2016-2017 Graduate Bulletin

Professional Psychology

Office: Ammi Hyde Building
Mail Code: 2450 S. Vine Street, Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-3736
Email: gsppinfo@du.edu
Web Site: www.du.edu/gspp/

Doctor of Psychology in clinical Psychology (psyD)

The PsyD program of the University of Denver is housed in the Graduate School of Professional Psychology (GSPP). GSPP’s mission is to provide an innovative educational environment that promotes the application of psychological theory, knowledge, skills, and attitudes/values to professional practice. The mission of the PsyD program is to train competent doctoral level practitioner-scholars who have foundational interpersonal and scientific skills, and have a functional mastery of psychological assessment and intervention, who can apply this knowledge and skill in a wide range of settings, with a variety of populations. 

Program Accreditation

The PsyD program has been continuously accredited by the American Psychological Association since 1979, upholding the practitioner-scholar model of training (also known as the Vail model).

Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology

The Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology was first offered at the GSPP in 1999 in response to the growing interest in the rapidly developing field of forensic psychology. The degree supplements fundamental master's level clinical psychology training with course work and practicum experiences in the area of psychology and law. The Master’s Degree in Forensic Psychology concerns the application of psychological theory, knowledge, skills and competencies to the civil and criminal justice systems. It is designed to train students to become mental health professionals, able to work in a variety of clinical settings within the criminal and civil legal system, including but not limited to: adult, juvenile and child populations; victim assistance; police consultation; correctional institutions; intimate partner violence and child abuse programs; and trial consulting. The MAFP Program is unique in many respects. Our curriculum, consisting of 90 credits, is forensically and clinically based, with an emphasis on applied practice.  Students complete two year-long field placements, allowing for the exploration of different forensic interests and providing them with a solid clinical foundation. Students benefit from the expertise of core and adjunct faculty who are active practitioners and scholars in the field.

Master of Arts in International Disaster Psychology

The University of Denver's Graduate School of Professional Psychology is proud to offer our Master’s Program in International Disaster Psychology. This degree is designed for those who wish to provide effective mental health and psychosocial services to individuals and communities in the US and globally who are affected by traumatic events, acute and chronic civil conflict, natural disasters, and health-related pandemics. Our program is recognized for ‘Innovative Graduate Training’ by both the American Psychological Association & the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology, and is the first master’s program of its kind in the nation.  

Through academic coursework and practical experiences students develop a solid foundation for knowledge and skills in the mental health field and unique and specific approaches in the field of international disaster psychology. Students receive essential opportunities to integrate knowledge with practice in contextually relevant and culturally competent ways. Internship experiences domestically and abroad, disaster simulation exercises, and classroom case studies support an integrated training experience helping students bring a “best practice” model to their work in a variety of psychosocial and mental health contexts internationally and in the U.S.

Instruction is provided in diverse areas including international disaster psychology, trauma intervention, disaster mental health, gender-based violence, crisis intervention, group dynamics, loss and grief, the effects of trauma on life-span development, psychotherapeutic models, program evaluation and research, global health, and cross-cultural foundations. Faculty expertise addresses the full span of mental health and psychosocial work that is necessary for effective work in this innovative field.

Our graduates work in a variety of professional settings providing direct services to populations affected by trauma, training and consulting with community, non-governmental and government agencies to promote psychosocial wellness of affected populations, developing emergency preparedness and response plans, and monitoring and evaluating psychosocial interventions. With comprehensive and specialized training in this emerging field of international disaster psychology, our students are prepared to make a difference in the world.

Master of Arts in Sport & Performance Psychology

The University of Denver's Graduate School of Professional Psychology (GSPP), with its history of pioneering innovative training in psychology, is proud to offer a Master of Arts degree in Sport and Performance Psychology. This degree is intended for individuals in the sport, performing arts, health and fitness, or mental health fields who want to develop their ability to improve the performance and lives of those with whom they work. Those applicants involved in coaching and teaching in sport and performance settings are encouraged to add to their skills and abilities through this training. Denver's passion for sports and a thriving performing arts scene make it a perfect place to master the practice of sport and performance psychology.

The field of sport and performance psychology is concerned with the psychological factors that influence human performance. Simply put, sport and performance psychology is about improving the lives of others. It involves assessment and intervention strategies that enhance an individual's performance and personal growth.

GSPP's program is unique and pioneering in many respects. There are four areas in which this program truly stands out from other educational opportunities in the field of sport and performance psychology: our applied focus, the curriculum, practicum opportunities, and the faculty. The program provides the necessary training for an individual to become a competent, proficient sport and performance psychologist with the completion of a psychology doctoral program. The Master of Arts degree in Sport and Performance Psychology will help those who coach and work with others do their job more effectively and experience more rewarding outcomes.

Master of Arts in Sport Coaching (Online)

The Sport Coaching program is housed in the Graduate School of Professional Psychology (GSPP), which has a rich history of innovative professional preparation. Psychologists and sport psychologists were pioneers to study coach effectiveness and coach education. In recent years, coach education at a University setting has become more popular, and more important to produce quality coaches. The Sport Coaching program is the only master’s level degree program in coaching offered in a school of psychology in the country. Our program builds upon the innovative preparation of the GSPP and the successful Master of Arts in Sport & Performance Psychology, but diverges in important ways.

The Sport Coaching curriculum was built from the ground up with student success and coach success in mind. From idea to implementation, nearly two years went into planning and designing the curriculum, collaborating with leading experts in teaching, learning and student success, hiring quality instructors with experience in sport and coaching settings, and crafting our courses. Students may complete all of the degree requirements fully online. Also, we are engaged in the process of becoming accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Coach Education programs and recognized by the National Strength and Conditioning Association. Upon approval, we will be the only program in the world accredited and recognized by these two distinguished national organizations.

Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology

Following are the simple steps to apply for graduate study in Forensic Psychology at the Graduate School of Professional Psychology, University of Denver. If you have any questions about the process, please contact the Office of Graduate Studies or the Graduate School of Professional Psychology Department.

Apply Online / Application Deadlines

  • Applications for graduate study at the University of Denver must be submitted online. Apply online.
  • Applicants are encouraged to have all online materials and supplemental materials, including transcripts, on file in the Office of Graduate Studies by the program’s stated deadline: January 5, 2016. Late application documents may continue to be accepted, but could delay the review of one’s application. The program admits for the fall quarter only. Please call the Graduate School of Professional Psychology to learn more: (303) 871-2908.
  • A $65 non-refundable application fee is required for an application to be processed. Application fee waivers are available for McNair Scholars.

Course and Degree Prerequisites and Requirements

  • Applicants must earn and submit proof of earning the equivalent of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution prior to beginning graduate coursework at DU. GSPP looks for an undergraduate GPA of around a 3.5.
  • For applicants WITHOUT a psychology background, the psychology prerequisite can be met through coursework or by obtaining a score of at least 660 on the psychology subject GRE. Applicants should state how they plan to meet the psychology prerequisite in their application.
  • For the psychology coursework prerequisite, applicants must complete four (4) psychology courses earning a 'B' or better in these classes from a regionally accredited institution. Applicants offered admission should be aware that all psychology classes must be completed before registration in September.
  • We recommend the following foundation courses:
    • abnormal psychology
    • child psychology
    • experimental psychology (requires the student to complete the content portion of an experimental psychology class [e.g., learning, perception, cognition, motivation, physiology, and to perform one or more direct experiments using the scientific method applied to some empirical question. This second requirement is often met by taking an experimental lab associated with the course.)
    • personality theory
    • statistics

Transcripts

  • Applicants are required to submit one official transcript from each post-secondary institution they have attended, or are presently attending, where two quarter hours (or one semester hour) or more were completed including study abroad and college coursework completed in high school.
  • The applicant is responsible for obtaining all transcripts. Applicants who have earned a degree outside the U.S. must submit transcripts accompanied by certified English translations, if not normally issued in English. DU students and alumni do not need to provide DU transcripts.
  • Official study abroad transcripts are required unless the course titles, grades and credit earned abroad appear on another transcript. Transcripts from outside of the U.S. are evaluated by the Office of International Student Admission. This process can take three to four weeks and must be complete by the program’s stated deadline. Therefore, applicants with a degree from outside of the U.S. are encouraged to apply early. Applicants educated outside the U.S. are encouraged to contact the Office of Graduate Studies for assistance regarding transcript-related materials.
  • The University of Denver will consider electronic transcripts official from a domestic institution provided by the following approved agencies: Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcript System (AARTS); Docufide/Parchment; National Student Clearinghouse; Naviance; Royall and Company; and, Scrip-Safe.
  • Mail official transcripts to

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

Language Proficiency

  • Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. Applications will not be processed until the required TOEFL or IELTS score is received. The TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. The minimum TOEFL score accepted by the Graduate School of Professional Psychology is 80 (iBT) or 550 (paper-based). The institution code for the University of Denver is 4842. The minimum IELTS score accepted by the University is 6.0. Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) must demonstrate fluency in spoken English by scoring a 26 on the TOEFL speaking section or 8.0 on the IELTS speaking section. Please see the Graduate Policy Manual for complete English language proficiency requirements.
  • Applicants may be exempted from English proficiency test requirements if by the time of matriculation they have earned a post-secondary degree from a formally-recognized/accredited university where the language of instruction and examination is English. Such applicants may be exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement but not from other standardized graduate entrance examinations. There are no exemptions for graduate teaching assistants.
  • Students whose native language is not English and who are required to submit TOEFL/IELTS scores will be assessed by the University of Denver English Language Center (ELC) prior to matriculation.

GRE Scores

  • General GRE scores are required; GRE psychology subject test is optional.
  • Scores must be received directly from the appropriate testing agency. DU's ETS Institution Code is 4842.
  • The GRE must have been taken within 5 years of the application date.
  • Applicants should take the GRE no later than the last testing date in December of the year prior to potential enrollment.
  • GSPP does not have GRE cutoff scores; we look for baseline scores near the 50th percentile or higher.

Essay

Resume / C.V.

  • A resume or C.V. is required. Please detail all relevant experiences in your resume/CV. This should include work experience, research, and/or volunteer work. The resume should be submitted via upload through the online application process.

Recommendation Letters

  • Two letters of recommendation are required; 3 letters are strongly preferred. If possible, it is helpful to have 1 letter speak to your academic abilities. Letters should be solicited and uploaded by recommenders through the online application system. Requests for letters should be sent to recommenders well in advance so the letters are on file by the application deadline.

Financial Support

  • To be considered for financial support, domestic applicants should apply early and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by the priority deadline; February 15. Information about financial aid can be found on the Office of Financial Aid Website. International students are not eligible for federal financial aid. All applicants are automatically considered for financial awards.

Application Status

  • We encourage you to be actively engaged in the admission process. You can check your application status online. Applicants will receive login information post application submission.

Contact Information

  • Mail official transcripts and any supplemental admission materials not submitted with the online application:

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

  • Electronic transcripts should be sent to gradinfo@du.edu.

  • For more information call the Office of Graduate Studies (303) 871-2706.

  • Graduate School of Professional Psychology: (303) 871-2908 or gsppinfo@du.edu.

International Applicants

  • For complete international applicant information, please visit the Office of Graduate Studies International Student Application Information. International applicants are strongly encouraged to have their applications complete, with all materials on file in the admission office, at least eight weeks prior to the program’s application deadline.

