2016-2017 Undergraduate Bulletin

Department of English

Office: Sturm Hall, Room 495
Mail Code: 2000 E. Asbury Ave. Denver, CO 80208
Phone:  303-871-2266
Email:  kheeps@du.edu
Web Site: http://www.du.edu/ahss/schools/english

The undergraduate mission of the English department is to help fulfill the University’s commitment to provide a liberal undergraduate education and to contribute to the University’s general education program. For most of its 150-year history, the academic study of English has been the study of literatures written in this language. That is, the focus of English study is on the history, production and interpretation of literature in English with accompanying emphasis on critical reception of texts, on the diverse cultures that contextualize literary writing and on other rhetorical “texts.” No single perspective dominates the study of English literature and language. Recently, it has also become apparent that even predominantly English-speaking cultures are highly diverse and comprise many different cultures in different languages. In broad terms, then, the discipline of English at DU includes a) the study of the history of literature in English and in English translation; b) the production of literature as a creative act; and c) the interpretation of literature within the rhetorical context of aesthetics, which has a complex relationship to social, economic, cultural and political conditions. Like most English departments, we accommodate several different approaches to and emphases on the study of literature and the teaching of creative writing. However, the English department is united in its acceptance of these three broad activities of English study as aspects of our mission.

English

Bachelor of Arts Major Requirements

(183 credits required for the degree)

Minimum of 44 credits in English; maximum of 60 credits.  No more than 8 credits of coursework at the 1000 level may be taken, and at least 12 credits must be taken at the 3000 level.

The English department offers four concentrations within the English major:

Literary Studies 

This concentration is for students who wish to study the historical development of literature in English. Students explore a range of writing from medieval British to postcolonial literatures of the Americas. The program is appropriate for those who plan careers in secondary education or who plan to attend graduate school for the MA or PhD in English.

Course Requirements:

*  8 credits British Literature Survey (ENGL 2100, ENGL 2200, or ENGL 2300)

*  8 credits American Literature Survey (ENGL 2750, ENGL 2751, or ENGL 2752)

*  4 credits Shakespeare (e.g., ENGL 2221, ENGL 2220)

*  4 credits Ethnic Literature (e.g., ENGL 2742ENGL 2715ENGL 3744)

*  4 credits International Literature (e.g., ENGL 2544ENGL 2613)

*  4 credits Rhetoric/Literary Theory (e.g., ENGL 2026, ENGL 2815, ENGL 3813, ENGL 3815, ENGL 3817, ENGL 3818, ENGL 3823, ENGL 3825, ENGL 3852)

*  12 credits English Electives

Textual Studies 

This concentration gives students the opportunity to pursue their most compelling literary interests and to design their own course of study in the major (in consultation with their advisors). Neither the British nor the American literature surveys are required, although students are required to choose at least two courses in both literatures. This program of study may also be appropriate for those who plan careers in secondary education or those who plan to attend graduate school for the MA or PhD in English.

Course Requirements:

*  8 credits British Literature (one course before 1789, e.g. ENGL 2100ENGL 2200, or ENGL 2120, and one after 1789, e.g. ENGL 2300ENGL 2401, or ENGL 2402)

*  8 credits American Literature (one course before 1900, e.g. ENGL 2750, and one after 1900, e.g. ENGL 2711)

*  4 credits Ethnic Literature (e.g., ENGL 2742, ENGL 2715ENGL 3744)

*  4 credits International Literature (e.g., ENGL 2544, ENGL 2613)

*  8 credits Rhetoric/Literary Theory (e.g., ENGL 2026ENGL 2815ENGL 3813ENGL 3815ENGL 3817ENGL 3818ENGL 3823ENGL 3825ENGL 3852)

*  12 credits English Electives

Creative Writing 

This concentration is for students who wish to create original works in poetry, fiction, nonfiction or translation, and who seek training from practicing writers in these areas. The program emphasizes, more than many such programs, the study of literature and theory. It is appropriate for students who plan to seek the MFA or PhD in English.

