2019-2020 Undergraduate Bulletin

Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture Courses

Through these courses, students gain knowledge essential for today’s global society, recognizing that human cultures are specific to time and place and that the practices and values of different societies vary widely. By gaining greater understanding of diverse cultural products, students will be better able to understand the world today and their own place in it. Students take two courses in different subjects studied from the perspectives of the arts and humanities, exploring culture and society from different perspectives. In these courses, students learn how to analyze the products of human cultures, including works of art, music, literature, philosophy and history. Students engage critically with such works through exposure to the vocabulary, concepts and methods used to analyze those works. Students explore how ideas and creative expressions both shape and are shaped by human experiences. Students who are CAHSS majors/minors may apply one Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture course (four credits) per major/minor program to partially satisfy both major/minor and Common Curriculum re­quirements if that course is listed as meeting the outcomes of a section of the Common Curriculum requirements. Non-music majors may take up to four one-credit ensembles towards this requirement.

ANTH 1910 Ancient Worlds (4 Credits)

This particular course uses the field of archaeology to illustrate the perspectives, methods and results of humanistic inquiry. It investigates human belief, creativity and spirituality in what we'll call deep history: the 50,000 years or so between the appearance of modern Homo sapiens and the rise of the first great civilizations of the Old and New Worlds. These aspects of life are examined through the study of human material culture, including portable objects, representational art, architecture, monuments and culturally-modified landscapes. A key underlying concept of the course is that material culture forms a unique narrative or "text" about the past history of humankind. This text is unique because everyone who has ever lived has helped to write it. Students learn how to interpret this text, recognize its multiple authors, and distill its larger social and cultural meaning. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ANTH 2020 Artifacts, Texts, Meaning (4 Credits)

How is it that anthropologists can look at an object in a museum collection and state with confidence what it once was a part of, how it was used, where it came from, how old it is, and even, perhaps, what it meant to the people who made it? What is an anthropological approach to documentation, an important accompaniment to the objects held in museums? In this course, participants learn about the ways anthropologists have approached researching material items and texts (both written and oral), ranging from time-tested techniques to materials science approaches. Students in the class do original research involving museum objects. The class involves hands-on work with artifacts, lecture, discussion, and laboratory analysis. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ANTH 2323 Global Health (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to global health. As one of the world’s faster growing fields, global health presents itself with complex opportunities and challenges, which require interdisciplinary conceptual and analytical tools for a comprehensive understanding of health, health care and their manifestations around the world. This course presents an overview of the multiple factors that influence global health and emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to respond to global health challenges. Disciplines included in the course include history, philosophy, bioethics, public health, anthropology, visual arts, and performing arts. We will explore ideas and behaviors related to health and health care in different societies and social groups. Topics include the evolution of primary health care and alternative strategies in global health, maternal and child health, nutrition, the rise of non-communicable diseases, water and sanitation, community engagement, global health agencies and funding sources, and human resources development. Course material combines introductory readings, academic articles and films with the analysis of journalistic pieces addressing currently important issues. It also combines the study of global health in the United States with that of other countries. Class meetings will consist of lectures to introduce topics and concepts, and group discussions to apply the concepts and examine them critically. Students will also work on individual and group projects. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ANTH 2420 Science, Technology and Human Values (4 Credits)

This course is designed to examine the nature of science and technology, and their interactions with each other and with society, with a specific focus on how they inform human values. We will examine the society-human-technology relationship as a continuum rather than as distinct, ontological entities in relationship to one another. In examining the grey areas between society-human-technology, it is important to look not only at the environmental and social-justice issues surrounding technology, but also how technologies shape our very humanity, our meaning-making practices, our value-systems, and our imaginations. In other words, how are technologies shaping human becoming? This course will address these types of questions from cultural, ethical, and philosophical perspectives. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 1010 Images of Culture (4 Credits)

This course looks at artistic creations as an expression of cultural traditions and beliefs. Instead of viewing art as the result of unique geniuses, the fruit of inspired individuals, we explore how artistic objects reflect the ideas of the times and social values held by the society in which they appear. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 1020 Highlights of Medieval Art (4 Credits)

The era known as the Middle Ages spans over a thousand years and includes many significant works in the history of art. This class endeavors to investigate the ways in which works of medieval art construct and convey meaning. In order to explore these ideas in greater depth, the class focuses on specific works of art that illustrate the rich complexities of the ways in which images convey meaning and the ways of understanding these meanings. As such, it is intended to provide an introduction to ways of reading and interpreting images. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 1030 Highlights of Renaissance Art (4 Credits)

The period known as the Renaissance witnessed the production of a tremendous number of artistic masterpieces, but also the formulation of the study of the history of art and the development of art theory. This class endeavors to investigate the ways in which works of Renaissance art construct and convey meaning. In order to explore these ideas in greater depth, the class focuses on specific works of art that illustrate the rich complexities of the ways in which images convey meaning and the ways of understanding these meanings. As such, it is intended to provide an introduction to ways of reading and interpreting images. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 1040 Sacred Spaces in Asia (4 Credits)

This course explores a variety of natural and man-made "Sacred Spaces" as it introduces the civilizations and major artistic traditions of India, China and Japan. Illustrated lectures consider public and private environments, their philosophical contexts and religious functions as well as the changing nature of their use and perceived meanings over time. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 1050 Highlights of American Art (4 Credits)

This course introduces American art by focusing on a single work of art each week. Through readings, illustrated lectures, discussion and museum visits, we explore the social, political, historical and cultural contexts of each masterwork; learn something about the featured artist's life and artistic processes; and discover related examples of fine and popular art from the seventeenth century to the present. In the process, participants refine their ability to look, describe, analyze and critique the visual. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 1060 Contemporary Art Worlds (4 Credits)

Have you ever wondered how a calf suspended in formaldehyde can sell at an art auction for nearly twenty-four million dollars? This class introduces the contemporary art world and explores how art functions within our society. Topics include the art market, the politics of museums, censorship and public funding, and popular cultural representations of the artist. We also look at how contemporary artists are engaging with some of the most important issues of our day. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 1070 Artists on Film (4 Credits)

Artists with turbulent lives have often captured the popular imagination. Typically, novels, plays and films about such artists perpetuate myths of tormented souls overcoming hardships, enduring romantic catastrophes and struggling with their creative genius. Usually, the reality is quite different as an artist's path is one of developing talent, hard work, persistence and great personal courage. This class explores the lives and works of several famous artists. We evaluate the myths and the realities of their lives by comparing their art to films and documentaries that have been made about them. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 2801 World Art I: Prehistory to c. 1000 (4 Credits)

This is the first quarter in a three-quarter foundation course in world art. Students will become familiar with significant examples of art, architecture and material culture emerging out of Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa from the Paleolithic era to approximately the year 1000. Students will consider the crucial role of these images and objects in the formation of their respective historical and cultural contexts. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 2802 World Art II: c.1000-1700 (4 Credits)

This is the second quarter of the three-quarter foundation course in world art. Students will become familiar with significant examples of art, architecture and material culture emerging out of Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa from approximately the year 1000 to 1700. Students will consider the crucial role of these images and objects in the formation of their respective historical and cultural contexts. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 2814 Medieval Art (4 Credits)

This course examines the art produced in Western Europe and the eastern Mediterranean from the 4th to 14th centuries. From the transition of the Late Roman Empire into new political and artistic climates of the Early Medieval period up through the lavish expanse of Late Gothic art we will explore the religious, political, cultural and artistic forces that shaped the creation of artistic monuments for over an thousand years. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 2840 Survey of Asian Art (4 Credits)

An introduction to major monuments, traditions and civilizations of India, China and Japan. This class may be used to fulfill the non-Western requirement for majors in the School of Art and Art History. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTS 1015 Thinking & Making in the Visual Arts (4 Credits)

This course explores the language of the visual arts and how it can be used to communicate ideas about culture, history and the personal. Through hands-on exercises and experimentation in different media students create visual art works that interpret the world around them. This course focuses on different areas of the visual arts that change its focus depending on the area of expertise of the faculty teaching it. (Example: drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, ceramics, sculpture.) Students leave the course with a broader understanding of the visual arts, past and present. Students also leave with a more in-depth understanding of the creative process that will inform other areas of studies throughout the University and which will enrich their lives long into the future. Lab fee. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ASIA 2702 Religions of China & Japan (4 Credits)

This is an introduction of some of the major East Asian religious and ethical traditions, focusing on Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shinto. By examining both translations of sacred texts as well as scholarly analyses, we explore the basic ideas, practices, and historical development of these varied and interconnected traditions. Special attention is paid to how people incorporate East Asian religious and ethical ideas and beliefs into contemporary life and how gender shapes the experience of religion. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with RLGS 2103.

ASIA 2714 History of Yoga (4 Credits)

This course explores different ancient and medieval forms of yoga in their Indian cultural contexts as well as modern forms of yoga in India and North America. Some of the issues we will engage include different conceptions of the human self, how and why particular cultural and religious practices cross geographical and cultural boundaries, the role of the guru, and secularization.This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.Cross listed with RLGS 2114.

CHIN 1516 Contemporary China in Literature and Films (4 Credits)

This course investigates, through critically examining the representative literary and filmic texts produced by Chinese as well as foreign writers and filmmakers, the many complicated aspects of some much-talked about issues. This includes the diminishing rural life and landscape, urbanization, migration/dislocation, the changing roles of women, social equality, as well as the balancing act of preserving tradition, the environment, and economic development. The in-depth examination and diverse approaches this course applies enables students to gain greater understanding of not only the challenges that contemporary China has raised, but also the complexities of the increasingly globalized world in which we are living. Cross listed with ASIA 1516. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

CHIN 1616 Asian Ecocinema and Ecoliterature (4 Credits)

Following decades of economic boom, continuing industrial development, and expansion of urbanization, many Asian countries, especially China and India, are now facing unprecedented environmental crises. The list of ecological woes in Asian countries include air, water, and soil pollution; flooding and drought, deforestation and desertification, epidemics of diseases, coal mine accidents, the loss of land to urban expansion, and mass migration. Asian ecoliterature and ecocinema, both in documentary and feature film form, have functioned as responses to, and critical reflection of, the urgent environmental crises, as well as broader cultural, historical, and social issues that caused environmental and ecological problems. Through critically examining the representative literary and filmic works, this course will 1) introduce students to ancient Asian concepts about Nature and critical events that have reshaped the historical course of development of the concerned countries; 2) demonstrate and explain primary themes presented in the ecocinema and literature, such as hydro-politics of air, water, forests and development; bio-ethics and green culture; eco-aesthetics and the representations of Nature; migration and urbanization. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 2008 Stereotyping and Violence in America Today (4 Credits)

This course is cross-listed with PHIL 2008, JUST 2008, RLGS 2008. This course offers students the opportunity to explore key issues relating to diversity and inclusion in the contemporary United States, focusing on the themes of stereotyping and violence, from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Students will engage with scholarly and popular culture artifacts to examine the kinds of stereotyping and types of violence, visible and invisible, that characterize and challenge political, social, cultural, economic, religious, and educational life in today’s United States, and will do so by working with the course instructor as well as faculty members from across the arts, humanities, and social sciences. Students will work together to connect the given week’s speaker’s assigned readings and insights to readings and insights from previous weeks’ speakers; assignments and classroom discussion will in this way be very interdisciplinary and will compare and contrast multiple diverse points of view and disciplinary lenses on the question of stereotyping and violence. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 2020 On the Black Panther Party (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the rhetorical, political, ideological, and cultural practices of the Black Panther Party. Using a variety of communicative texts, which will include texts written about the Party, the Party’s newspaper, and speeches from Party members, students will come to an understanding of the context in which the Party emerged, but also the demands the Party was making of society as a whole. In the process, the students will be given not only an overview of the Party, but a better understanding of the different communicative practices the Party engaged in to critique oppression in the US. In the process, the students will engage in critical conversations about racism, classism, and sexism not only within the Party, but within the larger US society. This course, then, uses the Party as a case study to analyze the politics of oppression in the US, in particular, but the world, in general. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 2030 Social Movement Rhetoric (4 Credits)

This course explores the principle agency that less powerful groups have used for social change in recent U.S. history--the rhetoric of social movement. More specifically, we consider in concrete detail and theoretical nuance the capacity of ordinary people to persuade others, voice grievances, and thus challenge broader society. Our explorations focus primarily on the rhetoric of dissident (non-majority, non-State, often un-institutionalized and non-normative) voice in our culture--both on the "right" and the "left"-- as they have sought, and continue to seek, social change. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 2210 Gender, Communication, Culture (4 Credits)

This course considers how gender is created, maintained, repaired, and transformed through communication in particular relational, cultural, social, and historical contexts. This course is designed to help students develop thoughtful answers to the following questions: What is gender, how do we acquire it, how do cultural structures and practices normalize and reproduce it, and how do we change and/or maintain it to better serve ourselves and our communities? Throughout the term, we explore how dynamic communicative interactions create, sustain, and subvert femininities and masculinities "from the ground up." This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with GWST 2212.

COMN 2220 Race and Popular Culture (4 Credits)

This course examines trajectories of representations of race in popular culture (i.e., film, music, television), both produced by the dominant culture, as well as self-produced by various racial and ethnic groups. Through a historical perspective, we trace images in popular culture and how those images are tied to contemporary events of the time. We pay particular attention not only to the specific archetypes that exist, but also how those archetypes are nuanced or colored differently through the lenses of ethnicity, nationality, race, class, gender, and sexuality. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 2300 Fundamentals of Argumentation (4 Credits)

This class offers a survey of approaches to the study of argumentation. We are going to examine and evaluate how argument is understood from various perspectives within the discipline of communication studies. We will engage theoretical concerns related to argumentation with a commitment to test their applicability to current events and issues. We will also explore how arguments are practiced in areas such as the arts and the media, legal contexts, interpersonal communication, public deliberation, and the sciences. The course will focus on expanding your contextual knowledge of how arguments operate within our culture and on cultivating your ability to read critically and creatively, make cogent arguments, assess opposing arguments charitably, and communicate your judgments effectively. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 2400 Landmarks in Rhetorical Theory (4 Credits)

This course is a survey of some of the major conceptual innovations in the history of rhetorical theory. In particular we will investigate the conceptions of rhetoric prevalent in antiquity and how they inform contemporary perspectives on rhetoric. In order to carry this off, we will conceptualize rhetoric as an attempt to answer the following questions: what is the relationship between what is true and what is the good. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 2450 Between Memory & Imagination (4 Credits)

How do our human memories and imaginations give rise to the stories we tell and to the selves that we are becoming? This course considers the nature of memory and its relationship to imagination, both in the evolving life of the individual and in the development of the larger group or culture. We examine the self, then, as both singular and collective, fixed and in flux, determined inwardly and shaped by external forces. We look at the relationship of identity to power, and address the question of how re-considering memory and identity might open up new imaginative spaces in global contexts. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 2471 The Social Construction of Travel (4 Credits)

Travel encompasses the myriad ways in which people and ideas become mobile. The goal of this course is to introduce students to various theoretical issues concerning travel. While the study of travel has been pursued in the context of tourism, commerce, and religion, in this course we also consider the effect of travel on the body of the traveler. We examine travel within many contexts having different registers of meaning - "vacation," "pilgrimage," "migration." However, the very nature of travel is that it transports bodies and ideas across multiple frameworks at a time. Therefore, we also consider how travel is understood within and as various cultural contexts. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

EDPX 2200 Cultures in Emergent Digital Practices (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the historical, economic, legal and social contexts of emergent digital practices and explores the various ways technology shapes and is shapedby culture. The rapid growth of participatory culture online through, for example, social networking sites, interactive news sites, gaming, mobile apps, and blogging has significant social implications and brings up issues of privacy, intellectual property, and the nature of community and public engagement. This class will explore these issues through various theoretical lens and concrete cases including politics, youth culture, activism, news and art. Particular emphasis will be placed on the question of how new media differs from mass media across various fields of cultural production (music, news, advertising, for example) and on what influence new digital products and practices might have on these industries and on cultures and societies more generally. This course counts towards the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross-listed with MFJS 2200.

