 Special Topics in Business (1-6 Credits)

BUS 4703 Special Topics in Business (1-6 Credits)

BUS 4704 Topics in Business (1-6 Credits)

BUS 4705 Topics in Business (1-6 Credits)

BUS 4802 Executing in a PM Enterprise (4 Credits)

This course is the second course in a three-part required series. Pre-requisite: Must be a Lockheed employee.

BUS 4804 Kaiser Leadership Edge - People Leadership (4 Credits)

The People Leadership course is part of the Leadership Edge program designed specifically for the Kaiser Permanente Colorado organization. The program grows the internal leadership capacity necessary to reach their goal of becoming the best solution in health care. By exploring topics and cases from multiple perspectives and across business areas, participants develop a deeper understanding of the challenges and opportunities that Kaiser faces. Signature needed to register. Must be a Kaiser employee to register.

BUS 4805 Kaiser Leadership Edge - Financial Acumen (4 Credits)

The Financial Acumen course is part of the Leadership Edge program designed specifically for the Kaiser Permanente Colorado organization. The program grows the internal leadership capacity necessary to reach their goal of becoming the best solution in health care. By exploring topics and cases from multiple perspectives and across business areas, participants develop a deeper understanding of the challenges and opportunities that Kaiser faces. Signature required to register. Must be a Kaiser employee to register.

BUS 4806 Kaiser Permanente Strategy, Innovation, and Execution (4 Credits)

The Strategy, Innovation and Execution course is part of the Leadership Edge program designed specifically for the Kaiser Permanente Colorado organization. The program grows the internal leadership capacity necessary to reach their goal of becoming the best solution in health care. By exploring topics and cases from multiple perspectives and across business areas, participants develop a deeper understanding of the challenges and opportunities that Kaiser faces. Signature required to register. Must be a Kaiser employee to register.

BUS 4980 Internship (0-10 Credits)

Faculty supervised Internship.

BUS 4991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

BUS 4995 Independent Thesis (6 Credits)

BUS 9000 Study Abroad Tongji University (0-18 Credits)

This course facilitates study abroad through an exchange agreement with Tongji University School of Economics and Management in Shanghai China. University of Denver exchange students may take only graduate level courses at Tongji University and only graduate level courses from Tongji are counted for graduate credit at the University of Denver.

BUS 9001 Study Abroad Doshisha University (0-18 Credits)

This course facilitates study abroad through an exchange agreement with Doshisha University, Global Business and Management Studies, Kyoto, Japan.

BUS 9002 Study Abroad University of Stockholm (0-18 Credits)

This course facilitates study abroad through an exchange agreement with the University of Stockholm Business School, Stockholm, Sweden.

Business Ethics &Legal Studies Courses

LGST 3730 Values Based Leadership in Practice (4 Credits)

This course is a practical focus on leadership culture through analysis of real leaders applying theory to their personal experiences and practice. The course utilizes speakers in the Voices of Experience Speaker Series and outstanding literature to facilitate discussion. The course is offered in two-credit-hour sequences over two quarters. Prerequisites: LGST 2000 and degree checkpoint 2.

LGST 4198 E-Commerce Law and Ethics (4 Credits)

The changes in technology and business over the past 20 years have been dramatic and far-reaching. Navigating the even more astonishing changes in the future requires some perspective on the developments of the recent past. How did we get to where we are? What technological, economic and political forces have generated the current state of e-commerce? How are these forces likely to change into the future? What are the basic features of e-commerce as its exists today?.

LGST 4550 Business Law for Accountants (4 Credits)

This course provides students with a detailed review of the legal considerations in forming, operating, and dissolving the most common forms of business entities: partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. The rights, duties and liabilities of the managers, owners and accountants (internal and external) of these entities are extensively examined. The course also provides an overview of federal securities laws impacting these organizations. Prerequisite: ACTG 4620 or BUS 4620 or LGST 2000 (concurrent registration OK).

LGST 4700 International Law (4 Credits)

Offers both an introduction to public international law (the rights and duties of states and intergovernmental organizations [IGOs]) and to private international law (the rights and duties of individuals, businesses, and non- governmental organizations [NGOs] in their international affairs). Majority of course devoted to key international issues of business law and public policy such as alternative dispute resolution (ADR), privatization, intellectual property, international sales, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, trade (GATT and WTO), and the international facilities that deal with the adjudication and resolution of legal issues related to business.

LGST 4701 Topics in Ethics & Legal Study (1-5 Credits)

This course examines complexities, paradoxes, and dangers of leadership. The platform for the course is a Core Leadership Model (and logical deviations from it) which can result in Great Leadership. At the heart of Great Leadership one finds a values base. Through in-depth analysis of the key dimensions of the Core Model and its accompanying deviations, participants gain a deep understanding of - and practical experience with - Values Based Leadership in today's world.

LGST 4730 Values Based Leadership in Practice (4 Credits)

The course examines the complexities, paradoxes, and dangers of leadership. The platform for the course is a Core Leadership Model (and logical deviations from it) which can result in Great Leadership. Through in-depth analysis of the key dimensions of the Core Model and its accompanying deviations, participants will gain a deep understanding of - and practical experience with - Values-Based Leadership in today's world.

LGST 4740 Science & Mgmt. of Org. Ethics (4 Credits)

This course examines our knowledge regarding ethical decision making and behavior in organizational contexts. The course also explores the implications of such knowledge for effectively creating and managing ethical organizations. The course will be conducted as a graduate seminar with students playing a central role in identifying topics, researching content areas, and deciding on course outcomes. We will examine conceptual and theoretical models of ethical behavior in organizations, research empirical studies, and develop managerial implications. The overarching goal is to increase knowledge and understanding so as to strengthen capacities to be ethical leaders and managers. Prerequisite: BUS 4100. Non-business students may take the course with permission.

LGST 4760 CEOs and Corporate Governance (4 Credits)

In the wake of the Sarbanes-Oxley and Dodd-Frank laws, corporate governance has become a compelling issue for business students and executives. Corporate board members and leaders of institutional investors share their insights concerning corporate governance from strategic, financial and legal perspectives. CEO/board dynamics are explored, along with leadership development and executive succession policies. The roles of major board committees, such as the audit, compensation, nominating, and legal compliance committees are given special emphasis. Board responsibilities in corporate crises and re-structuring are examined, along with the legal liabilities of executives, board members, and the corporation. Public policy pressures on corporate governance, including the roles played by the Securities and Exchange Commission and other regulatory bodies are discussed, along with the responses by business organizations, political interest groups, and self-regulatory bodies. Shareholder activism and litigation, along with pressures from other corporate stakeholders are also emphasized in the course. Examples of topics include corporate scandals, executive compensation, global corporate governance systems, and governance reforms. Students engage in a number of case analyses over the course of the quarter, produce a four-part case study, and discuss actual real world solutions with business leaders who have been involved in the issues. Cross-listed with ACTG 4760.

LGST 4775 The Leader's Compass (4 Credits)

This course qualifies for the four course requirement for the MBA Values Based Leadership concentration. By reading the works of great philosophers and using the Socratic Method, students come to understand the role of values in business and society, and learn to respectfully listen to, and learn from, those with different values. Students synthesize the readings and class discussions by writing a paper describing what (a) "a good society" and (b) "a good work organization" would look like to them personally, and what would be needed in terms of leadership to create each condition. Prerequisite: BUS 4620.

LGST 4780 Leadership, Teams & Values (4 Credits)

This course is designed for Daniel Scholars (who have completed the first quarter of their MBA program including Value Based Leadership) to provide both challenging intellectual discussion and physical engagement around the fundamental ethical dilemma of competition and/or cooperation. The venue for the course is Harbor Island, San Diego, California, and the adjacent waters of San Diego Bay and the Pacific Ocean. Both traditional classrooms and the untraditional learning environment of the off-shore sail boat provide the context of dynamic learning about values, teams and self. Prerequisite: BUS 4100.

LGST 4790 Entrepreneur & Family Business-Organization, Governance Ethics & Leadership (4 Credits)

This course covers the most current legal and ethical issues involving the creation of value, strengthening and growing family businesses through the process of best practices in business governance, coupled with ethical conduct and values based leadership, and legal compliance. Cross listed with LGST 3790. Prerequisite: BUS 4100.

LGST 4980 Internship (1-5 Credits)

LGST 4991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

LGST 4992 Directed Study (1-4 Credits)

LGST 4995 Independent Research (1-10 Credits)

Business Information&Analytics Courses

INFO 4100 Survey of Business Analytics (4 Credits)

This course provides an overview of business analytics: how data are generated, collected, actively warehoused and analyzed to support decision making. It addresses how to combine data with corporate processes and culture to gain new insights to empower corporate strategy and improve daily operations.

INFO 4120 Python for Business Analytics (4 Credits)

Python is a popular general purpose programming language which is well suited to a wide range of problems. With the right set of add-ons, it is comparable to domain-specific languages such as R and MATLAB. Python is a scripting language. The following topics will be covered: Importing data, Reading and writing files, Cleaning and Managing Data, Merging and joining DataFrame objects, Plotting and Visualization, Statistical Analysis, Fitting data to probability distributions and Linear models. Packages: Pandas, NumPy, matplotlib, statsmodels, Scikit-learn, and IPython. Principal Content Elements: 1. Introduction to Programming Logic and Design Using Python 2. Data Management 3. Statistical Analysis 4. Advanced Data Management and Statistical Analysis Prerequisites: STAT 4610.

INFO 4140 Business Databases (4 Credits)

This is an introductory database course which covers enterprise database design, modeling and implementation.

INFO 4200 Business Analytics Capstone Planning (2 Credits)

This course provides the foundation for the capstone course. Students begin the planning phase for their culminating project, identifying a business need and company with which to partner. Students then outline the problem, determine objectives and project deliverables, create a document of understanding, and produce a work plan. Prerequisite: STAT 4610.

INFO 4240 Data Warehousing (4 Credits)

This course addresses how to extract and time stamp data from many different business databases, transform it into a common compatible format, and load it into the data warehouse. The course includes using the data warehouse for real time queries as well as generating longer period reports for strategy considerations. Data marts and data mining are also included as part of this course. Prerequisites: INFO 4100 and INFO 4140.

INFO 4250 Data Driven Decision Making (4 Credits)

Businesses make decisions and improve processes using their own and external data and a variety of modeling and analytic techniques. This course introduces students to the business data landscape, data management in organizations, the data-driven decision-making process, and the fundamental concepts behind statistical inference and analytic modeling to support decision-making.

INFO 4280 Project Management (4 Credits)

In this course students examine the science, practice the art, and discuss the folklore or project management to enable them to contribute to and manage projects as well as to judge when to apply this discipline. The course also covers the use of MS Project Professional as a management tool and Crystal Ball as a Monte Carlo simulator for project exercises. Students also learn the fundamentals of process and project simulation for business decision-making. Prerequisite: INFO 4100.

INFO 4300 Predictive Analytics (4 Credits)

This course is designed to prepare students for managerial data analysis and data mining, predictive modeling, model assessment and implementation using large data sets. The course addresses the how, when, why and where of data mining. The emphasis is on understanding the application of a wide range of modern techniques to specific decision-making situations, rather than on mastering the theoretical underpinnings of the techniques. The course covers methods that are aimed at prediction, forecasting, classification, clustering and association. Students gain hands-on experience in using computer software to mine business data sets. Prerequisite: STAT 4610.

INFO 4340 Data Mining and Visualization (4 Credits)

In this course, students create business intelligence tools such as balanced scorecards, data visualization and dashboards to inform business decisions. The course focuses on the identification of metrics, measures, indicators and key performance indicators for a variety of business operations. The focus is on the advantages and disadvantages of various modeling methodologies and implementations moving towards performance improvement. Prerequisite: STAT 4610.

INFO 4360 Complex Data Analytics (4 Credits)

This course explores the concepts of the considerations and management of big data projects. It also explores technical aspects of performing text analytics and natural language processing, network analysis, as well as geographic data analysis. We will focus on social data for some of the examples and also explore how disparate data sources can be combined to provide insight for business decisions. Prerequisite: STAT 4610 preferred but not required.

INFO 4380 Decision Processes (4 Credits)

This course addresses the process of decision making in the enterprise: who makes what decisions based on what information and for what purpose. Business Intelligence is premised on the HP motto: "in God we trust. All others bring data." But what is the cost of collecting and analyzing the data and presenting the results, and what decisions justify that cost? Is the transformation from data to decision always rational, and what are the common pitfalls for human decision makers? We examine the results of recent experiments from behavior economics and their relevance to making business decisions. Prerequisite: INFO 4100.

INFO 4400 Business Analytics Capstone (4 Credits)

This course gives students an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills learned in this program to a real-world problem submitted by a partner business. Students take a business problem from model construction and data collection through an analysis and presentation of results to recommendations for specific business decisions. Prerequisite: INFO 4200.

INFO 4401 Business Analytics (2 Credits)

Businesses can never have perfect information; therefore, they must employ statistical techniques to improve the decision-making process. This course introduces students to managerial decision-making using probability and other statistical techniques to support and validate the chosen decision. A student project will focus on data collection (primary research), data analysis, decision analysis, written/oral presentation skills, and the development of an infographic.

INFO 4520 Health Informatics (4 Credits)

Annual health care spending in the United States exceeds 16% of GDP ($2 Trillion) and is expected to continue to increase. The effective use of information technology is perceived as an important tool in increasing the access to and quality of health care delivery in a cost effective manner. This course examines the role of health informatics in the health care deliver and management process. The objectives of this course are to familiarize students with the critical issues and challenges faced by those in the health care environment, what technologies are or will soon be available to potentially address these issues and challenges, potential barriers professionals employed in the health care field may face deploying and managing these technologies, and possible strategies to assist these professionals in addressing and overcoming these barriers. This course focuses on four major areas related to health informatics: the role of electronic health records, clinical decision support systems, analytics, and other e-health initiatives such as mobile technologies and telehealth.

INFO 4590 Optimization (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the basic optimization modeling techniques and tools as practiced by business analysts, operations research analysts, data analysts, data scientists, decision scientists, decision support scientists, business intelligence analysts, quants, actuaries, financial analysts, marketing analysts, and anyone else interested in using analytics to improve the bottom line. The course will focus on problem definitions, problem configuration, spreadsheet solution, LP Software (LINGO) solutions, and interpreting and implementing results.

INFO 4700 Topics in Business Analytics (0-10 Credits)

Exploration of current trends and topics in business analytics. Prerequisite: INFO 4100.

INFO 4991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

INFO 4992 Directed Study (1-4 Credits)

Construction Management Courses

CMGT 4110 Preconstruction Integration and Planning (4 Credits)

This course examines the role of preconstruction services, team integration, and joint design planning in various Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) approaches. Various tools and techniques associated with preconstruction services and design planning from the proposal stage through the design stages of a project are considered.

CMGT 4120 Construction Planning and Scheduling (4 Credits)

Understanding and applying scheduling and control to construction projects is essential to successful construction management. Project scheduling emphasizes network-based schedules, such as critical path management (CPM), network calculations, critical paths, resource scheduling, probabilistic scheduling and computer applications. Project control focuses on goals, flow of information, time and cost control, and change management. Prerequisite: CMGT 4410.

CMGT 4155 Sustainable Development/LEED (4 Credits)

The course includes many case studies of historic and contemporary structures exemplifying various sustainability features. Emphasis is placed on how LEED project certification influences the overall construction project. Topics include LEED certification techniques for sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, indoor environmental quality, innovation and design. The following topics are covered from a LEED perspective: ventilation, air conditioning, heating, electrical lighting, energy efficiency, and building control systems. The student studies and analyzes how management and LEED techniques are applied to current construction projects.

