2016-2017 Undergraduate Bulletin

Department of Sociology and Criminology

Office:  Sturm Hall, Room 446
Mail Code:  2000 E. Asbury Ave. Denver, CO 80208
Phone:  303.871.2948
Email:  sociology@du.edu
Web Site:  http://www.du.edu/ahss/sociology/

What causes delinquent and criminal behavior? Why do gender, racial and class inequalities exist in nearly every society? What are the origins of the self? These are the kinds of questions sociologists and criminologists attempt to answer. For students interested in sociology or criminology, the department offers non-majors an understanding of human social systems as part of a liberal arts education and prepares majors for graduate or professional school. The broad perspectives of sociology and criminology are also useful backgrounds for students planning to enter a variety of careers such as law, social work, education or management.

Our low student/faculty ratio allows professors to guide, counsel and advise students according to individual needs and career goals. As well as taking an active, creative role in the classroom and as advisors, DU professors are involved in exciting research projects in which undergraduate students can participate. The department also offers an internship program designed to give sociology and criminology majors and minors the opportunity to gain valuable work experience in a community agency.

Many of the department’s majors go on to law school or to graduate programs in sociology, criminology or social work. Others choose to work in various social service agencies, private organizations and businesses.

Sociology

The sociology major provides a general background in theory, methods and a variety of substantive areas within sociology.

Bachelor of Arts Major Requirements

(183 credits required for the degree)

Program note: Students may not double-major, double-minor or major-minor in both sociology and criminology.

 40 credits, including the following:

Required coursework
SOCI 1810Understanding Social Life4
SOCI 2020Sociological Classics4
SOCI 2005Sociological Imagination and Inquiry--Part A4
SOCI 2006Sociological Imagination and Inquiry--Part B4
SOCI 2420Social Inequality4
SOCI 3999Sociology Assessment0
Electives
Complete additional sociology courses to meet the 40 credit minimum. Up to eight credits can be internship. 120
Total Credits40
1

Internship note: Students must meet the following prerequisites to enroll in the internship program: have junior or senior standing, be sociology or criminology majors or minors, have a cumulative GPA of 3.25 and have taken at least three sociology- or criminology-related courses beyond Understanding Social Life (SOCI 1810).

Secondary Major

40 credits. Same requirements as for BA degree.

Minor Requirements

Pre-law and pre-social work students will find a minor in sociology especially helpful to their long-term careers.

Program note: Students may not double-major, double-minor or major-minor in both sociology and criminology.

20 credits, including:

SOCI 1810Understanding Social Life4
Electives
Complete additional sociology courses to meet the 20 credit minimum. Up to four credits can be the internship (see internship note above in major requirements section).16
Total Credits20

Criminology 

The criminology major provides a general background in theory and methods and a variety of substantive courses on the creation and application of criminal law, the causes of criminal behavior and societal responses to lawbreaking.

Bachelor of Arts Major Requirements

(183 credits required for the degree)

Program note: Students may not double-major, double-minor, or major-minor in both sociology and criminology.

 40 credits, including the following:

Required coursework
SOCI 1810Understanding Social Life4
SOCI 2020Sociological Classics4
SOCI 2005Sociological Imagination and Inquiry--Part A4
SOCI 2006Sociological Imagination and Inquiry--Part B4
SOCI 2250Criminology4
SOCI 3998Criminology Assessment0
Electives 120
Select five of the following: 2
Juvenile Delinquency
Deviance and Society
Crime and Inequality
Sociology of Law
Legal Actors and Institutions
State Violence
Discipline and Punishment
The Female Offender
Kids and Courts
Wrongful Conviction
Women and the Law
Family and the Law
Policing Society
Capital Punishment
Drugs and Society
White-Collar Crime
Crime and the Media
Total Credits40
1

Up to eight credits can be the internship. Internship note: Students must meet the following prerequisites to enroll in the internship program: have junior or senior standing, be sociology or criminology majors or minors, have a cumulative GPA of 3.25 and have taken at least three sociology- or criminology-related courses beyond Understanding Social Life (SOCI 1810).