Course Requirements:

*  4 credits Introduction to Creative Writing (ENGL 1000)

*  8 credits Intermediate Creative Writing (e.g., ENGL 2001,ENGL 2010)

*  8 credits British Literature (one course before 1789, e.g. ENGL 2100, ENGL 2200, or ENGL 2120, and one after 1789, e.g. ENGL 2300, ENGL 2401, or ENGL 2402)

*  8 credits American Literature (one course before 1900, e.g. ENGL 2750, and one after 1900, e.g. ENGL 2711)

*  4 credits International Literature (e.g., ENGL 2544ENGL 2613)

*  12 credits English Electives (one of which should be a 3000-level creative writing course, e.g. ENGL 3001 or ENGL 3010)

English Education 

This concentration is for students who wish to teach English language and literature at the secondary school level. Students explore a range of writings from medieval British to postcolonial literatures of the Americas, and in addition take courses in language and writing. Please note: Students who want to receive teaching certification upon completion of the BA or to go on for the dual degree option in teacher education must complete all requirements for this concentration by the end of the junior year with a minimum grade point average of 3.0. In their senior year, these students must complete the 40-hour Teacher Education Program. Inasmuch as the student may take an additional 16 credits in the major beyond the 44 required credits (or a maximum of 60 credits), we highly recommend that students in English education confer with the Morgridge College of Education’s teacher education department for its recommendations on additional areas students might want or need to cover in their English major.

Course Requirements:

*  8 credits British Literature Survey (ENGL 2100ENGL 2200, or ENGL 2300)

*  8 credits American Literature Survey (ENGL 2750ENGL 2751, or ENGL 2752)

*  4 credits Shakespeare (e.g., ENGL 2221ENGL 2220)

*  4 credits Ethnic Literature (e.g., ENGL 2742ENGL 2715ENGL 3744)

*  4 credits International Literature (e.g., ENGL 2544ENGL 2613)

*  4 credits English Grammar or History and Structure of the English Language (e.g., ENGL 2026, ENGL 3813)

*  4 credits Advanced Writing/Nonfiction (ENGL 2816ENGL 3015)

*  4 credits Literary Interpretation (e.g., ENGL 3823, ENGL 3825)

*  4 credits Poetry Genre (e.g., ENGL 1007, ENGL 2716, ENGL 2001)

Secondary Major

44 credits. Same requirements as for BA degree.

Minor Requirements

Students minoring in English must take a minimum of 24 credits in English. No specific courses are required; students are encouraged to design a minor that reflects their interests. No more than 8 credits may be taken at the 1000 level.  Minimum GPA in the minor is 2.0.

Requirements for Distinction in the Major in English

  • Minimum 3.5 GPA
  • Thesis Requirement: Students seeking recognition for "Distinction in English" are required to complete a thesis during the fall and winter quarters of their senior year. Students who wish to write a critical thesis must write a 40-50 page analytic research paper; students who wish to write a creative thesis must write a fiction and/or poetry project of a length to be determined by the student and the faculty director.
  • Students who intend to write a critical literary thesis must also complete: 3800 Bibliography & Research, 3995 Independent Research, one 3000-level Literary Theory course, and one additional 3000-level English course.

  • Students who intend to write a creative thesis must also complete: 3852 Topics in Poetics or 3800 Bibliography & Research, 3991 Independent Study with Thesis Director, one 3000-level Literary Theory course, and one 3000-level Creative Writing course.

Courses

ENGL 1000 Introduction to Creative Writing (4 Credits)

Basic techniques of fiction and poetry.

ENGL 1006 Art of Fiction (4 Credits)

An introduction to the appreciation of fiction as an art form through practice in interpretation and creation.

ENGL 1007 Art of Poetry (4 Credits)

An introduction to the appreciation of poetry as an art form through practice in interpretation and creation.

ENGL 1008 Art of Drama (4 Credits)

An introduction to the appreciation of drama as an art form through practice in interpretation and creation.

ENGL 1009 Art of Non-fiction (4 Credits)

An introduction to the appreciation of non-fiction as an art form through practice in interpretation and creation.

ENGL 1010 Introductory Topics in English (4 Credits)

Various topics in literary studies approached at the introductory level.