EDPX 2901 Computing and Society (4 Credits)

This class examines the computing and communication antecedents of digital media and the critical underpinnings of digital media studies. Starting with historical overview of the development of the computing machine, the class progresses to an examination of the effects of digital technologies on work, social life, the business world and the arts. We investigate the developments of the digital computer through the twentieth century as well as the development and growth of the software industry and the Internet. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with COMP 2901. No prerequisites.

EDPX 3730 21st Century Digital Art (4 Credits)

An exploration of Digital Art and surrounding culture from the last 15 years. Topics will include machinima, demoscenes, MMO performances, interactive installations, VR, animation, video shorts, and much more. Students will actively search for, share and critically review much of the creative work for the class.

EDPX 3710 Critical Game Studies (4 Credits)

This course is a critical investigation of contemporary ludic cultures. Ludic cultures are environments and practice of play. This course is taught with a hybrid teaching model where games are treated as texts, and outcomes are in the form of discussion and synthetic media responses. We construct and play a hyper-local canon of games, both in and outside of class. We read from the growing body of literature in game studies. We reflect and respond to these texts through shareable media. This course satisfies a cultures requirement for emergent digital practices majors and minors. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Lab fee. Prerequisite: EDPX 2200.

EDPX 3772 Cybercultures: Art, Technology, and the Extended Body (4 Credits)

This course explores the extensions of the body made possible by technology, with a particular focus on how artists have used both analog and digital technologies to extend the body and to influence their creative practices. Beginning with the camera obscura and ending with examples of contemporary computer-mediated and artworks, the course will present for critical analysis a wide range of the various technologies used by artists to shape and alter their creative practice. We will explore the nature of the technological interface with attention to its varied effects on human perception and on creative practice itself. A combination of critical texts, examples of artist works, written assignments and creative projects will foster an in-depth assessment of how technological tools and processes influence, enhance and alter the creative processes and practices used by artists.

ENGL 1110 Literary Inquiry (4 Credits)

Literary Inquiry introduces students to the variety of ways that poetry, fiction, and/or drama expand our understanding of what it means to be human. Topics vary to engage students in the rewarding process of interpreting the literary art form as a unique cultural expression. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2080 London as Global City: From Empire to Commonwealth (4 Credits)

London as Global City is designed to accommodate the newly structured London Program for Fall 2011. It entails biweekly meetings and site visits for 14 weeks and examines the origins of the British Empire, starting with the founding of the East India Company in 1600 and moving to 21st century London as a repository of peoples from across the globe, particularly descendants of former British colonies in India, Africa and the West Indies. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2104 The Bible as Literature (4 Credits)

The Bible has been one of the most important works in all of Western society. In this course we read the Bible as a masterpiece of literature. Rather than focusing on theological questions about this work as inspired scripture, we instead focus on its rich literary qualities and explore some ways in which these stories have influenced modern society. Reading select passages, we discuss its literary genres, forms, symbols and motifs, many of which are important in literature today. Of the latter, we encounter stories of creation and hero tales, parables, apocalyptic literature, and themes of paradise and the loss of Eden, wilderness, covenant, and the promised land. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with RLGS 2104 and JUST 2104.

ENGL 2120 Chaucer-Selected Poetry (4 Credits)

This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2130 World Literature (4 Credits)

A literary journey around the world, the focus of this course includes the study of modern literature from different parts of the world--such as Africa and the Caribbean, Asia and the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. Textual analysis as well as cultural and transnational contexts are emphasized. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2221 Shakespeare Seminar (4 Credits)

This course traces Shakespeare's development by looking at representative plays from his early through to his late period and counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2230 Shakespeare and Film (4 Credits)

An examination of film adaptation and staging of Shakespeare's plays. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2300 English Literature III (4 Credits)

A survey of British literary works and contexts from the 19th century onwards. The course will include selected readings of British and Anglophone Romantic, Victorian and Modern writers across multiple genres. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2402 Later Romantics (4 Credits)

This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2544 Globalization and Cultural Texts (4 Credits)

The focus of this course is on theory (drawn from the social sciences) of how cultures worldwide may be increasingly internationalized through the powerful effects of globalization and on cultural texts that present the human and aesthetic faces of globalization, as seen through literature and film, with particular reference to India, the United Kingdom, South Africa, and Japan. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2613 Excavating Italy (4 Credits)

This class provides an introduction to the art, history and literature of the Italian cities of Rome, Florence and Venice from classical antiquity through the High Renaissance, as well as visual and literary responses to Italy, by artists and writers. Students are encouraged to recognize the importance of classical architecture and sculpture as the artistic precedents for Renaissance art. We see how religious and literary themes provided much of the iconography of Renaissance painting. Students are also encouraged to become intimately acquainted with the works of a few selected major artists, such as Giotto, Botticelli, and Michelangelo, while also developing a wider understanding of the general stylistic features of Italian Renaissance art. The literature component focuses on a variety of genres from classical texts to Shakespeare's Italian plays to British travelers' impressions of Italian artists and scenes. This is a team-taught course. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with ARTH 2613.

ENGL 2700 Foundations of Early American Literature and Culture (4 Credits)

Introduction to foundational narratives and culturally formative ideas in North American literary history from the era of discovery and the beginnings of colonialization to the Civil War.

ENGL 2710 American Novel-19th & 20th Century (4 Credits)

This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2718 Latina/o Literature (4 Credits)

This course surveys U.S. Latina/Latino literature, with an emphasis on groups of Caribbean, Central American, Mexican, and South American descent. Representative readings will introduce the field's major critical trends, themes, genres, works, and writers. Social, historical, and political topics for investigation may include border theory, experiences of diaspora and im/migration, mestizaje, pan-latinidad, bildungsroman, labor, gender and sexuality, and language. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2741 American Jewish Literature: Immigrant Fiction (4 Credits)

This course surveys over 100 years of American Jewish immigrant narratives beginning with the great exodus of Eastern European and Russian Jewry at the end of the 19th century and ending with recent arrivals from Israel and the former U.S.S.R. Canonical works by central authors reveal the great successes of Jewish immigrants alongside their spiritual failures. A selection of memoir, novels, short stories, and poetry in English and in translation from Hebrew and Yiddish demonstrate the multilingual character of the Jewish experience in America. While helpful, no knowledge of Jewish languages, religious tradition, or cultural practice is necessary to succeed in this course. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with JUST 2741.

ENGL 2742 Modern Hebrew Literature in Translation: Against All Odds (4 Credits)

This course offers a survey of some of the most significant works of modern Hebrew literature available in translation. Students will consider how the development of Hebrew literature has contributed to the formation of contemporary Israeli identity, and how the conflicts that define the turbulent history of Israel are treated in works by canonical authors. The selection of diverse voices and literary materials exposes students to the social, political, and historical changes wrought by the rise of modern day Israel. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with JUST 2742.

ENGL 2743 Jewish Humor: Origins and Meaning (4 Credits)

Writers, scholars, and comedians all claim to locate an identifiable strain of “Jewish humor” running from the Bible through to today’s literary humorists and provocative stand-up comics. This course takes humor seriously in an effort to reveal the development of “Jewish humor” in American from a comparative context. But is there such a things as Jewish humor? And if so, what are its sources and characteristics? Does it exist across cultures and in different linguistic communities? Through lectures, discussion, exercises and papers, students gain a broad understanding of the history, psychology, and philosophy of humor as it relates to Jewish arts and letters in America. This course is cross-listed with JUST 2743.

ENGL 2816 Advanced Writing (4 Credits)

This class gives each student the opportunity to explore the humanities in an area of his or her particular interest. A research methods and writing course, this class guides students through the research and writing process from preliminary research to methodology to prospectus to drafting and finally revision. Class sessions operate as directed writing workshops, with students discussing their research and writing strategies. The final product of the course is a 15-page research essay on a subject of the student's choice. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2850 Literature of Utopia/Dystopia: Dystopian Fiction (4 Credits)

This course addresses the concurrent and interrelated themes of utopian and dystopian thought and their primary expression through 20th and 21st century literary texts. As such, it critically engages and interrogates relationships between knowledge and power, and freedom and oppression that have long been expressed in world literature. At its core, utopian/dystopian literatures are always in conversation with historical, social, and cultural thought, expressing anxiety towards the relationship between social structures and institutions with the individuals and the imposition of coercive power. Texts addressed in these course include those by writers such as Thomas More, Charlotte Gilman Perkins, Yevgeny Zamyatin, Aldous Huxley, George Orwell, Ray Bradbury, Margaret Atwood, Philip K. Dick, Octavia Butler, etc. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

FREN 2500 Qu'est-ce que la littérature? (4 Credits)

Introduction to critical analysis and appreciation of French and Francophone literary texts. Critical examination and questioning of the conventionally recognized literary genres of fiction, poetry, and theater. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: FREN 2400 or equivalent.

FREN 2501 La Nature et les animaux (4 Credits)

Nature and animals: as seen, imagined, and understood by humans. Literature has long made plants, landscapes, birds, and other animals into part of a human story. Through readings of French and Francophone literary texts, we will reflect on the various relationships that we construct with animals and nature. Works studied may include fables where animals serve to voice social values (La Fontaine) and poetry in which natural elements are symbolic of human concerns. But other works in this course will take a different approach: confusing or toppling the "normal" places occupied by humans and animals. Our discussions will occasionally touch on contemporary issues of environmental concern. This course many be taken in addition to other courses in the 25-series. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: FREN 2400 or its equivalent.

FREN 2504 La Culture au Cinema (4 Credits)

We will read and interpret contemporary French feature films and other related journalistic or literary texts. We will analyze the ways in which the directors/authors of such films/texts understand and represent a certain notion of "French" culture, in general, and its diverse and varied expressions, in particular. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisites: FREN 2400, 2500 or any FREN 26XX course.

FREN 2701 Sujets spéciaux (4 Credits)

Selected topics in French or Francophone literature and/or culture. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: FREN 2400 or equivalent.

FREN 3505 Masques du moi (4 Credits)

Qui suis-je??? The question of self, identity, and discovering "who I am" has preoccupied many writers, filmmakers, or other artists. Identity, or one's sense of self, can be shaped by families, personal experiences, or social and historical forces. Writers might recount the "true" facts of their lived experience or mix in some fictions as they fashion a story of the self. This course will explore the diverse ways that autobiography and others ways of "writing the self" represent the relation of self, world and word. Examples will come from French and Francophone contexts. The class is conducted all in French and emphasizes discussion, writing, and critical thinking. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: Two courses in the 25XX series or their equivalent.

GERM 1416 German Civilization: History, Politics, and Culture (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to intellectual and cultural currents in German civilization from the Enlightenment to the present, emphasizing the arts in the context of history and philosophy from the late 18th century to around the mid-20th century. Readings include excerpts from such thinkers as Kant, Fichte, Marx, Nietzsche, Weber, as well as poetry and short fictional works by Heine, Jünger, Remarque, Borchert, and others. The readings are supplemented by films that students are expected to have watched at the beginning of each week. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

GERM 2022 German Cinema: An Introduction to German Culture, History, and Politics through Film (4 Credits)

This is an introduction to 20th- and 21st-century German culture, history, and politics through film analysis. Studying the most famous and influential films in the history of German cinema, students explore a wide range of topics (including political propaganda, national identity, multiculturalism, terrorism, education and youth, the arts, gender, and class) and investigate how a popular culture medium like film can capture the political, social, and economic atmosphere in society. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

GREK 1416 Myths of Greece & Rome (4 Credits)

Introduction to the goddesses and gods, heroes and heroines, and not a few monstrosities from popular tradition, literature, and visual arts of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Activities include imaginative and creative assignments. No prerequisite. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

GREK 1716 It's Really Epic! The Ancient Heroic Epics of Homer and Virgil in Contemporary Translation (4 Credits)

Foundations of Western values and aspiration, good one and not so good ones, may be found at the beginning of Western/European literature in the "Homeric" epics Iliad and Odyssey. The very notions of "tragedy" and "romance" originate in them. For the past twenty six or seven centuries men and women have wrestled with problems, often moral dilemmas and contradictions, that are first dramatized there. Centuries later, though still two millennia before our time, the Roman poet Virgil confronts the triumphant individualism of the Greek epics in his Aeneid and answers them with compassion and a vision of a very different way to build a person and a community. A better one? We address that question by studying these three timeless texts in award-winning-winning 21st-century English versions. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

GREK 1816 Ancient Tragedy Ever Modern (4 Credits)

Three great Athenian tragedians of the 400s BCE--Aeschylus, Sophocles, and certainly most modernist of all Euripides--offer us of the 2000s CE much to experience, much to ponder, much that still challenges or provokes us. We experience their democratic Athenian community and its political and social, its religious and philosophic innovations as actualized in tragedy. We read and analyze, enact (in parts) and even imitate both widely known "world classics" Antigone and Oedipus Tyrannus , Medea and Bacchae with fresh approaches proper to our turbulent times, but also less familiar, often distressing "problem" plays that include Euripides' Andromache, Hecuba, and Heracles. This course bears the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture attribute in Common Curriculum.

GREK 1916 Comedy Old and New (4 Credits)

Reading and discussion of and experiment with comedies from ancient Rome and even more ancient Greece. We begin, however, with modernizations in American-musical form, and end with our own product in 21st-century emulation. Students' participation, even broad clownish histrionics, required. Students must also be eager to laugh--knowlingly and intelligently, of course.

GWST 2212 Gender, Communication, Culture (4 Credits)

This course considers how gender is created, maintained, repaired, and transformed through communication in particular relational, cultural, social, and historical contexts. This course is designed to help students develop thoughtful answers to the following questions: what is gender, how do we acquire it, how do cultural structures and practices normalize and reproduce it, and how do we change and/or maintain it to better serve ourselves and our communities? Throughout the term, the class explores how dynamic communicative interactions create, sustain, and subvert femininities and masculinities “from the ground up.” This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.This course is cross-listed with COMN 2210.

GWST 2740 Gender, (De)Colonization, and Science Fiction (4 Credits)

This course uses intersectional feminist theory to explore how authors and artists construct the past, present, and possible futures through the speculative arts—including imaginative constructions of gender, sexuality, statehood, tradition, labor, magic, and science—in order to imagine decolonial possibilities.