The Graduate Policies and Procedures provides complete details regarding admission requirements.

Master of Arts in International Disaster Psychology

Following are the simple steps to apply for graduate study in International Disaster Psychology at the Graduate School of Professional Psychology, University of Denver. If you have any questions about the process, please contact the Office of Graduate Studies or the Graduate School of Professional Psychology Department.

Apply Online / Application Deadlines

  • Applications for graduate study at the University of Denver must be submitted online. Apply online.
  • Applicants are encouraged to have all online materials and supplemental materials, including transcripts, on file in the Office of Graduate Studies by the program’s stated deadline: January 5, 2016. Late application documents may continue to be accepted, but could delay the review of one’s application. The program admits for the fall quarter only. Please call the Graduate School of Professional Psychology to learn more: (303) 871-2908
  • A $65 non-refundable application fee is required for an application to be processed. Application fee waivers are available for McNair Scholars.

Course and Degree Prerequisites and Requirements

  • Applicants must earn and submit proof of earning the equivalent of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution prior to beginning graduate coursework at DU. GSPP looks for an undergraduate GPA of around a 3.5.
  • For applicants WITHOUT a psychology background, the psychology prerequisite can be met through coursework or by obtaining a score of at least 660 on the psychology subject GRE. Applicants should state how they plan to meet the psychology prerequisite in their application.
  • For the psychology coursework prerequisite, applicants must complete four (4) psychology courses earning a 'B' or better in these classes from a regionally accredited institution. Applicants offered admission should be aware that all psychology classes must be completed before registration in September.
  • We recommend the following foundation courses:
    • abnormal psychology
    • child psychology
    • experimental psychology (requires the student to complete the content portion of an experimental psychology class [e.g., learning, perception, cognition, motivation, physiology, and to perform one or more direct experiments using the scientific method applied to some empirical question. This second requirement is often met by taking an experimental lab associated with the course.)
    • personality theory
    • statistics

Transcripts

  • Applicants are required to submit one official transcript from each post-secondary institution they have attended, or are presently attending, where two quarter hours (or one semester hour) or more were completed including study abroad and college coursework completed in high school.
  • The applicant is responsible for obtaining all transcripts. Applicants who have earned a degree outside the U.S. must submit transcripts accompanied by certified English translations, if not normally issued in English. DU students and alumni do not need to provide DU transcripts.
  • Official study abroad transcripts are required unless the course titles, grades and credit earned abroad appear on another transcript. Transcripts from outside of the U.S. are evaluated by the Office of International Student Admission. This process can take three to four weeks and must be complete by the program’s stated deadline. Therefore, applicants with a degree from outside of the U.S. are encouraged to apply early. Applicants educated outside the U.S. are encouraged to contact the Office of Graduate Studies for assistance regarding transcript-related materials.
  • The University of Denver will consider electronic transcripts official from a domestic institution provided by the following approved agencies: Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcript System (AARTS); Docufide/Parchment; National Student Clearinghouse; Naviance; Royall and Company; and, Scrip-Safe.
  • Mail official transcripts to

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

Language Proficiency

  • Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. Applications will not be processed until the required TOEFL or IELTS score is received. The TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. The minimum TOEFL score accepted by the Graduate School of Professional Psychology is 80 (iBT) or 550 (paper-based). The institution code for the University of Denver is 4842. The minimum IELTS score accepted by the University is 6.0. Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) must demonstrate fluency in spoken English by scoring a 26 on the TOEFL speaking section or 8.0 on the IELTS speaking section. Please see the Graduate Policy Manual for complete English language proficiency requirements.
  • Applicants may be exempted from English proficiency test requirements if by the time of matriculation they have earned a post-secondary degree from a formally-recognized/accredited university where the language of instruction and examination is English. Such applicants may be exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement but not from other standardized graduate entrance examinations. There are no exemptions for graduate teaching assistants.
  • Students whose native language is not English and who are required to submit TOEFL/IELTS scores will be assessed by the University of Denver English Language Center (ELC) prior to matriculation.

GRE Scores

  • General GRE scores are required; GRE psychology subject test is optional.
  • Scores must be received directly from the appropriate testing agency. DU's ETS Institution Code is 4842.
  • The GRE must have been taken within 5 years of the application date.
  • Applicants should take the GRE no later than the last testing date in December of the year prior to potential enrollment.
  • GSPP does not have GRE cutoff scores; we look for baseline scores near the 50th percentile or higher.

Essay

Resume / C.V.

  • A resume or C.V. is required. Please detail all relevant experiences in your resume/CV. This should include work experience, research, and/or volunteer work. The resume should be submitted via upload through the online application process.

Recommendation Letters

  • Two letters of recommendation are required; 3 letters are strongly preferred. If possible, it is helpful to have 1 letter speak to your academic abilities. Letters should be solicited and uploaded by recommenders through the online application system. Requests for letters should be sent to recommenders well in advance so the letters are on file by the application deadline.

Financial Support

  • To be considered for financial support, domestic applicants should apply early and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by the priority deadline; February 15. Information about financial aid can be found on the Office of Financial Aid Website. International students are not eligible for federal financial aid. All applicants are automatically considered for financial awards.

Application Status

  • We encourage you to be actively engaged in the admission process. You can check your application status online. Applicants will receive login information post application submission.

Contact Information

  • Mail official transcripts and any supplemental admission materials not submitted with the online application:

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

  • Electronic transcripts should be sent to gradinfo@du.edu.

  • For more information call The Office of Graduate Studies (303) 871-2706.

  • Graduate School of Professional Psychology: (303) 871-2908 or gsppinfo@du.edu.

International Applicants

  • For complete international applicant information, please visit the Office of Graduate Studies International Student Application Information. International applicants are strongly encouraged to have their applications complete, with all materials on file in the admission office, at least eight weeks prior to the program’s application deadline.

The Graduate Policies and Procedures provides complete details regarding admission requirements.

Master of Arts in Sport & Performance Psychology

Following are the simple steps to apply for graduate study in Sport & Performance Psychology at the Graduate School of Professional Psychology, University of Denver. If you have any questions about the process, please contact the Office of Graduate Studies or the Graduate School of Professional Psychology Department.

Apply Online / Application Deadlines

  • Applications for graduate study at the University of Denver must be submitted online. Apply online.
  • Applicants are encouraged to have all online materials and supplemental materials, including transcripts, on file in the Office of Graduate Studies by the program’s stated deadline: January 5, 2016. Late application documents may continue to be accepted, but could delay the review of one’s application. The program admits for the fall quarter only. Please call the Graduate School of Professional Psychology to learn more: (303) 871-2908
  • A $65 non-refundable application fee is required for an application to be processed. Application fee waivers are available for McNair Scholars.

Course and Degree Prerequisites and Requirements

  • Applicants must earn and submit proof of earning the equivalent of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution prior to beginning graduate coursework at DU. GSPP looks for an undergraduate GPA of around a 3.5.
  • For applicants WITHOUT a psychology background, the psychology prerequisite can be met through coursework or by obtaining a score of at least 660 on the psychology subject GRE. Applicants should state how they plan to meet the psychology prerequisite in their application.
  • For the psychology coursework prerequisite, applicants must complete four (4) psychology courses earning a 'B' or better in these classes from a regionally accredited institution. Applicants offered admission should be aware that all psychology classes must be completed before registration in September.
  • We recommend the following foundation courses:
    • abnormal psychology
    • child psychology
    • experimental psychology (requires the student to complete the content portion of an experimental psychology class [e.g., learning, perception, cognition, motivation, physiology, and to perform one or more direct experiments using the scientific method applied to some empirical question. This second requirement is often met by taking an experimental lab associated with the course.)
    • personality theory
    • statistics

Transcripts

  • Applicants are required to submit one official transcript from each post-secondary institution they have attended, or are presently attending, where two quarter hours (or one semester hour) or more were completed including study abroad and college coursework completed in high school.
  • The applicant is responsible for obtaining all transcripts. Applicants who have earned a degree outside the U.S. must submit transcripts accompanied by certified English translations, if not normally issued in English. DU students and alumni do not need to provide DU transcripts.
  • Official study abroad transcripts are required unless the course titles, grades and credit earned abroad appear on another transcript. Transcripts from outside of the U.S. are evaluated by the Office of International Student Admission. This process can take three to four weeks and must be complete by the program’s stated deadline. Therefore, applicants with a degree from outside of the U.S. are encouraged to apply early. Applicants educated outside the U.S. are encouraged to contact the Office of Graduate Studies for assistance regarding transcript-related materials.
  • The University of Denver will consider electronic transcripts official from a domestic institution provided by the following approved agencies: Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcript System (AARTS); Docufide/Parchment; National Student Clearinghouse; Naviance; Royall and Company; and, Scrip-Safe.
  • Mail official transcripts to

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

Language Proficiency

  • Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. Applications will not be processed until the required TOEFL or IELTS score is received. The TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. The minimum TOEFL score accepted by the Graduate School of Professional Psychology is 80 (iBT) or 550 (paper-based). The institution code for the University of Denver is 4842. The minimum IELTS score accepted by the University is 6.0. Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) must demonstrate fluency in spoken English by scoring a 26 on the TOEFL speaking section or 8.0 on the IELTS speaking section. Please see the Graduate Policy Manual for complete English language proficiency requirements.
  • Applicants may be exempted from English proficiency test requirements if by the time of matriculation they have earned a post-secondary degree from a formally-recognized/accredited university where the language of instruction and examination is English. Such applicants may be exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement but not from other standardized graduate entrance examinations. There are no exemptions for graduate teaching assistants.
  • Students whose native language is not English and who are required to submit TOEFL/IELTS scores will be assessed by the University of Denver English Language Center (ELC) prior to matriculation.

GREScores

  • General GRE scores are required; GRE psychology subject test is optional.
  • Scores must be received directly from the appropriate testing agency. DU's ETS Institution Code is 4842.
  • The GRE must have been taken within 5 years of the application date.
  • Applicants should take the GRE no later than the last testing date in December of the year prior to potential enrollment.
  • GSPP does not have GRE cutoff scores; we look for baseline scores near the 50th percentile or higher.

Essay

Resume / C.V.

  • A resume or C.V. is required. Please detail all relevant experiences in your resume/CV. This should include work experience, research, and/or volunteer work. The resume should be submitted via upload through the online application process.

Recommendation Letters

  • Two letters of recommendation are required; 3 letters are strongly preferred. If possible, it is helpful to have 1 letter speak to your academic abilities. Letters should be solicited and uploaded by recommenders through the online application system. Requests for letters should be sent to recommenders well in advance so the letters are on file by the application deadline.

Financial Support

  • To be considered for financial support, domestic applicants should apply early and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by the priority deadline; February 15. Information about financial aid can be found on the Office of Financial Aid Website. International students are not eligible for federal financial aid. All applicants are automatically considered for financial awards.

Application Status

  • We encourage you to be actively engaged in the admission process. You can check your application status online. Applicants will receive login information post application submission.

Contact Information

  • Mail official transcripts and any supplemental admission materials not submitted with the online application:

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

  • Electronic transcripts should be sent to gradinfo@du.edu.

  • For more information call The Office of Graduate Studies (303) 871-2706.

  • Graduate School of Professional Psychology: (303) 871-2908 or gsppinfo@du.edu.

