2022-2023 Undergraduate Bulletin

Socio-Legal Studies

Office: Ricketson Law Building, Room 465A

Mail Code: 2255 E. Evans Ave. Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-6761
Email: randolph.wagner@du.edu
Web Site: www.du.edu/ahss/sociolegal/

Law affects many aspects of our lives. Students who major or minor in socio-legal studies—an interdisciplinary program within the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences—focus on important questions about modern society: How does law operate in people’s everyday lives? How do social institutions shape law? How are social institutions shaped by law? How does law empower and constrain individuals, groups, organizations and communities? When can the law be used to change the society? Students majoring in socio-legal studies often pursue a legal career, but the issues addressed in the major are relevant to all fields of endeavor.

Socio-Legal Studies

Bachelor of Arts Major Requirements

(183 credits required for the degree)

All students must take a minimum of 40 credits of coursework. To ensure a broad education, students majoring in Socio-Legal Studies must also complete a second major. 

Required Courses
PLSC 1810Introduction to Law and Society4
SOCI 2120Methods of Socio-Legal Inquiry4
PLSC 2755Legal Actors and Institutions4
Electives
Remaining hours must be selected from the following approved electives (see internship option below) and topics courses approved by the director.
Environmental Science
ENVI 3000Environmental Law4
Media, Film and Journalism Studies
MFJS 3040Media Law4
MFJS 3700New Media Law & Regulation4
Philosophy
PHIL 2040Practical Logic4
PHIL 2150Philosophy of Law4
PHIL 2180Ethics4
PHIL 2700Biomedical Ethics4
PHIL 3061Kant's Ethics/Aesthetics/Politics4
PHIL 3175Morality and the Law4
PHIL 3178Metaethics4
PHIL 3701Topics in Philosophy1-4
Political Science
PLSC 2001Law and Politics4
PLSC 2700Topics in Political Science4
PLSC 2701Topics in American Politics4
PLSC 2820Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties4
PLSC 2830Judicial Politics4
PLSC 2840International Law & Human Rights4
PLSC 2860Constitutional Law: Governmental Structures and Powers4
Sociology
SOCI 2250Criminology4
SOCI 2750Sociology of Law4
SOCI 2760Discipline and Punishment4
SOCI 2765The Female Offender4
SOCI 2770Kids and Courts4
SOCI 2775Wrongful Conviction4
SOCI 2780Women and the Law4
SOCI 2785Family and the Law4
SOCI 2790Policing Society4
SOCI 2795Capital Punishment4
SOCI 2820Drugs and Society4
Internships
Student may complete pre-approved internships to fulfill up to 8 credits toward the major. Major and minor courses cannot be double counted.
Total Credits40

Secondary Major

40 credits. Same requirements as for BA degree.

Minor Requirements

The minor requires 20 credits including one of the following: PLSC 1810 Introduction to Law and Society, SOCI 2120 Methods of Socio-Legal Inquiry, PLSC 2755 Legal Actors and Institutions. Remaining credits are selected from electives listed in the major. Only one course in the student's minor can be from that student's major area. Student may complete a pre-approved internship to fulfill up to 4 credits toward the minor. Major and minor courses cannot be double counted. 

Requirements for Distinction in the Major in Socio-Legal Studies

Socio-legal majors may pursue graduating with Program Distinction if they receive a recommendation from a member of the Socio-legal Studies faculty and have an overall DU GPA of 3.5, and GPA within the Socio-legal Studies major of 3.75.

To win the designation of graduation with Distinction in Socio-legal Studies, students must successfully complete a Senior Thesis. The guidelines for completing the thesis are as follows:

  • Students must select a faculty member from the Program who will agree to act as Thesis Advisor.
  • Students will submit a thesis proposal to the Thesis Advisor for approval before October 15 of the

senior year.

  • Students wishing course credit for thesis work should contact the Program Director to register for an appropriate course. The Thesis Advisor will act as the designated instructor.
  • The completed thesis, once approved by the Thesis Advisor, must be submitted to a committee of three faculty by April 1 of the senior year. The committee will consist of the Thesis Advisor and two other faculty, one of whom may be from outside the Socio-legal Studies faculty.
  • During the month of April, the Thesis Advisor will schedule a one-hour meeting between the student and the faculty committee to discuss the thesis and its implications for the discipline.

o NOTE: If you are in the University Honors Program, you should check with them for specifics on their calendar and requirements for completion of the thesis; their deadlines are different than ours.

o Departmental Theses (for students who are NOT in the HONORS program) MUST be defended by the end of the 7th week of any quarter to ensure timely major approval and inclusion in the commencement program.