HIST 1110 Ancient Rome (4 Credits)

This course examines the history and culture of Rome from earliest times to the death of Augustus in A.D. 14. We look at political and military developments of Rome as it went from a monarchy, a republic, and an empire. We also study social and cultural aspects of the Romans, who originally were simple pastoralists living along the Tiber but in time became rulers of the entire Mediterranean region. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1220 Warring States and Middle Kingdoms (4 Credits)

The study of history at American universities has, in recent decades, moved beyond a narrow focus on Western civilization to embrace the study of broader world historical issues. Other academic disciplines have, to some extent, followed suit. Yet, despite the globalization of our lives and culture, the intellectual categories we normally employ to understand both the present and the past remain, to a considerable degree, bound by old restrictions. History--even world history--remains stuck in the past. This course aims to use concepts derived from East Asian history to interrogate and challenge received concepts and categories--not to impose another paradigm but to continue the quest for a better one. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1230 Asia and the Modern World (4 Credits)

This course considers the recent history of Asia in a broad world-historical context and, in doing so, asks students to examine commonly held assumptions about the nature (and presumed uniqueness) of the modern world and the "place" of Asia in it. The aim in doing so is to reconsider how we might better understand the past and the present. We proceed on two levels, using both primary and secondary sources. We critically examine Robert Marks' bold challenge to standard historiography, in "The Origins of the Modern World," for what it can teach us about the ongoing development of historical knowledge. We also dip into the past for primary documents--the stuff of historical analysis. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1240 Comparative History of Medicine (4 Credits)

This class examines the development of different traditions of medicine, comparing the history of modern scientific medicine with the histories of various forms of what today is called "alternative medicine." It requires no previous background in science, medicine, or history, but is meant to engage students interested in any one of those fields. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1250 Food in East Asian History (4 Credits)

This class examines the relationship between food and health in East Asian history. We focus on how that relationship, and the way people understood it, changed over the past century and a half. In other words, we focus not only on how (and what) people in East Asia have eaten, but also on how they have thought about eating. This course asks how western dietary ideas and practices have interacted with traditional East Asian ideas and practices over the past century and a half. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1310 Crime and Punishment (4 Credits)

We focus specifically on the history of crime and the history of punishment by examining the nineteenth century (1800s), considered by many to be the great age of criminology and the era of the birth of the modern prison system. Over the course of the nineteenth century, the meaning of crime underwent a radical change; whereas in earlier periods, crime was synonymous with sin and criminals were prosecuted for offenses against the common good, by the nineteenth century, criminals were individuals who did what they did for all sorts of complicated reasons and the scope of crime extended to offenses against individuals, property, and morality. Not surprisingly, the nature of punishment changed to meet the shifting definitions of crime. Punishment became less about torturing the body and more about reforming the will or character of the individual criminal. We study this change over time by looking mostly at Britain and Europe, considered to be at the forefront in criminology and penology at the time. We examine the implications of the shifting meanings of crime and punishment by looking at the criminologists' own words, media coverage of crimes, and the opinions of historians and other contemporary thinkers. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1320 European Culture in the World Wars (4 Credits)

This course covers the history of Europe in the first half of the twentieth century--a time of crisis, extreme violence, and fascinating cultural production. Within the context of war, economic crisis and political extremism, we study the ways in which artists, writers, composers and film makers responded to the dramatic events they witnessed. We also examine European governments’ attempts to shape public opinion through propaganda and mass media. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1330 History of Ireland (4 Credits)

We examine the creation of modern Ireland from the 16th-Century to the present, including a brief discussion of the Celtic and Medieval periods. Major themes of analysis and discussion include changing definitions and representations of 'Irishness', competing questions of identity and national membership and how these debates influenced the development of various nationalist movements in both the past and the present. The role of women, gender, violence, emigration, and other social and geographical factors within Irish society are used to examine Ireland’s evolution into a modern state and its relationship with the United States, Britain, and the rest of Europe. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1340 The British Monarchy (4 Credits)

This course explores the role of the monarchy in British society from Elizabeth I in the Sixteenth Century to Elizabeth II, the current Queen. We discuss how monarchs adapted to changing political situations and how they attempted to shape public perceptions. We also explore the ways in which expectations of the monarch have changed, from an almost absolute ruler to a constitutional monarch whose role has become largely ceremonial. Over the course of the nearly five hundred years covered in this period, Britain experienced a regicide, the forcible overthrow of a king, and a voluntary abdication, yet the institution of monarchy has proven remarkably resilient. In the twentieth century, as the royal family struggled with a series of scandals, some came to believe that the institution had run its course and was due for abolition, but today public fascination with royalty remains strong. We focus on the relationship between the public image of the monarchy and its political role as a way of understanding broader changes in British society in the modern era. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1350 History of the British Empire (4 Credits)

This course explores the rise and fall of the British Empire from its origins during the English conquests of Wales, Scotland and Ireland; explorations of the world, through commercial expansion under the British East India Company; the rise of Britain as the preeminent world imperial power during the 19th century and its eventual decline and legacy during the late 20th century. Using a variety of secondary articles, primary sources, films and monographs, this course analyzes highly debated issues including the interconnected nature of British society and developments out in the Empire, both cultural and political; the important role that women, gender, and racial ideologies placed in British dominance of one quarter of the globe; how the empire and representations of Empire changed over the century; and finally, the impact of that empire upon issues of identity and population in a post-colonial Britain. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1360 World War One (4 Credits)

Historians have argued that the First World War definitively shaped the twentieth century. It set the stage for World War II; it redefined the role of government in citizens’ lives; it brought technology full-force into power struggles between nations; it simultaneously birthed communism and fascism; and it desensitized entire generations to violence and brutality. In this class, students explore this very dramatic and influential war. Students unfamiliar with the war will more firmly grasp the historical significance of the event while students who may be familiar with the war will gain new insights and interpretation of how the war was conducted and why the war mattered. Students read the words and thoughts of those who participated in the war, as well as interpretations of the war by military, social, and political historians. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. There are no prerequisites for this class.

HIST 1370 Monks, Merchants, and Monsters: Medieval Travelers (4 Credits)

When we think of the Middle Ages we tend to think a static and isolated world, one without the benefits of fast travel or the convenience of easy communication via cell phones and e-mail, a world where much of the map was blank or contained the ominous words 'Here There Be Dragons.' And yet even in this period enterprising and intrepid men and women were on the move, exploring new places and meeting new peoples. In this course we will examine a number of different medieval travelers, from missionaries and religious pilgrims to merchants and diplomats, to explore how and why medieval people left home, and how these voyages shaped not just the travelers themselves but the lands they came from and those they entered.

HIST 1380 Barbarians at the Gates: Civilization and the Other in the Pre Modern World (4 Credits)

From the birth of the first cities in Mesopotamia in c. 7000 BCE writers and thinkers have been concerned with the peoples who lived beyond their walls. The Ancient Greeks coined the term "Barbarian" and this word continues to have incredible resonance even today. This course will look at a variety of pre-modern primary sources, from the very first written epic all the way to the discovery of America to examine how ideas of civilization and barbarism are created and used by pre-modern authors to understand both the world around them and their own identities. As we engage with these sources we will also work to see how these pre-modern events and ideas continue to impact our own conception of the past and our present. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1510 War and the Presidency (4 Credits)

This course examines four wars in American history and the relationship of those wars to the sitting presidents. Together we explore the reciprocal influence of Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War, Woodrow Wilson and World War I, Franklin Roosevelt and World War II, and Lyndon Johnson and the Vietnam War. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1520 Immigrant Voices in Modern America (4 Credits)

This United States has aptly been called "a nation of immigrants." In this course, we explore the immigrant experience of the last century by examining different forms of personal testimony--autobiographies, diaries, novels, personal correspondence, and oral histories. Listening to these various immigrant voices helps us to understand the processes at work as newcomers and their children (first- and second-generation immigrants) struggled to achieve economic stability and to define their identity as Americans. The course readings as well as the student projects are intended as instruments with which to assess the influence of old world customs, religion, education, work, gender and anti-immigrant prejudice in shaping the process of adaptation to American society. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1530 History of the United States since 1865 (4 Credits)

From the devastation left by slavery and the Civil War to the dizzying changes brought by globalization in our own time, this course sweeps through the last 150 years of the American experience. We wrestle with questions like the following: How did the Industrial Revolution, the Great Depression, two world wars and the Cold War change America, and ordinary Americans' everyday lives, and what legacies did these events leave for our own day? How have Americans defined and divided themselves--by race, gender, class, or otherwise--and how have such categories shifted over time? Where did we get our political parties and ideologies? Our work habits and habits of play? Our ideas about "big business," "big government," "American exceptionalism," or the "American dream"? As we consider these and other big questions, we also explore how historians make sense of U.S. history, and how we can make it relevant to our own times and our own lives. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1540 Society, Culture, and Popular Politics in the Making of Early America, 1607-1815 (4 Credits)

This course examines the foundations and development of American society and culture from 1607 to 1815. We study Native American societies and the establishment of European colonies in America, and the complex processes and events that led to the American Revolution and the creation of a republic in North America. Through class discussions, lectures, group work, and reading, we examine American society and culture from a variety of perspectives and viewpoints. Themes and topics include empire and colonization; race, gender, class; politics and society; and popular culture. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1550 America in the Sixties (4 Credits)

This course examines one of the most tumultuous eras in U.S. history, its role in the reshaping of American life after World War II, and its legacies for the present. What constitutes "the sixties"? Was it an era of discord, dissolution, and decline, or of empowerment and democratization? Together we sort through conflicting perceptions of the period and closely examine some of the most salient issues of the decade - including the war in Vietnam, ethnic and race relations, youth culture, feminism and gay liberation, and the rise of conservatism. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1600 Jews in the Islamic World, 632 C.E. - 1948 C.E. (4 Credits)

This course deals with Jewish history in the Islamic world from the death of Muhammad to the establishment of the state of Israel. Students are exposed to the political, social, and economic histories of various Jewish communities, many of which no longer exist, in numerous Islamic empires and/or political units. While studying these communities we also compare the treatment of Jews under Islamic rule to the treatment of Jews under Christian rule and the treatment of Christians under Islamic rule. Cross listed with JUST 1600. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1610 The History of the Crusades: 1095-1300 (4 Credits)

This course traces the origins and development of the Crusading movement as well as its impact on Christian, Muslim, and Jewish society in Europe and the Middle East from the 11th through the 14th centuries C.E. This course also examines ideas of Christian/Muslim/Jewish difference in this period. We pay special attention to primary source material. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1630 Social Revolts in Latin America (4 Credits)

This course examines major revolutionary events that helped define the history of present-day Latin American. Major revolutions and rebellions, their agendas, underpinnings, accomplishments, and shortcomings are studied. The underlining interpretive lens is to understand the political, economic, and cultural forces at work that compelled revolutionary behavior to emerge. While covering a large time period, the course is structured along transformative historical cases which are closely analyzed. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 2000 Ancient Egypt (4 Credits)

This course examines the history and culture of ancient Egypt. We focus particularly on political and military developments during the Old, Middle, and New Kingdoms. We also study the social and cultural practices of the ancient Egyptians. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 2016 Contemporary Israel-Palestinian Conflict, 2000-Today (4 Credits)

This course deals with the political, religious, and social dimensions of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from the failure of the Oslo Accords to the present. It provides students with a brief overview of the history and key issues in the conflict, turning to domestic, regional, and global developments, allegiances, and enmities – political, religious, and economic – that have shaped the past 15+ years of conflict. At a time when even optimistic observers call the two-state solution a vain hope, this course concludes with a look at viable approaches for domestically and internationally acceptable peace plans. This course is cross-listed with JUST 2016 and RLGS 2016.

HIST 2022 The Roman Empire (4 Credits)

This course examines the history and culture of ancient Rome during the height of the empire. We look at political and military developments of Rome as it transformed from a republic into an imperial power. We also study social and cultural aspects of the Romans, who originally were simple pastoralists living along the Tiber but in time became the rulers of the entire Mediterranean region. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 2107 Culture/Conscience in Vienna (4 Credits)

This study-abroad course focuses on the cultural and social history of the city of Vienna as the hub of politics, culture, and religion for Central Europe with special attention to its religious heritage as the seedbed for its rich cultural traditions. The course examines how its religious heritage, particularly Judaism, shaped its rich cultural heritage and the birth of modernism. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with RLGS 2107, JUST 2107.

HIST 2320 US Foreign Policy in the Middle East (4 Credits)

This course aims to introduce students to both Middle Eastern history and American Foreign Policy by exploring the politics and culture of U.S. involvement in the Middle East in the post-WWII period. In doing so this course pays special attention to the impact of the Cold War in the Middle East, American policy towards the Arab-Israeli conflict, the role of oil in American foreign policy, American responses to the rise of Islamist movements, the impact of media and culture on the formulation of America’s Middle Eastern policies, and U.S. relations with dictatorial governments in the Middle East. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with JUST 2320.

HIST 2330 Islamic Empires (4 Credits)

This course offers students a historical introduction to the major empires of the Muslim world. Starting with an overview of the major empires of the late antique Mediterranean (Roman and Sasanid Persian), it provides students with a primer on the rise and major principles of Islam, turning to the Umayyad and Abbasid empires and their roles in supporting the institutionalization and sectarian developments of classical and early-medieval era Islam. Students then examine the emergence of the great Andalusi and North American empires, noting their long-lasting influence on Spain. The course culminates in a multi-week study of the three major early modern sources from each empire and considers the political, social, religious, and economic aspects of each. The course concludes with a look at contemporary attempts to remember or revive the notion of "Islamic empire," connecting past to present. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with RLGS 2113.

HIST 2380 Israeli History & Society: 1948-2011 (4 Credits)

Through historical sources, documentaries, movies and scholarly research, the course examines the major wars and clashes between Israel and its neighbors in the years 1948 to 2011. In this way, we will examine in depth the complexities of Israel's relationship with their Arab neighbor States, with a particular focus on the details of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Moving chronologically, the course aims to develop historical perspectives on the State of Israel, and the impact of emerging historical realities on Israeli society, including implications for religious identities, economics, political parties, security issues, and nationalistic movements. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 2395 Contemporary India, 1947-2000 (4 Credits)

This course examines the history of India after independence from Britain in 1947. It traces the historical roots of the economy, society and polity of contemporary India. Understanding the hot button issues of the Kashmir conflict, nuclear weaponization, globalization and terrorism cannot be separated from and requires a historical grasp of the underlying processes of state formation, national identity, economic development and gender and social empowerment that have characterized India. While India will be the main focus, South Asia's shared colonial history and its legacies mean that the issues of regional tensions, ethnic and gender conflict, communal violence, secularism, the unevenness of electoral democracy and the fragility of civil society have wider application in the subcontinent as a whole. Therefore, the course constantly and continuously draws useful comparisons with events and processes in other South Asian nations such as Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Bhutan. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with ASIA 2395.

