2016-2017 Graduate Bulletin

Global Studies (GS)

 

Courses

GS 4010 Global Players, Structures, and Trends (4 Credits)

In this course, globalization is studied from historical and contemporary perspectives. Structures of community and organizations, governmental and nongovernmental, are examined and compared. Students study cases of global conflict and cooperation. Global issues are introduced, and students examine the role of the United States in the world across issues, borders, and cultures.

GS 4020 Cultural Positioning and Assessment (4 Credits)

In building a global perspective, it is essential to be able to position oneself culturally and interact with people from other cultural backgrounds. This course addresses the question of how to learn about different regions and cultures and how to assess the similarities and differences with one's own. Students learn about how to define culture. They develop skills to research countries, regions, and cultures through history, human geography, religion, and artistic traditions. They use the knowledge gleaned through research to build cross-cultural communication skills.

GS 4030 Issues in Working Internationally (4 Credits)

In a global marketplace, working internationally is very common. There are many legal, corporate, and cultural issues that individuals and corporations in the international workplace encounter on a regular basis. This course addresses legal issues – such as contracts and agreements, import/export regulations, intellectual property, and human resources – that affect how business is done across national and cultural lines. In addition, workers need to be able to assess the business and social cultures in another country in order to navigate the business climate and networking protocols.

GS 4100 Hunger, Food, and Health (4 Credits)

A growing world population, climate change, and scarce resources have many implications on hunger, food, and health. Floods and droughts, conflict and migration affect food supplies, which create hunger. Cultural norms and practices, famine, forced migration, and conflict contribute to health concerns. New strains of disease threaten global pandemics. Students in this course examine current issues of hunger, food, and health in a global context. Social, political, cultural, and economic aspects of these issues are analyzed. The role of governmental and non-governmental organizations and agencies in issues of hunger, food, and health are discussed. Students debate the causes and solutions of global hunger, food, and health issues, using case examples to support their arguments.

GS 4110 Sustainable Development (4 Credits)

Economic development, ecology and democracy are three dynamic, powerful and volatile forces in the world today. Players in the tension between them include nations, large corporations, and a groundswell of farmers, workers, and ordinary people. This course looks at the model of sustainable development as a way for countries to make long-term and ethical decisions about how to use resources: earth, water, air, energy, as well as the most important resource, people. Contrasts are drawn between Western economies and the emerging world attempting the leap from an agricultural paradigm to industrialization, while trying to avoid falling into the Malthus trap of overpopulation. Students develop an understanding of the complex, intertwined relationship between economic growth, environment and humanity.

GS 4120 Terrorism and War in the 21st Century (4 Credits)

In the 21st century, the word "terrorism" is a part of the common vernacular used with multiple, and at times vague, meanings. This course prepares students to understand and explain the contexts and impacts of terrorism through interdisciplinary exploration of terrorism theories. Students investigate how these theories apply to both real world situations and responses to terrorism and how these theories contribute to our understanding of 21st century concepts of war and terror.

GS 4130 Human Rights and the Role of Women (4 Credits)

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1948. With this international recognition of human rights is a responsibility to promote and protect those human rights. In this course, those rights and the organizations that promote and protect them are studied. The philosophical and theoretical bases for the concept of human rights is examined. In addition, students delve into women's human's rights and perspectives, including feminist perspectives on international human rights and issues such as trafficking, refugees, economic and social rights. The role of women in promoting and defending universal human rights is highlighted.

GS 4200 Globalization and Human Geography (4 Credits)

This course examines human-environment relations under globalization from the lens of human geography. Core concepts of human geography such as scale, place, and identity are used to examine current globalization trends, debates, and implications on human settlements and activities. Students examine the interconnection of economics, politics, migration, culture, trade, settlement patterns and development at different scales through the lens of geography. The course ends with an analysis of current resistance responses and alternatives for the future.

GS 4210 World Religious Traditions (4 Credits)

This course examines the religions of the world and their roles in defining cultures and societies. Major world religions are examined and discussed in this course, including their varied beliefs, rituals, and institutions. Comparisons and distinctions are drawn between the various Western and non-Western traditions. In addition to major religions, smaller religious movements and distinct religions from around the world are also discussed.

GS 4220 Competition and Conflict (4 Credits)

In this course, students study philosophies, cultures, and events of competition and conflict across the globe and throughout history. Theories of the dialectic, competition, and struggle for advancement are analyzed. Social and belief systems of nationalism, capitalism, and survival of the fittest are among those that create boundaries and encourage competition and, at times, conflict. Students delve into and analyze various conflicts and cultures throughout history marked by ideals of competition, individualism, and power.

