2018-2019 Undergraduate Bulletin

Leadership Studies Program

Office: Driscoll Student Center South, Suite 13
Mail Code: 
2050 E. Evans Ave. Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303.871.2462
Email: applyplp@du.edu
Web Site: 
http://www.du.edu/leadership

Leadership Studies

Minor Requirements - Pioneer Leadership

The minor requires 24 credits. In addition, students must complete a total of 80 service hours.

First year
LDRS 2017The Leadership Process1,2
LDRS 2018Self as a Leader1,2
LDRS 2019Leading Teams1,2
40 service hours
Second year
LDRS 2040Leading Community Change4
LDRS 2050Collaborative Leadership: Local Perspectives2
LDRS 2060Collaborative Leadership: Global Perspectives2
40 service hours
Third and/or fourth year
LDRS 3000Capstone: Leadership Ethics4
6 credits at the 2000 level or above 16
Total Credits24

Minor Requirements - CWC Scholars

The minor requires 24 credits.

First year
LDRS 2017The Leadership Process1,2
LDRS 2018Self as a Leader1,2
LDRS 2019Leading Teams1,2
Second year
LDRS 2040Leading Community Change4
LDRS 2050Collaborative Leadership: Local Perspectives2
LDRS 2060Collaborative Leadership: Global Perspectives2
Third and/or fourth year
LDRS 3000Capstone: Leadership Ethics4
6 credits at the 2000 level or above 16
Total Credits24

Minor Requirements - Army ROTC

The minor requires 24 credits.

LDRS 20004
RTC1 2031Methods of Leadership and Management 14
RTC1 2041Methods of Leadership and Management 24
RTC1 3072Adaptive Leadership4
RTC1 3082Leadership in a Complex World4
LDRS 31004
Total Credits24

Approved Elective Courses

ANTH 2400Social Change in Latin America4
ANTH 3430Visions, Utopias and Messiahs4
CUI 3055Human Rights & Education3
CUI 3990Service Learning in Community1-4
CUI 3996Urban Youth Development5
GEOG 3420Urban and Regional Planning4
COMN 2115Performance & Social Change4
COMN 2130Introduction to Organizational Communication4
COMN 2300Fundamentals of Argumentation4
COMN 2470Gender and Communication4
COMN 3020Conflict Management4
COMN 3110Intergroup Communication4
COMN 3140Advanced Intercultural Communication4
COMN 3230Principles of Leadership4
COMN 3245Building Group/Team Effectiveness4
COMN 3300Principles of Persuasion4
COMN 3315Public Deliberation4
COMN 3680Gender and Communication4
COMN 3770Mediated Communication and Relationships4
COMN 3850Communication Ethics4
COMN 3852Communication Ethics4
HIST 2530American History: 20th Century4
HIST 2570Civil War & Reconstruction4
INTS 2975Global Issues Research Practicum4
INTS 3310Disasters, Hazards & Response4
INTS 3385Migrants and Refugees: Humanity on the Move4
INTS 3952Human Rights in the Global World4
LGST 3730Values Based Leadership in Practice4
MGMT 2040Managing Human Resources4
MGMT 2420Global Management4
MGMT 3100Business Ethics and Social Responsibility4
MGMT 3270Dispute Resolution4
MGMT 3280Business Plan4
MGMT 3700Stress Management1-8
PHIL 2180Ethics4
PHIL 2785Environmental Ethics4
PLSC 2001Law and Politics4
PLSC 2050Anarchy or Order? World Politics4
PLSC 2420American Presidency4
PLSC 2430Political Parties & Interest Groups4
PLSC 2610Rise of Political Individualism4
PLSC 2820Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties4
PPOL 1910Hard Choices in Public Policy4
SOCI 2190American Communities4
SOCI 2320Race and Ethnic Relations4
SOCI 2420Social Inequality4
SOCI 2719Social Movements4
THEA 3760Stage Management4
THEA 2885Directing I4

Courses

LDRS 2000 Foundations of Leadership (4 Credits)

LDRS 2000 focuses on developing an understanding of the foundations of leadership through an overview of leadership theories and definitions, an exploration of the present and future contextual demands on leaders, and in-depth self-assessment which includes identification of strengths, weaknesses, social identity, and leadership practices. The course will also explore the role of leadership and followership in teams. LDRS 2000 is designed to broaden your understanding of what constitutes leadership while challenging you to understand yourself better and begin to apply civically engaged leadership in new ways. This course is designed to broaden your understanding of "who" and "what" constitutes leadership.