HIST 2515 Print and Politics in the American Revolution (4 Credits)

This course examines the impact of the American Revolution on American society, politics, and culture. It combines social history with a print-centered approach to explore how different groups used newspapers, pamphlets, magazines, and other media to articulate their respective and at times competing needs and interests during the conflict. The sources for this course consist primarily of the seminal texts produced during the Revolutionary era. These writings range from Thomas Paine's pamphlet Common Sense and the Declaration of the Independence to the sermons of the African-American minister Lemuel Haynes and the letters exchanged between John and Abigail Adams. In addition to studying the key arguments forwarded in these texts, we focus on how their production, circulation, and reception influenced the outcome of Revolutionary events. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 2535 Warfare and Society in Colonial America (4 Credits)

From the earliest English settlements to the struggle for independent, military strife and warfare have played a central role in shaping the course of American colonial history. Throughout this period, Anglo-Americans engaged in numerous conflicts, waging war against indigenous peoples, Europeans, and sometimes each other. For this course, we adopt the methodologies of "New Military History" - a discipline focusing on the interaction of warfare with society, politics, economics, and culture - to better understand the full impact and pervasive nature of colonial warfare. Our investigation therefore focuses on how the practices and heritage of warfare intersected with and influenced imperial rivalry, religious beliefs, cross-cultural encounters, racial formation, gender relations, as well as military strategy and technology, from 1607 to 1776. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 2710 From Sea to Shining Sea: Nature in American History to 1900 (4 Credits)

In ways often hidden or ill understood, natural and environmental factors powerfully shaped the history of America from colonial times to the nineteenth century. In this course, we consider how natural resources like fish and forests became the basis for European empire-building; how colonists, Indians, slaves, settlers, and industrialists all acted to transform the landscapes and ecosystems of North America; and how ideas about nature helped mold the market economy and an emerging sense of American national identity. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 2910 Colonial Latin America (4 Credits)

This course explores the encounters, struggles and realignments of Europeans and Native Americans in the process of conquest and colonization, the development of political, economic, and religious institutions, the racial and gender hierarchies that emerged in colonial society, the strategies of resistance and accommodation to Spanish and Portuguese colonial rule, and the origins, process and outcomes of the wars of independence. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 2920 The Making of Modern Latin America (4 Credits)

This is a general and introductory course of the history of Latin America that pays special attention to the modern period (19th and 20th centuries). The course is structured around themes dealing with the region's colonial legacy, economy, social life, politics, processes of modernization, urbanization, revolution, the quest for democracy and national development, and contemporary achievements and challenges. While much of Latin America's history has been a tale of violence and suffering, it has also been a story of great perseverance and self-affirmation. Using a historical perspective, the course seeks to understand how and why the struggle for independence, nation-building, economic growth, and social justice in the region has raged on for so long, and where it stands today. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 2955 Latin America at the Movies (4 Credits)

This is an introduction to the experiences of Latin America primarily aimed at reflecting about the process of formation of present-day Latin American societies, and secondly at motivating students to reflect about the historical evolution of multi-racial, multicultural societies in general. The activities for the course are structured around themes dealing with the region’s historical evolution and the present-day challenges of building a modern, developed and egalitarian society. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ITAL 2201 20th-Century History and Culture (4 Credits)

This course provides a historical and cultural approach to 20th-century Italy. Students refine their critical thinking skills as well as substantially develop their argumentative skills. This course centers on selected authors, literary movements, genres and historical and contemporary cultural phenomena in Italy. Topics may include film, TV, poetry, short stories, fascism and the resistance movement, Italian women, etc. Each week a new decade is discussed in a historical context and supplemented with cultural artifacts that are either centered on the decade in question or produced during the period. This course is taught in English. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ITAL 2355 Images of Rome in Literature & Film (4 Credits)

The city of Rome has been a major protagonist on the stage of history for several millennia. In 2,500 years of existence, Rome has seen more of the world’s history unfold at its doorsteps than any other capital in the western world. It has been the site of the building and the expansion of a vast and powerful Empire, the center of a major world religion, and a magnet for the arts throughout the centuries. This course focuses on late 19th- and 20th-Century Rome from the point of view of selected works of Italian literature (poetry, short stories, and novels or selections from novels) and films in which the city of Rome plays a prominent role. Students demonstrate the ability to identify, interpret, and analyze the connections between the texts and films. This course is taught in English. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ITAL 2750 Italian Jewish Literature and Cinema (4 Credits)

This course is cross-listed with JUST 2750 and offers an overview of Italian Jewish literature and cinema from the Middle Ages to the present. Students will read and discuss prose and poetry, essays and articles, as well as watch and discuss films that address issues such as religious and cultural identity, the right to difference, anti-Semitism and the Shoah. The course will also give students an overview of the formation and transformation of the Jewish community in Italian society. In addition to well-known Jewish Italian writers like Primo Levi and Giorgio Bassani, students will read pertinent works by non-Jewish writers like Rosetta Loy. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

JAPN 1216 Popular Culture of Japan (4 Credits)

In this course we examine and analyze the emergence of particular forms of mass-produced culture, or culture for mass consumption, in Japan from the early modern period to the present. Using a variety of cultural materials enjoyed from the early modern period (1600-1868,) during which Japanese society underwent extensive urbanization, secularization, and cultural commodification, through to the present, the course focuses on overarching themes: media and information technology (woodblock printing, newspapers, and the internet); entertainment and gender (the all-male kabuki theatre and all-female Takarazuka revue); commodified romance; fiction (illustrated fiction, manga, and novels); anime and television fandom; healer-bots and cyborgs. No knowledge of Japanese required. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

JAPN 1416 Postwar Japan: Changing Perspectives in Literature and Culture (4 Credits)

This course explores a range of Japanese cultural perspectives from the end of the Second World War to the present. The main focus is on the analysis and interpretation of Japanese literary texts, but during the course students also examine film, visual art, and other cultural products within a historical framework, to lead to a deeper understanding of the influences and events that have shaped both contemporary Japan and the wider world. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

JAPN 1616 Samurai and Merchants: Cultures of Tokugawa Japan (4 Credits)

Introduction to the cultures of Tokugawa, Japan, focusing on the tension between the samurai and merchant classes, the images they construct of self and other, and the morals and mores of their respective worlds. As well as examining Tokugawa fiction, drama, and other cultural artifacts, this course also considers later representation of the period and of its people in twenty- and twenty-first-century text, cinema, and television to understand the importance of contemporary influences on historical representation. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

JAPN 1816 Classical Japanese Literature (4 Credits)

The course covers one thousand years of Japanese writing, including a myth-history detailing the origins of Japan, the development of the rich poetic tradition, female diaries, the classic The Tale of Genji, medieval tales of wars and hermits, the nô drama, and the haiku and travel diaries. It will focus on such key binaries as orality and literacy, poetry and prose, native and foreign, popular and high-brow, and masculine and feminine. The course will also stress principles of literary analysis and interpretation. No knowledge of Japanese required. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

JUST 1600 Jews in the Islamic World, 632 C.E. - 1948 C.E. (4 Credits)

This course deals with Jewish history in the Islamic world from the death of Muhammad to the establishment of the state of Israel. Students are exposed to the political, social, and economic histories of various Jewish communities, many of which no longer exist, in numerous Islamic empires and/or political units. While studying these communities we also compare the treatment of Jews under Islamic rule to the treatment of Jews under Christian rule and the treatment of Christians under Islamic rule. Cross listed with HIST 1600. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

JUST 1610 The History of the Crusades: 1095-1300 (4 Credits)

This course traces the origins and development of the Crusading movement as well as its impact on Christian, Muslim, and Jewish society in Europe and the Middle East from the 11th through the 14th centuries C.E. This course also examines ideas of Christian/Muslim/Jewish difference in this period. We pay special attention to primary source material. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with HIST 1610.

JUST 2008 Stereotyping and Violence in America Today (4 Credits)

This course is cross-listed with PHIL 2008, COMN 2008, RLGS 2008. This course offers students the opportunity to explore key issues relating to diversity and inclusion in the contemporary United States, focusing on the themes of stereotyping and violence, from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Students will engage with scholarly and popular culture artifacts to examine the kinds of stereotyping and types of violence, visible and invisible, that characterize and challenge political, social, cultural, economic, religious, and educational life in today’s United States, and will do so by working with the course instructor as well as faculty members from across the arts, humanities, and social sciences. Students will work together to connect the given week’s speaker’s assigned readings and insights to readings and insights from previous weeks’ speakers; assignments and classroom discussion will in this way be very interdisciplinary and will compare and contrast multiple diverse points of view and disciplinary lenses on the question of stereotyping and violence. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

JUST 2014 Religious Existentialism: Christian and Jewish (4 Credits)

Existentialism focuses on the human experience of living, often with a focus on the sheer freedom of the human condition. Religious existentialism subtly modifies this picture through its own vision of human freedom as the ultimate encounter between the human subject and God (with 'God' understood in various ways). The religious existentialist in this sense philosophically explores that which is most-fully-human as a moment of relation and encounter between self and that which is beyond self. Starting with Sartre's non-religious statement of existentialism in Existentialism is a Humanism (1946), we go on to examine the Christian and Jewish existentialisms of Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Tillich (1886-1965), Buber (1878-1965), and Heschel (1907-1972). In the course of our reflections, we compare non-religious with religious approaches to basic questions about self, God and world, and we consider the relationship between Christian and Jewish existentialist approaches to these questions. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.Cross-listed with PHIL 2014 and RLGS 2014.

JUST 2016 Contemporary Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, 2000-Today (4 Credits)

This course deals with the political, religious, and social dimensions of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from the failure of the Oslo Accords to the present. It provides students with a brief overview of the history and key issues in the conflict, turning to domestic, regional, and global developments, allegiances, and enmities – political, religious, and economic – that have shaped the past 15+ years of conflict. At a time when even optimistic observers call the two-state solution a vain hope, this course concludes with a look at viable approaches for domestically and internationally acceptable peace plans. This course is cross-listed with JUST 2016 and RLGS 2016.

JUST 2026 Race: Black, Jew, Other (4 Credits)

This course is cross-listed with PHIL 2026 and RLGS 2026. In its investigation of philosophical writings on race and racism, this course explores a range of existential and phenomenological lenses for interrogating race and racism, with a focus on the shared theoretical and practical intersections of anti-Black and anti-Jew discourse. The course aims to help participants read and understand difficult primary philosophical (and some theological) texts—many of which are cited and engaged by contemporary writings across a number of disciplines. In this respect, we work through philosophical writings related to race, exile, “negritude,” “the wandering Jew,” and “otherness” by engaging such authors as: Sartre, Wright, De Bois, Levinas, Senghor, Fanon, Freud, Appiah, Jankelevitch, and Cone, alongside Gilman’s work on the “Jew’s Body” and “Jewish Self-Hatred,” Bernasconi’s work on the phenomenology of race, and discourses of “Other-as-disease” in American and Nazi eugenics. In all of its content, the course aims to engage participants with key issues and questions around race and racism, including extending the implications of anti-Black and anti-Jew discourses / practices to a range of other anti-Other discourses / practices at play in the world around us.

JUST 2040 Israel Between Wars: History and Society (4 Credits)

Through historical sources, documentaries, movies and scholarly research, this course examines the major wars and clashes between Israel and its neighbors in the years 1948 to 2011. In this way, we examine in depth the complexities of Israel's relationship with their Arab neighbor states with a particular focus on the details of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

JUST 2050 Jewish Philosophy (4 Credits)

This course sets out to explore the self and the sacred in Jewish tradition by exploring the nature of faith and reason, the call to ethical response, and the meaning of divine revelation in multiple Jewish philosophical voices across the ages, including Philo, Saadya, Halevi, Maimonides, Soloveitchik, Buber, Rosenzweig, and Levinas. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with PHIL 2050.

JUST 2104 The Bible as Literature (4 Credits)

The Bible has been one of the most important works in all of Western society. In this course we read the Bible as a masterpiece of literature. Rather than focusing on theological questions about this work as inspired scripture, we instead focus on its rich literary qualities and explore some ways in which these stories have influenced modern society. Reading select passages, we discuss its literary genres, forms, symbols and motifs, many of which are important in literature today. Of the latter, we encounter stories of creation and hero tales, parables, apocalyptic literature, and themes of paradise and the loss of Eden, wilderness, covenant, and the promised land. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with ENGL 2104 and RLGS 2104.

JUST 2202 New Testament (4 Credits)

This course takes a multifaceted approach (historical, literary, and critical) to the writings that comprise the Christian New Testament. The New Testament are read as a collection of primary documents that chronicle the primitive Church's slow and often painful process of self-definition. In these writings it is possible to discern the tension that arose because of the strong religious and cultural ties early Christianity maintained with Palestinian Judaism, from which it emerged as a sectarian or reform movement. The careful reader also finds evidence of the new religion's encounter with the Greco-Roman world from whose variegated ethos and culture it borrowed considerably on the way to becoming an important religious force in the first century. In exploring the New Testament, then, we attempt to recover something of the sense of what it meant to be a Christian in New Testament times. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with RLGS 2202.

JUST 2320 US Foreign Policy in the Middle East (4 Credits)

This course aims to introduce students to both Middle Eastern history and American Foreign Policy by exploring the politics and culture of U.S. involvement in the Middle East in the post-WWII period. In doing so this course pays special attention to the impact of the Cold War in the Middle East, American policy towards the Arab-Israeli conflict, the role of oil in American foreign policy, American responses to the rise of Islamist movements, the impact of media and culture on the formulation of America’s Middle Eastern policies, and U.S. relations with dictatorial governments in the Middle East. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with HIST 2320.

JUST 2350 Israeli Culture Through Film: Society, Ethnicity, and Inter-Cultural Discourse (4 Credits)

This course presents Israeli society and culture development as reflected in Israeli films from the 1950s to present day Israel. Topics include history and collective memory, ethnicities and the experiences of immigration, Israelis in their spatial Mediterranean/Middle-Eastern context and Judaism in its old and new representations. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

JUST 2360 Israeli Society Through Film: Narratives of the Holocaust, War and Terror in Israeli Life (4 Credits)

This course analyzes fundamental aspects of Israeli-Jewish collective identity through a consideration of the trauma of the Holocaust, and explores the representation of these issues in Israeli film from the 1960s to today. The course presents and analyzes narratives of human experience in traumatic times and their after-effects via cinematic perceptions of Holocaust survivors and their offspring, the relationship between the Israeli native Sabra and the Holocaust survivor, the impact of war on soldiers and their families, and the Israeli experience of terror. Screenings of Israeli film is a central part of the course. All films are in Hebrew with English subtitles. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. No prerequisites.

JUST 2410 Religious Diversity in Israel (4 Credits)

Through religious, sociological and historical sources, as well as documentaries, movies and scholarly readings, this course examines religious diversity in Israel since its establishment in 1948 to current events today. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with RLGS 2410.

JUST 2741 American Jewish Literature (4 Credits)

This course surveys over 100 years of American Jewish immigrant narratives beginning with the great exodus of Eastern European and Russian Jewry at the end of the 19th century and ending with recent arrivals from Israel and the former U.S.S.R. Canonical works by central authors reveal the great successes of Jewish immigrants alongside their spiritual failures. A selection of memoir, novels, short stories, and poetry in English and in translation from Hebrew and Yiddish demonstrate the multilingual character of the Jewish experience in America. While helpful, no knowledge of Jewish languages, religious tradition, or cultural practice is necessary to succeed in this course. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with ENGL 2741.