ENGL 1110 Literary Inquiry (4 Credits)

Literary Inquiry introduces students to the variety of ways that poetry, fiction, and/or drama expand our understanding of what it means to be human. Topics vary to engage students in the rewarding process of interpreting the literary art form as a unique cultural expression. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 1992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

ENGL 2001 Creative Writing-Poetry (4 Credits)

Techniques and forms of poetry. Prerequisite: an introductory creative writing course.

ENGL 2002 Creative Writing-Poetry (4 Credits)

Techniques and forms of poetry. Prerequisite: an introductory creative writing course.

ENGL 2003 Creative Writing-Poetry (4 Credits)

Techniques and forms of poetry. Prerequisite: an introductory creative writing course.

ENGL 2004 Magical Realism in Literature and Cinema (4 Credits)

This course examines the relationships between human groups and their social and aesthetic environments through the conjunction of history and myth or magical realism. We study magical realism both as auctorial flights of the imagination based on alternative ways of seeing and telling as well as a community-inspirited idiom shaped by a reperception of history and the environment. Our study is region-specific in sociocultural details as well as global in scope and involves the exploration of magical realism in literature and cinema. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2010 Creative Writing-Fiction (4 Credits)

Techniques and forms of fiction. Prerequisite: an introductory creative writing course.

ENGL 2011 Creative Writing-Fiction (4 Credits)

Techniques and forms of fiction. Prerequisite: an introductory creative writing course.

ENGL 2012 Creative Writing-Fiction (4 Credits)

Techniques and forms of fiction. Prerequisite: an introductory creative writing course.

ENGL 2013 Creative Writing-Fiction (4 Credits)

Techniques and forms of fiction. Prerequisite: an introductory creative writing course.

ENGL 2020 Studies in Non-Fiction (4 Credits)

ENGL 2021 Business Technical Writing (3,4 Credits)

Course open to Colorado Women's College students only.

ENGL 2026 English Grammar (4 Credits)

ENGL 2031 Poetry Since 1945 (4 Credits)

ENGL 2035 History of Genre-Poetry (4 Credits)

ENGL 2036 History of Genre-Fiction (4 Credits)

ENGL 2040 Introduction to Publishing (4 Credits)

Through lectures and field trips, students will learn how books get published - with all the steps involved. Cross listed with ENGL 3040, MFJS 3140.

ENGL 2060 Modern/Post Modern Literature (4 Credits)

ENGL 2070 Postcolonial Literature and Theory (4 Credits)

An examination of the phenomenon of postcolonialism, taking into account the ways in which it has been conceptualized. Key interests include the contexts of imperialism and decolonization as well as critical readings of pertinent literature.

ENGL 2080 London as Global City: From Empire to Commonwealth (4 Credits)

London as Global City is designed to accommodate the newly structured London Program for Fall 2011. It entails biweekly meetings and site visits for 14 weeks and examines the origins of the British Empire, starting with the founding of the East India Company in 1600 and moving to 21st century London as a repository of peoples from across the globe, particularly descendants of former British colonies in India, Africa and the West Indies. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2100 English Literature I: Beowulf-Spenser (4 Credits)

A survey of English literature from the earliest extant texts through works written in the late 16th century, ending with Spenser. Its purpose is to give students a historical grasp of the development and continuity of English literature during the Middle Ages and the 16th century. Old English and most Middle English texts will be read in translation, but Chaucer and Middle English lyrics will be read in the original.

ENGL 2104 The Bible as Literature (4 Credits)

The Bible has been one of the most important works in all of Western society. In this course we read the Bible as a masterpiece of literature. Rather than focusing on theological questions about this work as inspired scripture, we instead focus on its rich literary qualities and explore some ways in which these stories have influenced modern society. Reading select passages, we discuss its literary genres, forms, symbols and motifs, many of which are important in literature today. Of the latter, we encounter stories of creation and hero tales, parables, apocalyptic literature, and themes of paradise and the loss of Eden, wilderness, covenant, and the promised land. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with RLGS 2104 and JUST 2104.

ENGL 2120 Chaucer-Selected Poetry (4 Credits)

This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2125 Arthurian Literature (4 Credits)

Building upon Malory's classic Arthurian cycle, this course will follow the major developments in the legend of Arthur into the 20th century.