LDRS 2017 Inclusive Leadership (1,2 Credit)

In this academic entree to the study of leadership, we explore the fundamental nature of leadership and how to develop as students of leadership in a diverse world. This course encourages students to discover their personal identities, values, preferences, risk-taking propensity and other characteristics as these relate to their leadership potential. Students integrate learning in a Personal Leadership Statement, declaring what they stand for as an inclusive leader. We explore the idea of "community" and our obligations to take on a leadership role in the community with whom we identify. Service as an act of leadership will be expected both as a course requirement and overall program requirement in the Pioneer Leadership Program. Prerequisite: membership in the Pioneer Leadership Program (PLP), or permission of PLP faculty.

LDRS 2018 Self as a Leader (1,2 Credit)

This course continues the process of learning about leadership as a process and the role of the leader and follower in that process. Particular attention will be paid to developing passions, self-interests and facilitation skills that allow leaders and followers to create change. Service as an act of leadership continues both as a course requirement and overall program requirement in the Pioneer Leadership Program. Prerequisites: LDRS 2017 and membership in the Pioneer Leadership Program (PLP), or permission of PLP faculty.

LDRS 2019 Leading Teams (1,2 Credit)

Teams are the primary vehicle by which many, if not most, complex tasks are accomplished in our society. As a result, there is an increasing demand for leaders who can build, lead and participate in effective teams. With this course, you are completing your first-year sequence as a student of leadership. It will help lay the theoretical and conceptual foundations you need to prepare you to (a) reflect on teams of which you have been a part; (b) develop strategies for making your teams more effective, whether you are a leader or a team member; and (c) help you develop skills for your sophomore service project. Prerequisites: LDRS 2018 and membership in the Pioneer Leadership Program, or permission of PLP faculty.

LDRS 2040 Leading Community Change (4 Credits)

This course continues themes of the first-year Pioneer Leadership Program (PLP) sequence. Specifically, the course provides theoretical and applied concepts on effective change within a community while, at the same time, teaching students how to engage in transformational service within communities. Prerequisites: LDRS 2017, LDRS 2018, LDRS 2019 and membership in the Pioneer Leadership Program (PLP), or permission of the PLP faculty.

LDRS 2050 Collaborative Leadership: Local Perspectives (2 Credits)

In this two-course sequence, students have a chance to lead and implement a model of community based change involving service that was envisioned in COMN 2040. The sequence represents an important step in the Pioneer Leadership Program experience and in the student's development as a citizen leader. By the end of this sequence, the student should be able to lead community based change efforts and learn from the experiences associated with those efforts. Prerequisites: LDRS 2017, LDRS 2018, LDRS 2019, LDRS 2040 and PLP membership or approval.

LDRS 2060 Collaborative Leadership: Global Perspectives (2 Credits)

In this two-course sequence, students have a chance to lead and implement a model of community based change involving service that was envisioned in COMN 2040. The sequence represents an important step in the Pioneer Leadership Program experience and in the student's development as a citizen leader. By the end of this sequence, the student should be able to lead community based change efforts and learn from the experiences associated with those efforts. Prerequisites: LDRS 2050 and PLP membership or PLP approval.

LDRS 2300 Transformational Leadership (4 Credits)

This course focuses on an introduction to leadership theory and integration of this theory into the student's leadership development and service in all sectors. This class is designed to develop a particular understanding of citizen leadership as an avenue to create change and transformation of communities. Additionally, students gain a greater awareness of their own leadership style, develop a stronger appreciation for teamwork and create goals for leadership in their own context. We examine personal leadership development through three main lenses. First, students gain a better understanding of the contextual demands for leadership. The second focus entails conducting self-exploration of one's own leadership style through identifying values, personality, and strengths and weaknesses as a leader. Finally, the course includes developing a greater awareness of how one relates to others and engages in transformative change.