2

And/or from selected topics approved by the chair.

Secondary Major

40 credits. Same requirements as for BA degree.

Minor Requirements

Students interested in law or law enforcement will find a minor in criminology especially helpful to their long-term career goals.

Program note: Students may not double-major, double-minor or major-minor in both sociology and criminology.

20 credits of criminology-related courses, including the following:

SOCI 1810Understanding Social Life4
SOCI 2250Criminology4
Electives 112
Select three of the following: 2
Juvenile Delinquency
Deviance and Society
Crime and Inequality
Sociology of Law
Legal Actors and Institutions
State Violence
Discipline and Punishment
The Female Offender
Kids and Courts
Wrongful Conviction
Women and the Law
Family and the Law
Policing Society
Capital Punishment
Drugs and Society
White-Collar Crime
Crime and the Media
Total Credits20
1

Up to four credits can be the internship. Internship note: Students must meet the following prerequisites to enroll in the internship program: have junior or senior standing, be sociology or criminology majors or minors, have a cumulative GPA of 3.25 and have taken at least three sociology- or criminology-related courses beyond .

2

 And/or selected topics approved by the chair.

Requirements for Distinction in the Major in Sociology and/or Criminology

  • Minimum of 3.5 major GPA and 3.25 overall GPA
  • Completion of Senior Thesis
  • Student must select a faculty member from the Department who will agree to act as Thesis Advisor
  • Student will submit a thesis proposal to the Thesis Advisor for approval before October 15 of the senior year
  • The completed thesis, once approved by the Thesis Advisor, must be submitted to a committee of three faculty by April 1 of the senior year.  The committee will consist of the Thesis Advisor and two other faculty, one of whom may be from another department within the University of Denver
  • During the month of April, the student and faculty committee will meet to discuss the thesis and its implications for the discipline
    • NOTE: University Honors Program requirements may be different than ours; please confirm calendar requirements with that program
    • Departmental Theses (for students who are NOT in the Honors Program) MUST be defended by the end of the 7th week of any quarter to ensure timely major approval and inclusion in the commencement program
  • Students who satisfactorily complete a thesis, as determined by the faculty committee, will receive departmental distinction, which will be noted in the Commencement program and on your transcript

Students wishing further information should contact the Departmental Chairperson (Dr. Lisa Martinez; Sturm Hall 427; phone: 303.871.2994; email: Lisa.Martinez@du.edu).

Courses

SOCI 1810 Understanding Social Life (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the discipline of sociology and to the insights it provides into the human condition. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

SOCI 1992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

SOCI 2005 Sociological Imagination and Inquiry--Part A (4 Credits)

This course is the first of a two-quarter sequence on sociological research methods and focuses on introducing students to the many qualitative methods used in sociological research. We explore what social research is, what the goals of such research are, and how research questions guide the selection of different methodologies. The remainder of the course focuses on qualitative data collection, including in-depth interviewing, ethnographic methods, historical comparative and content analysis methods, and other qualitative methods. Prerequisites: SOCI 1810 and sophomore standing or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2006 Sociological Imagination and Inquiry--Part B (4 Credits)

This course is the second of a two-quarter sequence on sociological research methods, and examines how sociological research questions can be answered using quantitative methods. Specifically, the course focuses on survey research design and statistics. Prerequisites: SOCI 2005 and sophomore standing or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2020 Sociological Classics (4 Credits)

Two or more classic works read and discussed in detail; emphasis on understanding particular classical work and its place in sociological tradition. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 and sophomore standing or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2050 Political Sociology (4 Credits)

General sociological perspective on social bases of politics in their historical context, theoretical tradition and empirical foci; explore four major topics: 1) issues, perspectives, and variations in political thought; 2) social bases of politics: stratification, socialization and ideology; 3) power; and 4) political participation. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810.

SOCI 2060 Self and Society (4 Credits)

Impact of social groups and socialization processes on formation of individual perceptions, thoughts, emotions and self-awareness; both normal and deviant formations considered. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810.