CMGT 4177 Environmental Systems and MEP Coordination (4 Credits)

A study of electrical and mechanical systems used in the construction of buildings. Course content includes system design, component selection and utilization for energy conservation, cost estimating or systems, coordination and management of installation. Specific systems included are electrical, air conditioning, heating, ventilation and plumbing, fire protection, life safety, communication, power systems and lighting. The course also considers coordination of MEP systems and explores emerging technology and environmental issues related to mechanical and electrical systems in buildings. Cross listed with CMGT 3177 and XRCM 4177.

CMGT 4180 Construction Layout/Surveying (4 Credits)

Designed to provide the student with the theory, principles and techniques of construction layout and surveying. Includes field procedures in fundamental land surveying as well as site and foundation layout. Cross listed with CMGT 3180.

CMGT 4200 Lean Construction Project Management (4 Credits)

This advanced course focuses on cutting edge lean tools and other productive strategies for the management of people and processes in the construction industry. The tools and strategies presented draw on the very successful Toyota Production System adapted to the construction industry. Lean construction methodologies such as the Last Planner System, the Lean Project Delivery System, and Integrated Project Delivery are discussed. Topics also include sustainability and the emerging interest in "green construction," as well as the use of Building Information Modeling to enhance the development and management of integrated projects. This course also looks at the human element in relation to motivation, safety, and environmental stresses. A number of case studies are presented to highlight best practices in Lean Construction Project Management.

CMGT 4230 Design Management and Schedule Control (4 Credits)

This course examines the various strategies and techniques associated with managing the design delivery process to align with the construction budget and schedule needs in an integrated fashion. Design planning, scheduling, and resource allocation are considered along with design value determination and management of the design-construct interfaces. Constructability, value engineering, design performance.

CMGT 4250 Construction Job Site Management (4 Credits)

This course addresses how a successful construction project is managed and administered from design through construction to closeout. Emphasis will focus on how to unite the key stakeholders (contractors, architects, engineers, etc.) to provide them with a workable system for operating as an effective project team. The latest technology, laws and regulations associated with contract administration will be presented. Topics pertinent to each stage of a project are introduced and discussed as they occur throughout the life of the project. Numerous real-world examples will be utilized throughout the course. Various electronic project administration tools and techniques will be demonstrated including Building Information Modeling.

CMGT 4310 Cost Modeling and Trend Management (4 Credits)

This course covers various approaches to construction cost estimating at the conceptual stages of planning and design through detailed construction. Students learn parametric estimating techniques and how they are applied to construct and predict reliable budgets at the earliest stages of design. Students build cost models and refine those models with greater detail as design develops through a project. Building information modeling is introduced and used to create massing models to demonstrate design impacts on project costs. Cost trending techniques are presented to manage, monitor and document project performance relative to cost.

CMGT 4320 Architectural Planning and Design Management (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the significant value that architecture brings to real estate and the built environment and the various services and professions associated with it. Students will be introduced to principles, protocols and the planning process related to the design function and the link between the architect’s vision and the finished physical structure. Students will be introduced to design, thinking, theory and application. Student will learn to read and interpret the various graphical and written construction documents as well as know how they are developed and what information they contain. Architectural, structural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing and civil drawings and specifications are covered. The business model for design services will be explored as well as the unique risks and challenges associated with managing the design throughout the various stages of development and construction.

CMGT 4401 Residential Practicum I (4 Credits)

A three course sequence designed to emphasize the practical application of the theories and concepts of residential development. The courses provide a capstone experience for seniors. Students are expected to apply their knowledge of general business, real estate and construction management practices by forming a student business entity, acquiring land, building and selling a residential property. Students will apply accounting, finance, marketing, real estate and construction management techniques in the development of a single family residence. Cross listed with CMGT 3401.

CMGT 4410 Construction Building Systems (4 Credits)

A survey of residential and commercial construction materials, means, and methods associated with the various structural and architectural systems used to design and construct buildings. Project plans and specifications are incorporated to teach the basic sequencing and overall construction process. The influence of sustainability in construction is introduced.

CMGT 4420 Construction Estimating (4 Credits)

Integrated approach addressing construction accounting, estimating, purchasing, and management reporting systems. Cross listed with CMGT 3100, XRCM 4420. Prerequisite: CMGT 4400 or permission of instructor.

CMGT 4438 Legal Issues & Risk Management (4 Credits)

General contract and real estate law, including property rights, title concepts, deeds, purchase contracts, law of agency, environmental issues and disclosures, basics finance concerns, tax law, landlord-tenant law, construction contracts, indemnity agreements, rights and remedies of property owners, contractors and subcontractors issues, and various areas of liability for real estate practitioners and property owners.

CMGT 4480 Const Project Management (4 Credits)

Principles and techniques of construction project management, use of systems analysis, internal and external procedures, planning, programming, budgeting and staffing, controlling major projects, emphasis on construction scheduling techniques with case application. Cross listed with CMGT 3120.

CMGT 4490 Residential Development (4 Credits)

A seminar-style capstone course that integrates various aspects of the construction management curriculum. Emphasis is on topics in the construction and development industries. Cross listed with CMGT 3190. Prerequisite: CMGT 4410.

CMGT 4560 Relational Constracting and Risk Mitigation (4 Credits)

Relational contracting is a construction project delivery framework for multidisciplinary, integrated projects that focuses on aligned goals, high performance, innovation, mutual respect, open communication and a "no blame" culture between Client, Contractor, and Design Team. This approach to contracting, also known as Alliance Contracting, is becoming more prevalent in the United States and is often applied when using integrated project delivery systems. This course compares and contrasts transactional contracting methods with relational contracting methods and the influences on the project team and projects outcomes. Relational contracting is also considered in the context of risk mitigation and project optimization.

CMGT 4580 Integrated Teaming and Project Leadership (4 Credits)

This course examines the unique leadership skills and talents associated with leading and facilitating multidisciplinary, integrated design and construction teams. The focus of the course is on applying strategic intelligence and a system of leadership in the development of integrated solutions for the built environment. This leadership model is driven by a compelling purpose and supported by people who share practical values and have excellent processes, to look into the future, create a vision, and bring that vision to reality. Effective strategies for supporting high performance teams are explored.

CMGT 4700 Topics in Construction Mgmt (1-4 Credits)

CMGT 4980 Construction Mgmt Internship (0-10 Credits)

CMGT 4991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

CMGT 4992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

CMGT 4995 Independent Research (1-10 Credits)

Entrepreneurship & Venture Mgt Courses

EVM 4040 Social Entrp in Global Mrkt (4 Credits)

This is a dynamic hybrid course with online readings, cases, quizzes, and blogs, as well as in-class experiential interactions with social enterprises in the community. The distance component of this course is guest speakers from other countries. Students will have the opportunity to network, interact, and work with local social enterprises. A value added component of this course is the coverage of global and cross-cultural concepts and issues critical for successfully running social enterprises in a global context.

EVM 4350 Big Challenges, Big Solutions: The Emerging Start-Up (4 Credits)

Students in the experiential course will start a firm in which they formulate an idea, gather basic data, formulate hypotheses, and then test these hypotheses with potential market participants. Students are likely to pivot several times in this course as the experimentation process helps them shape the emerging firm.

EVM 4351 Designing the Start-Up (4 Credits)

In this class, students will develop an executive summary that outlines the core business concept and the type of governance that will be needed, how the business will scale both in terms of product/service and customers This executive summary will be used to fund the business and determine how the business will be funded-friends and family, credit cards, second mortgages, crowd funding, angel, or VC.

EVM 4355 Entrepreneurial Mindset (4 Credits)

A sustainable enterprise creates value for stakeholders along environmental, cultural/social, and economics dimensions. Based on a belief in the power of entrepreneurs to change the world, this course is designed as a general introduction to the basic concepts of entrepreneurship as a business discipline, whether you are interested in starting a business, working for an entrepreneurial company, launching an entrepreneurial venture within an existing organization, or working with entrepreneurial firms as an investor or advisor. The course is a broad overview of entrepreneurial activities and issues, including identifying business opportunities, developing those business models using the business model canvas, structuring and funding, early stage operations and exit strategies. The class will attempt to support the development of innovative and sustainable business models by students which, hopefully, will become successful entrepreneurial ventures which positively impact the earth.

EVM 4700 Funding the Business (2,4 Credits)

This course will focus exclusively on financing the business, including crowdfunding, angel investments, and private equity, the documents needed for such funding and the valuation of the firm as a result of funding.

EVM 4704 Topics in EVM (1-8 Credits)

EVM 4710 Innovation/Creativity-Business (4 Credits)

Cross listed with EVM 3710.

EVM 4980 Internship (1-5 Credits)

EVM 4991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

EVM 4992 Directed Study (1-4 Credits)

Finance Courses

FIN 4000 Financial Modeling and Databases Bootcamp (1 Credit)

This bootcamp is designed to equip students with a firm foundation in financial modeling as well as acquire an adequate command of Excel functionality and efficiency. This course also serves as an introduction to financial databases, mainly centered on the Capital IQ platform, which the student will be using throughout his or her academic and professional career. Topics covered include: Excel modeling best practices, keyboard shortcuts and common functions, financial datasets, and practical modeling applications in finance.

FIN 4110 Ethics in Finance (4 Credits)

This second course in the Compass is specifically designed for the Master of Science Finance (MSF) curriculum and focuses on the ethical, professional, social, and legal responsibilities of finance professionals, organizations and markets. Financial institutions are facing a crisis of confidence. Trust is an essential ingredient to maintaining efficient and effective financial markets. The finance industry has acquired a reputation for unethical and unsavory activity and has lost the trust of much of society. Many financial professionals believe they are encouraged and rewarded for engaging in unethical activity. We discuss the ethical issues facing financial institutions and professionals and explore solutions for resolving these issues and restoring trust.

FIN 4120 Quantitative Methods in Stock Selection (4 Credits)

This course introduces quantitative methods and techniques applied to alpha generation in stock selection. It enables students to better understand and conceptualize the entire quantitative investment process in the context of a simulated long/short equity portfolio. The student learns to set investment objectives, test investment hypotheses, define security selection criteria and construct portfolios using quantitative techniques. This is a practical class held in a lab environment using financial industry tools and data with a strong emphasis on student participation. Students have to define and defend a quantitative investment strategy and implement it in a simulated portfolio environment. Prerequisites: FIN 4200.

FIN 4130 Financial Risk Management Strategies (4 Credits)

This course applies risk management, quantitative approaches and investment theoretical models to derivatives markets. It examines the proven risk management and revenue enhancement strategies in derivatives and equity markets, creates innovated derivatives investment styles, validates quantitative strategies in options markets, and implements investment models. This course is to offer advanced graduates in finance a well-rounded exposure to the theory and practice of risk management and derivatives investment strategies. It focuses on four aspects: (1) essential risk management theories regarding asset pricing, portfolio construction, and financial statistics; (2) the approaches to develop risk management and derivatives investment strategies based on the fundamental analysis, statistical analysis, and behavioral finance; (3) the rigorous test of various options investment strategies; and (4) the implementation of risk management and investment strategies based on The Reiman Fund. Prerequisites: FIN 4200 and FIN 4500.

FIN 4140 Enterprise Risk Management (4 Credits)

This course introduces the fundamentals of enterprise risk management (ERM). The purpose of this course is to give students an overview of the current approaches used to identify, evaluate and monitor the key risks that an organization faces. Students learn that there are numerous approaches that organizations take in addressing ERM. Over the course of the quarter, a number of outside ERM experts address the class on various aspects of ERM. Students then apply newly gained ERM knowledge to a mock risk assessment developed from a real-life corporate scenario from Newmont Mining Corporation.

FIN 4150 Advanced Business Valuation (4 Credits)

The objective of this course is to present advanced valuation techniques to deepen students' understanding and enhance their knowledge of valuation theory and practical application.

FIN 4160 Treasury Management (4 Credits)

The objective of the course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of how various treasury functions are managed in a corporation and build students' capabilities to assume the role of a proficient treasury manager.

FIN 4170 Quantitative Methods in Finance (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the mathematical and statistical methods needed in order to succeed in the quantitative discipline of modern finance. Topics include differential calculus, optimization techniques, linear algebra, probability, and statistical methods. Data analysis software is used when appropriate to facilitate the analysis. Emphasis is on applications, analytic reasoning, and proper interpretation of results.

FIN 4180 Global Finance (2 Credits)

This course explores financial management in the international arena. Principal content elements include: The market for foreign exchange, interest rate parity, hedging currency risk, international portfolio management. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to accomplish the following objectives: Explain the determinants of foreign exchange rates; Explain and identify the financial difficulties and opportunities faced by corporations when operating internationally; Apply forwards and options for hedging currency risk; Identify the determinants of the expected returns on international investments; Discuss current issues in international finance. Prerequisites: FIN 4630.

FIN 4200 Financial Investments and Markets (4 Credits)

Introduction to financial markets, securities, instruments, and other factors that determine the financial environment. Prerequisites: FIN 4630 and STAT 4610 or FIN 4170.

FIN 4201 MS Management Managerial Finance (2 Credits)

FIN 4201 introduces concepts and analytical techniques to identify and solve financial management problems. The focus on Performance Metrics (Ratios and Du Pont Analysis), Time Value of Money and Opportunity Costs, and Project Analysis prepares managers to operate in an environment that can at times be driven by the financial performance of the company.

FIN 4320 Security Analysis and Valuation (4 Credits)

Examination of statistical and theoretical foundation for determination of market prices and market returns. Includes theoretical implications for investment management of options, futures, stocks and bonds. Prerequisite: FIN 4200.

FIN 4330 Portfolio Management and Risk Analytics (4 Credits)

Case and project approach to foundation of investment portfolio management. Prerequisite: FIN 4200.

FIN 4410 Financial Planning & Analysis (4 Credits)

Advanced course in financial planning and decision-making focusing on capital structure, working capital management, long-range and short-term financial planning, and mergers. Prerequisite: MBA 4112.

FIN 4420 Capital Expenditure Analysis (4 Credits)

Advanced course in capital budgeting examining capital allocation processes and procedures and the theory and applied techniques of capital spending and divestment under conditions of certainty and uncertainty. Related issues of cost of capital and leasing also included. Prerequisite: FIN 4630.

FIN 4500 Financial Modeling (4 Credits)

Use of erect functions and macros to construct financial models from corporate finance, investments and financial markets. Prerequisites: FIN 4170.

FIN 4610 Multinational Financial Management (4 Credits)

Financial analysis of multinational corporation operating in international markets, including exchange rates, international instruments, markets, institutions and futures. Prerequisite: MBA 4112.

FIN 4620 Financial Forecasting (4 Credits)

FIN 4630 Managerial Finance (4 Credits)

Analytical skills and tools of finances; theoretical concepts and practical applications. Topics include ratio analysis, breakeven analysis and leverage, securities valuation, capital budgeting, financial forecasting, and working capital management.

FIN 4700 Topics in Finance (4 Credits)

Topics vary each quarter. Course may be taken more than once if topics are different.

FIN 4701 Topics in Finance (1-10 Credits)

Topics vary. For new/experimental courses taught within the Reiman School of Finance.

FIN 4710 Marsico Investment Fund I (4 Credits)

A securities analysis and portfolio management practicum in which students manage a University endowment gift donated by Tom and Cydney Marsico. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (First part of two-quarter course.).