JUST 2742 Modern Hebrew Literature (4 Credits)

This course offers a survey of some of the most significant works of modern Hebrew literature available in translation. Students consider how the development of Hebrew literature has contributed to the formation of contemporary Israeli identity, and how the conflicts that define the turbulent history of Israel are treated in works by canonical authors. The selection of diverse voices and literary materials exposes students to the soil political, and historically changes wrought by the rise of modern day Israel. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with ENGL 2742.

JUST 2743 Jewish Humor: Origins and Meaning (4 Credits)

Writers, scholars, and comedians all claim to locate an identifiable strain of “Jewish humor” running from the Bible through to today’s literary humorists and provocative stand-up comics. This course takes humor seriously in an effort to reveal the development of “Jewish humor” in America from a comparative context. But is there such a thing as Jewish humor? And if so, what are its sources and characteristics? Does it exist across cultures and in different linguistic communities? Through lectures, discussion, exercises and papers, students gain a broad understanding of the history, psychology, and philosophy of humor as it relates to Jewish arts and letters in America. This course is cross-listed with ENGL 2743.

JUST 2750 Italian Jewish Literature and Cinema (4 Credits)

This course is cross-listed with ITAL 2750. It offers an overview of Italian Jewish literature and cinema from the Middle Ages to the present. Students will read and discuss prose and poetry, essays and articles, as well as watch and discuss films that address issues such as religious and cultural identity, the right to difference, anti-Semitism and the Shoah. The course will also give students an overview of the formation and transformation of the Jewish community in Italian society. In addition to well-known Jewish Italian writers like Primo Levi and Giorgio Bassani, students will read pertinent works by non-Jewish writers like Rosetta Loy. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MFJS 2000 Introduction to Film Criticism (4 Credits)

Theories and methods of social, cultural and aesthetic criticism of film; emphasis on critical writing. Laboratory fee required. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MFJS 2002 Introduction to Film Criticism (4 Credits)

Theories and methods of social, cultural and aesthetic criticism of film; emphasis on critical writing. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Course open to Colorado Women's College students only.

MFJS 2200 Emergent Digital Practices and Cultures (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the historical, economic, legal and social contexts of emergent digital practices and explores the various ways technology shapes and is shapedby culture. The rapid growth of participatory culture online through, for example, social networking sites, interactive news sites, gaming, mobile apps, and blogging has significant social implications and brings up issues of privacy, intellectual property, and the nature of community and public engagement. This class will explore these issues through various theoretical lens and concrete cases including politics, youth culture, activism, news and art. Particular emphasis will be placed on the question of how new media differs from mass media across various fields of cultural production (music, news, advertising, for example) and on what influence new digital products and practices might have on these industries and on cultures and societies more generally. This course counts towards the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross-listed with EDPX 2200.

MFJS 2290 Innovations in Media and Communications (4 Credits)

Today, it is difficult to imagine a life free of the media. There are more than 4 billion mobile phones in the world, and a billion people are now able to access the Internet. Television is available to close to 100% of people living in the media-saturated societies of North America, western and Eastern Europe, and East Asia, with radio widely available almost everywhere else. Moreover, with YouTube, blogs, online gaming, citizen journalism, experimental film, and peer-to-peer file sharing, people are actively creating and sharing their own news and entertainment experiences like never before. Communication technologies are changing the way money circulates, how and where business is conducted, the ways in which labor is deployed, and how people communicate between home and work, national and diasporic contexts. The media are facilitating both globalization and cultural hybridity, at times securing social cohesion and at other moments facilitating social movements for change. Where do these technologies come from? Who controls them? Who profits from them? How are they used, and with what potential implications? What does the future hold? These are some of the questions the class will address. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUAC 1012 Music, Society, and Culture (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the music of a variety of world areas. For each unit, students examine a diverse array of genres, analyzing music's relationship to religious life, aesthetics, politics, social organization, and identity. We also discuss the impact of globalization, transnationalism and immigration on the shaping and transformation of musical practice and meaning in each region. Reading materials, listening assignments, and discussion topics are supplemented by in-class performance workshops, designed to give students firsthand experience in non-Western performance traditions. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUAC 1016 History of Jazz (4 Credits)

This course examines the short history of jazz and all its sub-styles (swing, bop, cool, etc.) from its roots to the early eighties. Students have access to the entire course online, including all the fantastic listening. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Note: Music majors do not receive Common Curriculum credit for this course.

MUAC 1017 History of Rock and Roll (4 Credits)

The "birth of rock" occurred in the mid 1950's as a result of the convergence of pop, country and western, and rhythm and blues. This course traces that evolution by way of examining a broad picture of the general flow of those styles and their artists. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Note: Music majors do not receive Common Curriculum credit for this course.

MUAC 1018 Understanding Music (4 Credits)

In this course, students acquire a greater appreciation of musical history, context, composers, and genres. Through listening activities, texts, movies, and live concerts, students become educated listeners, able to describe intelligently musical experiences using appropriate vocabulary. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Note: Music majors do not receive Common Curriculum credit for this course.

MUAC 1019 American Popular Music (4 Credits)

American Popular Music combines the study of social and cultural history on the one hand with the analytical study of music styles on the other. Basically, it serves as an introduction to the wealth of American popular music from minstrelsy to hip hop. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. This class is not available to music or performance majors.

MUAC 1023 Mathematics in Music after 1970 (4 Credits)

This course examines the interaction of mathematics and music composition since 1970, an interaction that has grown more vibrant with the advent of electronic music and modern computation. In this course, we will use mathematical concepts and methods to address basic questions about music, mathematics, and musical works. The questions include, (a) how do pieces by contemporary composers reflect an affinity for mathematical concepts?, (b) are the intervals preferred by cultures as diverse as ancient Greece and the contemporary Levant inherently beautiful?, (c) what is the relationship between complexity and chance on the listening experience?, and several others. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUAC 1024 Black Sacred Music: A Survey (4 Credits)

This course is an experiential exploration of the spirituality of African-American sacred song. Participants will sing, consider the history of the music and explore their own connection to the songs, as well as the inspiration and challenge these songs may offer to present and future communities. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Note: Music majors do not receive Common Curriculum credit for this course and thus it will not fulfill AI: Society requirements for music majors.

MUAC 1025 Hip-Hop and Rap Music (4 Credits)

From its origins in dance parties in the Bronx in the late 1970s to its identification as the soundtrack of social movements around the globe, rap music has become perhaps the most prominent genre of popular music. This course, primarily, analyzes the musical features of rap music as a specific manifestation of the wider aesthetic of hip-hop. To set the stage for later musical analysis, the course includes brief introductions to technologies of hip-hop (e.g., sampling, drum machines, Autotune, streaming, etc.), earlier Afro-diasporic expressive forms and aesthetics (e.g., the dozens, toasts, double-dutch, etc.), and rap music’s relation with gender, race, identity, and politics.

MUAC 1026 American Musical Mavericks (4 Credits)

This course examines music history in the United States through the figure of the "maverick," a rugged individualist who operates outside the mainstream of society. Using Michael Broyles’s Mavericks and Other Traditions in American Music as a primary textbook, this course surveys American music from the 18th to the 21st centuries, introducing students to a variety of musical traditions, pieces, composers, performers, and artistic strategies. Central themes include: the impact of Puritanism on U.S. arts and culture, the dilemma of art music in a democratic society, and the struggle to develop a uniquely American musical voice in a nation of immigrants. Assignments are designed to promote achievement of the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture learning outcomes of the Common Curriculum: Apply the methods or techniques appropriate to disciplines in the arts or humanities in order to interpret texts, ideas or artifacts, or engage in creative activity (performance, composition, etc.). Analyze the relationship between texts, ideas, or creative works and a broader context (intellectual, political, artistic, etc.) in ways appropriate to disciplines in the arts or humanities. No prior musical experience is required. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUAC 1027 Global Pop (4 Credits)

This survey of global pop explores musical thought and processes through an examination of the development of “world music” and “world beat,” including its meaning and importance to contemporary culture as well as its history and impact. Intended to provide students with a basic understanding of the international popular music scene from its explosion at the close of the 20th century through the present day, this course questions the meaning and importance of this trend in contemporary culture. It explores the complex relationships of music and mass media while addressing themes of nationalism, popular resistance and subversion, censorship, transnational identity, gender representation, and cultural hegemony. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUAC 1028 Hearing the Movies (4 Credits)

Although we usually say that we watch movies, we might more accurately say that we “see-hear” or “audioview” them. Film sound tracks feature speech, sound effects, and music that fulfill practical storytelling roles, and that combine with imagery and narrative to create powerful emotional resonance in viewers. This interdisciplinary course explores the sonic elements of film history from 1895 to the present. Course activities include weekly film viewings and reading assignments set against lecture/discussions offering a topical survey of developments in film sound as both a technical practice and an art. Graded assignments include weekly online responses, a film introduction, a midterm exam, and a final project in which each student will re-score a film clip and compose an essay reflecting on that process. Assignments are designed to promote achievement of the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture learning outcomes of the Common Curriculum: • Apply the methods or techniques appropriate to disciplines in the arts or humanities in order to interpret texts, ideas or artifacts, or engage in creative activity. • Analyze the relationship between texts, ideas, or creative works and a broader context in ways appropriate to disciplines in the arts or humanities. No prior formal experience in music or film studies is required.

MUAC 2052 Musicology: Medieval And Renaissance Music (3 Credits)

Through the study of selected vocal and instrumental works, this course explores the musical style, performance practice issues and the historical context of Western European music from c. 800 to c. 1600. Scores, recordings, primary sources and secondary sources accompany the textbook. Because students interpret the musical works as they represent the ideas and artifacts of human culture and analyze the connections between these and varied human experiences and perceptions of the world, this course may be used to partially fulfill the general education requirement Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture. Prerequisite for music majors: MUAC 2051.

MUAC 2053 Musicology: Baroque Music (3 Credits)

Through the study of selected vocal, instrumental and operatic works, this course explores the musical style, performance practice issues and the historical context of Western European music from c. 1600 to c. 1750. Scores, recordings, primary sources and secondary sources accompany the textbook. Because students interpret the musical works as they represent the ideas and artifacts of human culture and analyze the connections between these and varied human experiences and perceptions of the world, this course may be used to partially fulfill the general education requirement Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture. Prerequisite for music majors: MUAC 2051.

MUAC 2054 Musicology: Classical Music (3 Credits)

Through the study of selected vocal, instrumental and operatic works, this course explores the musical style, performance practice issues and the historical context of Western European music from c. 1750 to c. 1820. Scores, recordings, primary sources and secondary sources accompany the textbook. Because students interpret the musical works as they represent the ideas and artifacts of human culture and analyze the connections between these and varied human experiences and perceptions of the world, this course may be used to partially fulfill the general education requirement Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture. Prerequisite for music majors: MUAC 2051.

MUAC 2055 Musicology: Romantic Music (3 Credits)

Through the study of selected vocal and instrumental works, this course explores the musical style, performance practice issues and the historical context of Western European music from c. 1830 to c. 1890. Scores, recordings, primary sources and secondary sources accompany the textbook. Because students interpret the musical works as they represent the ideas and artifacts of human culture and analyze the connections between these and varied human experiences and perceptions of the world, this course may be used to partially fulfill the general education requirement Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture. Prerequisite for music majors: MUAC 2051.

MUAC 2056 Musicology: Modern Music (3 Credits)

Through the study of selected vocal and instrumental works, this course explores the musical style, performance practice issues and the historical context of Western European music from c. 1890 to the present. Scores, recordings, primary sources and secondary sources accompany the textbook. Because students interpret the musical works as they represent the ideas and artifacts of human culture and analyze the connections between these and varied human experiences and perceptions of the world, this course may be used to partially fulfill the general education requirement Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture. Prerequisite for music majors: MUAC 2051.

MUAC 2057 Musicology: Introduction to World Musics (3 Credits)

This course is designed as an introduction to select world music traditions and to ethnomusicology, a discipline many define as the study of music in culture. We focus on three world areas: North India, Brazil, and Senegal. For each of these units, we examine various genres and musical systems and explore music's connection to ritual, belief, aesthetic ideals, politics, and social organization, asking what makes music meaningful for practitioners and audiences. Lectures and discussions are supplemented by regular guest lecture-demonstrations, films and hands-on workshops. Because students interpret the musical works as they represent the ideas and artifacts of human culture and analyze the connections between these and varied human experiences and perceptions of the world, this course may be used to partially fulfill the general education requirement Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture. Prerequisite for music majors: MUAC 2051.

MUAC 2058 Jazz and Commercial Music History and Repertoire I (1900-1955) (3 Credits)

This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUAC 2059 Jazz and Commercial Music History and Repertoire II (1955-Present) (3 Credits)

This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUEN 3043 Senegalese Drum/Dance Ensemble (0-1 Credits)

This ensemble is dedicated to learning the art of sabar dance and drumming, vibrant traditions of the Wolof people of Senegal, West Africa. In Senegal, sabar drums are played exclusively by griots, a caste of hereditary musicians. Sabar drum troupes perform at a variety of events, baptisms, weddings, wrestling matches, political meetings, and neighborhood dance parties. At most of these events, dance is an essential counterpart to drumming. The drum ensemble consists of numerous parts that come together to create complex polyrhythms. Ensemble members learn various drum parts that form rhythms over which a lead drummer solos, and dance movements that accompany these drum rhythms. They also learn bakks, extended musical phrases played in unison, and songs in the Wolof language. This course may be taken multiple times. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUEN 3044 Ghanaian Drumming Ensemble (0-1 Credits)

This class provides a practical and theoretical introduction to the drumming and singing traditions of Ghana, West Africa. Through hands-on instruction and oral transmission, students learn ceremonial and recreational music styles of select ethnic groups. Assigned readings, film viewing, guided listening, and in-class discussion familiarizes students with the social and cultural meanings of the musics performed in class. The course culminates in an end of the quarter concert. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUEN 3046 Indonesian Music Ensemble (0-1 Credits)

This class provides a practical and theoretical introduction to Indonesian performance traditions from the islands of Bali and Java. Through hands-on instruction and oral transmission, students will learn a variety of gamelan (gong/chime ensemble) traditions. While learning this sophisticated cyclic music, class discussions, assigned readings, films, and guided listening will further familiarize students with the social and cultural meanings of the musics performed in class. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to learn basic hand, foot, and eye movements for Balinese and Javanese dance, as well as to study kecak, a Balinese vocal music that imitates the sound of the gamelan. The course will culminate in an end of the quarter concert.

MUEN 3047 Xperimental Jazz Ensemble (0-1 Credits)

The Xperimental Jazz Ensemble is a pan-genre ensemble with a focus on creativity expressed through improvisation, transcription, arrangement, and composition. XJE will have variable instrumentation that may include vocalists, all “classical” and “jazz” instruments, and emergent electronic instruments and software. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUEN 3048 Bluegrass Ensemble (0-1 Credits)

In this class, students will receive instruction on proper bluegrass performance fundamentals with traditional bluegrass instruments, the harmony and rhythm of bluegrass music, the art of simultaneous playing and singing, the proper interpretation of the chosen repertoire per the composers' style, and the social and cultural influences that inspired the music. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUEN 3710 Opera (0-1 Credits)

Practical experience in operatic performance. One production each quarter; major production in winter quarter. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUEN 3712 Lamont Chorale (0-1 Credits)

The Lamont Chorale is a select mixed voice choir that performs choral literature from the Renaissance to present and strives for a high level of artistry. The choir performs works from the great masters of music, as well as living composers, world music, and spirituals. The Lamont Chorale is open to undergraduate and graduate students, music majors, non-music majors, and community members. Credits from this course can fulfill the AI-Society credit requirement for undergraduate students.