International Applicants

  • For complete international applicant information, please visit the Office of Graduate Studies International Student Application Information. International applicants are strongly encouraged to have their applications complete, with all materials on file in the admission office, at least eight weeks prior to the program’s application deadline.

The Graduate Policies and Procedures provides complete details regarding admission requirements.

Master of arts in sport coaching (online)

Following are the simple steps to apply for graduate study in Sport Coaching at the Graduate School of Professional Psychology, University of Denver. If you have any questions about the process, please contact the Office of Graduate Studies.

Apply Online / Application Deadlines

  • Applications for graduate study at the University of Denver must be submitted online. Apply online.
  • The Sport Coaching program was designed for rolling admissions, which means upon acceptance students may begin taking courses during any quarter. Students should apply no more than one year in advance of the quarter they seek to begin.
  • A $65 non-refundable application fee is required for an application to be processed. Application fee waivers are available for McNair Scholars.

Course and Degree Prerequisites and Requirements

  • Applicants must earn and submit proof of earning the equivalent of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution prior to beginning graduate coursework at DU. GSPP looks for an undergraduate GPA of around a 3.5.

Transcripts

  • Applicants are required to submit one official transcript from each post-secondary institution they have attended, or are presently attending, where two quarter hours (or one semester hour) or more were completed including study abroad and college coursework completed in high school.
  • The applicant is responsible for obtaining all transcripts. Applicants who have earned a degree outside the U.S. must submit transcripts accompanied by certified English translations, if not normally issued in English. DU students and alumni do not need to provide DU transcripts.
  • Official study abroad transcripts are required unless the course titles, grades and credit earned abroad appear on another transcript. Transcripts from outside of the U.S. are evaluated by the Office of International Student Admission. This process can take three to four weeks and must be complete by the program’s stated deadline. Therefore, applicants with a degree from outside of the U.S. are encouraged to apply early. Applicants educated outside the U.S. are encouraged to contact the Office of Graduate Studies for assistance regarding transcript-related materials.
  • The University of Denver will consider electronic transcripts official from a domestic institution provided by the following approved agencies: Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcript System (AARTS); Docufide/Parchment; National Student Clearinghouse; Naviance; Royall and Company; and, Scrip-Safe.
  • Mail official transcripts to

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

Language Proficiency

  • Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. Applications will not be processed until the required TOEFL or IELTS score is received. The TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. The minimum TOEFL score accepted by the Graduate School of Professional Psychology is 80 (iBT) or 550 (paper-based). The institution code for the University of Denver is 4842. The minimum IELTS score accepted by the University is 6.0. Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) must demonstrate fluency in spoken English by scoring a 26 on the TOEFL speaking section or 8.0 on the IELTS speaking section. Please see the Graduate Policy Manual for complete English language proficiency requirements.
  • Applicants may be exempted from English proficiency test requirements if by the time of matriculation they have earned a post-secondary degree from a formally-recognized/accredited university where the language of instruction and examination is English. Such applicants may be exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement but not from other standardized graduate entrance examinations. There are no exemptions for graduate teaching assistants.
  • Students whose native language is not English and who are required to submit TOEFL/IELTS scores will be assessed by the University of Denver English Language Center (ELC) prior to matriculation.

Test Scores

  • The GRE is not required for Sport Coaching.

Essay

  • Submit an essay (600 word maximum) of intent that clearly and concisely outline the three following items (1) your motivation to complete the Sport Coaching degree, (2) what steps you will take to facilitate your learning in an online environment and (3) what steps you will take to complete the degree.

Resume / C.V.

  • Submit a resume or curriculum vitae detailing all relevant athletic, coach, and administrative experience. Students should have a minimum of one year related experience. Students with less than two years of related experience should plan on completing an extensive practicum experience.

Recommendation Letters

  • Submit a minimum of two letters of recommendation, with up to four strongly encouraged. At least one letter should be from a university instructor or professor who can speak to your academic abilities, motivation, and knowledge of sport coaching, and another letter from a coach or administrator whom you played for at the club, high school, college or professional level, OR, a coach or athletic administrator you worked for (e.g., a coach who acted as a mentor or internship supervisor. If submitting more than two letters, we recommend students select people from varying backgrounds (i.e., coaches, administrators, teachers, athletes, peers, previous employers).

Financial Support

  • To be considered for financial support, domestic applicants should apply early and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by the priority deadline; February 15. Information about financial aid can be found on the Office of Financial Aid Website. International students are not eligible for federal financial aid. All applicants are automatically considered for financial awards.

Application Status

  • We encourage you to be actively engaged in the admission process. You can check your application status online at PioneerWeb. Applicants will receive login information post application submission.

Contact Information

  • Mail official transcripts and any supplemental admission materials not submitted with the online application:

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

  • Electronic transcripts should be sent to gradinfo@du.edu.

  • For more information call The Office of Graduate Studies (303) 871-2706.

  • Graduate School of Professional Psychology: (303) 871-2908 or gsppinfo@du.edu.

International Applicants

  • For complete international applicant information, please visit the Office of Graduate Studies International Student Application Information. International applicants are strongly encouraged to have their applications complete, with all materials on file in the admission office, at least eight weeks prior to the program’s application deadline.

The Graduate Policies and Procedures provides complete details regarding admission requirements.

Doctor of Psychology in Clinical psychology (psy.D.)

Following are the simple steps to apply for the Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (Psy.D.) at the Graduate School of Professional Psychology, University of Denver. If you have any questions about the process, please contact the Office of Graduate Studies or the Graduate School of Professional Psychology Department.

Apply Online / Application Deadlines

  • Applications for graduate study at the University of Denver must be submitted online. Apply online.
  • Applicants are encouraged to have all online materials and supplemental materials, including transcripts, on file in the Office of Graduate Studies by the program’s stated deadline: December 5th. Late application documents may continue to be accepted, but could delay the review of one’s application. The program admits for the fall quarter only. Please call the Graduate School of Professional Psychology to learn more: (303) 871-2908.
  • A $65 non-refundable application fee is required for an application to be processed. Application fee waivers are available for McNair Scholars.

Course and Degree Prerequisites and Requirements

  • Applicants must earn and submit proof of earning the equivalent of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution prior to beginning graduate coursework at DU. GSPP looks for an undergraduate GPA of around a 3.5 and a graduate GPA of a 3.0.
  • For applicants WITHOUT a psychology background or without an MA/MS in clinical or counseling psychology, the psychology prerequisite can be met through coursework or by obtaining a score of at least 660 on the psychology subject GRE. Applicants should state how they plan to meet the psychology prerequisite in their application.
  • For the psychology coursework prerequisite, applicants must complete four (4) psychology courses earning a 'B' or better in these classes from a regionally accredited institution. Applicants offered admission should be aware that all psychology classes must be completed before registration in September.
  • We recommend the following foundation courses:
    • abnormal psychology
    • child psychology
    • experimental psychology (requires the student to complete the content portion of an experimental psychology class [e.g., learning, perception, cognition, motivation, physiology, and to perform one or more direct experiments using the scientific method applied to some empirical question. This second requirement is often met by taking an experimental lab associated with the course.)
    • personality theory
    • statistics

Transcripts

  • Applicants are required to submit one official transcript from each post-secondary institution they have attended, or are presently attending, where two quarter hours (or one semester hour) or more were completed including study abroad and college coursework completed in high school.
  • The applicant is responsible for obtaining all transcripts. Applicants who have earned a degree outside the U.S. must submit transcripts accompanied by certified English translations, if not normally issued in English. DU students and alumni do not need to provide DU transcripts.
  • Official study abroad transcripts are required unless the course titles, grades and credit earned abroad appear on another transcript. Transcripts from outside of the U.S. are evaluated by the Office of International Student Admission. This process can take three to four weeks and must be complete by the program’s stated deadline. Therefore, applicants with a degree from outside of the U.S. are encouraged to apply early. Applicants educated outside the U.S. are encouraged to contact the Office of Graduate Studies for assistance regarding transcript-related materials.
  • The University of Denver will consider electronic transcripts official from a domestic institution provided by the following approved agencies: Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcript System (AARTS); Docufide/Parchment; National Student Clearinghouse; Naviance; Royall and Company; and, Scrip-Safe.
  • Mail official transcripts to

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

Language Proficiency

  • Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. Applications will not be processed until the required TOEFL or IELTS score is received. The TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. The minimum TOEFL score accepted by the Graduate School of Professional Psychology is 80 (iBT) or 550 (paper-based). The institution code for the University of Denver is 4842. The minimum IELTS score accepted by the University is 6.0. Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) must demonstrate fluency in spoken English by scoring a 26 on the TOEFL speaking section or 8.0 on the IELTS speaking section. Please see the Graduate Policy Manual for complete English language proficiency requirements.
  • Applicants may be exempted from English proficiency test requirements if by the time of matriculation they have earned a post-secondary degree from a formally-recognized/accredited university where the language of instruction and examination is English. Such applicants may be exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement but not from other standardized graduate entrance examinations. There are no exemptions for graduate teaching assistants.
  • Students whose native language is not English and who are required to submit TOEFL/IELTS scores will be assessed by the University of Denver English Language Center (ELC) prior to matriculation.

Test Scores

  • General GRE scores are required; GRE psychology subject test is optional.
  • Scores must be received directly from the appropriate testing agency. DU's ETS Institution Code is 4842.
  • The GRE must have been taken within 5 years of the application date.
  • Applicants should take the GRE no later than the last testing date in December of the year prior to potential enrollment.
  • GSPP does not have GRE cutoff scores; we look for baseline scores near the 50th percentile or higher.

Essay

Resume / C.V.

  • A resume or C.V. is required. Please detail all relevant experiences in your resume/CV. This should include work experience, research, and/or volunteer work. The resume should be submitted via upload through the online application process.

Recommendation Letters

  • Two letters of recommendation are required; 3 letters are strongly preferred. If possible, it is helpful to have 1 letter speak to your academic abilities. Letters should be solicited and uploaded by recommenders through the online application system. Requests for letters should be sent to recommenders well in advance so the letters are on file by the application deadline.

Financial Support

  • To be considered for financial support, domestic applicants should apply early and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by the priority deadline; February 15. Information about financial aid can be found on the Office of Financial Aid Website. International students are not eligible for federal financial aid. All applicants are automatically considered for financial awards.

Application Status

  • We encourage you to be actively engaged in the admission process. You can check your application status online. Applicants will receive login information post application submission.

Contact Information

  • Mail official transcripts and any supplemental admission materials not submitted with the online application:

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

  • Electronic transcripts should be sent to gradinfo@du.edu.

  • For more information call The Office of Graduate Studies (303) 871-2706.

  • Graduate School of Professional Psychology: (303) 871-2908 or gsppinfo@du.edu

International Applicants

  • For complete international applicant information, please visit the Office of Graduate Studies International Student Application Information. International applicants are strongly encouraged to have their applications complete, with all materials on file in the admission office, at least eight weeks prior to the program’s application deadline.

The Graduate Policies and Procedures provides complete details regarding admission requirements.

Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (PsyD)

The University of Denver is on a quarter system. Students attend classes as a cohort over fall, winter, spring and summer quarters for three years (minimum). The University of Denver and the American Psychological Association require that students enroll in course work for at least twelve quarters. Students are required to attend at least eight credit hours per quarter for twelve quarters unless pre-approved for part-time status. A minimal total of 135 credit hours are required for graduation.