  • Students who satisfactorily complete a thesis, as determined by the faculty committee, will receive program distinction, which will be noted in the Commencement program and on your transcript. You will also be recognized at our Department Recognition Ceremony in early June.
  • Honor cords are not given out for Distinction in the Major; they are only given to students invited to join Alpha Kappa Delta (AKD), the Sociology Honor Society.

Students wishing further information should contact the Program Director (Randy Wagner; Ricketson Law Building 450; phone: 303.871.6761 email: randolph.wagner@du.edu). 

BA in Socio-Legal Studies

The following course plan is a sample quarter-by-quarter schedule for intended majors. Because the bachelor of arts curriculum allows for tremendous flexibility, this is only intended as an example; that is to say, if specific courses or requirements are not available in a given term, students can generally complete those requirements in another term. More importantly, students should focus on exploring areas of interest, including Common Curriculum requirements and possible minors or second majors, and maintaining a course load which will allow for completion of the degree within four years.

Ideally, Common Curriculum requirements other than Advanced Seminar should be completed during the first two years. Students should anticipate taking an average course load of 16 credits each quarter.

Ways of Knowing courses in the areas of Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture and Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture introduce students to University-level study of disciplines in the arts, humanities and social sciences. Credits earned in Ways of Knowing courses may also apply to a major or minor.

The sample course plan below shows what courses a student pursuing this major might take in their first two years; beyond that, students should anticipate working closely with their major advisor to create a course of study to complete the degree.

First Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCredits
FSEM 11114WRIT 11224WRIT 11334
Foreign Language or Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World4Foreign Language or Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World4Foreign Language or Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World4
Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture or Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture4Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture or Analytical Inquiry: Natural and Physical World4Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture or Analytical Inquiry: Natural and Physical World4
PLSC 18104Other major, minor or elective4Other major, minor or elective4
 16 16 16
Second Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCredits
Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World or Foreign Language4Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World or Foreign Language4Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World or Foreign Language4
Analytical Inquiry: Natural and Physical Word or Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture4SOCI 21204Major Elective4
PLSC 27554Major Elective4INTZ 25011-2
Major Elective4Minor or Elective4Minor or Elective4
INTZ 250112 Minor or Elective4
 18 16 17-18
Total Credits: 99-100

ANTH 2011 Religion, Environmentalism, and Politics (4 Credits)

How does religion mediate the relationship between people and the natural world? How do different religious traditions understand and interpret the natural world and humans’ responsibility to and for it? Is it possible to reconcile an understanding of the world as divinely created with human destruction of the environment—and, if not, then what are the political consequences? In this course, we will consider a variety of disciplinary approaches to topics related to religion, environmentalism, and politics, taking Abrahamic and indigenous religions as our key examples. From urban gardening to green Islam to Standing Rock to eco-feminism, we’ll use theories about religion and culture to understand the complex intersections of faith, policy, and planetary crisis. The course includes a community engagement component that will bring us to a local faith-based urban farm where we will discuss course texts as we help prepare for the 2020 growing season. Cross-listed with JUST 2011 and RLGS 2011.

ECON 2540 Law and Economics (4 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to the study of law and economics, the objective being to provide a critical examination of the nexus between economics and law. After establishing foundational concepts and definitions the course turns to an investigation of legal history, traditions and movements. For example, this will include examination of common law and civil law (code), the progressive era, legal realism, critical legal studies, the law and economics movement, critical race theory, and law and neoliberalism. An assessment of distinct approaches to law and economics from different economic perspectives will also be undertaken. The latter half of the course covers the economic dimensions to various sources or core areas of law including property, contract, tort, administrative, criminal and constitutional law. Additionally, certain special topics will be introduced and analyzed throughout the course, including the social and legal construction of markets; public finance and the economic role of government; the legal foundations of money; and, environmental, international, family, public, corporate, competition and antitrust law. The course also offers exposure to hands-on and practical factors concerning the profession and practice of law including legal terminology, precedent, reasoning, case review, writing and procedure.