SOCI 2120 Methods of Socio-Legal Inquiry (4 Credits)

This course provides a broad overview of socio-legal research methods. Specifically, the course examines how qualitative and quantitative research methods are used to answer socio-legal research questions. Students participate in research in order to understand the process of designing a project, collecting data, analyzing data, and reporting findings.

SOCI 2140 Urban Sociology (4 Credits)

Sociological study of the city focuses on interrelationships among people, social institutions and space; process of urban development; comparison of competing theoretical perspectives. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810.

SOCI 2190 American Communities (4 Credits)

Study of 'community' as a foundational concept in the discipline; consideration of the changing structural contexts of community, as well as the social-psychological aspects of community; emphasis on emerging forms of community in the contemporary U.S. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810.

SOCI 2210 The Family (4 Credits)

Emphasis on different kinds of families and on contemporary issues of changing gender roles, intimacy, childbearing, family breakup and reconstitution, and family's relationships with other social institutions. Cross listed with GWST 2210. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2220 Sociology of Childhood (4 Credits)

This course explores the social meanings of childhood. In this course we will examine aspects of the symbolic meanings of childhood as well as the experiences of being a child. The commercialization of childhood through marketing to children, contradictory messages about children as innocent or problematic, the experience of gender socialization for children, and the expectations of creating perfect children will be explored in detail. Cross listed with GWST 2220. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2240 Sociology of Health (4 Credits)

This course explores questions of how individuals experience health and illness, how they interact with institutions and providers, and how these experiences are filtered through social structures that lead to inequality. Using a sociological perspective, we analyze how individuals’ experiences of health and illness, medical institutions, and work in the health professions are influenced by racial/ethnic background, gender, social class, sexual identity, and age. We analyze these concepts by looking at who gets to define health and illness as well as how medical decisions are made, including who has the right to make decisions, what are the limits on the kinds of decisions that can be made, and how are decisions enforced and challenged by law. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2250 Criminology (4 Credits)

Social meaning of criminal behavior; relationship between crime and society in particular, how production and distribution of economic, political and cultural resources shape construction of law, order and crime; different types of crime, criminals and victims, and efforts to understand and control them. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

SOCI 2255 Juvenile Delinquency (4 Credits)

Introduction to sociological study of delinquency in American society; history of juvenile delinquency, the creation of delinquent misconduct as a social and legal category, and current state of delinquent behavior. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2260 Deviance and Society (4 Credits)

Examines some behaviors often called deviant, such as mental illness, substance abuse, governmental crime and unconventional lifestyles, and asks what groups call them deviant, why and how behavior affects community. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2270 Sociology of Religion (4 Credits)

Sociological investigation of religion; how religion has influenced society, politics, gender equality; how society has influenced religion; why people participate in religion. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2320 Race and Ethnic Relations (4 Credits)

Relationship of racial and ethnic minority groups to systems of social stratification; emphasis on United States. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2420 Social Inequality (4 Credits)

Dimensions of social class and its effect on economic, political and social institutions as well as style of life. Cross listed with GWST 2420. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 and sophomore standing or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2500 Schooling and Society (4 Credits)

The objective of this course is to examine the relationship between schooling and the larger social inequalities (e.g., racism, poverty, and gender) that profoundly shape education. The major focus in this seminar will be on U.S. K-12 public education. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2540 Current Social Problems (4 Credits)

We often think about social problems in our social worlds. However, rarely do we consider how certain situations come to be defined as problems and why some "problems" remain a focal point of public attention while others fade, even when the circumstances around that issue have not improved. In this course, we look at these very issues. Using current social problems, we explore how a social phenomenon comes to be seen as a social problem, what is at stake in this process, and how these dynamics matter in terms of thinking about inequality. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

SOCI 2565 Men and Masculinities (4 Credits)

Many of us believe that anatomy is what determines our behavior and that our bodies dictate our social and psychological temperament. Looking specifically at men and masculinities, this course tests that general notion, investigates the various ways male behavior is gendered and critically explores the meanings of masculinity in contemporary institutions. Throughout the course, we look at the multidimensional and multicultural ways masculinity is produced, constructed, enacted, and resisted; how masculinities structure power and resources; and how masculinities benefit, regulate, and hurt men's lives. Cross listed with GWST 2565. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2611 Research Practicum (1-4 Credits)

Research process of hypothesis formation, data collection, data analysis and interpretation of results through collaboration with ongoing faculty research or through developing a guided individual research project. Prerequisites: SOCI 1810 and junior or senior standing.