MUEN 3730 American Heritage Chorale (1 Credit)

This ensemble will explore through choral music the various ways in which music written by American composers has been influenced and has its roots in music from other cultures and regions of the globe. Special attention shall be given to music by African American composers. American Heritage Chorale is open to all students interested in singing. Prior choral experience is not required. A brief vocal interview will determine appropriate placement within the ensemble. The course will conclude with a performance at the end of the quarter. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUEN 3740 Lamont Men's Choir (0-1 Credits)

MUEN 3751 Lamont Jazz Orchestra (0-1 Credits)

This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUEN 3752 Lamont Wind Ensemble (0-1 Credits)

Open to all students by audition and approval of conductor; regularly scheduled concerts. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUEN 3753 Lamont Jazz Ensemble (0-1 Credits)

Open to all students by audition and approval of director of jazz studies; regularly scheduled concerts. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUEN 3760 Lamont Symphony Orchestra (0-1 Credits)

The LSO generally performs six symphonic concerts and one opera each year. Students are exposed to orchestral repertoire from all periods and styles of music as well as appropriate performance practices associated with each period and style. The LSO is open to all university students by audition. However, because the course objective is to prepare students for successful professional orchestra careers, all participants are held to a very high standard and level of expectation. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MUEN 3900 Lamont Women's Chorus (0-1 Credits)

The Lamont Women’s Chorus is a treble voice choir that performs a wide variety of choral literature, including masterworks, a cappella works, spirituals, new music, and world music. The choir is open to undergraduate and graduate students, music majors, non-music majors, and community members. Credits from this course can fulfill the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture credit requirement for undergraduate students.

PHIL 1610 Discovering Philosophy (4 Credits)

In this course we explore a range of philosophical questions and examine the replies that have been made by historical figures.  We also think through the methods and strategies that have been used for thinking through those replies and explore these questions further on our own.  Topics may include how do we know what actions are moral?  What is knowledge?  What is the basic structure of the world? What is justice? What assumptions are made by the disciplines that take themselves to study the natural world? This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 1611 Philosophy and Social Justice (4 Credits)

This course examines classic works in the philosophy of social justice:  social contract theories, theories of political obligation, and theories of justice, especially the theory of John Rawls. There is particular focus on civil disobedience, economic justice, equal opportunity, and community action. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2001 Philosophy and Fiction (4 Credits)

Examination of diverse aspects of the relationship between philosophy and fiction. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2003 Philosophy and Popular Culture (4 Credits)

This course critically explores philosophical questions and issues in the context of contemporary popular culture. On the one hand, it considers more general questions about the nature and function of popular culture, including how popular culture has been defined and "theorized"; the connections between popular culture and the traditional and new media; the economic bases and functions of popular culture; and the political implications of popular culture. On the other, it explores particular philosophical issues--historical, ethical, political, aesthetic, and metaphysical--as they appear in selected areas or examples of popular culture: literature, film, the visual arts, digital media, graphic novels, music, television, etc. The aims are both to enhance students' critical understanding of the ways in which philosophical assumptions and ideas underlie popular culture and to present traditional and contemporary philosophical arguments, movements, and ideas using examples drawn from popular culture as reference points. As examples, we might explore ethical dilemmas posed in the "Sopranos" or "Mad Men"; mind-body problems in the "Matrix" or "Avatar"; or metaphysical issues in "Donny Darko" or "Run, Lola, Run." This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2004 Philosophy of Race (4 Credits)

This course is a systematic study of the scientific, metaphysical, ethical, and political issues surrounding the notion of race. We undertake a critical study of the following questions: Is race a scientifically legitimate concept, or is it a social construct? Is race a legitimate census category? How should questions of race be decided, and by whom? Why do we think of humans in terms of race--for evolutionary or psychological reasons? Religious reasons? What is racism? Why is racism morally wrong? What do psychological studies show about our racist tendencies? Does affirmative action provide a morally acceptable way of achieving racial justice? What race is a mixed race person? This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2005 Philosophy of Religion (4 Credits)

What is God? Can God be known or is faith precisely a relationship to something that cannot be known in the ordinary sense? What is the relationship between God and morality? Between God and science? Is it more reasonable to believe that your religion is the only path to God or more reasonable to believe that God is manifest in many ways across different cultures? Is it reasonable to believe in God at all? If it is reasonable to believe in God, what are the reasons? And if believing in God is not based on reasons in the ordinary sense, are there philosophical grounds for believing in God anyway? This course takes a "God friendly" approach to philosophical questions about religion, setting out to investigate ontological and epistemological questions about belief-in-God toward the goal of understanding different ways that philosophers over the years have philosophically gone about developing, upholding, and talking about relationship with God. The course includes consideration of philosophers from analytic and continental traditions, from American and European schools of thought, from ancient, medieval, modern and post-modern traditions, and from Greek, Islamic, Jewish, and Christian traditions. Thinkers to be addressed include Pascal, Anselm, Plantinga, Van Inwagen, Hick, Hume, Descartes, Spinoza, Plato, Aristotle, Ibn Tufayl, Averroes, Maimonides, James, Levinas, Marion, Badiou, Rosenzweig, Aquinas, Buber, Cohen, Mill, Lycan, Kant, Wittgenstein, Kierkegaard, and Kafka. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with RLGS 2005.

PHIL 2007 Philosophy and Video Games (4 Credits)

Traditional and novel metaphysical, ethical, political, and aesthetic issues both arising within video games and posed by this still developing medium. No prerequisites. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2008 Stereotyping and Violence in America Today (4 Credits)

This course is cross-listed with JUST 2008, COMN 2008, RLGS 2008. This course offers students the opportunity to explore key issues relating to diversity and inclusion in the contemporary United States, focusing on the themes of stereotyping and violence, from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Students will engage with scholarly and popular culture artifacts to examine the kinds of stereotyping and types of violence, visible and invisible, that characterize and challenge political, social, cultural, economic, religious, and educational life in today’s United States, and will do so by working with the course instructor as well as faculty members from across the arts, humanities, and social sciences. Students will work together to connect the given week’s speaker’s assigned readings and insights to readings and insights from previous weeks’ speakers; assignments and classroom discussion will in this way be very interdisciplinary and will compare and contrast multiple diverse points of view and disciplinary lenses on the question of stereotyping and violence. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2010 Existentialism (4 Credits)

Philosophical, religious, literary and psychological views of the existentialists including Kierkegaard, Sartre, and Camus. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2026 Race: Black, Jew, Other (4 Credits)

In its investigation of philosophical writings on race and racism, this course explores a range of existential and phenomenological lenses for interrogating race and racism, with a focus on the shared theoretical and practical intersections of anti-Black and anti-Jew discourse. The course aims to help participants read and understand difficult primary philosophical (and some theological) texts—many of which are cited and engaged by contemporary writings across a number of disciplines. In this respect, we work through philosophical writings related to race, exile, “negritude,” “the wandering Jew,” and “otherness” by engaging such authors as: Sartre, Wright, De Bois, Levinas, Senghor, Fanon, Freud, Appiah, Jankelevitch, and Cone, alongside Gilman’s work on the “Jew’s Body” and “Jewish Self-Hatred,” Bernasconi’s work on the phenomenology of race, and discourses of “Other-as-disease” in American and Nazi eugenics. In all of its content, the course aims to engage participants with key issues and questions around race and racism, including extending the implications of anti-Black and anti-Jew discourses / practices to a range of other anti-Other discourses / practices at play in the world around us. This course is cross-listed with JUST 2026 and RLGS 2026. This course counts for the AI:Society requirement.

PHIL 2050 Jewish Philosophy (4 Credits)

This course sets out to explore the self and the sacred in Jewish tradition by exploring the nature of faith and reason, the call to ethical response, and the meaning of divine revelation in multiple Jewish philosophical voices across the ages, including Philo, Saadya, Halevi, Maimonides, Soloveitchik, Buber, Rosenzweig, and Levinas. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with JUST 2050.

PHIL 2100 Philosophy of Mind (4 Credits)

Topics include nature of persons, consciousness, criteria of personal identity, the relation between mental and physical, and the role of neuroscience in the study of the mind--epistemological and ethical. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2110 Classical Greek Philosophy (4 Credits)

The philosophical thought of classical Greece that developed between about 500 and 300 BCE is the basis of all subsequent European philosophy and, arguably, of European culture itself. Besides its indisputable historical importance, it is also rich in ideas and insights that are as striking and relevant today as they were over 2000 years ago. This course serves as an introduction to this seminal period of philosophy, its historical and cultural context, and in fact, to philosophy itself. In the course, we focus primarily on the teachings of Socrates, the dialogues of his student Plato, and the writings of Plato's student Aristotle. In addition, we begin by considering the cultural and intellectual context, including the Homeric epics and the tragedies, that enabled such thinkers to arise and concludes with a brief look at the paths Greek philosophy took after the "Golden Age of Greece' has passed. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2111 Greek Moral Philosophy (4 Credits)

In this course we examine the "Good Life" in the writings of Plato, Aristotle, Epictetus and Lucretius and in selected Greek drama. Questions to be explored are as follows: What is justice? Why should I lead a just life? What is friendship? What is happiness? This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2120 Nature & Limits of Human Knowledge (4 Credits)

A study of both traditional and contemporary answers to the following questions: What is knowledge? How do we acquire it? What is the extent of our knowledge? This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2126 Suicide, Philosophy, Community (4 Credits)

Since its beginning among the ancient Greeks, the story of philosophy has been complexly intertwined with the two other stories, that of reflection on suicide, and that of reflection on the nature and nurture of community. In the first half of this course, we first examine a classic ancient Greek philosophical text addressing suicide, the we consider some 20th century philosophical reflections on that same topic, culminating in an impassioned defense – written and first published shortly before his own suicide by a philosophically trained writer who survived Auschwitz – of the individual’s right to choose “voluntary death.” Then, in the second half of the course, we turn to the issue of community, especially as thinking about the possibility of establishing a genuinely universal community inclusive of all humans without exception is surprisingly affected by serious reflection on the issues of suicide examined in the first part of the course. To aid and direct us, we examine some challenging contemporary philosophical writings concerning just such a possibility of truly inclusive human community. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2130 Philosophy of Early Modern Age (4 Credits)

Problems of reason and experience, mechanistic view of human beings, new interpretations of mind from Descartes, Spinoza, Leibinz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and Kant. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2140 Kant to Nietzsche (4 Credits)

German idealism; human beings as self-consciousness; counter-concept of alienated existence; Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2144 20th-Century Philosophy (4 Credits)

A general overview of prominent 20th-century philosophers and philosophical movements. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2145 Between Deleuze and Foucault (4 Credits)

Gilles Deleuze and Michel Foucault are widely accepted to be central figures of post-war French philosophy. Philosophers, cultural theorists, and others have devoted considerable effort to the critical examination of the work of each of these thinkers, but despite the strong biographical and philosophical connection between Foucault and Deleuze, very little has been done to explore the relationship between them. This course addresses the critical deficit by providing rigorous comparative discussions of the work of these two philosophers. The relationship between Foucault and Deleuze, however, is as strong as it is disparate: it is perhaps best described as a parallelism. As Deleuze says, “I never worked with Foucault. But I do think there are a lot of parallels between our work (with Guattari) and his, although they are, as it were, held at a distance because of our widely differing methods and even our objectives.” While the two were drawn together through their novel readings of Nietzsche, their commitment to a non-teleological theory of history, their activism in contemporary politics (with prisons, ’68, Palestine, etc.), their return to the stoics, and a theory of the event, Deleuze and Foucault were often decisively divided in their methods and motivations. Through primary and secondary readings, this course focuses on the similarities and differences in between these two thinkers. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2150 Philosophy of Law (4 Credits)

Principles, aims and methods of legal reasoning (judicial decision making); relationship between legal and moral reasoning. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2180 Ethics (4 Credits)

Alternative theories of morals and values, ethical problems and solutions offered by classical and contemporary thinkers. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2181 Aesthetics & Philosophy of Art (4 Credits)

Although critical reflection about art goes back at least to Plato, developments both in modern philosophy and in the arts themselves have produced an unprecedented, intense, and ongoing dialogue between artists and philosophers that has deeply affected the practices of both. Just as modern philosophers have come to view the arts as vitally important ways of experiencing and knowing, so modern artists have drawn heavily on philosophical ideas and views in creating their own works. The focus of this course is on some of the major ways in which new developments in the arts have influenced philosophical thought and have, in turn, been influenced by it. In particular, we consider some of the most representative artworks (many contemporary) that have raised the question, "Why is this art?," together with the major philosophical and critical theories that have attempted to respond to this question. Besides discussing specific works of art, we read and discuss some of the major statements and theories about them by both classical and contemporary philosophers, art historians and critics, and the artists themselves. This course is of interest both to students of philosophy wishing to explore contemporary developments in the arts as well as to art and art history students interested in a deeper understanding of the philosophical views that underlie so much modern and contemporary art. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2182 The Making of the Modern World: Science, Art, and Philosophy (4 Credits)

A combined on-campus/travel course exploring the ways in which the complex interactions among science, the arts, and philosophy served to create and define the 'modern world.' This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2184 Ethics, Individuals, & the Law (4 Credits)

Furnish students with a detailed and lasting understanding of a range of philosophical and ethical problems that arise in the law. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2200 Social & Political Philosophy (4 Credits)

Topics covered include the relation of the "social" to the "political," the nature and role of political ideology, issues in democracy and globalization. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2260 Philosophical Perspectives on Perception and Reality (4 Credits)

An examination of the theoretical hypothesis that our perceptions match up with, and therefore give us information about, an external and independent reality (what we call "the physical world"). In order to engage this issue, we look at the philosophical explorations of a number of historical figures in the Western philosophical tradition. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2401 Social Justice in a Global Context: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)

Theories of social justice, beginning with the ancient Hebrews and Greeks and running up through the modern era. The religious sources of these ideas, drawn primarily from the monotheistic faiths of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, are profiled. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2402 London and Paris: Medieval to Postmodern (4 Credits)

This is a 3-week summer session course involving one week on campus and two weeks travel to London and Paris. It traces the development of philosophical ideas, politics, social institutions, architecture, and the visual arts from the Middle Ages to the present as they occurred in these two major capitals. Its approach is both historical and comparative and emphasizes understanding and interpreting the contemporary experience of these cities in light of their shared as well as divergent historical paths.