ENGL 2130 World Literature (4 Credits)

A literary journey around the world, the focus of this course includes the study of modern literature from different parts of the world--such as Africa and the Caribbean, Asia and the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. Textual analysis as well as cultural and transnational contexts are emphasized. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2200 English Literature II: Donne-Johnson (4 Credits)

This course explores the literatures of the 17th and 18th centuries. This 200-year period marks England's transition from a medieval, relatively static society bound by hierarchy, religion and shared cultural values into a restless early-modern society of cities, social mobility, civic unrest, colonies and cosmopolitanism. Students work on understanding genres and styles, the basics of scansion, and the terminologies, methods and ideologies of literary criticism. The course is divided into generic categories.

ENGL 2202 Renaissance Poetry & Prose (4 Credits)

ENGL 2220 Shakespeare-Representative Plays (4 Credits)

Introduction covering about eight plays and some sonnets.

ENGL 2221 Shakespeare Seminar (4 Credits)

This course traces Shakespeare's development by looking at representative plays from his early through to his late period and counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2230 Shakespeare and Film (4 Credits)

An examination of film adaptation and staging of Shakespeare's plays. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2300 English Literature III (4 Credits)

A survey of British literary works and contexts from the 19th century onwards. The course will include selected readings of British and Anglophone Romantic, Victorian and Modern writers across multiple genres. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2311 English Novel to 1800 (4 Credits)

ENGL 2401 Blake, Wadsworth and Contemporaries (4 Credits)

The first generation of British Romantic writers came of age during a time of revolution (American, French, Haitian). The inheritors of radical eighteenth-century ideas about natural rights, the first-generation Romantics found optimism in human feeling as well as human reason. They believed that the capacity for sympathy and lyrical transport would lead to a new, benevolent society, but their belief in social progress was checked by revolutionary violence and the rise of a hyper-rationalism that seemed more dangerous than the superstition it was meant to replace.

ENGL 2402 Later Romantics (4 Credits)

This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2536 Shakespeare Plays in London (4-4.5 Credits)

Cross listed with THEA 2220.

ENGL 2544 Globalization and Cultural Texts (4 Credits)

The focus of this course is on theory (drawn from the social sciences) of how cultures worldwide may be increasingly internationalized through the powerful effects of globalization and on cultural texts that present the human and aesthetic faces of globalization, as seen through literature and film, with particular reference to India, the United Kingdom, South Africa, and Japan. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2613 Excavating Italy (4 Credits)

This class provides an introduction to the art, history and literature of the Italian cities of Rome, Florence and Venice from classical antiquity through the High Renaissance, as well as visual and literary responses to Italy, by artists and writers. Students are encouraged to recognize the importance of classical architecture and sculpture as the artistic precedents for Renaissance art. We see how religious and literary themes provided much of the iconography of Renaissance painting. Students are also encouraged to become intimately acquainted with the works of a few selected major artists, such as Giotto, Botticelli, and Michelangelo, while also developing a wider understanding of the general stylistic features of Italian Renaissance art. The literature component focuses on a variety of genres from classical texts to Shakespeare's Italian plays to British travelers' impressions of Italian artists and scenes. This is a team-taught course. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with ARTH 2613.

ENGL 2705 Literature of the American South (4 Credits)

An introductory course on the literature emanating from the American south. Texts may include fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction primarily spanning the 18th through the 21st century.

ENGL 2706 Writing the American West (4 Credits)

An introductory course on the literature emanating from the American west. Texts may include fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction spanning the 19th through the 21st century.

ENGL 2707 Contemporary Literature (4 Credits)

The course surveys contemporary books. The novel has never been a coherent genre, but especially since the 1960s its features, in some practitioners, have begun to resemble history, anthropology, poetry, science writing, or all of these. The course will include readings from Asia, South America, Europe and North America.