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

Core coursework requirements110
CPSY 4010Introduction to Statistics3
CPSY 5000Rad Behav/Func Contextl Models3
CPSY 5010Cognitive & Affective Models3
CPSY 5020Psychoanalytic Models (Diagnosis and Classification)3
CPSY 5030Systems Models3
CPSY 5040History and Systems in Psych2
CPSY 5050Advanced Statistics3
CPSY 5070Research Methods2
CPSY 5073Qualitative Research Methods2
CPSY 5075Program Evaluation Technique3
CPSY 5080Diagnosis and Classification2
CPSY 5130Issues in Measurement3
CPSY 5170Life Cycle: Inf to Mid Childhd3
CPSY 5180Life Cycle: Adolescent - Adult2
CPSY 5200Life Cycle: Late Adulthood3
CPSY 5230Group Dynamics & Interventions3
CPSY 5231Social Psychology3
CPSY 5270Physiological Psychology I3
CPSY 5290Clinical Neuropsychology3
CPSY 5310Ethical Issues in Psychology3
CPSY 5320Professional Issues in Psych2
CPSY 5340Social Psychology of Racism and Oppression3
CPSY 5360Racial/Ethnic Identity Dvlpmnt3
CPSY 5370Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Issues3
CPSY 5380Culturally Competent Psychotx3
CPSY 5385Pro Sem: Beg. Psychotherapy (2 credits/quarter for 4 quarters=8 credit hours total)2
CPSY 5562Psychological Consultation2
CPSY 5680Cognitive Assessment4
CPSY 5690Introduction to the Rorschac4
CPSY 5705Self Report Assessment3
CPSY 5740Integrative Personality Assessment2
CPSY 5750Supervision2
Advanced Professional Seminar16
Complete 2 credits/quarter for 8 quarters (16 credit hours total) from the following:
CPSY 5388Pro Sem:Psychological Assessmt2
CPSY 5389Pro Sem: Behavior Therapy2
CPSY 5386Pro Sem: Child & Ad Psychother2
CPSY 5390Pro Sem: Forensic Issues2
CPSY 5391Professional Seminar: Psychodynamic Therapy2
CPSY 5392Pro Sem: Couple and Family2
CPSY 5393Pro Sem: ACT2
CPSY 5404Prof Sem: Integrative Therapy2
CPSY 5406Professional Seminar: Health Psychology2
Elective requirements
Minimum of 25 credits from the following courses:
CPSY 4430Career Counseling3
CPSY 5108Introduction to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)2
CPSY 5120Introduction to Animal-Assisted Interventions3
CPSY 5250Existential and Humanistic Theory and Therapy2
CPSY 5271Physiological Lab I1
CPSY 5420Behav-Analytic Prin 12
CPSY 5421Behavioral Analysis Princ La1
CPSY 5422Behav-Analytic Prin 22
CPSY 5423Behav-Analytic Assess/Case Frm2
CPSY 5424Behavior-Analytic Intervention2
CPSY 5466Health Psychology2
CPSY 5467Health Psychology Service Learning Seminar1
CPSY 5469Sport and Performance Psychology Practicum in Collegiate Athletics II1
CPSY 5480Integrated Primary Care2
CPSY 5482Health Psychology Service-Learning: Clinical Practice in Integrated Primary Care1
CPSY 5500Diagnosis & Treatment of Children2
CPSY 5505Diagnosis & Treatment of Adolescents2
CPSY 5550Couples Therapy2
CPSY 5560Family Therapy2
CPSY 5591Psychodynamic Psychotherapy2
CPSY 5620Intersubjective Systems Theory2
CPSY 5685Introduction to Pediatric Neuropsychological Assessment2
CPSY 5686Suicide Prevention, Intervention and Postvention2
CPSY 5687Contemporary Issues in Geropsychology2
CPSY 5692Advanced Rorschach Analysis2
CPSY 5700Adv Personality Assessment3
CPSY 5706Self Report Assessment Lab1
CPSY 5741Therapeutic Assessment2
CPSY 5745Human Sexuality2
CPSY 5755Supervision Practicum I1
CPSY 5756Supervision Practicum II1
CPSY 5757Supervision Practicum III1
CPSY 5758Supervision Practicum IV1
CPSY 5760Professional Issues II2
CPSY 5765Cognitive Behavioral Therapy2
CPSY 5840Psychopharmacology2
CPSY 5880Business Issues in Professional Psychology2
CPSY 5989Doctoral Paper Development1
CPSY 5825Introduction to Latino Psychology and the Latino Experience3
CPSY 5826Therapy and Psychological Intervention with Latinos3
CPSY 5827Assessment with Latinos3
CPSY 5828Latino Psychology Practicum3
Minimum Number of Credits Required135

Coursework Requirements

  1. Specialty Focus Tool: Each student is required to create a Specialty Focus Tool to increase their depth of knowledge and skill in a recognized specialty area in clinical psychology. The specific specialty plan will be developed by the student in conjunction with the academic advisor (at the end of the first year) in order to meet the student’s needs and interests and to begin the process of creating a special skill set within clinical psychology. The specialty area should consist of 15 quarter hours of course work (excluding core courses but including, where applicable, specialized professional seminar registration) in GSPP or other departments of the University and can include courses transferred for credit. Examples of a specialty focus tools are couple therapy, behavior therapy, family therapy, forensic psychology, geropsychology, health psychology, neuropsychological assessment, dynamic psychotherapy, Latino psychology, military psychology, and oncology psychology.
  2. The 15 credit hours cannot include required/core courses but should include (a maximum of 8 credits of) professional seminar registration appropriate to the specialty area.
  3. Independent study, which is relevant, may be included. 
  4. Complementary clinical work, including a year of field placement in an appropriate setting, is recommended.
  5. It is also recommended that the student undertake a doctoral paper that will serve as a scholarly contribution to the area of specialization.
  6. Students must take a seminar in their specialized area, if one is given. If a seminar is not offered in the specialized field, they will need to coordinate with their advisor to take a field placement to cover the clinical experience.
  7. When checking out for internship, student should double check that courses were indeed completed. Student may need to update specialty focus tool form for their file.

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Professional Psychology Clinic: All students become staff members of the Professional Psychology Clinic (PPC) and are expected to work with clients in the center each year prior to the internship year. The center is an integral part of the school and includes interview, play therapy, and group therapy rooms as well as necessary supplies and equipment. One-way-vision mirrors, audio taping, videotaping, and digital recording facilitate ongoing supervision of clinical work. Clients of diverse ethnic, racial, social, religious, and individual backgrounds and cultural identities are seen by students for assessment and intervention. Referrals come from private and public sources throughout the community.

  • Community Field Placement: Each year prior to the internship year, students are also required to be in a community field placement for a minimum of eight hours per week. In these placements, students are involved in supervised professional experiences in mental health centers, schools, college counseling centers, the justice system, hospitals, rehabilitation centers, private practices, residential treatment homes, and businesses in the Denver metropolitan area. There is a wide choice of placements, and available paid placements are often filled by second and third-year students. Within the general field placement requirement, students are required to work a minimum of 40 contact hours with clients from at least one culturally diverse group. Opportunities for such experience are available in a variety of the community field placement settings. The 40 contact hours are a total to be achieved during the time a student is enrolled in the program.

  • Each student is required to pass a clinical competency exam prior to graduation from the program.

  • Doctoral Paper: The doctoral paper requirement requires students to make an original contribution to psychological scholarship. Students may choose to do a qualitative or quantitative research project, or can choose other forms of scholarship, such as developing a case study or treatment protocol. Doctoral papers should be publication quality, and students are encouraged to submit their papers for publication. 

  • The first draft of doctoral paper is due March 1st for students anticipating graduating in August. The chair may have a different (earlier) deadline, but March 1st is the absolute last day for a first draft.

  • Internship: GSPP requires an American Psychological Association (APA) approved clinical internship which is either full time for 12 months or equivalent. PsyD students participate in the national APPIC Match and are given significant support in this process from the Director of Clinical Training. GSPP offers an exclusively affiliated consortium that is APA accredited. Students may apply to sites outside the consortium, either locally or nationally. Students must pass the internship in order to receive the PsyD degree.

Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology

Program requirements are designed to be completed in six academic quarters over two years. The University of Denver (DU) requires that a student enroll in course work for at least six quarters. Students are required to attend at least 12 credit hours per quarter for six quarters (90 hours required for graduation), unless pre-approved for part-time status. The University of Denver is on a quarter system and students complete the program as a cohort, attending fall, winter, and spring quarters of both years. All students are required to successfully complete all courses, consisting of 90 quarter hours of coursework.

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

CPSY 4000Issues in Forensic Psychology I3
CPSY 4010Introduction to Statistics3
CPSY 4020Psychopathology and Diagnosis3
CPSY 4030Clinical Interviewing and Theories of Psychotherapy3
CPSY 4040Issues in Forensic Psychology II3
CPSY 4050Research Methods3
CPSY 4060Psychology of Criminal Behavior3
CPSY 4070Trauma & Crisis Intervention3
CPSY 4080Issues in Forensic Psychology III3
CPSY 4090Issues in Measurement3
CPSY 4100Mental Health Law3
CPSY 4110Family Systems and Therapy3
CPSY 4200Practicum I3
CPSY 4210Practicum II1-6
CPSY 4220Practicum III3
CPSY 4230Practicum IV: Theories of Personality3
CPSY 4240Practicum V1-6
CPSY 4250Practicum VI3
CPSY 4300Eval and Treat Juv Offender3
CPSY 4310Ethical Iss in Forensic Psyc3
CPSY 4320Cognitive Assessment3
CPSY 4330Cog Behavioral Interventions3
CPSY 4340Psychopathology, Evaluation & Treatment of the Adult Offender3
CPSY 4350Sociocultural Issues in Forensic Psychology3
CPSY 4360Personality Assessment: Self-Report3
CPSY 4370Substance Abuse3
CPSY 4380Group Interventions3
CPSY 4545Lifespan Development and the Cultural Context3
Elective Requirements6
Minimum of 6 credit hours
CPSY 4105Pyschology, Public Policy, and Advocacy2,3
CPSY 4321Assessment Independent Study1
CPSY 4400Personality Assessment: Projective3
CPSY 4410Criminal Evaluations3
CPSY 4420Research in Forensic Psychology: Independent Study1
CPSY 4430Career Counseling (Additional elective if wishing to pursue licensure in Colorado)3
CPSY 4678Scholarly Writing Methods and Practices1-3
Students are also allowed to take some elective courses in other specialty areas at GSPP, including courses in Latino psychology, military psychology, and oncology psychology.
Minimum Number of Credits Required90

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Field Placements: We require that students engage in direct service through their field placements, working with diverse populations and in diverse settings. A variety of field placement opportunities are available, including county probation, community health centers, correctional facilities, outpatient treatment agencies, medical examiner's office, victim assistance/advocacy agencies, and juvenile assessment centers. Students also have the option of completing a field placement through our institute, DenverFirst (Forensic Institute for Research, Service, and Training). As an adjunct to their field placements, students are enrolled in practicum courses that provide added clinical support and foster development as professionals and practitioners.

  • Clinical Competency Exam: Students will be required to pass a clinical competency exam in the spring of their second year. The oral exam is clinical in nature, and evaluates students on their mastery of the theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of forensic practice, as captured through our foundational competencies, and their ability to convey the technical and applied aspects of forensic practice, as reflected by our functional competencies.