FIN 4720 Marsico Investment Fund II (4 Credits)

A securities analysis and portfolio management practicum in which students manage a University endowment gift donated by Tom and Cydney Marsico. Prerequisite: FIN 4710. (Second part of two-quarter course.).

FIN 4730 Marsico Investment Fund III (4 Credits)

This course is an elective course that is the third in the series of classes involving the Graduate investment fund class: Marsico Investment Fund I & II. This course allows students to apply the investment, security analysis, and portfolio management tools and techniques that they have learned in their Finance classes. The students manage an actual portfolio, a portion of the University's endowment originally gifted by Tom and Cydney Marsico. The selection of students for this class is competitive. Students must agree to participate for 2 consecutive quarters, and they must be willing to address portfolio issues during the between-quarter periods if necessary. Because the course involves the application of tools and concepts learned in other classes, the best time to take the course is in the last year of a student's program. Prerequisites: FIN 4710 and FIN 4720.

FIN 4740 Managerial Microeconomics (2 Credits)

This course combines the standard tools of microeconomic analysis with a well-rounded appreciation of the important perspectives that form the business environment in the contemporary world. The goal is to provide students with the tools from microeconomics, game theory, and industrial organization that they need to make sound managerial decisions. The course uses case studies to develop practical insights into managing the firm's resources to achieve competitive advantage. The course is divided into two principle modules based on market structure: perfect competition and imperfect competition. Both modules cover optimal behavior and strategies.

FIN 4750 Managerial Macroeconomics (2 Credits)

This course covers the theory and practice of modern macroeconomics. It teaches students how private market forces and government policy decisions drive fluctuations in the global economy and affect the business environment. It explores issues related to inflation, interest rates, foreign exchange rate, business cycles, and monetary and fiscal policies. The course uses case studies to analyze real-life macroeconomic issues, and students are encouraged to investigate the potential and limitations of macroeconomic theory with real-world problems. The course is divided into two principle modules: the economy in the long run, and the economy in the short run. Both modules cover impacts of government policies on the business environment in a closed economy and an open economy.

FIN 4830 Econometrics for Finance (4 Credits)

This course focuses on econometric and statistical modeling with an emphasis on finance applications. Prerequisite: STAT 4610 or FIN 4170.

FIN 4860 Derivatives (4 Credits)

This course provides a theoretical foundation for the pricing of contingent claims and for designing risk-management strategies. It discusses more advanced material in financial derivatives and is intended for students who have a quantitative background and are interested in enhancing their knowledge of the way in which derivatives can be analyzed. This course covers option pricing models, hedging techniques, and trading strategies. It also includes portfolio insurance, value-at-risk measure, multistep binomial trees to value American options, interest rate options, and other exotic options. Prerequisite: FIN 4200.

FIN 4870 Strategic Finance (4 Credits)

Addresses theory, concepts, and techniques associated with asset management and creation of value from a strategic orientation. Links financial theory and practice to strategic and operational objectives of the firm, prepares student to incorporate risk and uncertainty into analytical decision-making process and to analyze divestiture, restructuring, and liquidation decisions. Prerequisites: MS/ Finance students only and FIN 4840.

FIN 4885 Investment Banking and External Financing (4 Credits)

Considers the blend of theory and practice with regard to designing the appropriate capital structure of the firm as well as appropriate use of securities and process for raising capital in different financial markets. Prerequisites: MS/Finance students only and FIN 4840.

FIN 4890 Fixed Income Analysis (4 Credits)

Emphasizes valuation and management of fixed income securities in prevailing environment of complex and innovative financial arrangements. Study of the nature of evolving markets, both domestically and internationally. Prerequisite: FIN 4200.

FIN 4980 Finance Internship (0-10 Credits)

Permission of instructor required. Hours and times arranged by student.

FIN 4991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

Individual study and report. Hours and times arranged by student.

FIN 4992 Directed Study (1-4 Credits)

Info Tech & E-Commerce Courses

ITEC 4270 Emerging Technologies (4 Credits)

Emerging Technologies and Strategies investigates new information technologies. Having a broad view of emerging technologies as they relate to business can provide an organization with a valuable strategic advantage. Those organizations that can most effectively grasp the deep currents of technological evolution can use their knowledge to protect themselves against sudden and fatal technological obsolescence.

ITEC 4280 Intro Software Engineering II (4 Credits)

A continuation of ITEC 4270, this course covers systems development in a client-server Internet/Intranet environment using the Java programming language. Principles of event- driven systems, remote database access, and building GUI (Graphical User Interface) prototypes for interfacing with desktop systems are included. Prerequisite: ITEC 4270 or instructor's permission.

ITEC 4310 Electronic Commerce (4 Credits)

This course is an overview of electronic commerce (EC) trends and techniques including the underlying technical infrastructure, traditional ED techniques such as electronic data interchange (EDI) and commerce at light speed (CALS), Internet use for EC, business models for business-to- consumer EC, marketing on the Internet, payment and fulfillment mechanisms, security and regulatory issues, and global implications. Uses lectures, cases, outside speakers from industry and field trips.

ITEC 4320 Networks & Telecommunication (4 Credits)

This course examines network-enabling technologies and concepts, including LANs and WANs. Network design, management, and trouble-shooting issues will be covered. Network design in the age of the Internet will be emphasized, including intranets, extranets, design issues, security and firewalls. Pros and cons of private networks, including virtual private networks, will be discussed. Alternative technologies such as wire line, wireless, satellite and cable will be covered. Cross listed with ITEC 3810. Prerequisite: ITEC 4475.

ITEC 4350 Practicum (1-4 Credits)

This course will consist of an information systems project performed by small teams of students and tailored to individual students' needs. It will be undertaken for a "client" in the business community. Supervised by a faculty member, each project will permit students to apply what they have learned in a live setting and focus on project management planning, reporting, and problem discovery and resolution. Prerequisite: ITEC 4300 or ITEC 4330.

ITEC 4476 Business Process Analysis and Design (4 Credits)

This course starts with the traditional information technology systems analysis and design and broadens this approach to include analysis and design of better business processes - innovative processes which deliver greater value to customers and enterprises alike through creative uses of information technology. We will analyze past and current examples and look for ways to build on and extend these successful exploitations of information technology to other companies and industries. In short, this course is about exploring innovative ways to create greater business value by analyzing and designing not only the systems, but also the business processes these systems are created to support.

ITEC 4477 Database-Driven Websites (4 Credits)

Using state of the art technologies, this course focuses on the development of dynamic web pages. Technologies include PEARL, ASP, ColdFusion, SQL, Access, and Oracle. Cross listed with ITEC 3477. Prerequisite: ITEC 4475 or current enrollment.

ITEC 4478 XML (4 Credits)

This programming course is the second of a five series Web Services course track designed to prepare the student for the certification exam offered by Microsoft in the development of .NET applications. The second module of the series, XML, provides a thorough understanding of the main techniques surrounding the development of XML applications. Up until now, it has been very difficult to communicate and transfer data between different platforms. The surge of XML as a universal text-based standard readable and interpreted by any other system available, has opened the channel to enhance the development of cross-functional applications. Students will learn to write the codes describing the data, processes it and prepare it for presentation, as well as modeling and designing functional components that will later be used to drive the applications. Topics include: creating well-formed and valid XML documents, parsing the documents and creating the format to display it through the client's browser, design functional components and the interconnections among them. Some of the tools that the student will learn to use in this course are XML Syntax, DTD, Schema, CSS, XSL, XSLT, DOM, SAX, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI. Prerequisite: ITEC 4477 or concurrent enrollment.

ITEC 4480 ASP.NET (4 Credits)

The goal of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills that are required to develop XML Web services-based solutions to solve common problems in the distributed application domain. The course focuses on using Microsoft Visual Studio .NET, Microsoft ASP.NET, and Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration (UDDI) to enable students to build, deploy, locate and consume Extensible Markup Language (XML) Web services.

ITEC 4481 C#.NET (4 Credits)

The goal of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to develop C# applications for the Microsoft .NET Platform. The course focuses on C# program structure, language syntax, and implementation details. C# was created to be the programming language best suited for writing .NET enterprise applications. C# combines the high productivity of Microsoft Visual Basic with the raw power of C++. It is a simple, object-oriented, and type-safe programming language that is based on the C and C++ family of languages.

ITEC 4486 Information Technology Management (4 Credits)

This course focuses on issues central to the effective management of the IT function including, but not limited to: managing the IT organization, IT's changing role in the enterprise, and managing internal and external relationships.

ITEC 4500 Strategic Info Technologies (4 Credits)

How organizations are using information technologies for competitive advantage.

ITEC 4610 IT Strategy (4 Credits)

Businesses run on information, organized data about customers, markets, competition, and environments. Information systems (interconnected computers, data, people, and processes) are critical to capture, organize, and disseminate that information in ways that provide stakeholder value. This course is designed to help managers, technical and non-technical alike, to explore how to derive greater value and satisfaction, both personally and professionally, from information systems.

ITEC 4700 Topics in Inform. Technology (1-10 Credits)

New topic area discussion in information technology.

ITEC 4980 Internship (0-10 Credits)

Permission of instructor required. Hours and times arranged by student.

ITEC 4991 Independent Study (1-8 Credits)

Individual study and report. Hours and times arranged by student.

ITEC 4992 Directed Study (1-4 Credits)

ITEC 4995 Independent Research (1-8 Credits)

MBA - General Courses

MBA 4000 Business Speaking Lab (4 Credits)

Provides students whose primary language is not English the opportunity to enhance their English language skills. No credit toward degree.

MBA 4001 Business Writing Lab (4 Credits)

Provides students whose primary language is not English the opportunity to enhance their English language skills. No credit toward degree.

MBA 4010 Business Speaking Lab II (1 Credit)

Provides students whose primary language is not English the opportunity to enhance their English language skills. No credit toward degree.

MBA 4011 Business Writing Lab II (1 Credit)

Provides students whose primary language is not English the opportunity to enhance their English language skills. No credit toward degree.

MBA 4050 Bus Innovation Challenge I (4 Credits)

Apply business skills to a live project in the form of a competition. Learn to work with remote teams using virtual collaboration software. Learn to use brainstorming and innovation techniques to design, recommend, and build break-through solutions to solve a problem or take advantage of an opportunity.

MBA 4060 Bus Innovation Challenge II (4 Credits)

Apply business skills to a live project in the form of a competition. Learn to work with remote teams using virtual collaboration software. Learn to use brainstorming and innovation techniques to design, recommend, and build break-through solutions to solve a problem or take advantage of an opportunity.

MBA 4110 Enterprise Challenge (2 Credits)

In recognition of the special value that comes from deep immersion into a subject, students in this course will start a business. Students will incorporate their business, put together an advisory board, identify customers, write an executive business summary, and have a professional business presentation. The final class will consist of presentations to entrepreneurs, representatives from the financial sector, and industry representatives. Students will learn about business by starting a business. This is a highly unstructured class. Students have to structure their projects and present to investors just as an entrepreneur would do.

MBA 4120 Strategic Transitioning from Uncertainty to Risk (2 Credits)

Strategically Transitioning from Uncertainty to Risk is a course that introduces the student to the confluence of entrepreneurship and strategic management. Students will use an organized approach to rapid design leveraging their business ideas created for the Enterprise Challenge in order to develop a sustainable competitive advantage based upon iteration of the business model. Iteration that is discovered through an analysis of the existing business model and the competitive landscape that includes consideration of competitors, customers, suppliers, substitutes, and new entrants. Opportunities to create competitive advantage are analyzed through the design of generic competitive strategies in domestic and international markets, alliances and partnerships, and corporate diversification.

MBA 4130 Corporate Financial Reporting (2 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the financial statements issued by companies to external parties, such as shareholders and creditors. The course covers the fundamentals of accounting, from recording economic events in the accounting records to the preparation of the company’s financial statements, as well as major transaction categories and accounting policies of business firms and their financial statement implications. In addition, the course introduces students to publicly-traded companies’ Form 10-K annual reports.

MBA 4140 Ethics in Practice (2 Credits)

The fundamental purposes of the course is to 1) engage students in ongoing reflection and dialogue about their responsibilities as managers and leaders, 2) understand cognitive, behavioral, and principled approaches to ethics, and 3) advance your job prospects by focusing on ethical skills, practices, and exercises that will make you better managers and leaders. Of particular emphasis are the ethical and social responsibilities of managers and leaders, especially as it relates to numerous stakeholders. This course focuses on a systems-oriented approach to the ethical and social relationships of business leaders and business organizations in their communities. These roles will be examined by analyzing a variety of representative issues that characterize current concerns with business ethics. The goal is to provide students with generalized understanding and skills that can be employed in dealing with other issues that may emerge in their business careers. While the core of the curriculum will strengthen foundation business and management skills and competencies, the assumption of this course is that all of these skills and competences must be grounded in a solid ethical and social commitment to values and principles. This course attempts to explore these values in various business contexts.

MBA 4150 Understanding Your Market (2 Credits)

This course focusing on “knowing your customer” through the Segment, Target and Position Model. The STP Model consists of three steps that help you analyze your offering(product or service) and the way you communicate its benefits and value to specific groups. STP stands for: Step 1: Segment your market. Step 2: Target your best customers. Step 3: Position your offering. This model is useful because it helps you identify your most valuable types of customer, and then develop products and marketing messages that ideally suit them. This allows you to engage with each group better, personalize your messages, and sell much more of your product. This course explores the development, evaluation, and implementation of marketing strategy in complex environments. The course deals primarily with an in-depth analysis of a variety of concepts, theories, facts, analytical procedures, techniques, and models. The course addresses strategic issues such as: -In what environment do we operate? What impact will the environment have on marketing decisions? -How should the market be segmented for best return on investment? -Which market should be targeted to achieve highest profitability? -How shall we position the offering in the minds of our customers? -Which marketing models are most appropriately applied to the business problem at hand?.

MBA 4160 Opportunities with Data Skills I (2 Credits)

Develop an understanding of the basic concepts of probability and statistics, and how they relate to managerial type problems and decision making. Develop experience performing and interpreting standard data analysis methodologies. Obtain familiarity with a statistical software package.

MBA 4170 Navigating the Global Economy (2 Credits)

Businesses today, whether domestic or multi-national, are part of a complex global economy. The challenges firms face today—global financial crises, corruption, and finite resources, to name a few—are impossible to tackle without a solid understanding of the broader political and economic institutions and environment. This class will provide a foundation to students’ understanding of the international political economy, international institutions, and trends and patterns across developed, emerging, and developing countries. Students will explore some of the myths of the global economy, the variations of capitalism that exist across time and space, as well as the role of international institutions and emerging economies in shaping the business environment.

MBA 4205 Strategic Career Management (4 Credits)

Strategic Career Management offers graduate business students a theoretical and practical understanding of career management within the context of the current and projected labor market. The course facilitates the development of personal short- and long-term career action plans, and provides students with the tools and frameworks for developing other employees' careers once they are in managerial roles. This course is offered in conjunction with the Suitts Center for Career Services. Major components of the course include in-depth self-assessment, labor market assessment (macro and micro), creating a career development and action plan, positioning and branding oneself within the marketplace, and lifelong career management. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BUS 4610.

MBA 4210 Foundations I (4 Credits)

Language, theoretical concepts, quantitative tools that are foundations for business decisions; theory/practice of tools from financial accounting, microeconomics, financial management, information systems in logical sequence. Successful completion of any pre-courses.