SOCI 2612 Research Practicum (1-4 Credits)

Research process of hypothesis formation, data collection, data analysis and interpretation of results through collaboration with ongoing faculty research or through developing a guided individual research project. Prerequisites: SOCI 1810 and junior or senior standing.

SOCI 2613 Research Practicum (1-4 Credits)

Research process of hypothesis formation, data collection, data analysis and interpretation of results through collaboration with ongoing faculty research or through developing a guided individual research project. Prerequisites: SOCI 1810 and junior or senior standing.

SOCI 2614 Research Practicum (1-4 Credits)

Research process of hypothesis formation, data collection, data analysis and interpretation of results through collaboration with ongoing faculty research or through developing a guided individual research project. Prerequisites: SOCI 1810 and junior or senior standing.

SOCI 2640 Community Response to Natural Disasters (4 Credits)

Introduction to social science literature of human response (including families, emergency organizations and communities) to natural disasters, e.g., hurricanes, floods, tornadoes. Emphasis on assessing use of social science knowledge as a basis for public policy guidance. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2650 Sociology of Immigration (4 Credits)

This course applies a sociological approach to the study of international migration. Students examine early and contemporary waves of migration to the U.S.; theories of migration; processes of settlement and incorporation; the construction of immigration and citizenship; and institutional responses to immigration across and within immigrant groups. The course also examines variation in immigrant experiences along the lines of race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual and age identities. The course culminates in an examination of the impact of migration on the U.S. and on immigrants' sending communities. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2655 Latina/os in American Society (4 Credits)

Latinas and Latinos constitute one of the largest and fastest growing ethnic groups in the United States. This course uses a sociological lens to understand Latina/os' experiences in the U.S. Specifically, we address Latinas' and Latinos' historical experiences and migration trajectories; assimilation, incorporation and racial/ethnic identity formation; the family, schools and labor markets; and political participation. In so doing, we discuss and challenge stereotypes about Latina/os, present alternative perspectives about Latina/o experiences in the U.S. and most importantly, understand their contributions to their families, their communities, and to the nation as a whole. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2701 Topics in Sociology (4 Credits)

Topics vary. Recent topics have included urban poverty, ethics, women and crime, and school and workplace violence. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2710 Crime and Inequality (4 Credits)

This course conducts a systematic investigation of the nature of inequality as it is related to crime and criminal justice in America. Racial, gender and class disparities are explored at critical stages of the criminal justice process, including crime commission, law-making, policing, court actions, and sentencing. This course considers the effects of inequality - particularly on system functions, employment opportunities, family stability and offenders' communities. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2719 Social Movements (4 Credits)

Studies in range of perspectives and research issues pertinent to understanding of social movements (groups operating without clear-cut direction from established social structure and culture). Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2730 Gender in Society (4 Credits)

How the biological fact of sex is transformed into socially created gender roles. How individuals learn they are male and female, and how their behaviors are learned. A look at gender distinctions built into language, education, mass media, religion, law, health systems and the workplace. Cross listed with GWST 2730. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2741 Work and Occupations (4 Credits)

How individuals fit into, are influenced by and in turn influence business institutions; changes in structure and meaning of workplace; different types of business and work relationships, forms of work, business roles and organizational structures; how business institutions affect society as a whole. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2750 Sociology of Law (4 Credits)

Overview of theory and research about relationship between law and society; legal rules, roles, organizations and inter-institutional relations; activities of legal profession, courts, juries, legislatures and regulatory agencies. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2755 Legal Actors and Institutions (4 Credits)

This course examines the legal system from the points of view of those who work within it. It considers the social characteristics of lawyers, judges, regulators, and even non-state actors and how they matter to the social construction of law. The emphasis is on the social organization of law and the everyday interactions that bring meaning to the legal system. It considers both local and global perspectives and seeks to understand how the changing locations of law influence its practice. Through the course, students are required to think critically about how the social relationships of law influence law's outcomes.