ENGL 2708 Topics in English (1-4 Credits)

ENGL 2709 Topics in English (1-10 Credits)

ENGL 2710 American Novel-19th & 20th Century (4 Credits)

This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2711 20th Century American Fiction (4 Credits)

Students read, evaluate and discuss the genre of the American immigrant novel. Topics include how this is a uniquely American literary form and what it says about life in America; the similarities and differences in how ethnic groups understand their experiences; how language and narrative techniques are used to convey the life of a new immigrant; how the experiences of men and women differ; how the immigrant novel has evolved as a literary genre. The readings will be analyzed as a means to consider how the immigration novel in America became a genre that expressed a variety of topics related to the American experience. The class will consider how these works helped to shape and define what it meant to be an American, and how that definition has changed over the last 100 years.

ENGL 2712 American Short Story (4 Credits)

Wide range of American short stories, quintessential American genre, from the early 19th century to present.

ENGL 2715 Native American Literature (4 Credits)

Native American Literature explores the relationships between contemporary Native American narratives and Native American oral traditions. We will examine the intellectual underpinnings of Native American literary expressions, focusing on tribally specific Native American concepts of language, perception, and process in relation to Native cultural and political survival. This course aims to celebrate Native American cultural expression through lectures and discussion, group work and intellectual exercises.

ENGL 2716 American Poetry (4 Credits)

This course examines American poetry by way of historical, thematic, and/or formalist approaches. Possible topics could include: post-WWII poetry, the New York School, Self and Other in American Poetry, Language poetry, etc.

ENGL 2717 African American Writers (4 Credits)

Defines, describes and analyzes the African-American aesthetic.

ENGL 2741 American Jewish Literature: Immigrant Fiction (4 Credits)

This course surveys over 100 years of American Jewish immigrant narratives beginning with the great exodus of Eastern European and Russian Jewry at the end of the 19th century and ending with recent arrivals from Israel and the former U.S.S.R. Canonical works by central authors reveal the great successes of Jewish immigrants alongside their spiritual failures. A selection of memoir, novels, short stories, and poetry in English and in translation from Hebrew and Yiddish demonstrate the multilingual character of the Jewish experience in America. While helpful, no knowledge of Jewish languages, religious tradition, or cultural practice is necessary to succeed in this course. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with JUST 2741.

ENGL 2742 Modern Hebrew Literature in Translation: Against All Odds (4 Credits)

This course offers a survey of some of the most significant works of modern Hebrew literature available in translation. Students will consider how the development of Hebrew literature has contributed to the formation of contemporary Israeli identity, and how the conflicts that define the turbulent history of Israel are treated in works by canonical authors. The selection of diverse voices and literary materials exposes students to the social, political, and historical changes wrought by the rise of modern day Israel. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with JUST 2742.

ENGL 2743 Jewish Humor: Origins and Meaning (4 Credits)

Writers, scholars, and comedians all claim to locate an identifiable strain of “Jewish humor” running from the Bible through to today’s literary humorists and provocative stand-up comics. This course takes humor seriously in an effort to reveal the development of “Jewish humor” in American from a comparative context. But is there such a things as Jewish humor? And if so, what are its sources and characteristics? Does it exist across cultures and in different linguistic communities? Through lectures, discussion, exercises and papers, students gain a broad understanding of the history, psychology, and philosophy of humor as it relates to Jewish arts and letters in America. This course is cross-listed with JUST 2743.

ENGL 2750 American Literature Survey I (4 Credits)

First part of American survey; introduction to major authors and genres.

ENGL 2751 American Literature Survey II (4 Credits)

Second part of American survey; further examination of major authors and genres.

ENGL 2752 American Literature Survey III (4 Credits)

A survey of American literature, including representative works of fiction, poetry and drama from the 1930s to the present.

ENGL 2815 Studies in Rhetoric (4 Credits)

ENGL 2816 Advanced Writing (4 Credits)

This class gives each student the opportunity to explore the humanities in an area of his or her particular interest. A research methods and writing course, this class guides students through the research and writing process from preliminary research to methodology to prospectus to drafting and finally revision. Class sessions operate as directed writing workshops, with students discussing their research and writing strategies. The final product of the course is a 15-page research essay on a subject of the student's choice. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2820 Philosophy and Literature (4 Credits)

Hermeneutics, sometimes called "the art of interpretation," offers us the opportunity to explore strategies of engagement and exegesis that seeks to observe, question, and celebrate the ways in which we read and write the world. By bringing critical and creative inquiry to bear on the event of interpretation itself we can consider the ethical implications of how we deal with our individual identities as well as our collective, national, and global identities. In this course we pose big questions--What are we talking about when we talk about existence? What does it mean to have a body? How does desire and memory construct history and identity? Walking these questions through a variety of literary and philosophical texts and artistic lenses, we consider how "the creative" (writing, the literary) performs, becomes, and is "the critical" and vice-versa. Students should be prepared to write, read, and participate in discussion.