MBA 4214 Creating Community Capital: The Social Good Challenge (2 Credits)

Creating Community Capital: The Social Good Challenge is a Challenge Driven Educational (CDE) course that builds off prior foundational and experiential courses. The course is a practicum designed to address social issues; its purpose is to provide the opportunity for students to address a social issue with the discipline of business tools and techniques. Through the Challenge experience, students learn first-hand how to use business skills for social change as they design organizational initiatives to address social problems. The goal for students will be to create a novel response to a social problem that is more effective, efficient, sustainable, or just than current responses. The course emphasizes learning by doing, supported by intensive faculty coaching and field work. A small number of formal class sessions will provide structure in the course, and will focus on collaborative problem solving; the remainder of time students will engage with community for-profit, non-profit, and government organizations to design and execute a social good initiative.

MBA 4220 High Performance Management I (4 Credits)

High Performance Management I focuses on development of management skills that affect individual and group performance in organizations. This course brings together concepts from organizational behavior, organization dynamics, change management and dispute resolution. Through creative instruction and experiential learning, students will develop expertise and understanding of organizational effectiveness through planning, motivation, negotiation, team-building, and leadership.

MBA 4222 Leading Effective Organizations (2 Credits)

This course introduces the human side of organizations. Its theme is leading people and organizations for high performance in changing times. It includes traditional organizational behavior concepts such as motivation, power and politics, organizational design and culture. The global context of business is emphasized as a central factor in leading organizations; and the course includes integrating themes of sustainability, engagement, and inclusion – creating organizations that are sustainable, that attract and engage talented people, and that exemplify inclusive excellence. Critical and analytical thinking skills are developed and reinforced throughout the course.

MBA 4230 Managing Cost Information (2 Credits)

Integrates technical knowledge and managerial skills, with key business issues; in-depth cases, diverse topics such as financial planning, market segmentation, budgeting, strategy development, operations management, information systems; breadth of case studies address decision-making in small start-up firms to large multi-national organizations; internal aspects of organization, external forces affecting organizational performance. Prerequisites: MBA 4211, 4210.

MBA 4235 Profit Planning and Measuring Performance (2 Credits)

Profit Planning and Measuring Performance provides students with the necessary skills to effectively perform planning and performance evaluation processes. In this course, students will learn how to prepare operating and capital budgets, analyze budget variances, identify key performance indicators, and design management control systems. Prerequisite: MBA 4234. Concurrent enrollment allowed.

MBA 4250 Values in Global Marketplace (4 Credits)

This course examines the ethical, legal, and public policy dimensions of business in the global marketplace. Prerequisite: BUS 4200.

MBA 4260 MBA Internship (0-8 Credits)

The internship typically is taken in either the third or fourth quarter of the MBA program and is a fulltime work experience (roughly 400 hours of work) at a sponsoring company. A participant can register for additional courses beyond the internship with approval of the sponsoring company. Prerequisites: MBA 4220, MBA 4231, BUS 4300.

MBA 4270 Integrative Challenge (4 Credits)

Field study experience at end of MBA program to provide students with exposure to current, relevant and challenging issues faced by Colorado businesses; practical application of business knowledge, managerial skills, professional competencies designed to integrate all graduate program elements and provide distinctive advantage in career development. Prerequisites: MBA 4221, 4232.

MBA 4280 Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies I (2 Credits)

This course and Mastering Managerial Financial Concepts II discusses basic principles of finance and provides practical tools for financial decisions and valuation. The purpose of these two courses is to give students a thorough introduction to the basics of finance. You will learn how to value distant and uncertain cash flows. You will learn how to apply the tools to make investment decisions for a firm. You will also survey the fundamental drivers of financing policy in a corporation and learn how financial markets interact with businesses. Unless you understand finance, you cannot have a thorough understanding of a company’s decision-making process. Prerequisites: MBA 4130. Concurrent enrollment allowed.

MBA 4285 Mastering Managerial Financial Competencies II (2 Credits)

This course and Mastering Managerial Financial Concepts I discusses basic principles of finance and provides practical tools for financial decisions and valuation. The purpose of these two courses is to give students a thorough introduction to the basics of finance. You will learn how to value distant and uncertain cash flows. You will learn how to apply the tools to make investment decisions for a firm. You will also survey the fundamental drivers of financing policy in a corporation and learn how financial markets interact with businesses. Unless you understand finance, you cannot have a thorough understanding of a company’s decision-making process. Prerequisites: MBA 4280. Concurrent enrollment allowed.

MBA 4290 Economics for Decision Making (2 Credits)

MBA 4290 emphasizes the standard tools of microeconomic analysis for the business manager. The focus is on managerial decision-making, and to emphasize real world economic decision makers for firm managers. The goal is for students to understand the current business environment and possess the tools to make sound managerial choices. The course will emphasize analytical problem solving to highlight the decisions managers must make under constrained conditions. There will be a series of short quizzes to emphasize these skills based on class lecturers and homework. We will also use case studies to develop practical insights into managing the firm’s resources to achieve competitive advantage.

MBA 4310 Experiencing Strategic Management through Corporate Challenges (2 Credits)

Experiencing Strategic Management through Corporate Challenges is a Challenge Driven Educational (CDE) course that builds off several previous foundational and experiential courses. Students will leverage the content from accounting, finance, management, marketing, economics, globalization, business stats and analysis in order to engage with corporate partners to examine real-world problems. Students will address issues involving vision / mission / values of the organization, the key industry forces that influence the corporate environment, ways of maintaining and sustaining a core competency, and critical strategy implementation issues that lead to a competitive advantage. The course will be offered in a work-shop atmosphere in which students will meet in class once a week and the remaining time outside of the classroom where students are expected to apply the various aspects of strategic analysis and management.

MBA 4340 Creating Sustainable Entrprise (2 Credits)

All students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of: (1) the concept of sustainability as a decision-making model; (2) the environmental, cultural, social justice, equity, and economic issues inherent in principles of sustainability; (3) the intra- and inter-generational aspects of sustainability; (3) the interconnectedness of individuals, societies, eco-systems, cultures and cultural products in understanding issues of sustainability; and (4) the roles that multiple academic disciplines and perspectives play in identifying, understanding, and addressing issues of sustainability. All students should be able to demonstrate the ability to: (1) apply critical thinking and analysis toward understanding and solving problems related to sustainability; (2) communicate about issues of sustainability across academic disciplines and to non-academics.

MBA 4350 Bien's Int Bus Exp in Europe (1-4 Credits)

The objective of this course is to provide an international experience to our students who are interested in international business. This is achieved through field trips, academic and professional presentations, journaling and cultural immersion. Students reflect on similarities and differences in business practices and broader cultural issues that exist between the U.S. and Scandinavian countries.

MBA 4351 Doing Business in Europe (4 Credits)

The objective of this course is to expose students to issues of international business and cultural diversity through field trips and academic and professional presentations in four Scandinavian countries. Topics to be covered include managing production and operations, international marketing, the European Union, personnel development, cross-cultural aspects of international management, and the role of government. The course includes office visits and plant tours of both large and small production facilities and presentations by industry management. The course is intended also to be an interesting and informative cultural experience with visits to a Viking museum, a ship museum, several castles, and with time for individualized travel in Europe after the course is over. A research project of 15-20 pages is required and due at the end of the summer quarter.

MBA 4360 Opportunities w/ Data Skill II (2 Credits)

Develop an understanding of more complex concepts of probability and statistics, and how they relate to managerial type problems and decision making. Develop experience performing and interpreting complex analysis methodologies. Obtain further familiarity with statistical software packages. Develop experience integrating data skills with project for Corporate Challenge. Prerequisites: MBA 4160.

MBA 4410 Global Challenge I (2 Credits)

This course provides you with the opportunity to apply what you have learned in the first year of your Denver MBA program with a live client. You will work on a project focused on entrepreneurship, social good, or a corporate partner. Scoping the project will be a key learning outcome, as will learning about cross-cultural issues.

MBA 4415 Global Challenge Trip (2 Credits)

This course provides you with the opportunity to apply what you have learned in the first year of your Denver MBA program, plus what you learned on the ground during your travel, on a project with a live client. You will work on a project focused on entrepreneurship, social good, or with a corporate partner. The key learning outcome is how to pivot based on your learning while in the host country.

MBA 4470 International Business Theory in Practice (2 Credits)

International business is its own field of academic study with rich theories and frameworks. Facing a dynamic, and increasingly chaotic, external business environment, business students need to understand both the theories and how they can be applied. To that end, this course draws on the rich international business writings to better understand global business practices and to ultimately make better business decisions. Students will actively explore current international business issues, will interact with local international business leaders, and learn specific concerns facing key regions or countries globally. Prerequisite: MBA 4170.

MBA 4490 Global Macroeconomics (2 Credits)

Managerial macroeconomics covers the theory and practice of modern macroeconomics. It teaches students how private market forces and government policy decisions drive fluctuations in the global economy and affect the business environment. It explores issues related to inflation, interest rates business cycles, and monetary and fiscal policies. The course will use case studies to analyze real-life macroeconomic issues. Students are encouraged to investigate the potential and limitations of macroeconomic theory with real-world problems, and the goal is to understand the macroeconomic environment. Prerequisites: MBA 4290.

MBA 4510 Global Challenge II (2 Credits)

This course provides you with the opportunity to apply what you have learned in the first year of your Denver MBA program, plus what you learned on the ground during your travel, on a project with a live client. You will work on a project focused on entrepreneurship, social good, or with a corporate partner. The key learning outcome is how to pivot based on your learning while in the host country.

MBA 4540 Business, Government and Society (2 Credits)

This course is a cornerstone graduate course delivering a comprehensive introduction to major topics, theories and issues relevant to business in its interactions with Business & Society.

MBA 4550 Strategic Marketing Decision-Making (2 Credits)

Strategy sets the direction for an enterprise, all of its employees, programs, tasks and activities. All must be planned and executed “on strategy”. Marketing Strategy essentially is the overall company’s strategy applied and executed within the Marketing Department. Deciding upon a strategy offering the best opportunities for the organization to succeed is critical. Being able to implement it effectively is essential. Making informed strategic marketing decisions in the real world is highly complex, challenging and demanding. Choosing among strategic alternatives requires qualitative and quantitative analysis of options, making tough choices and trade-offs, and assessing requirements for executing a bona fide option successfully. Case analysis provides the primary learning methodology for the course. This is a case-based course. This course effectively approaches strategic decision-making through the lens of Marketing ; that is, through marketing-focused cases and decisions, although making successful decisions in a marketing context requires evaluating them in a larger strategic perspective and company context. It also requires thorough understanding and application of basic marketing concepts, industry (external) and company (internal) situation analyses, and identification of critical issues and success factors, and the application of basic financial analysis—all of which are foundation blocks for making successful strategic decisions out in the real world. Each case features a specific marketing situation that serves as a “portal” for strategic decision-making. The specific situations include pricing, distribution, new product introductions, branding, communications, sales and distribution and the like. Every case evaluation, like every real-world decision, requires financial analysis. Students must be able to analyze income statements and selective balance sheet factors. Marketing and financial metrics play roles in case strategic decision-making. (Students will be provided with a financial “refresher” package in the first class that includes problems representative of those the cases contain. A student who struggles with the practice financial problems is likely to struggle analyzing cases in the course. The good news is that this course provides a great opportunity to learn how to use financial analytical tools before it really counts—later in your careers. Suggestion: seize this opportunity to improve your financial skill set; you will need it someday.) The course involves identification, synthesis, integration and application of basic marketing concepts within strategic decision-making contexts. Core marketing concepts are reviewed in classes on a high level. (PowerPoint slides on each review topic will be posted in Canvas, and these become the de facto “textbook” and reference for course content.) Prerequisites: MBA 4150.

MBA 4610 Law and Public Policy (4 Credits)

This course is designed as a survey to cover a broad scope of basic concepts, along with their application to three major policy areas in the final weeks of the course. The course begins with an exploration of the role of business in the public policy environment. The course then examines the legal environment of business, including key elements of private law (contracts, agency, torts, and business organization law) and public law (employment law, administrative law, antitrust law, environmental law, and intellectual property law). In so doing, the course finally applies basic concepts from law and public policy, along with some concepts from economics, to examine three crucial policy areas related to business: regulatory policy, competition policy, and natural resource policy.

MBA 4620 Leadership Capstone: Integration and Transition (2 Credits)

This course is a capstone course to integrate the leadership learning and development across the two-years of the MBA. In it, students will explore further their three core areas of development as a leader: 1) Emotional Intelligence; 2) Self-Leadership, and 3) Capacity to Develop Teams. These areas of study are reflective of interconnected areas of development within the Daniels Leadership Development (p3) model. At its core the model investigates purpose, principles, and presence, and in its outer ring explores perspective, partnerships, and practices. Students in this course will deepen their understanding and fluency with the P3 model by exploring the particular areas of emotional intelligence, self-leadership, and team building. They will conclude the course with a study of models of organizational and individual change and transition, in preparation for their own professional transition and deepening of capacity to lead change. The course is designed to be experiential – work will be done in the context of a team – and reflective, with an emphasis on self-reflection and individual learning. The course is organized to provide students with a platform for integrating learning during the last quarter of the MBA.

MBA 4670 Global Issues (2 Credits)

Develop a personal viewpoint regarding the “Global Tilt.” Explore current global issues and their implications for business and careers. Develop future scanning strategy/skills to keep up with global issues. Assess the changing “permeability” of national borders. Prerequisites: MBA 4470.

MBA 4690 Enterprise Solutions (4 Credits)

A practical application of key business and managerial knowledge, skills, and competencies designed to integrate all graduate program elements and provide students with a distinctive advantage in career development.

MBA 4691 Project Analysis 1 (2 Credits)

Capstone class for MBA program. Students should be full-time MBA students in their final 2 quarters of the program or receive faculty permission.

MBA 4692 Project Analysis 2 (2 Credits)

Students should be full-time MBA students in their final 2 quarters of the program or receive faculty permission. Students must have taken Project Analysis 1 to enroll.

MBA 4980 MBA Internship (0-10 Credits)

Denver MBA students have an opportunity to take for-credit internships. You and your supervising professor should develop an internship proposal which contains (a) a description of the experience and why it is important, (b) a detailed outline of the paper you will submit. You may or may not get paid for the internship work.

MBA 4991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

MBA 4992 Directed Study (1-5 Credits)

Management Courses

MGMT 4201 Persuasive Communications - Digital, Oral, Written (2 Credits)

Many surveys show that employers want job candidates with strong communication skills. Similarly, success in a graduate program requires the ability to articulate your thoughts clearly and persuasively in all forms. In this course, we study the principles of effective oral, written, and digital communications. We accomplish the learning outcomes of this course by critically examining yours and others’ communications styles, practicing oral and written forms, maintaining effective social media presence, and delivering impactful and persuasive presentations.

MGMT 4202 Profiles in Leadership and Management (2 Credits)

This course is a seminar designed to provide exposure to mid- to high-level executives and the decisions they face. A diverse set of speakers are invited to class to describe their career path, views on leadership and management, and particularly challenging decisions they faced during their career. The speakers are selected to represent a variety of business types both for-profit and non-for-profit, career paths, and leadership and management perspectives. The course encourages students to evaluate the speakers in the context of selected dimensions of leadership and management.