LDRS 2310 Leadership in a Virtual World (4 Credits)

Distributed organizations are commonplace in the high-tech world in which we now find ourselves living and working. Leading in private and public settings requires a developed set of skills to utilize the virtual environment to advance a shared goal. Technical skills and communication take on new importance for leading virtually. This course focuses on these new realities of today's work and community environments. Through readings of current research on virtual work and team leadership as well as online assignments to recognize, practice and develop needed skills, students gain a strong foundational understanding of what constitutes effectiveness in virtual work and community leadership.

LDRS 2320 Presidential Leadership (4 Credits)

The University of Denver had the privilege to host the first 2012 Presidential Debate in October. With all of the attention this brings to campus, it is appropriate to examine the role of a president as a leader and the process of becoming president. What does it take to be a successful U.S. president? What characteristics and behaviors are more commonly found in effective presidential leadership? How do campaigns and parties frame the success or failure of presidential candidates? How can the average citizen understand the role of this leadership position and become informed on the leadership capacity of various candidates to fill that role effectively? This course examines the extensive research and theorizing about presidential leadership and their success factors. Various approaches to studying the leadership of presidents are utilized including case studies, memoirs, research projects, and guest speakers. Guests include past presidential candidates, campaign managers, speechwriters and party officials from all sides. A variety of readings are selected to inform and frame this discussion-intense course. The goal is to review the literature and a number of varied approaches to understand presidential leadership with a focus on the role of the president as chief leader of our nation.

LDRS 2330 Sustainability Leadership in Denver (4 Credits)

The wicked problems to be addressed by sustainability leadership include climate change, deforestation, water shortages, overpopulation, and waste disposal, among many others. This course will explore how community, government and business leaders in Denver are addressing environmental problems while balancing economic and social equity concerns. Students will understand multiple models of sustainable development through course readings and offsite experiences.

LDRS 2400 Leadership and Sustainability in Belize (4 Credits)

Every day, decisions are made by leaders in business, government, and non-profit settings that impact sustainability in its many forms. This course explores multiple meanings and interpretations of sustainability. The course location of Belize provides a perfect learning laboratory to examine how one country is attempting to balance the sometimes competing demands of economic, cultural, and environmental sustainability. Course activities include staying at a low-environmental impact conference center in the rainforest, visiting a model environmentally sustainable island community, hearing guest lectures from various country experts, and exploring Mayan ruins. Through these activities students examine the role that leadership plays in contributing to small and large scale sustainability efforts. Students must apply and receive instructor permission to register for this course.

LDRS 2410 Global Leadership: A Yucatan Experience (4 Credits)

Developing the capacity to work and lead in a global environment has never been more important for university graduates. Strong personal awareness, coupled with mature intercultural competencies and knowledge, is required of any graduate hoping to take a meaningful role in a globalizing world. This course is designed to couple intercultural awareness with critical principles for global leadership effectiveness in a unique cross-cultural environment: Yucatan, Mexico. Using Merida as a base camp, this class focuses on the challenges of leading in a region with a strong colonial past, a proud Mayan culture influencing the present, and globalization that attracts many foreign interests through tourism and natural resource development. Through a unique partnership with Project C.U.R.E., a non-profit organization dedicated to building sustainable healthcare infrastructure, students hear and see the work of an international non-profit dedicated to building strong healthy communities. In addition, students learn from leaders within the government and business community, examining local and regional issues that challenge and must be understood to create vibrant sustainable communities. Course activities include lectures from local and international leaders, organizational and cultural site visits, intercultural and leadership assessments, and a hospital work project service opportunity. Days are filled with experiential learning and evenings are set aside for group and personal reflections. Required pre-course reading helps all begin with a common language of leadership principles, globalization understanding and awareness of pertinent challenges facing the Yucatan region.

LDRS 2510 Outdoor Leadership: Developing Leaders in Colorado's Backcountry (4 Credits)

This experiential-based leadership course is designed to engage the student learner in the theory and practice of adventure education as it applies to leadership development for university students. The course includes three hours of pre-trip planning. The expedition portion of the course is eight full days with seven days of backpacking in the Raggeds Wilderness Area, which spans the White River and Gunnison National Forest. The proposed course is 44 miles round trip and includes two high altitude mountain passes and an opportunity for a peak attempt on Treasury Mountain. The course area is located between Paonia and Crested Butte, Colorado. With the support of professional instructor facilitators, students follow a traditional outdoor leadership course progression that allows them to practice and improve their leadership skills. This includes group management, navigation, lesson planning, outdoor ethics and Leave No Trace philosophy, risk management, facilitation, group processing and transfer of learning. The pinnacle of the course includes a professionally facilitated overnight solo, peak attempt and completion of the outdoor leadership competencies included in the curriculum.