  • Personal Therapy: The Master’s in Forensic Psychology program requires personal therapy for all students. Faculty believe that personal therapy is a vital component of clinical psychology training and growth, and that it is the professional responsibility of every clinician to identify, address, and work through personal issues that may have an impact on clinical interactions with clients. Students are required to complete a minimum of 10 sessions (45-50 minutes in length) with the same therapist by the end of their first year of the program. It is required that therapy be provided by a licensed psychologist, professional counselor, social worker, or other mental health worker under the supervision of a licensed professional. If you select a therapist not in this category, you must petition the Director of Forensic Studies for approval. Students will not be advanced to preliminary candidacy until the therapy requirement is met. Students must submit a therapy plan by November 1st of fall quarter. Students must complete this requirement by the summer of their first year. The student must petition the Director for an exception if therapy is not completed in this time frame.

Optional Research

  • Students can also enroll in a one credit elective, CPSY 4420 Research in Forensic Psychology: Independent Study, and engage in ongoing or novel research through DenverFirst. Students have been able to present at local and national conferences and have published with faculty in law and psychology journals.

Master of Arts in International Disaster Psychology

Program requirements are designed to be completed in seven academic quarters over two years. The University of Denver is on a quarter system and students must attend fall, winter, spring, and summer quarters of their first year and fall, winter, and spring quarters of their second year. All students are required to successfully complete all courses, consisting of 90 quarter hours of coursework.

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

Core requirements
CPSY 4010Introduction to Statistics3
CPSY 4020Psychopathology and Diagnosis3
CPSY 4050Research Methods3
CPSY 4090Issues in Measurement3
CPSY 4380Group Interventions3
CPSY 4500International Disaster Psychology: Foundations3
CPSY 4501Psychotherapeutic Models of Intervention3
CPSY 4503Clinical Interviewing3
CPSY 4505Cross Cultural Analysis3
CPSY 4509Global Mental Health Systems3
CPSY 4510Preparation for International Internships: Intercultural Competence3
CPSY 4512Disaster Mental Health3
CPSY 4515Ethics3
CPSY 4530Program Evaluation3
CPSY 4545Lifespan Development and the Cultural Context3
CPSY 4550Seminar: Therapeutic Interventions (3 credits/quarter for 6 quarters=18 credit hours total)3
CPSY 4556International Perspective of Trauma Intervention3
CPSY 4557Interntl Public Health3
CPSY 4570Crises Intervention3
CPSY 4590Psychology of Loss and Grief3
CPSY 4595International Disaster Psychology Internship6
CPSY 4606Gender-based Violence3
Elective requirements3
Students are also allowed to take some elective courses in other specialty areas at GSPP, including courses in Latino psychology, military psychology, and oncology psychology.
CPSY 4430Career Counseling3
CPSY 4563Family Therapy: Children and Families in Crisis2
CPSY 4566From Triage to Justpeace3
Minimum Number of Credits Required90

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Community Based Field Placement: During fall, winter, and spring terms of both their first and second years, students are required to complete community field placements and supervision in the Denver area. A variety of field-placement sites are available, including local non-governmental and state agencies providing direct mental health care, case management, policy and grant writing, disaster planning and preparedness, and disaster relief services. Agencies serve diverse populations and age-groups, including refugee and low-SES individuals, many of whom have been affected by trauma and disaster. Students spend a minimum of ten hours a week at their placement.

  • Trauma and Disaster Recovery Clinic (TDRC): During the fall, winter and spring terms of their first and second years, students are required to carry a client (individual, couple, family or group) in the TDRC. This clinical work is supervised in the small-group supervision seminar. Either in the first or second year of the program, students may request to participate in the small-group program evaluation seminar to fulfill this requirement.
  • International Internship: During the summer between the first and second year of enrollment, students engage in an 8-week international internship, providing a rich opportunity to apply theory to practice in the global context. International internships are arranged by the program with non-governmental and governmental agencies whose missions focus on a variety of mental health and psychosocial issues relevant to the needs of individuals and communities affected by disaster and trauma. While the locations of our internships vary each summer, in recent years students have interned in Ghana, Liberia, Bosnia, Serbia, Croatia, Nepal, Egypt, Ethiopia, India, Panama and Belize.

  • Each student is required to pass a competency exam prior to graduation from the program. This exam will be administered during the spring quarter of the second-year of matriculation. 

Master of Arts in Sport and Performance Psychology

Program requirements are designed to be completed in six academic quarters over two years. The University of Denver (DU) requires that a student enroll in course work for at least six quarters. Students are required to attend at least 12 credit hours per quarter for six quarters (72 hours required for graduation), unless pre-approved for part-time status. The University of Denver is on a quarter system and students complete the program as a cohort, attending fall, winter, and spring quarters of both years.

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

Core requirements
CPSY 4010Introduction to Statistics3
CPSY 4050Research Methods3
CPSY 4652Theoretical Aspects of Sport and Performance Psychology3
CPSY 4662Foundation of Counseling Theories3
CPSY 4669Consulting Methods & Practices3
CPSY 4671Theories of Performance Excellence3
CPSY 4672Counseling Methods & Practices3
CPSY 4674Clinical Issues: Interviewing and Diagnosis3
CPSY 4680Sport and Performance Psychology Practicum (3 credits/quarter for 3 quarters=9 credit hours total)3
CPSY 4681Multicultural Issues3
CPSY 4682Ethical and Legal Issues3
CPSY 4683Group Interventions3
CPSY 4684Team and Organizational Dynamics3
CPSY 4685Human Growth & Development3
CPSY 4686Practicum in Sport and Performance Psychology: Professional Practice (3 credits/quarter for 3 quarters=9 credit hours total)3
CPSY 4690Sport and Performance Psychology Interventions3
Elective requirements12
Students are also allowed to take some elective courses in other specialty areas at GSPP, including courses in Latino psychology, military psychology, and oncology psychology.
Minimum Number of Credits Required72

Minimum number of credits required for degree: 72 hours

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Practicum: It is important to put theory into practice; therefore, the practicum experience is critical to the development of a competent sport and performance consultant. In addition to integrating theory into actual technique, the practicum affords students the opportunity to network within the field. GSPP is committed to practical training and there are many exciting opportunities and experiences available at the University of Denver as well as in the metro area. Sites include, but are not limited to: private high school academies, public high school athletic departments, club sports programs, collegiate athletic departments, the DU Lamont School of Music, private practice, coaching, local exercise and health related industries, Boys and Girls Clubs of Metro Denver, Vail Ski and Snowboard Academy, and Craig Hospital. Other practical experiences in the program are available as formal internships during the year and in the summer. Sites around the nation that current/former students have obtained internships at include: the US Olympic Training Center, Vail Ski & Snowboard Academy, Evert Tennis Academy, and IMG Academies.

  • Master's project: The Master’s Project requirement is designed to serve as a capstone achievement demonstrating students’ comprehensive knowledge of sports and performance theories, concepts, applications, and professional and ethical guidelines. Most importantly, students will organize and present the breadth and depth of their knowledge in a personally meaningful way that is directly relatable to the working world. Students are encouraged to participate in group projects with the evaluation criteria for an individual’s completion being a contribution worthy of authorship on a journal article (see American Psychological Association publication manual for more details on the definition of authorship). Group projects are intended to increase the scientific contribution (e.g., the possibility of multi-year studies, more collaboration) and thus the likelihood of publication. Faculty may offer particular project ideas to students, and students may also propose ideas to faculty.

    If a student elects for an individual master’s project, the types of projects include: (a) a professional practice report (e.g., a case study or a series of case studies approached from a clearly delineated theoretical perspective with an analysis of the pros and cons associated with the theoretical approach including relevant research and associated findings); OR (b) a data-based research paper including a detailed review of literature leading to new conclusions and collecting and analyzing original data. The student is then responsible for getting a sports and performance faculty member to approve the proposal and serve as the Master’s Project Chair. The end result of an individual’s project must be a unique contribution to the literature and thus of scholarly rigor and publishable quality. As an example, a mental training plan for a specific sport would not be sufficient, but a mental training plan that involves a new hypothesis or synthesis of literature may be sufficient if the project Chair deems the project worthy of consideration for publication or professional presentation at a national or international conference.

Master of Arts in Sport Coaching (Online)

The Graduate School of Professional Psychology, along with most graduate courses at DU, use the quarter system. The Sport Coaching program requires a minimum of 46 quarter hours (i.e., equivalent to 36 semester hours). Our courses are offered year-round in each of the four quarters: fall, winter, spring and summer. We intend to offer two required courses per quarter, along with one elective. Most courses are four credit hours.

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

Core requirements
CPSY 4700Organization and Administration of Sport4
CPSY 4705Sociocultural Aspects of Sport Coaching4
CPSY 4710Motor Learning and Sport Pedagogy4
CPSY 4715Strength, Conditioning, and Injury Prevention Program Design4
CPSY 4720Psychology of Athletic Performance4
CPSY 4725Philosophy, Leadership and Legal Issues of Sport4
CPSY 4730Biomechanics of Athletic Performance4
CPSY 4735Understanding Sport Research4
CPSY 4740Practicum 1 in Sport Coaching (Course is required twice for a total of 2 credit hours to meet requirement.)1
CPSY 4745Practicum 2 in Sport Coaching (Course is required twice for a total of 2 credit hours to meet requirement.)1
CPSY 4750Sport Coaching Capstone2-4
CPSY 4991Independent Study1-17
Elective requirements8
Minimum of 8 credits and must be approved
Minimum Number of Credits Required46

Approved Electives
Electives will be offered based upon student interest and program growth. We anticipate offering the following electives on a consistent basis: Kinesiology, Exercise Physiology, and Sport Nutrition. Electives in the future would likely include Ethics of Coaching and Sport, Advanced Seminar in Psychology of Coaching, Advanced Seminar in Sociology of Coaching, and Sport Technology. We encourage K-12 teacher-coaches to identify possible electives offered by the Morgridge College of Education. Independent study and directed research may also be completed to meet the requirement for approved electives.

The Program Director, Dr. Brian Gearity, will advise all students on their coursework and degree plan. Dr. Gearity recommends students consider how to individualize their coursework to meet their personal desires and professional needs while completing the degree in a timely manner. 