GS 4230 Community and Cooperation (4 Credits)

In this course, students examine world cultures, ideas, and events across history through a lens of community and cooperation. Philosophies of community, social cooperation, and unity for societal progress are analyzed. The philosophies of socialism and communism, their various modes of implementation, and their success are assessed. International organizations that foster cooperation and community, such as the United Nations and the European Union are investigated. Social movements for change that create communities across borders are analyzed and discussed.

GS 4300 Foundations of Translation: The Role of the Professional Translator (4 Credits)

This course examines fundamental translation ideas and theories through assigned readings, lectures, and class discussions. It explores the links between linguistic and cultural factors and their relevance to translation. The course covers the different aspects of translation, surveys translation tools and reference materials, discusses professional roles of translators, analyzes the public perception of the profession, and examines standard business practices and professional codes of ethics. It also introduces the actual practice of translation through realistic exercises.

GS 4301 Written & Sight Translation for Translators & Interpreters (4 Credits)

This is an introductory course for translators and interpreters covering a variety of registers: commercial, journalistic, legal, literary, medical, and technical. Students learn to apply text analysis, text typology, and contrastive analysis of their working languages to identify, analyze, and resolve translation/interpretation problems while independently developing an efficient and rational approach to the process of translation or interpretation. In addition, course assignments include practice and graded exercises in translation and sight translation, utilizing authentic texts drawn from an extensive variety of text categories that include, but are not limited to, current events, general political economy, general legal documents, and scientific and technical topics for general audiences. Language-specific.

GS 4302 Computer Aided Translation (CAT): An Introduction to Software for Translators (4 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to various types of Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools, including translation memory software and translation QA tools. Translation theory or field-specific terminology are not covered. Students become familiar with the concept of translation memory, learn to use the main features (create, import, export, analyze, clean up) of some of the applications available, and use translation memory in the translation process as necessary to create a translation project workflow from start to end. Students also learn to use translation QA tools to revise and perfect translations drafted using translation memory tools. This course may be taken concurrently with GS 4300: Foundations of Translation.

GS 4303 Language Services Practicum (4 Credits)

The Practicum helps students develop and establish an identity as professionals because it builds a practical knowledge of translation or interpretation as a profession. Its goal is to empower students to identify and pursue professional development opportunities and specializations. Students are expected to apply the knowledge, skills, and attitudes attained in the translation and interpretation curriculum by apprenticing under qualified translators or interpreters, language agencies, law firms, government agencies (e.g., school districts, the IRS, police departments, social services agencies), and/or healthcare and community-based organizations in a variety of general work situations. Interns shadow their mentors and then move into actual translation or interpretation assignments in monitored situations. Initiation into the language industry through interaction with members of the profession, professional organizations, and institutions is encouraged. Students must prepare a final project based on their practicum experience, following the University College Internship Handbook. The practicum should be taken as one of the last two Translation Studies classes.

GS 4304 Introduction to Legal Translation (4 Credits)

Because a legal document bears legal liabilities, the translation of a legal document has the same legal effect as the original. As a result, the requirements for accuracy in legal translation (meaning, tone, and style) are quite high. This course provides an overview of the nature of legal translation and an introduction to the principles of comparative law, such as how to research legal issues in the countries of the language pair. The concepts of equivalence and zero equivalence are analyzed. Participants translate different types of agreements; certificates; and affidavits, as well as a wide array of documents focusing on probate, family, poverty, and criminal law. Students are given assignments on the research approach, steps, and skills needed to tackle a legal translation project from start to finish. Fundamental legal translation theory is emphasized at the beginning of the course and conveyed in the form of assigned readings, lectures, class discussions, and independent research. Language specific. Prerequisites: GS 4301 and admission to the Master of Liberal Studies in Global Affairs with a Translation Studies specialty of the Certificate of Advanced Study in Translation Studies.

GS 4305 Localization and Translation of Software and Web Pages (4 Credits)

This course provides students with a general overview of the field of web page translation and an introduction to software localization. Class topics range from technical discussions on computer architecture to tips for managing localization projects. Students gain a thorough understanding of the basic components of a localization project (web, software, online help, and documentation) and insight into the larger context of software/web localization and internationalization processes. Using real-life examples and hands-on exercises, students explore the cultural, technical, and organizational challenges in the adaptation of culturally sensitive elements. Language generic. Prerequisites: GS 4301 and admission to the Master of Liberal Studies in Global Affairs with a Translation Studies specialty of the Certificate of Advanced Study in Translation Studies.