LDRS 2901 Women, Careers and Leadership I: Job & Internship Search Preparation (2 Credits)

This course is designed to give students who identify as female the unique resources, skills, confidence and tools necessary to be successful in the internship search and develop a mindset for strong workplace excellence and leadership. While women are entering the workforce in numbers that equal men, their earnings equity and ascent to leadership is slow. This course will explore the gender challenges and opportunities that exist for women in the complex workforce. Internships can create an important learning experience for developing the requisite skills to overcome obstacles and seize opportunities for future success. But the internship search process involves much more than simply submitting a resume in the current economy. Through in-class activities and homework assignments, you will understand workplace complexities and learn how to create a strong resume to address those complexities, how to market your skills to employers and how to find internship openings for your field. The course will include content delivered by career and professional development professionals, employers, and alumni.

LDRS 2902 Women, Careers and Leadership II: Preparing for your Internships (2 Credits)

Progressing in one’s career requires the acquisition of hands-on experience to gain the knowledge and skills to be marketable in specific industries. Additionally, cultivating personal and professional development specific to women in the workplace is vital to successfully navigating their career and professional development. As such, a prerequisite to this course is Women, Careers and Leadership I. This second course in the series, entitled, Women, Careers and Leadership II, is intended to support students who identify as female in developing their knowledge, skills and strategies to be successful in, and maximize on their internship. Students will learn about organizational structure and culture and how those factors impact workplace dynamics, including communication. In addition, students will learn the key traits of leadership with a focus on building self-esteem and self-efficacy while increasing emotional intelligence. Prerequisite: LDRS 2901.

LDRS 2911 Careers & Leadership I: Job and Internship Search Preparation (2 Credits)

This course is designed to give students the unique resources, skills, confidence and tools necessary to be successful in the internship search and develop a mindset for strong workplace excellence and leadership.The internship search process involves much more than simply submitting a resume in the current economy. Internships can create an important learning experience for developing the requisite skills to overcome obstacles and seize opportunities for future success. Through in-class activities and assignments, students will understand workplace complexities and learn how to create a strong resume to address those complexities. The course will include content delivered by Career & Professional Development professionals, employers, and alumni.

LDRS 2912 Careers and Leadership II: Preparing for your Internship (2 Credits)

Progressing in one’s career requires the acquisition of hands-on experience to gain the knowledge and skills to be marketable in specific industries. Additionally, cultivating personal and professional development specific to women in the workplace is vital to successfully navigating their career and professional development. As such, a prerequisite to this course is Careers &Leadership I. This second course in the series, entitled Careers & Leadership II, is intended to support students in developing their knowledge, skills and strategies to be successful in, and maximize on their internship. Students will learn about organizational structure and culture and how those factors impact workplace dynamics, including communication. In addition, students will learn the key traits of leadership with a focus on building self-esteem and self-efficacy while increasing emotional intelligence. Prerequisite: LDRS 2911.

LDRS 3000 Capstone: Leadership Ethics (4 Credits)

This course completes leadership studies as an undergraduate at DU, and the process is designed to help students think in a structured, reflective way about the ethical considerations surrounding leadership acts and consequences. As a result, students should leave with a greater understanding of your own and others' leadership, as well as with tools to help students navigate ambiguous situations and conflicting interests associated with their future leadership roles. Prerequisites: LDRS 2017, LDRS 2018, LDRS 2019, LDRS 2040, LDRS 2050, and LDRS 2060.

LDRS 3980 Internship (1-6 Credits)

The PLP Internship program provides individualized opportunities to gain valuable professional experience and build leadership skills. This hands-on program complements a student's academic major or a specified interest area that supports the student's leadership development through careful placement in community based learning. All three sectors of government, not-for-profit and private enterprise are available for internship learning opportunities.

LDRS 3991 Independent Study (1-5 Credits)

LDRS 3992 Directed Study (1-5 Credits)

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