ENGL 2825 Cultural Criticism (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to some of the major moments in the development of cultural studies and will show how the discipline "works" to make sense of culture at large. Cross listed with ENGL 3825.

ENGL 2830 Representations of Women (4 Credits)

Consideration of images presented of and by women in works of English and American literature from Middle Ages to present. Cross listed with GWST 2830.

ENGL 2845 Politics and Literature (4 Credits)

ENGL 2980 Internship in English (1-5 Credits)

This course provides academic credit for off-campus internships in fields related to the English major. One paper is required at the end, articulating how the internship complemented the student's studies in English. Requires approval by director of undergraduate studies in English.

ENGL 2992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

ENGL 3000 Advanced Creative Writing-Poetry (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3001 Advanced Creative Writing-Poetry (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3002 Advanced Creative Writing-Poetry (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3003 Advanced Creative Writing-Poetry (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3010 Advanced Creative Writing-Fiction (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3011 Advanced Creative Writing-Fiction (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3012 Advanced Creative Writing-Fiction (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3013 Adv Creative Writing-Fiction (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3015 Advanced Creative Writing: Non-Fiction (4 Credits)

ENGL 3017 Travel Writing-Fiction & Fact (4 Credits)

A study of European, American and other narratives of travel. This course examines relevant postcolonial and literary theories of travel and nationhood.

ENGL 3040 Introduction to Publishing (4 Credits)

Cross listed with ENGL 2040, MFJS 3140.

ENGL 3101 Non-Chaucerian Middle English Literature (4 Credits)

A study of Chaucer's near-contemporaries, Gower, Langland, and the Pearl poet as well as drama and lyrics.

ENGL 3121 Chaucer: Canterbury Tales (4 Credits)

Life, culture, language and literary trends of Chaucer's age as reflected in "The Canterbury Tales".

ENGL 3320 Oral Literature and Orality in Literature (4 Credits)

The term "oral literature" generally refers to narratives and poems--including songs--performed and disseminated orally from one generation to the other. Oral literature is, in some respects, the foundational 'text' of written literature. Some of the questions that we therefore explore in this course are as follows: How did oral literature develop? What are its types and their characteristics? How has oral literature been shaped by time and place? How is it distinct from as well as related to written literature? To answer these questions, we explore different forms of oral literature--from the traditional (such as folklore) to the contemporary (such as spoken work poetry). We also study the use of orality as a literary device in written literature. Our studies involve the examination of material and texts from different parts of the world.

ENGL 3402 Early Romantics (4 Credits)

ENGL 3404 England and Empire: Ambivalent Imperialism in Victorian and Edwardian Literature (4 Credits)

A course investigating the literary accounts of and responses to British imperialism in Victorian and Edwardian England in which students read works by Conrad, Kipling and Forster as well as several 20th-21st works by post Commenwealth authors in London.

ENGL 3405 Postmodern Visions of Israel (4 Credits)

This course investigates how representation of Israel as a modernist utopia have been replaced in contemporary literature with images of Israel as a dystopia. The class discusses the historical context that gave rise to visions of an idealized Israel, and the role the Hebrew language played in consolidating and connecting narration to nation. Next the class considers how belles-lettres from recent decades have reimagined Israel as a series of multilingual “multiverses.” A selection of fiction translated from Hebrew forms the core of class reading. Theoretical exploration of postmodernism help us conceptualize the poetics of postmodern literature. No knowledge of Israeli history or Jewish culture is necessary to succeed in this course. Cross listed with JUST 3405.

ENGL 3706 Writing the American West (4 Credits)

Explores historical and contemporary writing produced in and about the American West.