MGMT 4203 Foundations of Strategy (2 Credits)

Foundations of Strategy is a course that introduces the student to the theory of strategic management. Students will develop the ability to think strategically by examining a firm’s mission, vision, and values, business model and financial health of the organization. After assessing the firm’s strengths and weaknesses, the focus is then placed on the industry and competitive environments using a series of tools and frameworks that result in identifying opportunities and threats. Synthesis in the course takes place when the student is able to provide strategic recommendations that generate added value and competitive advantage for the firm. Learning is facilitated through a work-shop atmosphere that uses case studies of industry leaders currently in the news. Principal Content Elements (i.e., modules / weeks): Intro to Strategy Business Models Competitive Advantage Role of Mission / Vision / Values Evaluating a Company’s Resources, Capabilities, and Competitiveness Evaluating the External Environment Generic Competitive Strategies Strengthening a Company’s Competitive Position Strategies for Competing in International Markets Corporate Strategy – Diversification and the Multi-business Company Strategic Alliances and Partnerships Strategy Execution and Implementation Challenges.

MGMT 4204 Ascend Industry or Topic Ideation and Research (2 Credits)

This is the first of a three Ascend course series in the Master of Science in Management Program. During this self-directed and faculty supervised project course the student will choose one of the following two options: A. In consultation with the supervising faculty member, the student will choose an industry and thoroughly research and analyze industry conditions using an appropriate theoretical framework, and explore the entry and mid-level career opportunities in the industry. In addition, the student will choose and approach a company in this industry that will provide him/her with a two-quarter internship opportunity. B.

MGMT 4240 Global Business Imperative (4 Credits)

Conducting business outside the United States involves a unique set of challenges. Diverse cultures, laws, languages and currencies add to the complexity of putting together and managing international business ventures. This course will help you to prepare for these activities by exploring ten questions, which focus critical aspects of international business. The primary vehicle for accomplishing this will be class discussions built around presentations by the instructors as well as cases and exercises dealing with a range of issues, countries, and industries.

MGMT 4280 Business Design (4 Credits)

Each student learns an organized approach to rapid design of a business with a sustainable competitive advantage based upon innovations(s) to the business model. That innovation(s) is discovered through an investigation of the existing business models and the competitive landscape including: suppliers, customers, competitors, substitutes and barriers of entry. Specific opportunities are identified through investigation of the following: industry, market, and competition. Opportunities to create competitive advantages are investigated through the design of strategies in: marketing, sales, operations, human capital, social responsibility, financing, corporate governance and technology. The course offers a workshop atmosphere in which students are expected to apply and discuss the various aspects of business planning. The result is a written business plan and presentation to funding sources reflecting a sustainable competitive advantage and creation of a defensible market.

MGMT 4301 MS Management Organizational Behavior (2 Credits)

Organizations can be mysterious places, often very difficult to understand. Spend any amount of time in an organization – large or small, business, not-for-profit, government – and you’ll probably find yourself scratching your head. “Who came up with that idea?” “Why does this always (or never) happen?” In this course you will get a framework that will help you make sense of these questions. You will come to understand how some decisions that seem to make no sense to you, make eminent sense when viewed from a different perspective. You will get a framework for examining behaviors in organizations. You will also learn your particular perspective on organizations and how it can limit your ability to truly understand differing points of view. Drawing on several disciplines – Sociology, Social Psychology, Political Science, Cultural Anthropology, Symbolism –this course will help give you the tools necessary to understand why things happen in organizations the way they do, and how to adapt your style to be a successful and influential member and leader in your organization.

MGMT 4302 MS Management Human Resource Management (2 Credits)

A management course for graduate students grounded in a strong foundation of real experiences managing and leading Human Resource organizations. This course is designed to unify strategy, human resource strategy and principles of management in a highly interactive format employing multiple learning methods.

MGMT 4303 Conflict and Change Management (2 Credits)

This course will cover the theory and practice of conflict management, negotiation, and change management in the workplace. Change is an inevitable part of organizational life, and competencies in managing change along with resulting conflicts, is a critical skill set for both new and experienced leaders. Using established models, the course will explore sources of, and strategies for dealing with, conflict at multiple levels: individual, dyadic, team, and organizational. Methods of principled negotiation will be presented and practiced during the course.

MGMT 4304 Project and Budget Management (2 Credits)

This course will introduce the student to the key elements of a successful project delivery system. The project delivery system consists of five components: training, tools, core skills, company support, and a project delivery process. The process is the means by which projects are consistently and efficiently planned, executed, and completed to the satisfaction of clients. The system is aligned with the principles of a total quality improvement program, namely client focus, project manager commitment, evaluation and measurement, corporate support, and continuous improvement.

MGMT 4305 Business Model Design and Innovation (2 Credits)

Each student learns an organized approach to rapid design of a business with a sustainable competitive advantage based upon innovations(s) to the business model. Innovation(s) is discovered through an investigation of the existing business models and the industry landscape including: customers, competitors, substitutes, suppliers, and barriers to entry. Specific opportunities are identified through investigation of the following: industry, market, and competition. Opportunities to create competitive advantages are investigated through the design of financial, marketing, sales, operation, talent, technology, and social responsibility strategies. The course offers a workshop atmosphere in which students are expected to apply and discuss the various aspects of a Business Model and a Business Plan. The result is a written business plan and presentation to a potential funding panel.

MGMT 4306 Virtual Business Management Simulation (2 Credits)

The focus of this course is on gaining new venture experience. Through an online/virtual computer simulation, students will be placed into a very realistic international business setting, where they will start up and run a company through multiple rounds of decision-making. The online simulation allows students to build entrepreneurial firms, experiment with strategies, and compete with other student teams in a virtual business world. Designed to mimic the competitive, ever changing marketplace, the simulation lets students gain experience in market analysis, strategy formulation, and the management of a new venture.

MGMT 4307 Ascend Internship (4 Credits)

The MSM Ascend internship is about learning by doing. Internships in addition to providing an opportunity for hands-on learning, often open the door to the first professional job. Course requirements include an internship report that covers a study of the industry and the organization, and what you learned from your experience. The Ascend internship is a win-win course where you put into practice the management and business acumen you have learned at Daniels, and discover new skills from your colleagues in the organization. Permission of instructor required. Hours and times arranged by the student and the internship granting organization.

MGMT 4340 Strategic Human Resource Mgmt (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the effective management of human resources in order to create sustained competitive advantage. The course covers the major policy areas of employee influence mechanisms, staffing, training and development, performance appraisal, reward systems, and work design so that students are better prepared to provide direction to the creation and implementation of effective management systems. Prerequisite: MGMT 3900 or permission of instructor.

MGMT 4345 Performance & Rewards System (4 Credits)

Measuring and improving human performance, techniques of individual objective settings including MBO, appraisal and feedback systems, creating and managing compensation programs, job design, analysis and redesign of reward systems in various organizational contexts. Prerequisite: MBA 4121 or equivalent.

MGMT 4350 Business Summit Series: Current Business Issues and Topics (4 Credits)

The Business Summit Series is an elective course that provides students with insights into a variety of contemporary business issues and topics with a practical approach to developing business leadership skills and competencies. Before the course commences, students are invited to provide input and help faculty select the topics that are covered in the series. The faculty will develop modules, with each module covering a discrete business topic a workshop format. The workshops are taught in four-hour segments, with some workshops covering more than four hours, depending on content and learning outcomes. Workshops span practical topics that are not covered in-depth during the core PMBA curriculum, and they also include emerging business subjects. Topics include: Go-To-Market Strategy, Business Development Strategies, Mastering Sales Techniques, Business Consulting Skills, Becoming a Manager, Organizational Change Leadership, Franchise Business Model, and Colorado's Marijuana Industry. Other emerging business topics may include the Colorado small business market and new industry segments. Industry leaders may present to the class as subject matter experts.

MGMT 4401 Managing Cross-Cultural and Virtual Teams (2 Credits)

The world is more connected than ever before and culturally diverse virtual teams are a reality in the global marketplace. This course provides an introduction into managing culturally diverse and virtual team work in practice and distinctive features and challenges of virtual working environments. The course covers topics such as: managing cultural differences; knowledge sharing and team communication; managing yourself; engaging culturally diverse employees; managing conflicts in team work; and online tools and digital work.

MGMT 4402 Management Ethics (2 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to ethical concepts, theories and issues as they relate to business and managerial decision-making. Consideration of ethics and the social responsibilities of business are relevant both for effective managing and for businesses properly fulfilling their function(s) in the larger society. This is a course in applied ethics. A primary focus will be specific issues related to business and managerial decision-making. The course is also designed to introduce students to more general approaches or ways of thinking about ethics, and students will be exposed to both normative and behavioral aspects of ethics. An important learning outcome of the course is to strengthen the capacity of students to make practically wise decisions in their future careers.

MGMT 4403 Business and Society (2 Credits)

This course examines the role of business in society and explores important issues in the relationships between business, government, and society. These issues are approached from a stakeholder perspective, integrating business strategy with law, ethics, and social responsibility. The obligations of business to its multiple stakeholders are established and applied through analysis of companies, cases, and current events.

MGMT 4405 Strategic Execution and Summit Team Competition and Assessment (3 Credits)

Strategic Execution is a Challenge Driven Educational (CDE) course that builds off several previous MS Management courses. Students will leverage the contents from accounting, finance, management, marketing, strategy, and business analytics to engage with corporate partners to examine real-world problems. This course provides you with the opportunity to apply what you have learned so far in the MSM program with a live client. You will work on a project focused on business and management. Scoping the project will be a key learning outcome.

MGMT 4490 Global Strategy (4 Credits)

Management of multinational enterprises; identification, analysis, and discussion of key policy issues for the international manager within various functional areas; home and host country relationships including assessment of political risk, selection of foreign locations, entry and ownership strategy, personnel and staffing considerations, technology transfer, multinational labor relations, organizing for international operations. Prerequisite: Should be taken in the last possible quarter before graduation and after completion of all advanced requirements and ITEC 3900, MGMT 3900, MKTG 3900, STAT 3910, and FIN 4610.

MGMT 4503 Comparative Management (2 Credits)

Exploration of similarities and dissimilarities of management practices in various cultures, determination of political, economic and cultural factors primarily affecting management theory and practice, transferability of certain management practices to other cultures. Introduction to basic assumptions and approaches of comparative research methodology. Prerequisite: MBA 4121.

MGMT 4515 Introduction to Sport and Entertainment Management (4 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a very broad but significant exposure to the business of sports, which represents a global, multi-billion dollar industry. By critically analyzing numerous facets within this business from the perspective of a manager, student come away with knowledge that is wide enough but deep enough to foster a solid understanding of this dynamic and exciting industry. At the same time, this course provides students with specific and valuable insights that foster and stimulate deeper interest in a particular aspect within this industry through subsequent and additional coursework, independent study, and/or internship opportunities.

MGMT 4520 Managing Sport & Entertainment Contracts (4 Credits)

This is a comprehensive and interactive seminar on managing sports and entertainment contracts. The class covers intellectual property; the role of entertainment and sports managers and agents; general contract principles and theory; contract negotiation; management and operating agreements; and sponsorship, endorsement, and licensing agreements.

MGMT 4525 Facility Management (4 Credits)

What is a Public Assembly Facility? Public assembly facilities such as arenas, stadiums, convention centers, and theatres evolved out of the need by social communities to build permanent structures for public assembly, for political and commercial activities, religion, sports, spectacles, artistic expression and for commercial and educational assemblies. This course examines the specific areas of responsibility that one must acknowledge and understand to operate a successful venue of this type. We discuss the core competencies required and the unique areas of concentration that separate a public assembly facility from other venue types. Students realize the significant impact and benefit that facilities like these have on the social, educational and economic environment of communities.

MGMT 4530 Technologies for Sport & Entertainment Management (2 Credits)

This is a specialized course for the MBA student interested in expanding their knowledge of the sports industry as a business and as a world economic force. It provides students with a framework for understanding the scope of the sports business across various venues, as it relates to information technology. Management Sport Technology focuses on understanding the practical uses of computer applications as a tool in sport management activities. Emphasis is placed on demonstrated proficiency in project management, spreadsheet management, database management, and Web page development.

MGMT 4535 Managing Sponsorships for Sport & Entertainment Events (2 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to give students an understanding of sports sponsorship from the perspective of the corporate sponsor and the sports entity. The course identifies and describes the several media distribution channels that are used in corporate sports sponsorship. In addition, students learn how to use sports media distribution properties to create an effective sports marketing plan for corporate sponsors. Students put together a corporate sports marketing plan with a sample sports team.

MGMT 4540 Advanced Seminar in Sports and Entertainment Management (4 Credits)

The purpose of this seminar is to consider current topics in sport and entertainment management. Topics vary by quarter depending on timeliness of topics and interest of students. Potential topics may include public policy questions; ethical issues; current economic impacts and analysis; sport and entertainment management factors and how the various segments (professional, amateur, collegiate, high school, recreational and others) relate; environmental impacts; global issues and other issues that impact the current and future fields of sport and entertainment management.

MGMT 4545 Leadership, Team, and Career Development (2 Credits)

Daniels MBA students are preparing for leadership roles-as entrepreneurs, in corporations, and in not-for-profit organizations. In this course we will look at leadership from a variety of perspectives. Once we have reviewed what the experts have to say about leadership, we will turn our focus to helping you develop your personal theory of leadership. You will answer on important questions: How will I lead? Armed with this knowledge, you will be better equipped to handle leadership challenges as you go forward in life.

MGMT 4620 Organizational Dynamics (4 Credits)

In this course, you will: (1) understand and develop a set of management and leadership skills critical for effectiveness in high performance work environments; (2) develop the ability to analyze organizations and environments from multiple perspectives; (3) explore policies and practices for facilitating organizational change; (4) become a valued and effective member of a work team; and (5) learn how to incorporate effective communication, critical thinking, creative problem solving, and technology, into organizational behaviors and processes.

MGMT 4625 Managing Human Capital (6 Credits)

This course focuses on the effective management of people, every organization’s most critical resource. Employees’ knowledge, skills, commitment, creativity, and effort are the basis for sustained competitive advantage. It is people who deal directly with customers, have creative ideas for new products or for process improvements, who devise marketing strategy or take technologies to the next level. In this course, the class approaches the people side of business from a general management perspective, integrating concepts from organizational behavior, human resource management, strategy, and organizational design. Course topics include motivation, reward systems, engagement; feedback; processes by which work is done and decisions are made, including attention to teams, power dynamics, conflict, and negotiations; the structure of the organization and its systems, including job and organizational design and system and policies affecting human capital; the organization’s culture and history; and the external environment within which the organization operates, including legal, regulatory, demographic, economic and national cultural factors.

MGMT 4630 Strategic Human Resources Management (4 Credits)

This course advances the argument that effective human resource policies will create sustained competitive advantage. To that end, this course will address the effective management of human resources in various policy areas: staffing, diversity, training and development, voice and influence, performance appraisal, and reward systems. Rather than taking a traditional, staff personnel perspective, we will discuss human resource management from the strategic perspective of a general manager. Prerequisite: MGMT 4620.

MGMT 4650 Management Consulting (4 Credits)

This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the management consulting profession, including its industry and competitive dynamics, major practice areas, approaches to implementation, management of consulting firms and the future of consulting. In addition, emphasis is given to the practice of consulting through the development of certain high impact skills in evaluation, proposal writing, data gathering and client presentations. The course is relevant to those who: 1) are specifically interested in consulting careers, 2) have job interests that involve staff positions in corporations, 3) want to become line managers who might one day use consultants, 4) wish to develop general consulting skills and familiarity with the consulting industry. The learning process in class will consist of lectures, cases, readings, exercises and guest speakers. This wide variety of learning methods is intended to convey both the necessary knowledge and practical skills necessary for building a sound foundation for becoming a professional consultant. It is essential that everyone comes well-prepared to class, as the learning process depends heavily upon participation.