GS 4306 Translation of Medical Texts for the Health Care Industry (4 Credits)

This course covers medical terminology involving patient education, medical research, drug development, the human body and systems, major diseases, as well as the most common injuries. Students translate documents used in general medical practice and are introduced to the common roots, prefixes and suffixes in medical terminology. Translation skills are reinforced by analyzing different levels of difficulty in medical texts, by translating, and by addressing requests for editing and rewriting translated materials for patient populations and audiences of different education levels. Students practice translating medical office correspondence, informational brochures, patient letters, discharge information, hospital intake questionnaires, living wills, patient outreach/educational materials, instructions for taking medications, laboratory tests, and medical disability reports, among others. Language-specific. Prerequisites: GS 4301.

GS 4307 Translation Project Management (4 Credits)

This course gives students the opportunity to address both translation and non-translation related issues associated with planning, executing, controlling, and delivering a final translation for a client (either direct or as an agency). Particular focus is given to hands-on practice of the various communications between the parties. The course outlines an effective project management methodology that can be applied to large or small translation/localization projects. Language generic. Prerequisites: GS 4301 and admission to the Master of Liberal Studies in Global Affairs with a Translation Studies specialty of the Certificate of Advanced Study in Translation Studies.

GS 4308 Introduction to Terminology for Translators & Interpreters (4 Credits)

Terminology is a fundamental part of both translation and interpretation, and knowing how to create and use terminology is a skill necessary both to translators and interpreters. This course will introduce what terminology is, how a termbase differs from a simple glossary or from a dictionary, and how terminology differs from allied fields such as lexicography. It will further introduce some tools used by translators, interpreters and terminologists in their work. Language generic.

GS 4310 Foundations of Interpretation (4 Credits)

This course examines the profession of interpreting, including employment opportunities, the role of the interpreter, administrative matters, and ethical considerations. In addition, an overview will be given of the three modes of interpretation (sight, consecutive, and simultaneous), as well as the different areas of interpretation, such as legal, medical, business, community, and conference interpretation.

GS 4311 The Language Services Business for Translators & Interpreters (4 Credits)

Translation and interpretation are professions that typically require their practitioners to set up businesses on their own. This course addresses the key issues involved in being an independent contractor in the language industry, including how to acquire clients, how to price professional language services, how to estimate different types of service, and how to manage different client relationships, from government entities to private individuals. The course also analyzes the differences between working directly for clients and working with translation agencies or as a staff translator or interpreter, where it is crucial to know how to work on a team with other language professionals and content experts. The course also covers basic standard business practices in the language industry and business codes of ethics.

GS 4312 Research for Translation & Interpretation (4 Credits)

Not so long ago, the only way for translators to conduct research for their assignments was to consult the reference works they happened to own, or (if they lived near a good library), go to the library and hope what they needed was available there. The Internet changed all that, revolutionizing the translation and interpretation professions. Now translators and interpreters have at their disposal a seemingly bottomless well of information. At the same time, the research skills needed for translation and interpretation also have changed. This course teaches students how to conduct research using a variety of online tools, how to distinguish between reliable and unreliable sources of information, how to take advantage of the research tools made available by libraries, and in particular how to leverage the various types of resources offered by different types of libraries. Language-generic.

GS 4313 Translation for the Publishing Industry (4 Credits)

Most professional translators work outside the publishing industry: they work as freelancers or staff translators in business, technical, medical, legal translation--or in some other translation specialization. But when people outside our industry think of translators, it is likely they think of book translators, i.e., translators who work for the publishing industry. Working as a translator for the publishing industry may be rewarding, but in many respects it is different from the kind of work most translators are accustomed to. This course will explore such themes as the difference between working on book-length projects and shorter projects, and the difference between translations performed as "work done for hire" and copyrighted translations. It will look at publishing contracts, and at the difference between translating non-fiction and fiction works. It will also survey the most prominent theories of translation, past and present, to see how they apply to the translation of literature. Language-specific.

GS 4314 Translation & Interpretation for Law Enforcement (4 Credits)

This course explores the scope and nature of translating and interpreting in a law enforcement context, including the kinds of documents a translator is likely to encounter and how an interpreter interacts with both law enforcement professionals and members of the public who lack fluency in English. Language-specific.

GS 4315 Interpreting for Health Care (4 Credits)

This course explores the general body of knowledge that serves as the context for the health care interpreting profession and covers the special skills and abilities health care interpreters must demonstrate. It addresses the health care interpreter code of ethics, essential health care terminology, and the different modes of interpreting used in health care settings. The course also covers how to interact effectively with other health care professionals and how to serve as an effective cultural broker between U.S. health care providers and patients with limited English proficiency.