ENVI 3000 Environmental Law (4 Credits)

Purpose and applications of federal laws pertaining to environmental protection, including NEPA, RCRA, CERCLA, and Clean Water and Clean Air Acts; addresses role of states in implementation of federal environmental laws.

JUST 2011 Religion, Environmentalism, and Politics (4 Credits)

How does religion mediate the relationship between people and the natural world? How do different religious traditions understand and interpret the natural world and humans’ responsibility to and for it? Is it possible to reconcile an understanding of the world as divinely created with human destruction of the environment—and, if not, then what are the political consequences? In this course, we will consider a variety of disciplinary approaches to topics related to religion, environmentalism, and politics, taking Abrahamic and indigenous religions as our key examples. From urban gardening to green Islam to Standing Rock to eco-feminism, we’ll use theories about religion and culture to understand the complex intersections of faith, policy, and planetary crisis. The course includes a community engagement component that will bring us to a local faith-based urban farm where we will discuss course texts as we help prepare for the 2020 growing season. Cross-listed with ANTH 2011 and RLGS 2011.

JUST 2012 Jewish Politics and Political Jews in the United States (4 Credits)

Milton Himmelfarb famously quipped that “Jews earn like Episcopalians, and vote like Puerto Ricans.” This statement captures the surprising loyalty of American Jews to liberalism and the Democratic party despite the group’s significant socioeconomic achievement in the post-World War II era. This course considers Jewish political behavior in the United States through a variety of disciplinary lenses. Our study will be enriched through archival research in the Beck archives (held at DU) and through conversations with local political figures. The course will also track and analyze relevant developments for Jews and politics related to the 2020 Presidential election. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society requirement for the Undergraduate Core Curriculum. Cross-listed with RLGS 2012.

LGST 3440 The Supreme Court & Your Life: Constitutional Law, Ethics & Policy for the 21st Century (2 Credits)

This course evaluates the most critical ways in which the United States Supreme Court interacts with and affects an individual’s life, career, education, freedom, and future. Over ten weeks, we analyze how: (1) each major section of the Constitution and how it makes its way to the Court, (2) is ultimately interpreted by each of the nine current Justices, and (3) the subsequent repercussions of the opinion. The primary vehicles used for this task are actual Supreme Court cases, federal circuit court opinions, and legal briefs filed by the parties and interest groups on both sides of each dispute. Each of these documents is part of the public record and easy to locate. Because many students are likely to hear, believe, and/or resonate with only one side of each politically-charged divisive case heard by the Court (perhaps because they listen to only one news source or affiliate primarily with people of the same ideological bent), this class will emphasize the importance of seeing both sides of important public policy, legal, and ethical issues before taking a position. This is a valuable skill that is often neglected in college courses but will take a student far in life.

LGST 3450 Impact of Driverless Mobility: Business, Legal & Ethical Implications (4 Credits)

Smartphones and personal computers have changed the world and how we live in it. Now, Driverless Vehicles are poised to profoundly reshape our transportation systems, real estate development, access to goods and services, and our collective ecological footprint. In our “Impact of Driverless Mobility” course, we will consider many of the broad implications of this disruptive technology, including, but not limited to, the many legal, ethical and business considerations. Prerequisite: LGST 2000.

MFJS 3040 Media Law (4 Credits)

Introduction to freedom of expression and media law. Students learn how the American legal system works and gain an understanding and appreciation of the philosophical foundations of free expression. In addition, students confront many of the issues facing professional communicators today. Topics include incitement, hate speech, student speech, copyright, defamation, and other issues crucial to mass media professionals. The course examines also explores challenges to free expression brought by new(er) communication technologies. The purpose of this class is to give students the knowledge and critical thinking skills needed to be successful in today’s rapidly changing communication environment. Cross-listed with MFJS 4300.

MFJS 3700 New Media Law & Regulation (4 Credits)

An examination of recent developments in internet and social media law and regulation.