MGMT 4690 Strategic Management (4 Credits)

This course builds from the premise that managers make decisions that influence the overall success of their organizations. We will concentrate on how top managers create and maximize value for their stakeholders. You will learn about how companies compete against each other in the quest of achieving high performance and market victories. You will learn about how and why some companies are successful while others are not. This course is about strategy. The primary task of strategy is the allocation and commitment of critical resources over relatively long periods of time in pursuit of specific goals and objectives. Strategic decisions take account of the conditions that prevail within the industry environment, both positive and negative, and the resources and capabilities available to managers for meeting environmental challenges. Strategy also requires establishing and managing an internal organizational system that creates and sustains strategic value.

MGMT 4700 Topics in Management (1-4 Credits)

MGMT 4710 Sustaining Family Enterprises (4 Credits)

Family enterprises have a tremendous impact on our local, national and global economies. Today, the definition of the family enterprise extends beyond just the business entity. It includes family offices, family "banks," family councils, trusts, and family foundations, just to name a few. Further, what happens in, and how decisions are made by, family enterprise affects not only the active family members but other key stakeholders such as inactive family members, in-laws, non-family managers and employees, professional advisors, customers, suppliers and competitors. This course gives students insight into the universe of possibilities that families, enterprises and their advisors face when engaged in systemic transition planning. This highly interdisciplinary course is appropriate for anyone who intends to work in or with family enterprises. This includes family members, accountants, attorneys, estate planners, financial or wealth managers, family office professionals, insurance consultants, business advisors, management consultants, organizational and leadership development experts, international business professionals, psychologists, social workers, and family therapists.

MGMT 4790 Managing Strategic Alliances (4 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to examine and expand upon the current understanding of the challenges of developing and managing strategic alliances. Reflecting the breadth of the novel features of the structure, the course draws from both strategic management and organizational behavioral disciplines. To order the discussion, we take a process view in addressing why and then how to use a strategic alliance. We initially focus on when to use an alliance. We then turn to the formation of an alliance - examining how to select a partner, which structure to choose and how to negotiate. Following, we discuss post-formation issues of partner relationships, management of the alliance, performance evaluation and alliance termination. We conclude the course with sessions devoted towards managing a portfolio of alliances and network management in general.

MGMT 4980 Graduate Internship in Mgmt (0-10 Credits)

Hours and times arranged by student.

MGMT 4991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

Individual research and report. Hours and times arranged by student.

MGMT 4992 Directed Study (1-4 Credits)

MGMT 4995 Independent Research (1-10 Credits)

Marketing Courses

MKTG 4000 Foundations of Marketing (0 Credits)

This is primarily an online course. The purpose of the course is to ensure that all incoming students have some foundational knowledge of marketing. Most of our incoming students have undergraduate degrees in business and work experience in marketing, and so will already have a working knowledge of marketing vocabulary and may be able to pass the self-check exams in this course without further study. Other students will need to do some reading to pass the assessments. Assessments may be taken as many times as necessary to achieve a score indicating that the student has achieved foundational knowledge of marketing. The course will also integrate a few on-campus professional development tasks to ensure that students get an early start on the next phase of their careers.

MKTG 4100 Marketing Concepts (4 Credits)

Ever wonder what’s behind those Super Bowl ads we love to watch? Or, how Apple decides the price of its newest electronic wonder? Did you notice you can almost always find what you are looking for at the grocery store, whether it’s in season or out? How does that happen? This course provides students with a lens through which they may view the world as a consumer and as a marketer, relating marketing principles and models to consumer and business actions. The course investigates marketing strategy and tactics using contemporary examples from the headlines, active class discussion, and a marketing strategy simulation or client engagement.

MKTG 4201 MS Management Marketing Management (2 Credits)

Marketing Management, is a newly developed, hands-on course that is part of the Mater of Science in Management degree in the Department of Management. It uses a fresh integrated approach to applying the basic fundamentals of marketing to complex and evolving scenarios. This course also helps graduate students learn skills in a safe environment and leverage their experience and knowledge to investigate business situations and opportunities in a thoughtful and sophisticated manner. This course develops a student’s ability to make sound business planning decisions using marketing theories and tools.

MKTG 4220 Customer Experience Management (4 Credits)

In their best-selling book, The Experience Economy, Pine and Gilmore set the stage for what today’s organizations are facing—customers that connect with brands on the basis of the experiences they receive: products and service are no longer a sufficient differentiator. This course takes the student beyond the ‘better product, better service’ approach to the cutting edge concepts of customer experience management (CEM). It provides an understanding of CEM, its best practices, and the tools for its implementation and evaluation. The course considers the challenges of creating and delivering customer experiences in a variety of settings—in-store operations, branded products, and web-based operations. One of the special features of this course is the use of live, case studies from a variety of companies. Among the companies recently represented by guest speakers are Charles Schwab, Comcast, Starbucks, and others.

MKTG 4230 Financial Aspects of Customer Experience Management (4 Credits)

Successful customer experience management requires knowledge of the tools and techniques to assess the costs, benefits, and return on investment in customer relationships. This course shows students how to conceptualize, design, implement, and evaluate information and financial systems that support successful customer experience operations. A particular focus of this course is the determination of the optimal investment in customer experience, including insights from concepts such as lifetime value of customers. Prerequisite: MKTG 4220.

MKTG 4240 Customer Experience Management Integration (4 Credits)

A key component of every successful customer experience management (CEM) program is the ability to integrate CEM, marketing, financial, and information systems information, concepts, and processes into a successful operation for the customer and the company. This course provides the student with the tools to evaluate the success of customer experience management systems through conducting the CEM Audit. Students apply the CEM Audit to evaluate the level of company achievement of CEM goals and objectives. This course builds on the courses in the CEM and IMC programs (primarily MKTG 4220) as well as other courses in marketing and business. In this sense, it is a capstone course, integrating the knowledge and experience acquired through other courses and your life and business experiences. Developing skills in assessment of an organization against CEM standards is the primary objective of this course. Prerequisite: MKTG 4220.

MKTG 4360 Global Transportation Systems (4 Credits)

Managing a global supply chain involves applying increased discipline to a process with many parts. The key parts of the supply chain over which a company has the least control are the transportation carriers that connect a company with its customers and suppliers in all parts of the world. Global Transportation Systems covers the various modes of transportation including ocean vessel, barge, railroads, truck and air freight. The course will touch on the operating characteristics, service, infrastructure, sustainability, ownership, finances, prices and each mode’s place in the global supply chain both across borders and domestically in several target countries including the U.S. In addition Global Transportation Systems will provide the student with an understanding of how public policy affects transportation infrastructure investment, security, cost and service around the world. The course provides a solid foundation for other supply chain courses. Cross listed with MKTG 3360.

MKTG 4370 Marketing Channels & Logistics (4 Credits)

Of the four Ps (product, price, promotion, and place), MKTG 4370 explores the “place” in a firm’s marketing efforts to gain sustainable competitive advantage. Marketing channels are the routes to market used to sell every product and service that consumers and business buyers purchase everywhere in the world. Logistics is the other half; delivering the right product at the right time to the right place in the right quantities to keep satisfied loyal customers, a crucial element in making the sale. In this course, students learn the design of marketing channels to deliver sustainable competitive advantage while building channel power and managing channel conflict. Sound strategic and tactical channels decisions are taught via an on-line computer simulation. Logistics design and execution includes best practices for demand management, order management, customer service, inventory strategy, transportation, and distribution, all of which are taught through lecture, hands-on exercises, and case studies of the world’s best supply chains. Cross listed with MKTG 3370.

MKTG 4375 Strategic Sourcing (4 Credits)

Current businesses face relentless pressure to provide additional value in an ever more competitive world. Globalization of world markets has reconfigured supply networks across the globe, causing increasing complexities and challenges in sourcing. In this course, the student learns about the strategic sourcing process, from the development of a sourcing strategy to establishing, managing, and optimizing the firm’s supply base. A framework for aligning corporate, business unit and functional department objectives with a sourcing strategy for each commodity purchased by the firm will be presented, along with spend analysis, portfolio analysis, and other best practices (supply base optimization, supplier scorecards, supplier development programs, reverse cost analysis, B2B Auctions, learning curves, value analysis, total cost of ownership, and gain sharing) for improving a firm’s cost and financial performance through improved supply chain performance. Cross listed with MTKG 3375.

MKTG 4380 Supply Chain Management (4 Credits)

Today’s economy of globally sourced manufacturing, developing markets, synchronized e-commerce, international trade lanes, and intertwined economies demand supply chains of global reach to bring goods and services from around the world to local stores or even the consumer’s front door. This course addresses the challenges and illustrates the tools required to build, maintain, and expand global supply chains. The course develops the ability to make sound strategic, tactical, and operational supply chain decisions via an on-line simulation tool, and superior supply chain design and performance is taught through in-depth case studies from the world’s top 25 supply chains. Students are able to connect improvements in supply chain design and performance to the financial performance of a firm. Cross listed with MKTG 3380. Prerequisites: MKTG 4360 and MKTG 4370.

MKTG 4400 Social Awareness and Ethics (2 Credits)

Social awareness & ethics uses a fresh integrated approach to applying the basic fundamentals of marketing to complex and evolving scenarios involving social change and insight, cultural trends and topics, and tricky, often emotional, ethical situations. This course also helps students learn skills in a safe environment and leverage their experience and knowledge to investigate business situations and opportunities in a thoughtful and sophisticated manner. This course develops a student’s ability to make sound business planning decisions using real information from the external environment. This course will combine business ethics’ overarching intent to protect employees, the environment, and their customers with marketing ethics’ principles of honesty, fairness, responsibility, and respect. As part of this, students will learn about and apply Daniels Fund Initiate Principles: http://www.danielsfund.org/_Assets/files/Ethics%20Initiative%20Principles.pdf Prerequisites: Pass foundations exam or MKTG 4100.

MKTG 4501 Client Lab I (1 Credit)

MKTG 4501 is a requirement to be taken concurrently with a distinct marketing class over the duration of your program. In this course, you will be working with a business client to identify and solve a client problem in the area of focus for the companion course. By taking this course and solving three different types of client problems, over the duration of your program, you will have the chance to sharpen your problem identification abilities and to work with marketing professionals, demonstrating your marketing ability.

MKTG 4502 Client Lab II (1 Credit)

MKTG 4502 is a requirement to be taken concurrently with a distinct marketing class over the duration of your program. In this course, you will be working with a business client to identify and solve a client problem in the area of focus for the companion course. By taking this course and solving three different types of client problems, over the duration of your program, you will have the chance to sharpen your problem identification abilities and to work with marketing professionals, demonstrating your marketing ability.

MKTG 4503 Client Lab III (1 Credit)

MKTG 4503 is a requirement to be taken concurrently with a distinct marketing class over the duration of your program. In this course, you will be working with a business client to identify and solve a client problem in the area of focus for the companion course. By taking this course and solving three different types of client problems, over the duration of your program, you will have the chance to sharpen your problem identification abilities and to work with marketing professionals, demonstrating your marketing ability.

MKTG 4510 Consumer Behavior (4 Credits)

What makes consumers tick? This course draws on a variety of sources, including concepts and models from psychology, sociology, anthropology, and economics, to offer helpful frameworks for understanding why consumers buy what they buy. These concepts are applied to real-world situations to give students practice at making better product, promotion, pricing, and distribution decisions based on consumer insights.

MKTG 4515 International Consumer Behavior (4 Credits)

The focus of this course is to introduce the complex role that consumer behavior and consumption plays within an international context. Knowledge of customers is one of the cornerstones for developing sound business strategies, and there is a need to better understand the diverse aspects of consumer behavior that marketers must cater to in the global marketplace. As the study of consumer behavior draws upon marketing, psychology, economics, anthropology, and other disciplines, the added complexity of understanding it beyond ones’ home market results in additional challenges and opportunities. Consumer behavior attempts to understand the consumption activities of individuals as opposed to markets, and as this course will demonstrate, consumption activities are not universal. The course will focus on both consumer behavior theory, as well as the integration of regional, global, and cultural variables that marketers must account for in developing marketing programs in strategies. Topics such as global consumer culture, values and consumption, international consumer attributes, international social and mental processes, will be used to help comprehend and explain the convergence and divergence of consumer behavior in the global marketplace. The goal of this course is to provide a more concrete understanding of how marketers account for similarities and differences in the development and implementation of marketing practices, in the field of advertising, product and service development and usage, retailing, and communications. Prerequisites: MKTG 4510.

MKTG 4520 Marketing Metrics (4 Credits)

There’s no escape; even marketing managers need to understand financials. This course is designed to introduce MS Marketing students to the principles of financial decision-making and the use of marketing metrics, including customer lifetime value (CLV) and media mix modeling. Students learn how to compute marketing ROI and how to make marketing decisions that enhance the bottom line. Prerequisites: MKTG 4510 and MKTG 4530 or instructor permission.

MKTG 4530 Marketing Research & Analytics (4 Credits)

Understanding consumers requires careful observation and thoughtful questions. Marketing research represents a methodology for getting the answers needed to be successful in business. This course introduces students to a broad array of marketing research tools, including focus groups, ethnographic studies, survey research, and experiments. Students will learn how and when to apply these tools, as well as how to interpret the results to make sound marketing decisions. Highly recommended students take statistics prior to taking this course. Prerequisites: MKTG 4100.

MKTG 4540 Product and Service Innovation (4 Credits)

Developing and introducing new products and services are the lifeblood for companies and a primary responsibility of product management. This course is focused on the most current innovations in materials, hardware, CPG, and software. This is a travel course and students will be required to travel to the Consumer Electronics Show in addition to attending class on campus. We’ll be using Google Ventures rapid sprint framework to develop/test new product ideas. Prerequisites: MKTG 4510, MKTG 4520, MKTG 4530, and MKTG 4810 or instructor permission.

MKTG 4550 Marketing Planning (4 Credits)

It has been said that “planning without action is futile, and action without planning is fatal.” The objective of this course is to enable students to utilize a rigorous planning process to develop action-oriented marketing programs. This activity involves an integrated application of concepts and theories characterized by the logical use of facts -- leading to alternatives -- leading to actions. By the end of the course students should be able to develop effective marketing programs, and to understand the strength and limitations of the principal planning tools a marketing manager has at his/her disposal. The skills developed in this class are particularly important because many organizations now use the marketing plan as the basis for developing the business plan. In fact, marketing-developed plans often must precede the subsequent decisions in planning production, finance, and other corporate activities. Each student will apply the planning process, develop an action plan, and identify specific marketing outcomes for an existing or prospective enterprise. The course utilizes current practices, contemporary exemplars, and rigorous communication/presentation platforms. Course must be taken within one quarter of graduation or with instructor’s permission.

MKTG 4560 Pricing Strategy (4 Credits)

This course provides an overview of all aspects of Pricing, a key driver of growth and profitability. As one of the 4 “Ps” of Marketing, attention and interest in Pricing is growing. This is not surprising, given that Price is the one “P” that drives the topline, with a direct impact on on revenue growth, customer growth, market share, and profitability. This Pricing survey course examines established and emerging pricing strategies and principles. In addition, students learn some basic analytical tools that can be applied to pricing strategy decisions and explore approaches to optimize the impact of pricing strategies and tactics, including segmentation, addressing the competition, and communicating value. Prerequisites: MKTG 4510, MKTG 4520, and MKTG 4530 or instructor permission.