GS 4701 Topics in Global Affairs (4 Credits)

The content of this course varies each time it is offered. Specific course content is detailed on quarterly schedule. Depending on the subject matter, students may be required to have completed prerequisite courses.

GS 4901 Capstone Project (4 Credits)

The Capstone Project provides students the opportunity to research a topic, problem, or issue within their field of study, and work individually with a Capstone advisor. Similar in weight to a thesis, but more flexible, this final project will synthesize and apply core concepts acquired from the program. The student will select an appropriate Capstone advisor who is knowledgeable in the field of study to work closely with and whom can guide the research project. Evaluation will be focused on the quality and professionalism of applied research and writing; critical and creative thinking; problem-solving skills; knowledge of research design, method, and implementation; and contribution to the field and topic of study. Please see the Capstone Guidelines for additional details. Prerequisites: A Capstone Proposal that has been approved by both the Capstone Advisor and the Academic Director, unconditional acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. A final grade of a B- or better is required to pass.

GS 4902 Capstone Seminar (4 Credits)

The Capstone Seminar is a graduate seminar in which students utilize the knowledge and skills gained through the degree program to create a culminating work that critically addresses a problem in their degree field of study. The students produces a Capstone of 7000-8000 words that presents a position on a relevant problem, supports the position with professional and academic literature, analyzes and tests the proposed solution, and discusses the findings as related to the field of study. The seminar is dependent upon quality, collegial discussion, and feedback of students’ research and work products, under the facilitation of a faculty member. The course structure guides the students through the process of independent, secondary research and writing of a Capstone. No primary research is allowed. Students generate the course content through ongoing discussion and peer feedback on the Capstone process and individual topic areas under investigation. Students professionally and academically communicate through written work and oral presentation . Students must have: Unconditional acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. A final grade of B- or better is required in this course to meet degree requirements. Students must complete the Capstone Seminar in one quarter; no incomplete grades are assigned.

GS 4904 Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar (4 Credits)

The Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar is a graduate seminar in which students utilize the knowledge and skills gained through the degree program to create a culminating work that critically addresses a problem or issue in the degree field of study. Members of the class will include students from various UCOL programs, representing multiple topics of study. On campus offerings of this course include required online components. The student produces a paper of 7000-8000 words that presents a position on a relevant problem or issue, supports the position with professional and academic work in the field, analyzes and tests the paper position, and discusses the role of the findings within the field of study. Students professionally and academically communicate their findings through written work and oral presentations. The seminar is dependent upon active and collegial discussion and critique of student research and work under the facilitation of a faculty member, and it is governed by the quality of participation and contributions of the students. Students must have: Unconditional acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. A final grade of B- or better is required in this course to meet degree requirements. Students must complete the Capstone Seminar in one quarter; no incomplete grades are assigned.

GS 4905 Graduate Social Research Methods (4 Credits)

Graduate Social Research Methods is an exploration of the methods and purposes of social science research from the perspective of the researcher as well as that of the informed professional and consumer of information. Students will learn about the process of research, including the development of research questions, the purpose of various social science research methods, the role of professional ethics, and general approaches to the analysis and interpretation of data. Students will develop the ability to read and critique basic social science research articles and to implement simple research designs. Students will develop and write a research proposal around a specific research question informed by a review of the literature. Technical requirements include the ability to read and modify Microsoft Excel documents. This course is required of all degree-seeking students and should be taken in the first three quarters of enrollment.

GS 4980 Internship (4 Credits)

The internship is designed to offer students a purposeful experience in a practical, industry related setting. The internship is an individualized learning experience and a training plan is created for each student in conjunction with the internship site to provide experiences related to the skills and knowledge covered in the certificate and master's programs.

GS 4991 Independent Study (1-5 Credits)

This is an advanced course for students wishing to pursue an independent course of study. The student must be accepted in a degree program, have earned a grade point average of 3.0 or better, obtained the approval of the department director, and have completed the Independent Study form and filed the form with all appropriate offices before registering for the independent study. Independent Study is offered only on a credit basis and only for degree candidates.

GS 4992 Directed Study (1-5 Credits)

This is an advanced course for students wishing to pursue a directed course of study. The student must be accepted in a degree program, have earned a grade point average of 3.0 or better, obtained the approval of the department director, and have completed the Independent Study form and filed the form with all appropriate offices before registering for the independent study. Directed Study is offered only on a for-credit basis.

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