PHIL 2040 Practical Logic (4 Credits)

In this course students will learn how to identify and understand real arguments, the kinds of arguments that they confront everyday in the media, textbooks and periodicals, in addition to those made in philosophical writings. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

PHIL 2150 Philosophy of Law (4 Credits)

Principles, aims and methods of legal reasoning (judicial decision making); relationship between legal and moral reasoning. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2180 Ethics (4 Credits)

Alternative theories of morals and values, ethical problems and solutions offered by classical and contemporary thinkers. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2700 Biomedical Ethics (4 Credits)

Discussion of some of the most pressing ethical issues engaged by contemporary developments in biology and medicine. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 3061 Kant's Ethics/Aesthetics/Politics (4 Credits)

A study of Kant's "value theory" and its historical significance. Prerequisite: junior standing or instructor's permission.

PHIL 3175 Morality and the Law (4 Credits)

A systematic study of various elements of the relation between law and morality. Are we obligated to obey every law the government enacts? Why? If we do have an obligation to obey the law, are civil disobedients like Martin Luther King, Jr. justified in disobeying the law? Are immoral laws, laws at all, or must a law connect with some higher moral truth to have any authority? To what extent is it morally permissible for the law to restrict our personal freedoms? To what extent is it morally permissible for the law to enforce morality in general? If it is not permissible for the law to enforce morality, do we incur any obligation to obey the law? Prerequisite: junior standing or instructor's permission.

PHIL 3179 Virtue Ethics (4 Credits)

Virtue ethics purportedly provides a distinct approach to moral deliberation, moral reasoning, moral decision-making, and moral justification. This course is a systematic study o the nature of virtue ethics, the nature of a virtue, and the alleged superiority of virtue ethics over its more familiar consequentialist and deontological alternatives. We also study various responses to the following questions: Have moral psychologists generated any valuable studies on the nature of virtue? What virtues ought we to endorse? At least Junior standing required or permission of the instructor.

PHIL 3211 Contemporary Pol Philosophy (4 Credits)

This class focuses primarily on the philosophical problems generated by thinking about political authority and justice. We discuss the nature of political authority, justice, rights, equality and the role of property in a modern state.

PLSC 1810 Introduction to Law and Society (4 Credits)

This course introduces the relationship between law and society, exploring principles of legal conduct in social contexts and explaining how social scientific methods are used to understand these principles. Questions discussed include what is the relationship between the “law-on-the-books” and “law-in-action,” and what can we learn from gaps between formal law and the “real” law that is experienced in society? Empirical examples may include international comparisons and the evolution of law over time. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PLSC 2001 Law and Politics (4 Credits)

Introduces the relationship between law and politics, describing the basic principles of legal conduct in political contexts and explaining how social scientific methods are used to understand these underlying principles. Questions explored include the following: Where does the law come from? Whose interests does it reflect? Does formal legal change lead to practical political and social change? Why do we comply with the law? What are the limits of enforcement? This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. It also satisfies the department distribution requirement in law. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

PLSC 2703 Topics in Law and Politics (4 Credits)

Focuses on topics in law from a political science perspective. Satisfies departmental distribution requirement in law. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

PLSC 2755 Legal Actors and Institutions (4 Credits)

This course examines the legal system from the points of view of those who work within it. It considers the social characteristics of lawyers, judges, regulators, elected officials and non-state actors, and how they matter to the social construction of law. The emphasis is on the social organization of law and the everyday interactions that bring meaning to the legal system. It considers and seeks to understand how legal roles, legal institutions and power relations within the law influence its development and practice. Throughout the course, students are required to think critically about how society and the social relationships of law influence law's outcomes. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

PLSC 2820 Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties (4 Credits)

This course addresses major ideas and principles of U.S. constitutional law, with a focus on equal protection of the law, fundamental rights, and freedom of speech and religion. Within each of these areas, we will consider the development of court rulings over time, economic and political influences on court decision-making, and policy implications of these rulings. While PLSC 2860 complements this course, it is not necessary to take both courses. Satisfies the department distribution requirement in law. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

PLSC 2830 Judicial Politics (4 Credits)

This course considers the role of courts, especially the Supreme Court, in the U.S. political system. Topics include the the potential dangers and benefits of allocating significant power to un-elected justices, judicial decision-making, Court-Congress interaction in developing public policies, the social and political effects of court rulings, and legal interest groups.