ENGL 3711 20th-Century American Fiction (4 Credits)

Fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction on selected themes by 20th and 21st century American writers. Topics for study may include issues related to regionalism, ethnicity and gender, as well as specific social and historical concerns.

ENGL 3731 Topics in English (1-4 Credits)

ENGL 3732 Topics in English (1-4 Credits)

ENGL 3733 Topics in English (1-4 Credits)

Topics vary reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the department and studies of the faculty.

ENGL 3743 Modern Jewish Literature (4 Credits)

Stories, novels and memoirs by 20th-century Jewish writers; consideration of issues of generation, gender and idea of Jewish literature as a genre. Cross listed with JUST 3743.

ENGL 3744 African American Literature (4 Credits)

This course examines fiction, poetry, autobiography, and drama by African American writers, with strong consideration on the socio-historical conditions that gave rise to and continue to inform this literary tradition.

ENGL 3800 Bibliography/Research Method (4 Credits)

ENGL 3803 Modernism/Postmodernism (4 Credits)

ENGL 3813 History and Structure of the English Language (4 Credits)

A composite course studying both the structure of modern English and the history of the English language.

ENGL 3815 Studies in Rhetoric (4 Credits)

This course will examine the history and principles of rhetoric and how they pertain to theory and practice in the field of composition and rhetoric.

ENGL 3817 History of Rhetoric (4 Credits)

ENGL 3818 Composition Theory (4 Credits)

ENGL 3821 Literary Criticism: 19th Century-Present (4 Credits)

ENGL 3822 Literary Criticism: 20th Century (4 Credits)

Critical methods and philosophies of 20th-century critics; their relationship to traditions.

ENGL 3823 Interpretation Theory (4 Credits)

ENGL 3825 Cultural Criticism (4 Credits)

Cross listed with ENGL 2835.

ENGL 3852 Topics in Poetics (4 Credits)

ENGL 3982 Writers in the Schools (2,4 Credits)

This course operates mostly "in the field." Following the models of California Poets in the Schools and Teachers & Writers Collaborative, students are in training with a poet-in-residence, observing him as he conducts a residency in a public school. In addition, we have our own meetings to discuss pedagogy, classroom practices and management, teacher-writer relations, and all other necessary logistical planning. Placement in public schools is facilitated by Denver SCORES, an education program dedicated to increasing literacy in Denver's at-risk school population. For those wishing to work with middle or high school students, or in other community settings (e.g., homeless or women's shelters), special arrangements can be made. This course is a collaborative effort between CO Humanities, Denver SCORES, and the University of Denver.

ENGL 3991 Independent Study (1-17 Credits)

ENGL 3992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

ENGL 3995 Independent Research (1-10 Credits)

Faculty

Clark Davis, Professor and Department Chair, PhD, University at Buffalo - State University of New York

Linda Bensel-Meyers, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Oregon

Gerald Chapman, Professor, Emeritus, PhD, Harvard University

Ann Dobyns, Professor, PhD, University of Oregon

Donna Beth Ellard, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara

Rachel Feder, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Michigan

Graham Foust, Associate Professor, PhD, University at Buffalo - State University of New York

Jan Gorak, Professor, PhD, University of Southern California

Eric Gould, Professor, PhD, University of London

Tayana Hardin, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Michigan

Douglas Hesse, Professor, PhD, University of Iowa

Scott Howard, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Washington

Laird Hunt, Professor, MFA, Naropa University

Brian Kiteley, Professor, MA, City College NY

Eleanor McNees, Professor, PhD, University of Colorado Boulder

Jessica Munns, Professor, Emerita, PhD, University of Warwick

Maik Nwosu, Associate Professor, PhD, Syracuse University

Charlotte Quinney, Adjunct Professor, PhD, Bowling Green State University

Bin Ramke, Professor, PhD, Ohio University

Adam Rovner, Associate Professor, PhD, Indiana University

Selah Saterstrom, Associate Professor, MFA, Goddard College

Eleni Sikelianos, Associate Professor, MFA, Naropa University

Billy J. Stratton, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Arizona

Nichol Weizenbeck, Visiting Teaching Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Denver

Margaret Whitt, Professor, Emerita, PhD, University of Denver

Barbara Wilcots, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Denver

Back to Top