PHIL 2700 Biomedical Ethics (4 Credits)

Discussion of some of the most pressing ethical issues engaged by contemporary developments in biology and medicine. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2770 Philosophy of Science (4 Credits)

This course provides an introduction to some major topics in the philosophy of science focusing on issues concerning what science is and how it works, the scientific method, the objectivity of science and the goal of science. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 1101 Religious Lives: Jesus (4 Credits)

The title of this course has a double meaning. On the one hand, the title suggests ours is a study of a religiously important figure. Jesus is one such historical personage. Hence his life is the object of study. The course title also points to the character of the gospels. They are “lives,” “religious lives” of Jesus that arose out of storytelling cultures. In those contexts, stories were read and heard aloud, often “performed” and adapted. Gospels are not “biographies” of Jesus, as we typically think of that genre. It is important to recognize that in “telling the story of Jesus,” the gospel writers were also telling us a story of their own communities, framing stories that would influence how early Christians lived out their religious commitments to Jesus in a world shaped by the forces of late ancient Judaism and Greco-Roman imperialism. We must follow tantalizing clues and draw conclusions from texts--usefully compared to the scripts of plays--that were not interested, primarily, in objective, non-partisan, historical description. Both Jesus and the gospels rivet our attention in this course. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2005 Philosophy of Religion (4 Credits)

What is God? Can God be known or is faith precisely a relationship to something that cannot be known in the ordinary sense? What is the relationship between God and morality? Between God and science? Is it more reasonable to believe that your religion is the only path to God or more reasonable to believe that God is manifest in many ways across different cultures? Is it reasonable to believe in God at all? If it is reasonable to believe in God, what are the reasons? And if believing in God is not based on reasons in the ordinary sense, are there philosophical grounds for believing in God anyway? This course takes a "God friendly" approach to philosophical questions about religion, setting out to investigate ontological and epistemological questions about belief-in-God toward the goal of understanding different ways that philosophers over the years have philosophically gone about developing, upholding, and talking about relationship with God. The course includes consideration of philosophers from analytic and continental traditions, from American and European schools of thought, from ancient, medieval, modern and post-modern traditions, and from Greek, Islamic, Jewish, and Christian traditions. Thinkers to be addressed include Pascal, Anselm, Plantinga, Van Inwagen, Hick, Hume, Descartes, Spinoza, Plato, Aristotle, Ibn Tufayl, Averroes, Maimonides, James, Levinas, Marion, Badiou, Rosenzweig, Aquinas, Buber, Cohen, Mill, Lycan, Kant, Wittgenstein, Kierkegaard, and Kafka. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with PHIL 2005.

RLGS 2008 Stereotyping and Violence in America Today (4 Credits)

This course is cross-listed with PHIL 2008, COMN 2008, JUST 2008. This course offers students the opportunity to explore key issues relating to diversity and inclusion in the contemporary United States, focusing on the themes of stereotyping and violence, from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Students will engage with scholarly and popular culture artifacts to examine the kinds of stereotyping and types of violence, visible and invisible, that characterize and challenge political, social, cultural, economic, religious, and educational life in today’s United States, and will do so by working with the course instructor as well as faculty members from across the arts, humanities, and social sciences. Students will work together to connect the given week’s speaker’s assigned readings and insights to readings and insights from previous weeks’ speakers; assignments and classroom discussion will in this way be very interdisciplinary and will compare and contrast multiple diverse points of view and disciplinary lenses on the question of stereotyping and violence. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2014 Religious Existentialism: Christian and Jewish (4 Credits)

Existentialism focuses on the human experience of living, often with a focus on the sheer freedom of the human condition. Religious existentialism subtly modifies this picture through its own vision of human freedom as the ultimate encounter between the human subject and God (with 'God' understood in various ways). The religious existentialist in this sense philosophically explores that which is most-fully-human as a moment of relation and encounter between self and that which is beyond self. Starting with Sartre's non-religious statement of existentialism in Existentialism is a Humanism (1946), we go on to examine the Christian and Jewish existentialisms of Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Tillich (1886-1965), Buber (1878-1965), and Heschel (1907-1972). In the course of our reflections, we compare non-religious with religious approaches to basic questions about self, God and world, and we consider the relationship between Christian and Jewish existentialist approaches to these questions. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross-listed with PHIL 2014 and JUST 2014.

RLGS 2016 Contemporary Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, 2000-Today (4 Credits)

This course deals with the political, religious, and social dimensions of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from the failure of the Oslo Accords to the present. It provides students with a brief overview of the history and key issues in the conflict, turning to domestic, regional, and global developments, allegiances, and enmities – political, religious, and economic – that have shaped the past 15+ years of conflict. At a time when even optimistic observers call the two-state solution a vain hope, this course concludes with a look at viable approaches for domestically and internationally acceptable peace plans. This course is cross-listed with JUST 2016 and HIST 2016.

RLGS 2026 Race: Black, Jew, Other (4 Credits)

In its investigation of philosophical writings on race and racism, this course explores a range of existential and phenomenological lenses for interrogating race and racism, with a focus on the shared theoretical and practical intersections of anti-Black and anti-Jew discourse. The course aims to help participants read and understand difficult primary philosophical (and some theological) texts—many of which are cited and engaged by contemporary writings across a number of disciplines. In this respect, we work through philosophical writings related to race, exile, “negritude,” “the wandering Jew,” and “otherness” by engaging such authors as: Sartre, Wright, De Bois, Levinas, Senghor, Fanon, Freud, Appiah, Jankelevitch, and Cone, alongside Gilman’s work on the “Jew’s Body” and “Jewish Self-Hatred,” Bernasconi’s work on the phenomenology of race, and discourses of “Other-as-disease” in American and Nazi eugenics. In all of its content, the course aims to engage participants with key issues and questions around race and racism, including extending the implications of anti-Black and anti-Jew discourses / practices to a range of other anti-Other discourses / practices at play in the world around us. Cross-listed with JUST-2026 and PHIL-2026.

RLGS 2101 Exploring Religion in America (4 Credits)

What do Americans believe? Is there a singular religion or set of religious beliefs that bind together the varieties of American faith traditions and ethnic cultures into a common national identity? E pluribus unum--from the plurality a unity is formed--is one of three official mottoes adapted in 1782 to define and represent the U.S. To what extent is this true, both today and in the past? Americans are faced with the difficult task of creating a harmonious society from the encounter, repulsion, and attraction of discrete civilizations. At the vanguard of modern republican democracy, the U.S. is the central playing field upon which cultural/religious pluralism is negotiated, defined, and legislated. The course explores the evolution of the American nation as a pluralistic belief or faith community and explores the meaning and potential for a singular national religious community. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2102 Judaism, Christianity & Islam (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the three major monotheistic religious traditions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In the process of tracing the long and rich histories of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, we examine the beliefs and practices that became central and definitive for Jews, Christians, and Muslims. We begin with the ancient heritage of each religion (scriptures, founders, early institutions). Then we explore how these foundational traditions were preserved and re-invigorated in response to centuries of social change and critical moments of political upheaval. Most significant, in this regard, is the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim encounter with their respective holy Scriptures--as generation after generation of adherents have attempted to understand the revealed words of God, to proclaim their continual relevance for all places and all times and to inscribe them upon their bodies and hearts through prayer, worship, and daily life. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2103 Religions of China & Japan (4 Credits)

This is an introduction of some of the major East Asian religious and ethical traditions, focusing on Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shinto. By examining both translations of sacred texts as well as scholarly analyses, we explore the basic ideas, practices, and historical development of these varied and interconnected traditions. Special attention is paid to how people incorporate East Asian religious and ethical ideas and beliefs into contemporary life and how gender shapes the experience of religion. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with ASIA 2702.

RLGS 2104 The Bible as Literature (4 Credits)

The Bible has been one of the most important works in all of Western society. In this course we read the Bible as a masterpiece of literature. Rather than focusing on theological questions about this work as inspired scripture, we instead focus on its rich literary qualities and explore some ways in which these stories have influenced modern society. Reading select passages, we discuss its literary genres, forms, symbols and motifs, many of which are important in literature today. Of the latter, we encounter stories of creation and hero tales, parables, apocalyptic literature, and themes of paradise and the loss of Eden, wilderness, covenant, and the promised land. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with ENGL 2104 and JUST 2104.

RLGS 2105 Works and Lives (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the study of religion through the examination of religious works and lives. For purposes of our exploration, we think of religion as a system of relationships between major ideas and everyday life practices that orients people to a view of the whole of existence. "Works" is a term that covers two major aspects of religions: rituals and moral codes. The term "works" has to do with behaviors, whether they are the behaviors involved in a specifically religious situation (often rituals) or the behaviors in everyday life that are addressed by religious commands and prohibitions (often morals). We also consider stories of lives and guidelines for "lives." Some of these lives are clearly related to daily life within the religious traditions. Some are stories of lives that seem utterly fantastic. We question why such lives are written, what the reader can take from them, and what points they might make. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2106 Religious and Social Justice in Vienna (4 Credits)

This special travel course provides an opportunity for students to learn how certain major religions are globally engaged in the promotion of social justice through humanitarian relief work and cultural exchanges. In addition to a brief survey of the historical relationship between the beliefs, teachings, and social practices of the major Western traditions, the course offers hands-on experience and interaction with Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant relief agencies as well as other non-governmental organizations in Vienna, Austria, which has become the international center for UN-directed human services and humanitarian relief efforts as well as global headquarters for leading NGOs. Students discover how the culture, history, and geography of Vienna have nurtured the vast global human services "economy" to which these religious organizations contribute and which are built around the work of the United Nations. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2107 Culture and Conscience in Vienna (4 Credits)

This study abroad course focuses on the cultural and social history of the city of Vienna as the hub of politics, culture, and religion for Central Europe with special attention to its religious heritage as the seedbed for its rich cultural traditions. The course examines how its religious heritage, particularly Judaism, shaped its rich cultural heritage and the birth of modernism. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with HIST 2107, JUST 2107.

RLGS 2108 Islam in the United States (4 Credits)

A historical introduction to the presence of Islam and Muslims in the United States, from an examination of the first Muslims in North America, to the substantive influence of the minority Indian evangelical Ahmadiyya movement, to Islam in African American communities. Also examines contemporary Muslim communities in the U.S. and the ways in which ritual and faith are today developing with "American" accents. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2109 Religions of Tibet (4 Credits)

This course explores the religious terrain of Tibet by looking at the historical and cultural development of the four main Tibetan Buddhist traditions: Nyingma, Sakya, Kagyu and Geluk, as well as the indigenous religion called Bon. Topics include the sacred landscape of Tibet; key doctrinal features; cultural artifacts like sacred biographies, art, and poetry; the 20th-century spread of Tibetan Buddhism from the Himalayas to North American communities; the future of Tibetan Buddhism in exile; and China and the West. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2110 Buddhism in the U.S.A. (4 Credits)

Exploration of different viewpoints on complex issues related to the assimilation, acculturation and reinvention of Asian Buddhist traditions both locally and globally in the past 150 years. Students consider the "two-way traffic" between recent developments in various traditions of newly Americanized Buddhism and their respective cultures of origin through the processes of globalization and transnationalism. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2111 Islam and United States Politics (4 Credits)

This course offers students a historically grounded introduction to the relationship(s) between Islam and United States politics. Students consider the role played by Islam and Muslims in early American political thought, Americans’ relationships with Muslims abroad and at home, as well as evangelization efforts. It examines the impacts of the Nation of Islam, the Cold War, Iranian Revolution and Gulf War I, as well as of the September 11 terror attacks, the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, the 2006 and 2008 elections, and concludes by reflecting on the 2012 election and suggesting how Islam might impact U.S. politics over the next decade. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2112 Major Islamic Thinkers 1900s-2000s (4 Credits)

This course offers students a substantive introduction to the major Islamic thinkers of the 20th and 21st centuries. Starting with Abu `Ala Maududi, whose work on Qur'anic interpretation and the meaning of jihad laid the groundwork for new waves of radical activism in the modern Muslim world, this course exposes students to the works of major "movers and shakers" like Sayyid Qutb and Ayotollah Ruhollah Khomeini. Students engage these thinkers through a mixture of primary and secondary sources, developing a sense of context as they work through these thinkers' arguments. The course continues with an examination of some of the major later 20th-Century Islamic thinkers active in Muslim-minority spaces, focusing on Bosnian Grand Mufti Mustafai Ceric and the late Moroccan-French scholar Mohammed Arkoun. It concludes by looking at two major figures of the early 21st century, noting how they blend intellectual and political activism: Iranian cleric Mohsen Kadivar and American scholar Amina Wadud. Throughout the course, student groups present on various contemporary issues, helping them develop presentation and writing skills while allowing them to apply course knowledge to real-world issues. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2113 Islamic Empires (4 Credits)

This course offers students a historical introduction to the major empires of the Muslim world. Starting with an overview of the major empires of the late antique Mediterranean (Roman and Sasanid Persian), it provides students with a primer on the rise and major principles of Islam, turning to the Umayyad and Abbasid empires and their roles in supporting the institutionalization and sectarian developments of classical and early-medieval era Islam. Students then examine the emergence of the great Andalusi and North American empires, noting their long-lasting influence on Spain. The course culminates in a multi-week study of the three major early modern sources from each empire and considers the political, social, religious, and economic aspects of each. The course concludes with a look at contemporary attempts to remember or revive the notion of "Islamic empire," connecting past to present. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with HIST 2330.

RLGS 2114 History of Yoga (4 Credits)

This course explores different ancient and medieval forms of yoga in their Indian cultural contexts as well as modern forms of yoga in India and North America. Some of the issues we will engage include different conceptions of the human self, how and why particular cultural and religious practices cross geographical and cultural boundaries, the role of the guru, and secularization.This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.Cross listed with ASIA 2714.

RLGS 2115 Major figures in the Bible and Qur’an (4 Credits)

This course offers students a thematic introduction to the key common figures in the Bible and Qur’an, focusing on the major prophets, from Adam to Jesus, as well as Eve and Mary. Grounded in the primary source texts while exposing students to classic and contemporary scholarly work on these figures, it concludes with a look at the figure of God in the two scriptures.

RLGS 2117 Religions of India (4 Credits)

The religions of India include Jainism, Buddhism, Islam, Sikhism, Christianity, Judaism, and Hinduism. Students will be introduced to the history and literature of each of these religious traditions. These religious traditions are not completely separate entities. Indian religious groups are always in dialogue and often in competition with one another. The course will explore the dominant religious groups and their intersections in various historical periods. Common religious places--temples, monasteries, pilgrimages sites, and sacred geography--function as points for interaction and mutual influence between rival religious traditions. Religion is what you do, not what you think. As such, ritual practice and literature will be emphasized over philosophy and dogma. The dominant mode of study will be history of religions, with an emphasis on history. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2118 "Women as the Gateway to Hell": Gender and Identity in South Asia (4 Credits)

This course explores the role of women in public and private spaces in South Asia through the lens of religious praxis and belief. We will explore the ways in which Hindu, Jain, Buddhist, Sikh, Muslim, Christian, and Adivasi (indigenous) traditions have portrayed the role of women in scripture and consider these textual proscriptions and descriptions in the context of the lived experience of these belief systems. The primary aim of the course is to expose students to the complex relationship between the deified “feminine” and the construction of gender within modern South Asia.