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Practicum in Coaching: The practicum in coaching course is intended to enhance and deepen students’ understanding of coaching in a real life coaching context. Students must practice coaching in the practicum, not only or mainly observing. Students must complete a minimum of four credit hours of practicum over four quarters. Therefore, students will typically enroll in one hour of practicum over four quarters to meet this requirement. Students may continue to enroll in practicum, but only four hours will be counted towards meeting the degree requirements.
    During the practicum, students must complete a minimum of 50 hours coaching, and will also complete additional assignments online. Students may complete the practicum in a setting of their choosing, and it is acceptable for coaches to complete the practicum in a position in which they are currently employed. That is, it is acceptable to complete the practicum in coaching for a position already being performed (i.e., high school or college level coaching or performance training center). Students may also select a site through a Sport Coaching program affiliate such as a public or private high school, club, performance training center, intercollegiate athletic department or professional sport team. All practicum sites must be approved by the Program Director.
    The Sport Coaching program also offers a dual-instructor model for its Practicum course. This model is the only such of its kind in the world. Dr. Gearity will teach the online course components, while an additional instructor, a mental skills consultant, will advise students through the use of distance technologies, or face-to-face where possible. The mental skills consultant will be a DU alumni from our outstanding Sport and Performance Psychology program. Prospective students should consult with Dr. Gearity for additional information on this unique educational opportunity.
  • Capstone: Capstone literally means “a finishing stone or a structure.” Similarly, students will identify and then complete a project that demonstrates the student’s initiative and excellence. Students must wait to enroll in capstone until they have completed the Understanding Sport and Coaching Research course and 23 credits towards the Sport Coaching degree.
    Projects need to be approved by the Program Director by the end of the first week of the Capstone course. Students are encouraged to discuss a suitable project with course instructors early in the program. In most cases, projects will be completed individually, but a collaborative small group project is also possible. Groups would typically consist of two to four Sport Coaching students. Students are encouraged to build off a previous course or collaborate with a Sport Coaching instructor or affiliate researcher.

interim master of arts in clinical psychology

To be eligible students must have two years of residency and successful advancement to preliminary candidacy.  Students must submit an application to graduate and meet with their advisor for candidacy sign-off by the deadline.  

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

  • Completion of 90 quarter hours of coursework earned from GSPP at the University of Denver

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Two years of field placement and seminar
  • Clinical Competency Exam

Students who come to GSPP with a psychology based MA, who receive blanket 45 transfer credits for the PsyD degree, are not eligible for the interim MA from GSPP. 

Courses

CPSY 4000 Issues in Forensic Psychology I (3 Credits)

Overview of psychological theory, research and practice as used within the legal and criminal justice system; differences between forensic and clinical assessments and interventions; special topic areas (e.g. trauma, abuse, domestic violence, etc.); ethical issues.

CPSY 4010 Introduction to Statistics (3 Credits)

General statistical principles and techniques and their application to psychological and psycho-legal issues. Students will develop computer analytic skills to assist in answering professionally relevant questions.

CPSY 4020 Psychopathology and Diagnosis (3 Credits)

An overview of major DSM diagnostic categories, as well as an introduction to ICD and noncategorical classification.

CPSY 4030 Clinical Interviewing and Theories of Psychotherapy (3 Credits)

Theoretical and practical issues related to clinical interviewing within forensic and non-forensic settings; exploration of the process of psychotherapy from various theoretical perspectives.

CPSY 4040 Issues in Forensic Psychology II (3 Credits)

Further exploration of the relationship between the legal system and psychological theory in areas of criminal law (e.g. standards of legal competency, insanity defense, prediction of dangerousness), civil law ( civil commitment, personal injury) and family law (e.g. child custody determinations, juvenile issues).

CPSY 4050 Research Methods (3 Credits)

Examination of the research process, including the formulation of questions and utilization of various methodologies to answer hypotheses.

CPSY 4060 Psychology of Criminal Behavior (3 Credits)

Psychological origins and dynamics of criminal behavior from the viewpoint of major psychological theories; treatment of the types of offender populations (e.g. the antisocial personality, psychopath, adolescent offender, female offender) within the criminal justice system.

CPSY 4070 Trauma & Crisis Intervention (3 Credits)

Theory, techniques and research relating to various types of trauma (e.g. childhood abuse, combat veterans, natural disaster survivors); crisis intervention techniques as a system of managing trauma related difficulties.

CPSY 4080 Issues in Forensic Psychology III (3 Credits)

Relationship and application of psychological principles and practice to varied law enforcement and correctional functions; assessment of violence in the workplace, trauma debriefing; hostage negotiation. Students will become prepared to assume the role of an expert witness in a variety of psycho-legal settings.

CPSY 4090 Issues in Measurement (3 Credits)

Critical assessment of various psychological tests, with an emphasis on validity, reliability and issues of standardization.

CPSY 4100 Mental Health Law (3 Credits)

The goal of this introductory Mental Health Law course is to provide students with a general understanding of the laws impacting the field of mental health, including those involving professional responsibility and ethics; competency issues; court-ordered evaluations and testimony; family law issues; the rights of differently-abled and historically marginalized persons; and defenses based on mental state. Course objectives include assisting students in locating, understanding, and interpreting laws relevant to the mental health practitioner; recognizing potential legal and ethical dilemmas faced in forensic practice; and applying the principles of mental health law to offer the highest standard of care in their clinical practices.

CPSY 4105 Pyschology, Public Policy, and Advocacy (2,3 Credits)

This course is designed to provide students in clinical training with an overview of the political advocacy process in the United States, its potential impact on the practice of mental health, and opportunities for involvement in public policy discourse.

CPSY 4110 Family Systems and Therapy (3 Credits)

This course examines various approaches to family systems, including an overview of systems theory, plus ideas that have been labelled structural, strategic, and Bowenian. Goffman’s performance theory will also be emphasized, especially as it applies to clinical work. Students will practice rethinking interpersonal conflicts, and they will develop increased awareness of their own families and their roles in them. Students will also apply systemic ideas to their own required therapies.

CPSY 4120 Psychology of Performing Arts (3 Credits)

Students gain an understanding of the psychological factors involved in the performing arts, including theatre, acting, dancing, music, and circus arts. Students learn about appropriate psychological interventions for these populations to enhance performance. The course format includes lecture, discussion, guest speakers, case studies, and role plays.

CPSY 4130 Organizational Leadership: Center for Performance Excellence (3 Credits)

This course is designed to familiarize CPEX Officers with approaches to effective leadership while engaging in leadership roles within the Center for Performance Excellence (CPEX). Students are exposed to successful leadership strategies from the business world and thave the opportunity to implement these strategies into their roles as leaders within CPEX. This course is intended for CPEX Officers only.

CPSY 4140 Exercise Psychology (3 Credits)

In this course, students explore the theory, research, and practice related to psychological aspects of exercise behavior. Students explore research and intervention models in exercise psychology and be able to integrate this knowledge in their practice. Major topics include health behavior change, the impact of exercise on mental health, and exercise motivation and adherence.

CPSY 4150 Psychology of Performance in Business (3 Credits)

Students gain an understanding of the psychological factors involved in the business world. Factors are examined at the individual, team, and organizational level. Students learn about appropriate psychological interventions for these populations to enhance performance. The course format includes lecture, discussion, guest speakers, case studies, and role plays.

CPSY 4160 Psychology of High Risk Occupations (3 Credits)

In this course, students gain an understanding of the psychological factors involved in high risk occupations. High risk occupations include individuals whose profession directly involves saving lives or placing their own life at risk. Students learn about appropriate psychological interventions for these populations to enhance performance and resilience in the high stress situations required by their jobs. The course format includes lecture, discussion, guest speakers, case studies, and role plays.

CPSY 4200 Practicum I (3 Credits)

CPSY 4210 Practicum II (1-6 Credits)

CPSY 4220 Practicum III (3 Credits)

CPSY 4230 Practicum IV: Theories of Personality (3 Credits)

CPSY 4240 Practicum V (1-6 Credits)

CPSY 4250 Practicum VI (3 Credits)

CPSY 4260 Psychophysiology and Biofeedback Lab (2 Credits)

This course is designed to be both an introduction to psychophysiology and biofeedback and to its applications, particularly to sport and performance. The principles of psychophysiology, the biofeedback instruments used, the areas of application, the techniques commonly used in conjunction with biofeedback, the diverse field of biofeedback and applied psychophysiology, and the latest uses for optimal self-regulation are covered. The course involves use of biofeedback instrumentation as well as classroom participation and readings and a self-regulation project.

CPSY 4300 Eval and Treat Juv Offender (3 Credits)

Theories of juvenile delinquency and studies concerned with the etiology, development and prediction of such; review of the various psychological treatment options utilization with juvenile offenders; consideration of the legal responses to juvenile crime and the role of the psychologist within the juvenile justice system.

CPSY 4310 Ethical Iss in Forensic Psyc (3 Credits)

Discussion of ethical and legal conflicts and dilemmas as a psychologist within the legal system, and consideration of ways to resolve such conflicts, including standards applicable to the science and practice of forensic psychology and the role of the expert witness.

CPSY 4320 Cognitive Assessment (3 Credits)

Students learn to administer, score, and interpret the WAIS. There is some exposure to other intelligence tests as well. Students understand diagnostic validity (Bayes' Theorem), how to identify interpretive material, and how to think ideographically about nomothetic data. Through discussions of legal cases, students learn numerous forensic issues to which cognitive assessment is applicable, including for example testamentary capacity, competence to waive Miranda rights, and ability to enter a contract.

CPSY 4321 Assessment Independent Study (1 Credit)

CPSY 4330 Cog Behavioral Interventions (3 Credits)

Theory, techniques and research relating to cognitive- behavioral therapy, focusing on assessment, case conceptualization and intervention approaches within a forensic setting.

CPSY 4335 Intro to Trial Consulting (3 Credits)

The art of trial consulting is the skill to meld multiple theories, methodologies, and concepts into a working and research-based strategy. This skill is very reminiscent to the art and practice of therapy. As with any practice, be it law, psychology or trial consulting, a solid base is necessary. This course is an introduction into the theory and application of trial consulting techniques in the criminal and civil arena. This overview addresses the key elements in the trial consulting including and introduction into the psycho-legal perspective, the application of research methodologies utilized by trial consultants, and specific interdisciplinary topics within trial consulting. These specific topics include concepts like the theory of persuasion, jury selection, expert testimony, and neuropsychology.

CPSY 4340 Psychopathology, Evaluation & Treatment of the Adult Offender (3 Credits)

Psychological theories related to etiology, development and prediction of violent crime; types of intervention possible within in the criminal justice setting, Topic areas may include special offender populations (e.g. sexual offender, offenders with developmental disabilities or those classified as mentally retarded).

CPSY 4350 Sociocultural Issues in Forensic Psychology (3 Credits)

Explores the impact of identity dynamics, including privilege and oppression, in clinical forensic practice.

CPSY 4360 Personality Assessment: Self-Report (3 Credits)

Administration and interpretation of objective personality instruments and discussion of their utilization within a forensic setting; use of the MMPI-2 and MCMI.

CPSY 4370 Substance Abuse (3 Credits)

Substance use and abuse, with focus on symptom formation, classification, causes socio-cultural factors and treatment modalities; various theoretical approaches to the etiology and treatment of substance abuse; resultant psychological and physiological effects of various drugs.

CPSY 4380 Group Interventions (3 Credits)

Interpersonal dynamics of small groups and larger organizational settings; understanding of group processes (such as group formulations and development, group conflict, and group resistance); skills enabling positive group intervention.

CPSY 4400 Personality Assessment: Projective (3 Credits)

Students learn to administer and interpret the Thematic Apperception Test and Early Memories. These are construed as behavior samples under conditions where the occasioning environment is reproducible, so that the functional relationship between the behavior and the stimulus can be understood carefully. Students learn to write reports that integrate several sources of information to answer referral questions.

CPSY 4410 Criminal Evaluations (3 Credits)

Incidence and prevalence of criminal violence; risk assessment within the context of prediction, supervision and intervention in both a correctional and mental health setting. Special topics will include assessment of various legal competencies, the insanity of defense and assessment of dangerousness.