MKTG 4580 Collaborative Innovation: Designing New Customer Experiences (4 Credits)

Innovation is a driving force of change for organizations and markets. It is becoming increasingly clear that the development of novel and compelling offerings requires the contributions of multiple stakeholders, including customers. Companies such as Apple, Facebook and Google, focus on engaging an ecosystem of partners to develop new value propositions to continually improve customer experiences. This course explores the collaborative processes that drive value creation and innovation. Students will learn to strategically apply design thinking and community-building approaches to innovate customer experiences in ever-changing markets. Prerequisites: MKTG 4510 and MKTG 4530 or instructor permission.

MKTG 4605 Current Marketing Perspectives (4 Credits)

Like most disciplines, marketing is evolving constantly. One can learn about marketing and its classic terms and notions by reading a textbook. But to familiarize oneself with the current pressing issues, emerging ideas, and innovative applications, one must consult both industry practitioners and academic gurus. In this course, students and faculty will meet and interview several top business executives in the Denver area as well as visit their facilities. Such interaction with the managers and faculty will help the students understand the interface of theory and application. In addition, by identifying the current issues in marketing and learning how to develop strategies to handle them, students add to their preparation for the job market.

MKTG 4630 International Marketing (4 Credits)

The shrinking planet and constant pressure to maintain a firm’s growth mean that global marketing continues to grow in importance. This course introduces the various economic, social, cultural, political, and legal dimensions of international marketing from conceptual, methodological and application perspectives, and emphasizes how these factors should affect, and can be integrated into, marketing programs and strategies. This course provides students with methods for analyzing world markets and their respective consumers and environments, and to equip students with the skills in developing and implementing marketing strategies and decision making in international contexts. It includes a combination of lectures and discussions, case analyses of real global marketing issues, videos and readings from the business press, country snapshots, and a group research project in which student teams launch a discrete product in a foreign country of their choice.

MKTG 4635 International Consumer Behavior (4 Credits)

The focus of this course is to introduce the complex role that consumer behavior and consumption plays within an international context. Knowledge of customers is one of the cornerstones for developing sound business strategies, and there is a need to better understand the diverse aspects of consumer behavior that marketers must cater to in the global marketplace. As the study of consumer behavior draws upon marketing, psychology, economics, anthropology, and other disciplines, the added complexity of understanding it beyond ones’ home market results in additional challenges and opportunities. Consumer behavior attempts to understand the consumption activities of individuals as opposed to markets, and as this course will demonstrate, consumption activities are not universal. The course will focus on both consumer behavior theory, as well as the integration of regional, global, and cultural variables that marketers must account for in developing marketing programs in strategies. Topics such as global consumer culture, values and consumption, international consumer attributes, international social and mental processes, will be used to help comprehend and explain the convergence and divergence of consumer behavior in the global marketplace. The goal of this course is to provide a more concrete understanding of how marketers account for similarities and differences in the development and implementation of marketing practices, in the field of advertising, product and service development and usage, retailing, and communications. Cross-listed with MKTG 3635. Prerequisite: MKTG 4510 or instructor permission.

MKTG 4660 Sports & Entertainment Marketing (4 Credits)

There are few products for which consumers are more passionate than their sports and entertainment expenditures, so this topic is always an exciting one in marketing. This course provides an in-depth look at the processes and practices of marketing sports, concerts, film and other entertainment. The course emphasizes the practical use of advertising, promotion and public relations in creating athlete or entertainer images, providing a quality fan experience, promoting sponsorships or driving event ticket sales. Participation in a current sports marketing project provides context for graduate students to apply theory to practice. Cross listed with MKTG 3660. Prerequisites: MKTG 4100.

MKTG 4670 Competitive Strategies (4 Credits)

This course will examine what is happening in the world of corporate marketing today. Which companies' marketing strategies are working and why? Which are not working and why? Who is winning in the competitive marketplace and who is losing? How do you know? What is the connection between a company's marketing strategy and its financial strategy? Prerequisites: MKTG 4100.

MKTG 4705 Topics in Marketing (1-4 Credits)

TOPIC CHANGES EACH TERM.

MKTG 4750 Digital Strategies (4 Credits)

We’re 20 years into the digital marketing revolution and the ecosystem continues to evolve. From the birth of the Internet and email to the recent addition of messaging apps and the Internet of Things: It’s a fantastic time to be a marketer. In this class, we will take what you learned in consumer behavior and extend it in the social/mobile/search realm. We’ll utilize lessons learned from cognitive neuroscience combined with qualitative/quantitative data to create one-to-one marketing experiences for B2B/B2C consumers. Prerequisites: MKTG 4510 and MKTG 4530 or instructor permission.

MKTG 4800 Global Integrated Marketing Communication (4 Credits)

The Global IMC class is for graduates who have worked in marketing communications or have taken marketing communications classes and want to gain an understanding of how use this knowledge in the global marketplace. It helps students to understand similarities and differences between markets and how to most effectively approach them. What are the IMC tools that work best and how do you use them with cultural sensitivity? The class features a number of guest speakers and at least one off-site agency visit. The finale to this high-intensity class will have competing teams creating a global campaign. Prerequisites: MKTG 4810 or instructor permission.

MKTG 4805 Foundations of Digital Marketing (4 Credits)

Knowing how to use digital marketing tools as part of an integrated marketing strategy is critical in today's marketplace. This course provides the knowledge and skills to plan and implement a digital marketing strategy using three powerful digital marketing elements: (1) UX/UI - User eXperience design is one of the most difficult aspects for businesses to define and yet it's essential to map out when creating a holistic strategy. User Interface design is one part of the user experience and we will work together to show you best-in-class examples. (2)Facebook Advertising – Facebook is quickly becoming the hyper-targeted advertising platform for businesses of any size. You will walk through Facebook’s Blueprint Training to help you understand what types of digital advertising are possible. (3) Email Marketing – Email has long been a staple in digital marketing. We will show you the ins and outs of this digital medium and teach you how to take control of this evolving channel. Cross-listed with MKTG 3480.

MKTG 4810 Integrated Marketing Communication (4 Credits)

IMC is a critical component of marketing strategy and is vital to business success in today’s economy. Organizational, technological, and social trends of the past few years have considerably impacted marketing communications by necessitating new communication strategies and adding new delivery tools (e.g., digital and social). Thus, it is important to integrate all marketing communication activities into one master plan. This course is based upon the notion that marketing communications include much more than advertising. The course provides students with a foundation in the development and execution of communications strategies for any organization (large, small, public, or private). Primary emphasis is placed on consumer insight, branding, market segmentation and positioning, message strategy, sales promotion and the execution of marketing communications through appropriate media technologies. Students will develop an understanding of marketing communications practice through a real-world project, readings, lectures, case analyses and discussions. Prerequisites: MKTG 4510 and MKTG 4530 or instructor permission.

MKTG 4815 Social Media Marketing (4 Credits)

Social media marketing is an evolving field with consumers driving the changes marketers are seeing. Based on your business model, social media may be more than just distribution and consumers will be a part of your long-term business strategy beyond revenue. We'll illuminate the increasing importance of social media as it relates to consumer behavior, the purchase cycle and the rise of messaging apps as it relates to business success. We will also develop a strategic model for a diverse range of businesses (B2B, B2C, Product, Service, Online, Online with Brick and Mortar) that will empower you as a marketer to determine your best strategy. Cross-listed with MKTG 3490. Prerequisites: MKTG 4100.

MKTG 4820 Brand Management (4 Credits)

“How do leading organizations create compelling brands that inspire trust, build a sense of community, and fuel loyalty? As consumers find their digital voice, how are brands co-created by firms and users alike? And what can brand managers to do insure their brand equity is sustainable throughout the product lifecycle? In this project-based [WINTER] or interview-based [SUMMER] course, you’ll learn the underlying principles and theories from brand authorities, then apply them to real-world client challenges. Join us as we create goal-driven brand strategies, harness tactics to build and amplify the brand, foster brand experiences, conversations and relationships, and then learn ways to measure the resulting impact on brand value.Prerequisite: MKTG 4100. Concurrent enrollment allowed.

MKTG 4825 Mobile Marketing (4 Credits)

Smartphones are the device for today’s consumer. Mobile usage easily eclipses all other digital venues and you will be learning how to harness this ever-evolving field. Knowledge of mobile search, mobile applications, mobile advertising and location-based services are essential for today’s business leaders. This course will enable students to build creative mobile marketing campaigns that complement digital and traditional marketing strategies. This fast-paced course is a must for people interested in marketing. Cross-listed with MKTG 3475. Prerequisite: MKTG 4100.

MKTG 4830 Integrated Marketing Communication Cases (4 Credits)

Using the Harvard case method, students analyze marketing communication and brand building campaigns and processes used to acquire and retain customers, generate sales, and increase profits. The presence (and absence) of IMC strategies and practices are identified and discussed. Course concludes with presentations of cases created (based on working with real companies) by student teams. Prerequisite: MKTG 4810.

MKTG 4835 Search Engine Marketing (4 Credits)

The digital marketing landscape has thousands of tools that marketers can utilize to increase revenue, execute on strategies and develop deep brands. This course will review the most essential of those tools: Google Analytics and Google AdWords. Our goal is to enable students to attain individual certification in Google Analytics and begin the process of getting Google AdWords Fundamentals certified. You will be working with real-world clients, helping them increase revenue! Cross listed with MKTG 3485.

MKTG 4845 Tech in Marketing: Design Tools and Digital Foundations (4 Credits)

“Software is eating the world.” That was the quote from Marc Andreesen way back in 2011. His point was now that software had disrupted the tech industry, it was now evolving into every other industry. Agriculture. Mass transit. Construction. Everything. This prediction has become true with companies like Google and Uber. We’re at a point where coding/technology are now a matter of literacy. We are going to work together as a class to make you more literate. We are going to learn how to utilize digital design tools such as Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator to create brand imagery. We’ll then move on to learn HTML/CSS and APIs: the building blocks of the Internet. We’ll also spend some time prototyping software such as Axure and tap into memes and Gifs. This is a tactical, hands-on class. Cross-listed with MKTG 3945.

MKTG 4850 Integrated Marketing Communication Campaign (4 Credits)

This course builds on all of the courses in the IMC program/concentration as well as other courses offered through the Department of Marketing. In this sense, it is a capstone course, integrating the knowledge and experience acquired through these other courses. Integration is the primary objective of this course—that is, to develop skills in integrating content from other courses into a complete IMC campaign for a brand of the student’s choice. IMC Campaign is a major project course with a single significant outcome, the IMC Campaign. The project is conducted in a team environment with the guidance of the instructor. Prerequisites: MKTG 4810 or instructor permission.

MKTG 4900 Advanced Marketing Strategy (4 Credits)

Making sound strategic marketing decisions in the real world is complex and challenging, even for seasoned executives. Determining sound strategies is critical. Implementing them effectively and profitably is essential. How can managers increase their chances for making better strategic marketing decisions leading to more successful outcomes more often? This course applies concepts, constructs and learning acquired in prior marketing courses to complex strategic decisions. Live cases are at the heart of the course, challenging teams and individuals to make specific marketing decisions in the context of larger strategic marketing and company contexts, including accounting for top- and bottom-line impact. Students are required to be within one quarter of graduation. Prerequisites: MS MKTG students only within one (1) quarter of graduation or with instructor permission.

MKTG 4980 Marketing Internship (0-10 Credits)

We learn by doing. That’s what a marketing internship at Daniels is all about. Recent studies show that one to three internships on a resume go a long way towards landing that first job in marketing. At Daniels, we network with some of the top marketers in Denver and across the US. Our marketing students have worked at National CineMedia, Integer Advertising, Bank of America, Enterprise, Northwestern Mutual Insurance, eBags, Crispin-Porter + Bogusky, Einstein’s, Johns Manville, Ski Magazine, the Pepsi Center, 15 Million Elephants, Flextronics, Merrill Lynch, Dish Network, AEG Live, Altitude Sports & Entertainment, and the list goes on. Not only will students earn school credit, they may very well land a paid internship, and eventually a full-time job. Course requirements include an internship report that covers your experience on the job, a study of the industry, and what they learned from their company. It’s a win-win course where you put into practice the marketing concepts you’ve learned at DU, and discover new marketing tactics from your company co-workers. “Thanks to the University of Denver for fostering this partnership and providing such great students” (NCM Media Networks).

MKTG 4991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

Hours and times arranged by student.

MKTG 4992 Directed Study (1-4 Credits)

MKTG 4995 Independent Research (1-10 Credits)

MKTG 4999 Marketing Assessment (0 Credits)

Some experiences are essential to a student’s development, but don’t fit well within the confines of a traditional course. This is a face-to-face, zero-credit required course, held throughout your program. The course involves a series of executive coaching experiences with experts within and outside of Daniels, networking with fellow students and professionals in the Denver area, and assessment of your development through the program.

Real Estate Courses

REAL 4000 Business of the Built Environment (4 Credits)

The emphasis of this course is on the importance of real estate and the built environment and its impacts and influences on how we live, work, and play. The course employs a full life cycle sustainable model that links the various phases, functions, and professions of real estate, project delivery, and asset/facility management to create holistic, value generating solutions for society. Professional practices/skillsets associated with the many career options that engage the built environment are explored.

REAL 4002 The Business of Real Estate (2 Credits)

This is an introduction to home ownership, real estate industry and its markets; legal aspects of home ownership from consumer's point of view, including property rights, title, concepts, deeds, and purchase contracts. Listing contracts, law of agency, types of mortgages, basics of home loan finance, appraisal, investment and tax benefits are also covered in this class. Partially satisfies Colorado Real Estate sales licensing requirements.

REAL 4007 Real Estate Financial Analysis (4 Credits)

Alternative analysis formats that can be applied to a wide array of real estate analysis issues; simulates working/decision-making environment; structured overview of analysis tools focused on specific facets of multidimensional real estate decision-making environment; applications in investment analysis, feasibility analysis, valuation, market analysis, and report writing and presentation. Prerequisite: REAL 4407.

REAL 4010 Real Estate Capital Markets (4 Credits)

This course will expose students to the Commercial Real Estate Capital Markets that have evolved from exclusively private in the 1980s to a mix of private and public, including commercial mortgage backed securities (CMBS) and real estate investment trusts (REITs), in the 1990s. Any person involved in real estate today must understand all the alternative capital sources available and their requirements. Students will be exposed to the positives and pitfalls of all the capital market products. This course will provide students with the general concepts and definitions. A combination of lectures, guest lectures from industry experts, text & article readings, class discussions, and case studies using real life examples. Cross listed with REAL 3010. Prerequisite: REAL 4007.

REAL 4110 Advanced Issues in Real Estate & Construction Management (4 Credits)

This course concentrates on five advanced real estate and construction management topics; the design build environment, negotiation skills in real estate and construction management, real estate capital markets, the entitlement process -- urban planning, zoning, PUDs and underutilized tax advantages in real estate. Cross listed with REAL 3110. Prerequisite: REAL 4407.

REAL 4140 Global Perspectives in Real Estate (4 Credits)

This course focuses on inbound U.S. and outbound U.S. real estate transactions and the cultural issues that impact these transactions. This can also be taken as a Burns Global Delegation travel course. Cross listed with REAL 3140, XRCM 4140.