RLGS 2202 New Testament (4 Credits)

This course takes a multifaceted approach (historical, literary, and critical) to the writings that comprise the Christian New Testament. The New Testament are read as a collection of primary documents that chronicle the primitive Church’s slow and often painful process of self-definition. In these writings it is possible to discern the tension that arose because of the strong religious and cultural ties early Christianity maintained with Palestinian Judaism, from which it emerged as a sectarian or reform movement. The careful reader also finds evidence of the new religion’s encounter with the Greco-Roman world from whose variegated ethos and culture it borrowed considerably on the way to becoming an important religious force in the first century. In exploring the New Testament, then, we attempt to recover something of the sense of what it meant to be a Christian in New Testament times. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with JUST 2202.

RLGS 2301 American Indian Religion (4 Credits)

This course will provide an overview of the religious beliefs and practices, histories, cultures, and contemporary lives of the Native American communities in the Rocky Mountains (Ute) as well as those commonly referred to as the “Great Plains Indians” (primarily the Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Sioux, and Crow). Made up of thirty different tribes with seven different language groups, Plains Indians constitute a diverse range of languages, customs, social structures, and religious beliefs. As we learn about the various worldviews and lifeways of Rocky Mountain and Plains Indians peoples, we will also explore the relationships between religion and culture, religion and society, religion and land, and religion and conflict. We will watch several films covering a variety of Native American issues.

RLGS 2303 Lived Religions (4 Credits)

The concept of “lived religions” has become prominent in religious studies since the 2000’s. While people may think of religions as sets of sacred writings, rules, and rituals, the “lived religions” approach focuses on the ways that people incorporate religion into their activities. The approach is new enough that scholars have not yet come to full agreement on what the term “lived religions” should include and what it implies about religions and how to study them. The course will make room, therefore, to debate the advantages and drawbacks of studying religions through the ways people use religion to shape their life. Students will examine examples of how people live their religion and trace the relationships of these practices to religious teachings and ideas. This effort will involve asking a variety of questions. How closely are religious practices related to teachings and ideas? Does a specific religion put greater emphasis on engaging in specific activities or on agreeing with particular teachings? If people’s behavior does not fit with a religion’s teachings but the people still consider it to be related to key aspects of religion, does it count as religious? Or have these people moved away from religion into a practice that is spiritually meaningful but not religious? Or is spirituality something even more sharply different from religion? Or is spirituality also part of religion? If we look closely at how people in a religious tradition live, what do we see that we would not notice if we were looking at the religion as only a system of beliefs? For instance, does the sense of time of people who adhere to the religion’s calendar of remembrances differ from the sense of time of people who do not? And what specifically would we do to learn about religion, if we concentrate on people’s actions? In opening up such inquiries students will learn both about studying religions and about major facets of religious traditions. The course will require reading and successful completion of tests. Visits to off-campus sites and completion of reports on site visits will facilitate learning through encounter and participation. Students will also undertake a project using concepts from the course to imagine and interpret lived religion in behaviors or in aspects of the physical or social world. The religions, practices, and sites for study, observation, and interpretation—as well as the assignments—may vary each time the course is offered. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2310 World Christianities (4 Credits)

This class will be an exploration of the variety of Christian expressions that have developed around the globe. As Christianity has spread through conquest, missionary work, immigration, trade, and other means, new converts and their offspring have had to reconcile Christian doctrines, rituals, and ethics with the beliefs and practices of their own cultures. This has led to what some scholars have referred to variously as mixing, syncretism, hybridity, creolization, contextualization and/or enculturation. This class, while considering the value of these terms, will, however, take the following as it’s foundational perspective: from the early Christian community to contemporary denominational specificity, all forms of Christianity have emerged as a result of cultural contextualization.

RLGS 2401 Social Justice in a Global Context: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)

Theories of social justice, beginning with the ancient Hebrews and Greeks and running up through the modern era. The religious sources of these ideas, drawn primarily from the monotheistic faiths of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, are profiled. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2410 Religious Diversity in Israel (4 Credits)

Through religious, sociological and historical sources, as well as documentaries, movies and scholarly readings, this course examines religious diversity in Israel since ts establishment in 1948 to current events today. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with JUST 2410.

RLGS 2501 Islam on Film (4 Credits)

This course uses the medium of film to introduce students to the history, faith, practice, culture(s), and politics of Islam. Focusing on feature films and documentaries, it employs film to open up a broad spectrum of questions relating to personal piety, gender equity, generational conflicts, social class, governmental repression, and ritual practice. Proceeding thematically along a broad historical frame, the course focuses on the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, presenting a balanced picture of life in Muslim-majority and Muslim-minority countries and highlighting the complex picture of Muslim life today. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RUSS 1416 Introduction to Russian Culture: Evil and the Supernatural (4 Credits)

What is evil? Where does it come from and what place does it have in our world? What, if anything, are we supposed to do about it? We examine how Russian writers wrestle with these thorny questions, and how they engage in a dialogue with the Russian folk tradition and the Orthodox church--two rich resources for thinking about and coping with evil. We read world-famous Russian classics such as Dostoevsky, Pushkin, Gogol, and Bulgakov, as well as Russian folk tales, writings produced by Russian Orthodox clergy, and recent critical studies that represent a broad range of approaches to the problem of evil. No knowledge of Russian is necessary; all class discussion, readings, and writing are in English. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with RUSS 2416.

RUSS 1613 Introduction to Russian Culture and Civilization (4 Credits)

This course surveys Russia's cultural past and present. Although it touches on aspects of Soviet Culture, the main emphasis is what has been called the "real Russian Culture," eclipsed for seventy years under the communist regime. The course surveys the various attitudes of Russian thinkers and authors towards the question of national identity and national destiny. Examples of Russian high culture (literature, art, film, music) and Russian religious faith (Orthodoxy) are discussed alongisde daily life and folkloric beliefs. The course includes several significant Russian films. Knowledge of Russian language and history is not required. The course format consists of lectures, slides, video and audio presentations, as well as whole-class and small-group discussions. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RUSS 1860 The Russian Short Story (4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to Russian literature through some of its shorter “masterpieces” of fiction. Students will explore the lives and ideas of some of Russia’s greatest writers, the literary movements of which they were a part, and the broader cultural and historical periods in which they wrote. Students will read and analyze works from the end of the 18th century to the Post-Soviet era, including stories by Pushkin, Gogol, Chekhov, and others. All course materials in English translation. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. No prerequisites.

RUSS 1917 Russian Revolution in Literature and History (4 Credits)

The course introduces students to the literature and history of the Russian revolution of 1917. Students examine how Russian literature helped pave the way for the revolution and how literature and film helped Russians make sense of the radical transformation of their society. Students gain insight into the reciprocal relationship of literature and politics, learning how literature shaped the revolutionary movement and how the revolution inspired new forms of artistic expression. All course materials in English translation. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. No Prerequisites.

RUSS 1922 The Soviet Experiment in Literature and Film (4 Credits)

Architects of the Soviet experiment claimed to create a radically new type of society and person, superior to all that came before. What were the defining features and founding myths of the Soviet identity, as propagandized by the government? How did this imagined identity clash with realities of life in the USSR? What cultural figures opposed the official discourse, and what artistic modes of resistance did they develop? To explore these questions, we read fiction and poetry by authors central to defining and contesting the Soviet experiment, including Maiakovski, Gladkov, Ginzburg, Pelevin, Dovlatov, and Petrushevskaya, and watch ground-breaking films by Vertov, Tarkovsky, Daneliya and others. All materials are in English. No prior knowledge of Russian literature or culture is required. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RUSS 2111 Linguistic Politeness and Intercultural Communication (4 Credits)

In this course, students will explore how American and Russian speakers perceive politeness, and how sociocultural values underlying both cultures affect the speakers’ communicative styles, their performance and perception of speech acts, and expression of emotions. Although this course focuses on Russian, other cultures will also be analyzed, such as German and Polish, and those of students’ heritage. This course will help students to improve their communicative competence and deepen their understanding of some European cultures. The course will be conducted in English. Highly recommended for students planning on studying in Russia, Germany, or Poland. The course format consists of lectures, presentations, as well as class and group discussions. Students who major in Russian may get credit by providing coursework in Russian. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RUSS 2116 Russian 19th-Century Novel: Society, Identity, and the Rise of Prose Fiction (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to classical Russian novels by world-famous authors, including Pushkin, Lermontov, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. Students develop an ability to interpret each work with a dual focus on text and context. Students deepen their appreciation of literary texts as works of art through learning to read closely and focusing on literary devices such as the narrator's voice, plot, structure, and figurative language. Students also learn to relate novels to their historical and cultural context, the better to understand how Russian writers responded to their country's intractable problems that included a crisis of cultural identity, the injustices of serfdom, and debates about women's place in society. All readings in English translation. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. No prerequisites.

RUSS 2416 Russian Classics in the Original: Evil and the Supernatural (4 Credits)

What is evil? Where does it come from and what place does it have in our world? What - if anything - are we supposed to do about it? We examine how Russian writers wrestle with these thorny questions, and how they engage in a dialogue with the Russian folk tradition and the Orthodox church - two rich resources for thinking about and coping with evil. We read world-famous Russian Classics such as Dostoevsky, Pushkin, Gogol, and Bulgakov, as well as Russian folk tales, writings produced by Russian Orthodox clergy, and recent critical studies that represent a broad range of approaches to the problem of evil. Readings and writing in Russian. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with RUSS 1416. May not be taken with or after RUSS 1416. Prerequisite: RUSS 2110 or equivalent.

RUSS 2917 Russian Revolution in Literature and History (4 Credits)

The course introduces students to the literature and history of the Russian revolution of 1917. Students examine how Russian literature helped pave the way for the revolution and how literature and film helped Russians make sense of the radical transformation of their society. Students gain insight into the reciprocal relationship of literature and politics, learning how literature shaped the revolutionary movement and how the revolution inspired new forms of artistic expression. Students develop their Russian reading and writing skills. Selected readings and all essays in Russian. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: RUSS 2110 or instructor approval. May not be taken after or together with RUSS 1917.

RUSS 3232 Russian Avant-Garde (4 Credits)

This interdisciplinary course addresses various manifestations of the avant-garde in Russian art, literature, poetry, theatre and film in the late 19th – early 20th century. Its objective is to provide an understanding of rapid, drastic, and often conflicting cultural and artistic transformations as a whole, rather than a mixture of separate events, trends, and works. Major artistic and literary movements, such as Symbolism, Futurism, Cubo-futurism, Neo-Primitivism, Suprematism, Rayonism and Constructivism will be studied in the context of Russian pre-revolutionary, revolutionary and post-revolutionary social, political, philosophical and cultural developments, with a special attention paid to the cultural dialogue between Russia and the West. Selected philosophical essays, films, plays, poems and short stories are studied, in addition to a variety of works of art created during this period, beginning with the first modernist experimentation of the Silver Age (turn of the century) through the imposition of Socialist Realism in the 1930s.

SPAN 1500 Understanding Contemporary Spain (4 Credits)

This course examines the key political, social and cultural issues at play in contemporary Spanish society. Via the analysis of various texts –historical, sociological, literary, filmic—this course will familiarize students with the key issues that define Spanish society today. The themes that will be the primary focus of class discussions and assignments include national vs. regional identities, gender roles, multiculturalism, Spain and the European Union and the legacy of the Franco dictatorship. Students will also read short stories by contemporary Spanish authors that address these same themes in order to have the opportunity to analyze and interpret artistic representations of thekey issues at play in Spanish society today. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

SPAN 2300 Iberian Culture & Civilization (4 Credits)

Intensive study of culture of Spain; manifestations of culture found in history, art, architecture, music, literature, and politics of early and modern Spain. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or equivalent.

SPAN 2350 Latin American Culture and Societies (4 Credits)

An introductory and interdisciplinary course on the political, historical, and cultural dynamics that have shaped Latin America, the Caribbean and U.S. Latinos. An examination of the political and intellectual movements and economic forces embedded in relations of power from pre-Colombian civilizations, colonialism, independence, nation building, and imperialism to the struggle for democracy. Analysis of diverse cultural practices such as literature, music, film, and visual art within a national and transnational context. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or equivalent.

SPAN 2400 Latino Cultures in the United States (4 Credits)

Interdisciplinary study of Latino contemporary issues in the United States incorporating aspects of the distinct socio-historical, political, economic, and cultural dynamics that have contributed to the shaping, development and increasing prominence of Latino communities. Includes an examination of how Latino cultural forms and practices intersect with socio-historical, economic, and political forces as a framework for understanding the Mexicano/Chicano, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican and other Latino communities embedded in the very fabric of what constitutes the United States. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: SPAN 2350 or equivalent.

THEA 1810 The Process of Theatre: Page to Stage (4 Credits)

Exploration of the process playwrights, directors, actors, and designers use in creating a theatrical production. Individual sections may focus on single areas only—please see department for current offerings. In this course, students will demonstrate the ability to create or interpret the texts, ideas or artifacts of human culture. They will also identify and analyze the connections between these things and the human experience/perception of the world. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

THEA 1861 Theatre Imagination (4 Credits)

Beginning exploration of nature of theatricality through exercises and study of specific plays; explore acting, directing, designing and writing. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

THEA 1862 How to Read a Play (4 Credits)

Close analysis of selected dramatic texts from Aeschylus to Caryl Churchill. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

THEA 1880 Fundamentals of Theatre Design (4 Credits)

The work of the theatre designer is to transform a text into visual and aural expression, by planning and creating the physical environment of a live performance. Students will learn about -- and learn appreciation for -- theatre design in order to be better theatre artists (and audience members) themselves, through the applied practice of designing a "paper" production, collaboratively with a small team.

THEA 2870 Acting I (4 Credits)

Exploration of acting through physical and vocal exercises, followed by scene study. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

THEA 2880 Scene Design I (4 Credits)

Exploration of methods, techniques and procedures involved in transforming scenic concepts into actual practice. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

THEA 2881 Lighting Design I (4 Credits)

Exploration of methods, techniques and procedures involved in transforming lighting concepts into actual practice. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

THEA 2890 Theatre History I (4 Credits)

This course examines the development of Western theatre and drama from the Ancient Greeks to the 19th-Century, concentrating on the intellectual, social and artistic foundations of theatre and drama. The course is designed to engage theatre from its theatrical, social, cultural, and historical contexts. The lecture-discussion format of this course is intended to foster an active engagement among the students with the theatre and drama of the past. Through in-class readings, discussions of the readings, written assignments, and presentations, students are encouraged to consider the material under investigation from sociohistorical and theatrical perspectives, as well as from the material's relation and relevance to the present. The focus is on theatre and drama representative of the major styles, authors, and genres from Fifth-Century B.C.E. into the early 19th-Century. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

THEA 2891 Theatre History II (4 Credits)

This course examines the development of Western theatre and drama from the 19th-Century to the present. Concentrating on the intellectual, social and artistic foundations of theatre and drama, this course is designed to engage theatre from its theatrical, social, cultural, and historical contexts. The lecture-discussion format of this course is intended to foster an active engagement among students with the theatre and drama of the past. Through in-class readings, discussions of the readings, written assignments, and presentations, students are encouraged to consider the material under investigation from sociohistorical and theatrical perspectives, as well as from the material's relation and relevance to the present. The focus is on theatre and drama representative of the major styles, authors, and genres from the 19th-Century to the present. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

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