PLSC 2840 International Law & Human Rights (4 Credits)

This course explores the role that international law plays in promoting human rights. Why did states first commit to international human rights protections after the Second World War? Why did states voluntarily surrender their sovereignty by signing and ratifying human rights treaties that limit their freedom to act domestically? Does this international law influence governments’ human rights practices? Who enforces international human rights law? Which countries are leaders or laggards when it comes to international human rights? This course can count toward the sub-field requirement for PLSC majors in either law or comparative/international politics.

PLSC 2850 Politics of Criminal Justice in the US (4 Credits)

Problems and reforms in American criminal justice system; causes and extent of crime, excessive use of force by police, systemic racism, bail reform, probation and parole; prisons and police/community relations. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

PLSC 2855 Conservative Politics and the Courts (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the reasons for and uses of litigation and judicial politics in the pursuit of conservative ends. As such, the class critically examines the different major sub-groups that define modern American conservatism; how these subgroups compare to and interact with one another; the conditions that allow for political movements generally to use courts in pursuing policy ends; and the specific steps that various American conservative groups have taken in order to influence courts, law, and policy. Introduction to American Politics (PLSC 1000) is recommended, but not required.

PLSC 2860 Constitutional Law: Governmental Structures and Powers (4 Credits)

This course addresses major ideas and principles of U.S. constitutional law, with a focus on federalism, the growth of national power, and separation of powers. Within each of these areas, we will consider the development of court rulings over time, economic and political influences on court decision-making, and policy implications of these rulings. While PLSC 2820 complements this course, it is not necessary to take both courses. Satisfies the department distribution requirement in law. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

PLSC 2870 Theories of Law (4 Credits)

Approaches to law, courts and judges focusing of various theories of law including legal realism, feminist legal theory, law and society, law and economics, behavioralism. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

PLSC 3985 Legal Internship (4 Credits)

This is an online class for students working in internships related to the legal profession. Students may work in the local courts, advocacy organizations, the public defender’s office, or the district attorney’s office, either in Denver or elsewhere in the U.S. Students will complete internship hours in addition to engaging in an online course that focuses on professional development, reflections on the internship experience, and relevant legal scholarship. Students are responsible for applying to and securing their own internships (with assistance from the professor), and should plan to begin this process early, typically in advance of registration.

PSYC 2610 Forensic Psychology (4 Credits)

Scientific study of the the intersection of human behavior and the legal process. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

RLGS 2011 Religion, Environmentalism, and Politics (4 Credits)

How does religion mediate the relationship between people and the natural world? How do different religious traditions understand and interpret the natural world and humans’ responsibility to and for it? Is it possible to reconcile an understanding of the world as divinely created with human destruction of the environment—and, if not, then what are the political consequences? In this course, we will consider a variety of disciplinary approaches to topics related to religion, environmentalism, and politics, taking Abrahamic and indigenous religions as our key examples. From urban gardening to green Islam to Standing Rock to eco-feminism, we’ll use theories about religion and culture to understand the complex intersections of faith, policy, and planetary crisis. The course includes a community engagement component that will bring us to a local faith-based urban farm where we will discuss course texts as we help prepare for the 2020 growing season. Cross-listed with ANTH 2011 and JUST 2011.

RLGS 2012 Jewish Politics and Political Jews in the United States (4 Credits)

Milton Himmelfarb famously quipped that “Jews earn like Episcopalians, and vote like Puerto Ricans.” This statement captures the surprising loyalty of American Jews to liberalism and the Democratic party despite the group’s significant socioeconomic achievement in the post-World War II era. This course considers Jewish political behavior in the United States through a variety of disciplinary lenses. Our study will be enriched through archival research in the Beck archives (held at DU) and through conversations with local political figures. The course will also track and analyze relevant developments for Jews and politics related to the 2020 Presidential election. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society requirement for the Undergraduate Core Curriculum. Cross-listed with JUST 2012.

SOCI 2120 Methods of Socio-Legal Inquiry (4 Credits)

This course provides a broad overview of socio-legal research methods. Specifically, the course examines how qualitative and quantitative research methods are used to answer socio-legal research questions. Students participate in research in order to understand the process of designing a project, collecting data, analyzing data, and reporting findings.