REAL 4210 Planning, Entitlements, and Public Finance (4 Credits)

Real estate development, place making, and community building require the combined efforts of the public, for-profit, and non-profit sectors. Participants in the real estate development process need to understand and appreciate the sometimes competing and sometimes collaborative interests of governments, agencies, and the private developer. This course is designed to familiarize students with the overall context of urban planning and land use. Students discover the variety of participants in the development process and also become familiar with the project entitlement process, zoning, and land use regulation. Students also examine public/private financing structures such as public-private-partnerships (P3s) and become familiar with detailed calculations relating to Tax Incremental Financing (TIF) and Metropolitan Districts.

REAL 4337 RE Securities/Syn/Entrep (4 Credits)

Introduction to real estate securities; emphasis on private offerings; determining whether a contemplated transaction involves a security, and what happens if it does; exemptions from registration (Reg D); registration requirements; investor suitability, how to syndicate, acquisition of property, marketing or the property, tax structure and formation of syndication, compensation to syndicators, real estate tax considerations. Cross listed with REAL 3337, XRCM 4337.

REAL 4347 Mgmt of Income Properties (4 Credits)

Explore the complexities of managing apartments, condominiums, office buildings, industrial property and shopping centers. This course covers rental markets, development of rental schedules, leasing techniques and negotiations, repairs and maintenance, tenant relations, merchandising, selection and training of personnel, accounting, and owner relations. Cross listed with REAL 3347.

REAL 4369 Real Estate Taxation (4 Credits)

Tax factors affecting investments and operations in real estate; special attention is given to legal forms of ownership, depreciation, tax basis, tax impacts of exchanges, syndications, real estate securities, and other federal tax laws affecting real estate. Cross listed with REAL 3369.

REAL 4400 Real Estate Principles and Practices (4 Credits)

Principles of real estate, real estate industry and its markets; legal aspects of home ownership from consumer's point of view, including property rights, title concepts, deeds, purchase contracts, listing contracts, law of agency, environmental issues and disclosures, types of mortgages, basics of home loan financing, appraisal investment and tax benefits. Partially satisfies Colorado real estate broker licensing requirements. Cross listed with REAL 1777.

REAL 4407 Income Property Finance (4 Credits)

This course explores conventional and alternative financing, mortgage banking, law and markets, loan underwriting analysis and the impact of monetary and fiscal policies on the real estate and mortgage markets, with emphasis on decision making from the equity investors point of view. Specific topics include an overview and history of real estate finance, the taxation and legal aspects of real estate finance, compounding and discounting, functions of interest and real estate capital markets and securities. Specific areas of focus are residential property finance, income property finance, and construction and development financing. Cross listed with REAL 3307.

REAL 4417 Income Property Valuation and Appraisal (4 Credits)

Residential/Commercial appraising, including market cost and income approaches to value, gross rent multiplier analysis, neighborhood and site analysis, valuation of income properties including market cost and income approaches to value, capitalization theory and techniques, mortgage-equity analysis, and investment value concepts. Prerequisite: REAL 4407.

REAL 4467 Property Development and Feasibility (4 Credits)

Commercial real estate development analysis and feasibility includes economic base analysis, tenant demand analysis, development and construction cost analysis, lease-up analysis, financial feasibility, leasing and property management practices. Five major property types (office, industrial, retail, apartment and hotel) are covered. Prerequisite: REAL 4007.

REAL 4477 Income Property Investment (4 Credits)

Comprehensive analytical framework for real estate investment decision-making, equity investment decisions via discounted cash flow, and risk analysis models and strategic planning concepts, structuring parameters to maximize rates of return while controlling downside risks; emphasis on theory, concept building, and practical application to various types of investment properties. Cross listed with REAL 3377. Prerequisite: REAL 4007.

REAL 4500 Argus Financial Analysis (4 Credits)

This course concentrates on practical applications of the Argus (TM) Real Estate Financial Software through interactive examples and case studies. Participants will be exposed to the software's capabilities, fundamentals, and unique nuances. Cross listed with REAL 4500, XRCM 4702. Prerequisite: REAL 4007.

REAL 4701 Topics in Real Estate (1-5 Credits)

REAL 4705 Risk Management in the Built Environment (4 Credits)

Decision making and risk analysis concepts in the context of real estate and the built environment. This includes, but is not limited to, liability issues as to persons and property, casualty and property damage questions, employee and employer insurance areas, auto insurance, professional liability insurance, directors' and owners' liability issues, medical insurance, life insurance, environmental risks, and much more in areas of exposure that one can face in the business world. The course further examines means to minimize such areas of exposure.

REAL 4800 NAIOP Challenge (2-4 Credits)

A unique non-traditional course, where the students will work on a complex real estate problem culminating in an internal competition and external competition which includes a written report and an oral presentation. Cross listed with CMGT 3800, CMGT 4800, REAL 3800.

REAL 4890 Internship (0-10 Credits)

REAL 4980 Adv Valuation/Report Writing (1-10 Credits)

Advanced cutting-edge techniques not yet institutionalized nor commonly practiced in the field. Includes writing skills workshops appropriate to specialized nature of appraisal reports, and composition of a complex field problem report to prepare student for writing "demonstration" report required for MAI professional designation. Prerequisite: REAL 4417.

REAL 4991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

REAL 4992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

REAL 4995 Independent Research (1-10 Credits)

Statistics Courses

STAT 3920 Strategic Management of Operations (4 Credits)

The operations function is the unit of the organization that produces the products and/or delivers the service for which the company earns revenue. It is the largest unit of the organization with which all other units interact. Therefore, efficient management of this function is a critical success factor for any company. This course focuses on an organization's management (planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling) when converting inputs into products and services. Companies today must remain competitive in the global marketplace, and careful consideration of various options regarding cost containment and use of technology are required. This course will explore how operations managers meet these challenges in the manufacturing and services firms in response to changes in economic conditions. Students will be exposed to a number of quantitative tools as well as becoming familiar with new systems and methods in the operations management field. When appropriate, optimization software such as Microsoft Solver will be utilized to conduct analysis. Prerequisite: STAT 3900.

STAT 4040 Basic Math-Graduate Students (2 Credits)

STAT 4045 Basic Math-Evening MBA Stdnt (1 Credit)

STAT 4050 Basic Statistics-Grad Students (2 Credits)

STAT 4100 Quantitative Methods I (4 Credits)

An introduction to the methods of quantitative analysis commonly used in business, with an emphasis on finance applications. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, fundamentals of statistical inference, correlation, and simple and multiple regression analysis.

STAT 4200 Quantitative Methods II (4 Credits)

STAT 4300 Production & Operation Mgmt (3 Credits)

STAT 4350 Statistical Computing (4 Credits)

Introduction to and training in the use of modern statistical software packages. Exposure to several of SAS, STATISTICA, S-PLUS, and SPSS with focus on one to best fit student needs. Data acquisition, management, graphs, analyses, reports, customizing and programming. Cross listed with STAT 3350.

STAT 4400 Risky Business (4 Credits)

An interterm travel course to Las Vegas that deals with the theory, practice, and business of gambling.

STAT 4500 Prob Thry Math Gamb (4 Credits)

This course covers the theory of probability and the formal study of mathematics underlying gambling and games of chance. Topics include probability concepts, probability rules, expectation, permutations and combinations, the law of large numbers, the law of "averages," history of gambling, house advantage, fallacies and betting systems, volatility and operations, game odds and price setting, games of pure chance, games with a skill component. Prerequisite: a previous course in statistics or permission of instructor. Cross listed with STAT 3500.

STAT 4510 Applied Decision Theory (4 Credits)

Application of classical and Bayesian decision theory and game theory to practical problems. Prerequisite: MBA 4111, MBA 4112, or permission of instructor.

STAT 4610 Business Statistics (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to basic analytical tools in statistics and operations management, and provides theoretical concepts and skills that are building blocks for future courses. The approach is to present students with a "corporate" view of how statistical tools are used to analyze data and facilitate business decision-making. Students will familiarize themselves with all of the statistical techniques and models presented in the course and will demonstrate knowledge in applying the appropriate techniques and models to various data sets and interpreting the results of the analysis. The Microsoft Excel Data Analysis and Solver Toolkits will be used to conduct statistical analyses, allowing students to become more proficient overall in using Microsoft Excel and to place their emphasis on applications to core business disciplines, statistical reasoning, and proper interpretation of results. A rich variety of such problems and settings will be discussed in class.

STAT 4640 Regrsn/Correlation Analysis (4 Credits)

Simple linear regression analysis, methods of estimation, multivariate multiple regression and correlation, tests of reliability and significance, simultaneous equations model and applications. Prerequisite: MBA 4111, MBA 4112, or permission of instructor.

STAT 4650 Applied Multivariate Analysis (4 Credits)

The introduction and application of multivariate analytical techniques and model building for problem solving in business and other settings. Cross listed with STAT 3650. Prerequisite: MBA 4111, MBA 4112, or permission of instructor.

STAT 4680 Sampling Theory & Application (4 Credits)

Simple and stratified random sampling; multistage, cluster, and sequential sampling; optimum allocation and economic efficiency; ratio estimation methods; design of sample studies of various human and physical populations; financial auditing by probability sampling. Prerequisite: MBA 4111, MBA 4112, or permission of instructor.

STAT 4687 Advanced Statistics (4 Credits)

STAT 4700 Intro Computer Simulation (4 Credits)

Deterministic and probabilistic model structures, planning models, heuristics and artificial intelligence, Monte Carlo methods, simulation programming languages, model design, experimentation, and verification. Prerequisite: MBA 4111, MBA 4112, or permission of instructor.

STAT 4704 Topics in Statistics (1-5 Credits)

Various topics including travel courses.

STAT 4709 Computer Simulation Methods for Business (4 Credits)

Large-scale simulation in business and economics, deterministic and probabilistic model structures, corporate planning models, heuristics and artificial intelligence; Monte Carlo methods, model design, experimentation and verification, tactical problems in total systems simulation. Cross listed with STAT 3709.

STAT 4710 Statistical Quality Control (4 Credits)

Applies the basic concepts of statistics to quality improvement in the business environment. Topics include a summary of Total Quality Management (TQM) and where Statistical Quality Control fits in, the tools of Statistical Process Control, Deming's Continuous Improvement Cycle, as well as the evaluation of Process Capability and Sampling. Cross listed with STAT 3710. Prerequisite: MBA 4111, MBA 4112, or permission of instructor.

STAT 4780 Dsgn & Analysis Exp & Survey (4 Credits)

STAT 4783 Forecasting-Financial Envirn (4 Credits)

Cross listed with FIN 3610, STAT 3620.

STAT 4793 Sem: Statistical Methods (1-5 Credits)

STAT 4794 Sem: Operations Research (1-5 Credits)

STAT 4795 Grad Research Sem-Statistics (1-5 Credits)

STAT 4800 Dsgn & Analysis Exp & Survey (4 Credits)

Designing experiments, analysis of results of experiments, nonparametric and parametric tests, randomization, factorial and nonfactorial designs, Latin squares, survey methodology, survey techniques for field investigations. Prerequisite: MBA 4111, MBA 4112, or permission of instructor.

STAT 4810 Nonparametric Statistics (4 Credits)

Statistical procedures applicable in many situations where standard normal theory methods are not. Especially useful when data are of categorical or rank type or when sampled population is excessively skewed. Emphasis will be on applications, making use of the laws of probability. Cross listed with STAT 3110. Prerequisite: MBA 4111, MBA 4112, or permission of instructor.

STAT 4830 Stats-Econ & Bus Forecasting (4 Credits)

Methods to explain, discover, and predict business and economic forces, bases for evaluating such methods. Prerequisite: STAT 4100 or equivalent. Cross-listed with FIN 4620.

STAT 4840 Decision Sciences (4 Credits)

Decision-making techniques, processes, and support systems; basic decision models dealing with certainty, uncertainty, and static and dynamic time frames; emphasis on viewing all decision problems from perspective of a generalized decision-making structure; introduction to computerized decision support systems. Prerequisites: MBA 4111, MBA 4112, or permission of instructor.

STAT 4850 Operations Research I (4 Credits)

Linear programming, including transportation, warehousing, assignment models, and sensitivity analysis, integer programming and game theory. Permission of instructor required.

STAT 4860 Operations Research II (4 Credits)

Non-linear models and optimization, Kuhn Tucker conditions, quadratic and dynamic programming, inventory and queuing models, simulation. Permission of instructor required.

STAT 4870 Advanced Statistics (4 Credits)

Discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling distributions, estimation methods, moment generating functions, analysis of variance, test of reliability, and significance by parametric and non-parametric methods. Prerequisites: MBA 4111, MBA 4112, or permission of instructor.

STAT 4930 Sem: Statistical Methods (1-5 Credits)

STAT 4940 Sem: Operations Research (1-5 Credits)

STAT 4950 Grad Research Sem-Statistics (1-5 Credits)

STAT 4960 Intern/Case Study: Statistics (1-5 Credits)

STAT 4970 Intern/Case Study: Ops Res (1-10 Credits)

STAT 4980 Intern/Case Study: Statistics (0-10 Credits)

Hours and times arranged by student.

STAT 4981 Intern/Case Study: Ops Res (4 Credits)

STAT 4991 Independent Study (1-4 Credits)

Individual research and report. Hours and times arranged by student.

STAT 4992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

STAT 4995 Independent Research (1-10 Credits)

Faculty

Sharon Lassar, Professor and Director, PhD, University of Southern California

Donald Mayer, Teaching Professor and Department Chair, JD, Duke University

Samuel Battaglia, Associate Professor, Emeritus, PhD, The State University of New York at Buffalo

Jeff Brothers, Teaching Assistant Professor, MAcc, University of Denver

Ryan Casey, Assistant Professor, PhD, Arizona State University

Sam Cassidy III, Professor, JD, University of Tulsa

Corey Ciocchetti, Associate Professor, JD, Duke University

Kathleen Davisson, Teaching Associate Professor, MAcc, University of Denver

Kelsey Dworkis, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Southern California

Jacqueline Eschenlohr, Teaching Assistant Professor, MAcc, University of Denver

Joyce Frakes, Professor, Emerita, PhD, Stanford University

Robert Giacalone, Professor, PhD, State University of New York at Albany

Adam Greiner, Assistant Professor, PhD, Florida Atlantic University

Hugh Grove, Professor, DBA, University of Southern California

Glyn Hanbery, Professor, Emeritus, PhD, Arizona State University

Paul Harrison, Teaching Assistant Professor, MBA, University of Colorado, Denver

John Holcomb, Professor, JD, Georgetown University

Paula Holt, Teaching Assistant Professor, JD, University of Denver

R. Hutton, Professor, EMERITUS, PhD, University of Florida

Ruth Jebe, Teaching Associate Professor, JD, University of Minnesota

Bruce Klaw, Assistant Professor, JD, Harvard University

Rick Leaman, Professor, JD, University of Chicago

Suzette Loving, Assistant Professor of the Practice of Accountancy, MBA, Michigan State University

Jane Morton, Teaching Associate Professor, PhD, University of Arizona

Erin Nickell, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Central Florida

Kevin O'Brien, Associate Professor, JD, University of Denver

Tricia Olsen, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Lorenzo Patelli, Associate Professor, PhD, Univ Comm 'Luigi Bocconi'

Brittany Scantland, Teaching Assistant Professor, JD, University of Denver

Philipp Schaberl, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Cincinnati

Buie Seawell, Teaching Professor, JD, University of Denver

Keith Sellers, Associate Professor, DBA, University of Memphis

James Sorensen, Professor, PhD, The Ohio State University

Ron Thompkins, Teaching Assistant Professor, BA, Howard University

John Tripp, Professor, PhD, University of Houston

Lisa Victoravich, Associate Professor, PhD, Florida State University

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