CPSY 4420 Research in Forensic Psychology: Independent Study (1 Credit)

CPSY 4430 Career Counseling (3 Credits)

This course is designed to teach the theoretical framework of career counseling, and introduce the basic counseling tools used in the career counseling process. The course presents major theories of career development, introduce sources of occupational information, and introduce principles of assessment in career counseling. The impact of diversity and difference on career development and choices, as well as the career counseling process, is also explored. Topics include: the role of interests, skills, values and personality in the career development process; social, cultural and family influences on the career development process; and career development across the lifespan.

CPSY 4500 International Disaster Psychology: Foundations (3 Credits)

This is the first course in a three course sequence designed to provide the entering M.A. student with a fluent understanding of the area of International Disaster Psychology. The course will cover the evolution of IDP from its beginnings to its present status. It will review the different innovations in the area. Potential subject areas include the treatment of refugees, torture victims, child soldiers, internally displaced persons and complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

CPSY 4501 Psychotherapeutic Models of Intervention (3 Credits)

Major psychological models of intervention are the focus of this course. The major theoretical models of personality development, psychopathology and theories of intervention are explored including psychodynamic, family systems, behaviorism, cognitive-behavioral approaches and others.

CPSY 4502 Psychotherapy with Children and Families (3 Credits)

This course provides an understanding of various psychotherapeutic approaches to children and families. The perspectives and techniques of play therapy, behavioral interventions, cognitive-behavioral therapy and integrative work with parents and families are explored.

CPSY 4503 Clinical Interviewing (3 Credits)

Theoretical and practical issues related to clinical interviewing in international and national disaster settings.

CPSY 4505 Cross Cultural Analysis (3 Credits)

The first course in a two part series designed to provide students with an understanding of cross cultural analysis. The course will provide an understanding of diverse cultures. Students will review historical literature in the area of cross cultural understanding. Students will also be taught methodologies for conceptualizing and understanding diverse cultures and cross cultural practices in psychology.

CPSY 4509 Global Mental Health Systems (3 Credits)

This course will focus on the dynamics of mental health systems in developing countries.

CPSY 4510 Preparation for International Internships: Intercultural Competence (3 Credits)

This is the second course in the three part introductory sequence. Students will continue to learn about the field of IDP and future trends for the field. The course will address specific subject areas within the field in order to provide students with the working knowledge needed to continue to pursue advanced training in the area. Potential subject areas will include treatment of refugees, torture victims and working in post conflict areas across the globe.

CPSY 4511 Humanitarian and International Refugee Law (3 Credits)

This course surveys the central rules, complexities and debates of international refugee law, which is both a specialized field of its own and also an intersection of human rights law, migration law, and humanitarian policy. We focus extensively on how courts and the United Nations have attempted to interpret the various refugee definitions found in human rights treaties, and introduce rules of international law governing how refugees should be treated. We also examine the obstacles refugees face today in enjoying their rights.

CPSY 4512 Disaster Mental Health (3 Credits)

This course will explore disaster response systems and their mental health components.

CPSY 4513 International Disaster Psychology Case Conference (2 Credits)

This class meets to discuss case theory, formulation and psychotherapy practice with persons affected by disaster and/or trauma.

CPSY 4515 Ethics (3 Credits)

The course is designed to educate students about the ethical guidelines in psychology applicable to the field of IDP. Students will learn the APA Ethics Code as well as other more specialized ethics guidelines applicable to the field of IDP. Students will be expected to identify, address and resolve potential ethical conflicts. Potential future trends in the development of ethics in the area of IDP will be addressed.

CPSY 4530 Program Evaluation (3 Credits)

Theory and techniques for developing management information and assessment systems for human service programs. Organization evaluation of international organizations will be discussed. Psychosocial interventions will be highlighted.

CPSY 4545 Lifespan Development and the Cultural Context (3 Credits)

CPSY 4550 Seminar: Therapeutic Interventions (3 Credits)

Small group seminar is a small group class designed to provide students a discussion forum to share and integrate their experiences in the IDP Master's Program. Students are expected to address and share their field placement experiences with other students in their seminar. The seminar will also provide instruction on the implementation of theory in IDP to practice in multiple settings. Faculty will provide supervision for the students' field placements.

CPSY 4555 Trauma & Child Development (3 Credits)

The course reviews the literature regarding childhood trauma and its implications for child and adult development. Models for the conceptualization of trauma and for treatment of childhood trauma are discussed. Cross-cultural theories of childhood development and trauma are emphasized.

CPSY 4556 International Perspective of Trauma Intervention (3 Credits)

This course, taught by a different visiting professor each year, will take an in-depth look at trauma and the development of mental health systems and interventions internationally.

CPSY 4557 Interntl Public Health (3 Credits)

This course will provide an overview to the many issues concerning international public health today. Topics include basic epidemiology, malaria, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, diarrheal diseases, injury prevention, and environmental health. Specific attention will be given to examining the intersection between disease prevention and disaster mitigation.

CPSY 4558 Practical Apps Clinical Theory (1 Credit)

This course enables first year Master of Arts in International Disaster Psychology (MAIDP) students to explore the application of coursework in clinical psychology to practice in the field. Articles and case examples that apply ethics, developmental theory, psychotherapeutic models, cross cultural analysis and group interventions are discussed.

CPSY 4560 Humanitarian Law of Armed Conf (3,5 Credits)

This course is a theoretical and practical introduction to international humanitarian law (IHL). IHL is known by many other names such as "humanitarian law," "law of conflict," and "laws of war." All these terms refer to the rules regarding the treatment of civilians and non-combatants. These "rules" are especially important to know if you eventually work for an IO or NGO that finds itself in areas of armed conflict. Cross listed with INTS 4935.

CPSY 4563 Family Therapy: Children and Families in Crisis (2 Credits)

This course will explore theoretical and practical approaches to working with children, adolescents and families in crisis. Integrative frameworks will be discussed that view culture, family system and individual functioning as inter-related, and family, parent and child related interventions will be explored. Several therapeutic modalities applied across multiple settings that reduce the impact of crisis and trauma and promote functioning will be studied. Prerequisites: CPSY 4545 and CPSY 4500.

CPSY 4565 Group Dynamics of Organizations (3 Credits)

A comprehensive review of the literature regarding the understanding of systems and organizational structure and dynamics. Methods of assessment and interventions in organizational structure will be presented. Cross-cultural implications will also be addressed.

CPSY 4566 From Triage to Justpeace (3 Credits)

This course examines the inter-disciplinary continuum of integrated work that responds initially to natural and human-made disaster, but then leads to coordinated relief and development projects, and eventually seeks longer-term justpeace. Students learn how normative "regimes" or changed behavior are built and sustained by societal, state, and global actors. Students apply critical interview skills among professionals of diverse disciplines, and in particular, meet the range of development organizations headquartered in Colorado.

CPSY 4570 Crises Intervention (3 Credits)

This course will deal with the clinical approaches to handling psycho-social crises.

CPSY 4580 Psychodynamic Theory (3 Credits)

Traditional and modern theories of psychodynamic concepts will be presented. Students are instructed on the use of such theories as a tool to structure interventions in their field work.

CPSY 4585 Family Systems (3 Credits)

A comprehensive review of family therapy concepts and treatment theories. A review of the applicable literature of family therapy is provided with an emphasis on cross-cultural models and interventions.

CPSY 4590 Psychology of Loss and Grief (3 Credits)

A review of the theory of loss and grief. The course reviews cultural understandings of loss and grief as seen following disaster and conflict. Treatment modalities of loss and grief are also presented.

CPSY 4591 Supervision Group - IDP (1 Credit)

This class is an opportunity for students in field-placements to receive additional supervision for their field-placement work. Students present and receive supervisory consultation about their work in these settings.

CPSY 4595 International Disaster Psychology Internship (6 Credits)

Students will spend one quarter in various international locations working in full time internships with international nonprofit organizations applying the principles and knowledge obtained during their study in the IDP program. Students will work under faculty and professional supervision.

CPSY 4600 Community Psychology in an International Setting: South Africa (5 Credits)

Community Psychology in an International Setting: South Africa combines pre-departure academic study at the University of Denver (DU) with service learning field placements in the Republic of South Africa (RSA). The course requires attendance at four classroom session prior to departure, full participation in a filed placement while in RSA, and a re-entry meeting upon our return. Overall, the fundamental focus will be on community psychology in RSA - salient issues, challenges, resources, and success in post-Apartheid South Africa. Community psychology both shapes and reflects change. Students will learn about how various historical and current policies in RSA have shaped (and disenfranchised) various communities throughout the country. Field placements will prioritize community psychology issues inherent in the organizations, people, and settings of historically disadvantaged black communities in South Africa. Secondarily, academic topics will include the history of RSA (emphasizing pre- and post-Apartheid time periods), current challenges in RSA (ethnicity, immigration, HIV/ADIS, increased crime rate), and cultural aspects of RSA. Pre-departure classes will also focus on the pragmatics of the trip, team-building, and exploring the goals of international service learning.

CPSY 4605 Psychotherapy Interventions (3 Credits)

This course will survey different theoretical models of psychotherapy with an emphasis on specific intervention approaches.

CPSY 4606 Gender-based Violence (3 Credits)

Gender-based Violence will cover issues as they relate cross-culturally. Special attention will be directed towards descriptions of programs approaching these issues and the challenges of designing and implementing such programs in various cultural environments.

CPSY 4610 Exercise Physiology (2 Credits)

This course offers an advanced study of selected areas in physiology of sport and exercise. The applied perspective emphasizes understanding the principles in designing effective conditioning programs for performance, fitness, and health. Empirically valid principles of training for muscular fitness (e.g., strength, power, speed) and energy fitness (i.e., aerobic and anaerobic) are explored. Additionally, environmental influences (e.g., altitude), lifestyle choices (e.g., nutrition), and selected developmental considerations (e.g., as related to gender differences) are discussed. Applications to sport and performance psychology consulting in sport, performing arts, and high-risk professions complement the course content.

CPSY 4615 The Elite Athlete Brain (3 Credits)

The primary goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the expert’s brain from sport and performance literature. The course will review landmark and recent publications examining expert-novice contrasts, and those of athlete-non athlete comparisons. Students will review literature on training interventions to accelerate the development of expertise and learn to evaluate the validity of scientific claims of related consumer products. Students will gain a basic understanding of where state of science in understanding sport related concussions, including diagnostic tools, recovery, and prevention.

CPSY 4620 Kinesiology (2 Credits)

This course is an in-depth exploration of selected areas of kinesiology as a discipline and a profession focusing on human movement. Based on interdisciplinary theoretical and empirical perspectives, the explored areas include: (a) functional anatomy as related to adaptations to training; (b) biomechanics; (c) neurophysiological processes involved in motor learning and motor control; and (d) other relevant biophysical processes (as related to talent selection and development, physiological adaptations to training, etc.). In addition, this course surveys career opportunities in academic study and clinical practice in various areas of sport, fitness, exercise, and physical education.

CPSY 4630 Adept, Professional, Supervisor and Leader (2 Credits)

This course addresses the multiple roles of sport and performance psychology (SPP) consultants from a developmental perspective (i.e., education and training, early years in the profession, and full professional maturity). In-depth examinations of the consultant as an expert, person, performer, and self-regulator are grounded in the SPP literature and theoretical accomplishments in related fields (e.g., counseling psychology). Additionally, the acquisition of fundamental knowledge, skills, and abilities involved in supervision (mentorship) and further socialization to the field of SPP with an emphasis on positive leadership for local, national, and global progress complement the course content.