SOCI 2757 State Violence (4 Credits)

This course applies a socio-legal approach to the study of state violence. We will explore the ways that social institutions, culture, and law shape states' uses of violence both internationally and domestically. We will also examine the socio-legal foundations of efforts to control and collectively respond to state violence. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2760 Discipline and Punishment (4 Credits)

Institutional mechanisms for imposing discipline and for punishing wayward individuals and groups; contradictory social objectives of punishment and corrections; organizational settings for administering punishment and identifying predominant institutional routines in coercive environments. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2765 The Female Offender (4 Credits)

Female offenders are one of the fastest growing segments in both the juvenile and adult justice systems. This course introduces students to debates and issues surrounding girls, women, and crime; explores different theoretical perspectives of gender and crime; and examines the impact of gender on the construction and treatment of female offenders by the justice system. In addition, this course specifically looks at girls' and women's pathways to offending and incarcerations; understanding girls' violence in the inner city; exploring the reality of prison life for women, with a particular focus on the gender-sensitive programming for incarcerated mothers; and ending with an examination of how capital punishment has affected women offenders historically and contemporarily. Cross listed with GWST 2765. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2770 Kids and Courts (4 Credits)

This course examines how American society has responded to the problem of at-risk and delinquent youth in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The primary focus will be on the juvenile court's and the encompassing juvenile justice system's efforts to address this problem. The court's and the system's ameliorative attempts to help at-risk children/adolescents as well as their more punitive policies directed at serious and violent young offenders will be investigated. Differences in juvenile court policies and practices over time and across jurisdictions (both in the United States and in other countries) will be considered. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2775 Wrongful Conviction (4 Credits)

The criminal justice system was once considered infallible--innocent people did not end up in prison. But DNA evidence has revealed that innocents are incarcerated and perhaps even executed. This course focuses on the prevalence of wrongful conviction; the harms caused by wrongful conviction; the causes of wrongful conviction; strategies for reducing wrongful conviction; and the prospect of compensating the wrongfully convicted. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2780 Women and the Law (4 Credits)

This course explores the relationship between women and the law, looking at the way the categories of sex and gender have been produced and re-produced through law. Through a look at case law and sociological research, students will examine women as bodies, workers and family members. This course also explores the development and current status of American law in the areas of women's constitutional equality, pay equity and equal opportunity, women's access to education, women in the workplace and violence against women. Cross listed with GWST 2780. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of the instructor.

SOCI 2785 Family and the Law (4 Credits)

The government is actively involved in deciding who gets to be a family and what families should look like. The state and its laws are involved in shaping family life, making decisions for family members, and mediating familial conflict. This course looks at the appropriate role of the state in family life by examining state legislation and court decisions and social research on a variety of topics. Cross listed with GWST 2785. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2790 Policing Society (4 Credits)

Emergence and development of police organizations and tactics; factors that influence policing styles and objectives; historical precedents; policing the street; policing the board room; policing the world; and policing everyday life. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2795 Capital Punishment (4 Credits)

This course examines three main topics: the history of capital punishment (facts and trends, public opinion, legislation, and landmark Supreme Court cases); arguments often made for abolition (arbitrariness, cost, and innocence); and arguments often made for retention (deterrence, incapacitation, and retribution). Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2800 Sociology of Sport (4 Credits)

Locating contemporary sport within context of history of work and leisure to explore sociological forces that have shaped the way we work and play; emphasis on how sport fits into the American culture; aspects such as race, gender, class, intercollegiate athletics, socialization, professionalization, economics, politics and social change. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2820 Drugs and Society (4 Credits)

Relationship between drug use, drug control and social contexts; various sociological themes relating to use and control of drugs in American society. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2830 White-Collar Crime (4 Credits)