SOCI 2250 Criminology (4 Credits)

Social meaning of criminal behavior; relationship between crime and society in particular, how production and distribution of economic, political and cultural resources shape construction of law, order and crime; different types of crime, criminals and victims, and efforts to understand and control them. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

SOCI 2622 Deportation Nation (4 Credits)

This service-learning course examines the nexus of the criminal justice and immigration—or, crimmigration—system. Through a scholarly analysis situated of the historical, social, and political processes that have informed contemporary immigration law and policy, the course focuses on the shift to enhanced enforcement, detention, and mass deportation. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810.

SOCI 2750 Sociology of Law (4 Credits)

Overview of theory and research about relationship between law and society; legal rules, roles, organizations and inter-institutional relations; activities of legal profession, courts, juries, legislatures and regulatory agencies. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2760 Discipline and Punishment (4 Credits)

Institutional mechanisms for imposing discipline and for punishing wayward individuals and groups; contradictory social objectives of punishment and corrections; organizational settings for administering punishment and identifying predominant institutional routines in coercive environments. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2765 The Female Offender (4 Credits)

Female offenders are one of the fastest growing segments in both the juvenile and adult justice systems. This course introduces students to debates and issues surrounding girls, women, and crime; explores different theoretical perspectives of gender and crime; and examines the impact of gender on the construction and treatment of female offenders by the justice system. In addition, this course specifically looks at girls' and women's pathways to offending and incarcerations; understanding girls' violence in the inner city; exploring the reality of prison life for women, with a particular focus on the gender-sensitive programming for incarcerated mothers; and ending with an examination of how capital punishment has affected women offenders historically and contemporarily. Cross listed with GWST 2765. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2770 Kids and Courts (4 Credits)

This course examines how American society has responded to the problem of at-risk and delinquent youth in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The primary focus will be on the juvenile court's and the encompassing juvenile justice system's efforts to address this problem. The court's and the system's ameliorative attempts to help at-risk children/adolescents as well as their more punitive policies directed at serious and violent young offenders will be investigated. Differences in juvenile court policies and practices over time and across jurisdictions (both in the United States and in other countries) will be considered. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2775 Wrongful Conviction (4 Credits)

The criminal justice system was once considered infallible--innocent people did not end up in prison. But DNA evidence has revealed that innocents are incarcerated and perhaps even executed. This course focuses on the prevalence of wrongful conviction; the harms caused by wrongful conviction; the causes of wrongful conviction; strategies for reducing wrongful conviction; and the prospect of compensating the wrongfully convicted. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2780 Women and the Law (4 Credits)

This course explores the relationship between women and the law, looking at the way the categories of sex and gender have been produced and re-produced through law. Through a look at case law and sociological research, students will examine women as bodies, workers and family members. This course also explores the development and current status of American law in the areas of women's constitutional equality, pay equity and equal opportunity, women's access to education, women in the workplace and violence against women. Cross listed with GWST 2780. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of the instructor.

SOCI 2785 Family and the Law (4 Credits)

The government is actively involved in deciding who gets to be a family and what families should look like. The state and its laws are involved in shaping family life, making decisions for family members, and mediating familial conflict. This course looks at the appropriate role of the state in family life by examining state legislation and court decisions and social research on a variety of topics. Cross listed with GWST 2785. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2790 Policing Society (4 Credits)

Emergence and development of police organizations and tactics; factors that influence policing styles and objectives; historical precedents; policing the street; policing the board room; policing the world; and policing everyday life. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2795 Capital Punishment (4 Credits)

This course examines three main topics: the history of capital punishment (facts and trends, public opinion, legislation, and landmark Supreme Court cases); arguments often made for abolition (arbitrariness, cost, and innocence); and arguments often made for retention (deterrence, incapacitation, and retribution). Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2820 Drugs and Society (4 Credits)

Relationship between drug use, drug control and social contexts; various sociological themes relating to use and control of drugs in American society. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2825 Sexualities and the Law (4 Credits)

This course provides an overall conceptual and applied understanding of sexualities (sexual identities, relationships, behavior, and choices), law, and punishment in the United States. All of the following areas will be examined: sexual minorities’ rights (with a focus on marriage equality) and relationships; reproductive regulation; sex industry; pornography; and responses to sex offenses (with a focus on responses to college sexual assault). Students in this course will identify the ways legislation and the courts define and regulate sexualities in society. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810.

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