Organization and control of white-collar crime, including fraud, corruption, price fixing, embezzlement, regulatory violations and other crimes committed by high-status individuals for and against organizations. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2850 Sociology of Poverty (4 Credits)

Causes, incidence and consequences of poverty; the various "pockets" of poverty: aged, urban, ethnic minorities, women; exploration of poverty in the U.S. and cross-culturally. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2855 Crime and the Media (4 Credits)

This course explores the complex relationship between crime and the media. We use sociological and cultural theories to examine how crime, criminals, and the criminal justice system are portrayed in print and visual media outlets. We explore the media's role in shaping crime control and other public policies. We investigate the influence of offender and victim characteristics (e.g., race, gender, class, celebrity status) on how crime is presented. We also "turn the tables" to learn about how media itself may influence patterns of criminal offending (think violent video games). The overarching goal of this class is to teach students to watch/read crime media with an educated, critical eye. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 2900 Methods of Social Research (4 Credits)

Relationship between theory and data, experimental and survey design, other techniques of controlling variables, constructing and evaluating scales, use of questionnaires and other research instruments, the logic of data analysis. Required for majors. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810.

SOCI 2992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

SOCI 3701 Topics in Sociology (4 Credits)

Topics vary. Recent topics have included criminal justice policy; qualitative methods and data analysis; environmental governance; advanced ethnographic methods; community values. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

SOCI 3981 Internship (1-4 Credits)

Opportunity to gain valuable work experience, explore various career options, develop job competencies and apply theoretical knowledge to practical concerns of the world. Must have junior or senior standing, be sociology or criminology major or minor, have a cumulative GPA of 3.0, and have taken at least three sociology- and/or criminology-related courses beyond SOCI 1810.

SOCI 3982 Internship (1-4 Credits)

Opportunity to gain valuable work experience, explore various career options, develop job competencies and apply theoretical knowledge to practical concerns of the world. Must have junior or senior standing, be sociology or criminology major or minor, have a cumulative GPA or 3.0, and have taken at least three sociology- and/or criminology-related courses beyond SOCI 1810.

SOCI 3985 Thesis Research Seminar (2 Credits)

This course is designed to provide support and structure for students working on their senior thesis. The course presumes that students have completed a methods sequence, have chosen a thesis topic, and have a plan for how they will develop their thesis. Prerequisites: SOCI 2005 and SOCI 2006; permission of the instructor.

SOCI 3986 Thesis Writing Seminar (2 Credits)

This course is designed to provide continued support and structure for students working on their senior thesis. The class helps students with the structure of writing and defending their thesis. The course presumes that students have begun their projects, are significantly or nearly finished with data collection and organization, and are ready for analysis and writing. Prerequisites: SOCI 2005, SOCI 2006 and SOCI 3985; permission of the instructor.

SOCI 3991 Independent Study (1-8 Credits)

SOCI 3992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

SOCI 3998 Criminology Assessment (0 Credits)

This course involves a required assessment of graduating sociology and criminology majors' knowledge of the discipline based on courses taken. Prerequisites: SOCI 1810, SOCI 2005, SOCI 2006, SOCI 2020, and SOCI 2250; permission of instructor.

SOCI 3999 Sociology Assessment (0 Credits)

This course involves a required assessment of graduating sociology and criminology majors' knowledge of the discipline based on courses taken. Prerequisites: SOCI 1810, SOCI 2005, SOCI 2006, SOCI 2020, and SOCI 2420; permission of instructor.

Faculty

Lisa M. Martinez, Associate Professor and Department Chair, PhD, University of Arizona

Karen Albright, Assistant Professor, PhD, New York University

Paul Colomy, Professor, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles

Jared Del Rosso, Assistant Professor, PhD, Boston College

Hava Gordon, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Oregon

Jeffrey Lin, Associate Professor, PhD, New York University

Raul Nguyen-Perez, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of California, Irvine

Lisa Pasko, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Scott Phillips, Professor, PhD, University of Georgia

Nancy Reichman, Professor, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Trent (Tate) Steidley, Assistant Professor, PhD, The Ohio State University

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