CPSY 4635 Athletic and Performance Nutrition (2 Credits)

Graduate level course educating student-coaches and administrators and performance specialists to use research and best practices in performance nutrition to achieve athletic and performance enhancement, and general wellbeing. The course will help facilitate students' ability to influence sporting and general environments to use nutrition as a means to enhance performance, with a secondary examination of preparing students to understand and manage individual differences, needs, and motivations for food choices. Course content will include modeling nutrition, encouraging a sense of family at team meals, leveraging media to internalize nutrition behaviors, and impacting availability of positive nutrition choices.

CPSY 4650 Sport Psychology (3 Credits)

A comprehensive view of the field of sport psychology will be covered. Through participation in this course, students will develop a better understanding of the field of sport and exercise psychology and develop skills that will assist in enhancing their career opportunities. Varied psychology topics (e.g., individual differences/personality, motivational orientations and strategies, applied psychological skills, social influence and group dynamics) with an emphasis on understanding major theories and research and applying those theories and research findings to diverse sport, exercise, and performance settings. Additionally, the psychological effect that participation in a sport or a physical activity has on a performer including anxiety reduction, aggressive behavior, and personality development will be explored.

CPSY 4652 Theoretical Aspects of Sport and Performance Psychology (3 Credits)

This course is an in-depth exploration of selected aspects of the theories of sport psychology along with applications of these theories to other performance domains. An advanced understanding of the field of sport and performance psychology is pursued in relation to psychosocial aspects involved in both the preparation and performance processes among adults, youth, and children who represent all skill levels. The explored areas include: (a) motivation, confidence, and anxiety in sport and performance, (b) selected topics in social psychology and psychobiology, (c) psychological skills training, and (d) special topics (e.g., personality, flow, injuries, burnout).

CPSY 4653 Sport in American Society (3 Credits)

This course examines the influence of the social context on sport. Attention is given to the influence of society on sport as an institution and the role of sport as an agent of social change. This course examines how sport affects the social world we live in. Topics explored include the intersection of sport and: gender, race/ethnicity/culture, socioeconomic class, media relations, violence, deviance, and sexuality.

CPSY 4654 Coaching & Leadership (3 Credits)

This course is a survey of the intersection of coaching, leadership, organizational behavior, organization dynamics, and change management. It examines the definitions, history, theories, and research in the sport and management leadership literature. Students will gain an understanding of how planning, motivation, team building, and leadership impact a team's or organization's effectiveness. Students are expected to learn and personally develop the analytical and leadership skills that affect individual and group performance.

CPSY 4655 Social Psychology of Sport (3 Credits)

This course will address the relationship between sport and cultural dynamics, sociological factors underlying competitive physical activity, and behavioral responses of sport participants and supporters to various socio-cultural motivations. This course will be a serious study of organized professional, amateur, and youth sports in North America. Emphasis will be placed on social forces that both impinge on and enhance athletic activities and organizations, and the influence sport has on society.

CPSY 4656 Psychology of Injury (3 Credits)

In this course, students will explore psychological theory, research, and practice in relation to the prevention, occurrence, and rehabilitation of sport injuries. Major topics will include: psychological risk factors for injury, psychological responses to injury, and psychological interventions to prevent sport injuries and enhance sport injury rehabilitation.

CPSY 4657 Motivational Interviewing (2 Credits)

This is an advanced course reviewing the theories and research findings related to motivational interviewing with the goal to apply them to performance (athletic, non-athletic) and exercise contexts. Topics include motivation for behavior change, transtheoretical model of behavior change, self-determination theory as applied to behavior modification, and the relationship between and the influences of emotion and motivation on counseling and sport and performance consultation. This course will place an emphasis on relating current leading theories and research evidence to consulting work. Equally in importance, there will be in-class hands-on activities (e.g., role playing), experiences (e.g., self-reflective tasks) and assignments (e.g., role playing tasks) that will add to the student competence in motivational interviewing.

CPSY 4660 Sport Psychology Interventions and Techniques (3 Credits)

Students will acquire knowledge and increase their comprehension of cognitive-behavioral intervention strategies (e.g., mental skills training) and how they can be applied to achieve optimal performance of athletes and others. The complex interaction between the sport psychology consultant and performer will be explored.

CPSY 4662 Foundation of Counseling Theories (3 Credits)

This course will review major contemporary counseling models, theories, procedures, and the helping relationship. Advanced study of techniques and research findings. Survey of principles underlying individual, family systems, and multicultural approaches to counseling.

CPSY 4663 Applied Motor Learning (2 Credits)

This course is an advanced examination of applied motor behavior theories and research. Emphasis is given to understanding of the processes involved in controlling skilled movement and the principles of skill acquisition to guide designing effective learning environments, practice schedules, and practice units. The examined areas include: (a) the field of study of motor control and learning; (b) performance and learning variables as impacting retention and transfer; (c) information processing model; (d) sensory and central contributions to motor control; (e) individual differences; and (g) instruction, demonstration, and feedback across different stages in motor learning.

CPSY 4664 Practicum in Sport and Performance Psychology III: Business Principles (3 Credits)

This is the third course in a year long, three-part sequence. This course serves the purpose of (a) providing an opportunity for students to learn about sport and performance psychology through observation and experiential opportunities; (b) providing an intimate forum for discussing the practice of sport and performance psychology; and (c) providing information on professional development and conduct. The course requires didactic and experiential activities. Business, consultation, and professional development issues in sport and performance psychology will be addressed. Prerequisite: CPSY 4673.

CPSY 4665 Beh Kinesiology & Physiology (3 Credits)

A study of human movement. Topics will include but are not limited to structural anatomy, biomechanics, and neurophysiology. the biomechanical etiology of various injuries will be studied.

CPSY 4666 Movement Principles for Performance (3 Credits)

This course is an exploration of selected areas of the exercise and sport sciences. The explored areas include: functional anatomy, biomechanics, and exercise physiology.

CPSY 4668 Psychology of Excellence (3 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to examine the theories, research, and intervention strategies related to the pursuit of excellence. This course explores the deliberate interventions necessary to support the development of excellence and expertise. Students will learn the nature of expertise development, the necessary steps to achieve excellence, and common roadblocks. The concept of excellence will be investigated in many contexts, such as sport and performance, intrapersonal, relationships, and life in general. Topics to be explored include: happiness, contentment, life satisfaction, values, character strengths, emotional intelligence, optimism, hope, flow, and resiliency.

CPSY 4669 Consulting Methods & Practices (3 Credits)

This course is an advanced exploration of theories, research findings, and skills related to the practice of consultation in performance settings. Specific topics include: (a) the consultant roles; (b) the major theoretical approaches to consultation (e.g., mental health, systemic); (c) the processes and stages of consultation (e.g., developing interpersonal relationships; design, implementation, and evaluation of service delivery); (d) ethical and multicultural issues; and (e) students' personal strengths and concerns in the role of a consultant (e.g., values interpersonal style, and consultant variables that impact the effectiveness of their role as an agent of behavior change).

CPSY 4670 Psych of Coaching & Leadership (3 Credits)

Examination of psychological components of coaching and talent development. Explores coaching development, coaching models, as well as strategies for dealing with athletes and different coaching contexts. Discussion of talent development theories including influence of genetic and environmental factors.

CPSY 4671 Theories of Performance Excellence (3 Credits)

This course is designed to familiarize students with theories of performance excellence developed by leading practitioners. Each week, students are exposed to a different practitioner's approach, which often includes an opportunity to observe the practitioner's style through video. Emphasis is placed on the role of theory in practice, theory-based conceptualizations utilizing a case study format, and comparing and contrasting the different theories.

CPSY 4672 Counseling Methods & Practices (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to counseling microskills and techniques needed in helping relationships, with attention to building the therapeutic alliance. Emphasis placed on learning skills in small group format. Laboratory experience in demonstrating skills and the ability to form an effective counseling relationship is required. Pre-practicum experience to prepare students to work with clients.

CPSY 4673 Practicum in Sport and Performance Psychology 2 (3 Credits)

This is the second course in a year long, three-part sequence. This course serves the purpose of (a) providing an opportunity for students to learn about sport & performance psychology through observation and experiential opportunities; (b) providing an intimate forum for discussing the practice of sport and performance psychology; and (c) providing information on professional development and conduct. The course requires didactic and experiential activities. Psychological consultation, best practices, and professional development issues in sport and performance psychology will be addressed. Prerequisite: Practicum in Sport and Performance Psychology I.

CPSY 4674 Clinical Issues: Interviewing and Diagnosis (3 Credits)

This course examines adult psychopathology as classified in the DSM. Special emphasis will be placed on the intersection of performance with more traditional psychopathology. Students learn about etiology, symptomology, epidemiology, and treatment issues. Possible causes and contributory factors are examined, as well as theoretical and multicultural considerations. Prerequisites: Theoretical Aspects of SPP, Applied SPP, and Ethical Issues in SPP.

CPSY 4676 Assessment and Measurement (3 Credits)

This course covers the selection, use, and proper interpretation of common sport and performance psychology assessments. Basic principles of educational and psychological measurement, including test construction, validity, and reliability are addressed. The assessments taught include those used for individual assessment, individual selection, and organizational assessment (360 degree feedback, surveys, etc.). Prerequisites: CPSY 4652, CPSY 4690, and CPSY 4682.

CPSY 4677 Motivation, Emotion & Learning (3 Credits)

This is an in-depth course reviewing the theories and research related to motivation, emotion, and learning in performance contexts. Topics include the relationships between motivation, emotion, and learning; and the influences of emotion and motivation on counseling and consultation. The course provides basic information about the human cognitive system. Students are taught the basic principles of learning, with a focus on the principles of learning which are most applicable in sport and performance settings. This course places an emphasis on relating current research to practice.

CPSY 4678 Scholarly Writing Methods and Practices (1-3 Credits)

The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with the methods and practices of scholarly writing. The course focuses on writing a scholarly review of literature, methodology, results, and conclusions according to APA style. Within the course, students are also asked to review one another's work while developing editing skills and methodological complexity.

CPSY 4679 Field Placement Practicum in Sport and Performance Psychology (3 Credits)

Supervised practice sport & performance psychology in an approved sport or performance setting under licensed practitioners.

CPSY 4680 Sport and Performance Psychology Practicum (3 Credits)

This course will familiarize students with professional issues relevant to the practice of sport and performance psychology. Students will be presenting and analyzing their current applied experiences as coaches and leaders in sport and performance settings in the community. This is a participation-intensive course and the students will receive feedback and suggestions from both the instructor and peers in a group supervision format. Importantly, the ongoing feedback and readings will provide an opportunity for students to understand and apply theories and practice systems of behavior change in sport and performance psychology in the context of their own clients/cases. Students will learn the roles and responsibilities inherent in professional and ethical consultation, with a special emphasis given to the dilemmas of serving as an embedded consultant.

CPSY 4681 Multicultural Issues (3 Credits)

This course covers the research and theories of counseling the culturally different client. Students are expected to develop multicultural skills, including culturally-based conceptualization, assessment, and selection of culturally appropriate intervention strategies. This course will examine these issues in general, with a special emphasis on those in sport and performance cultures. This is both an experimental and seminar-based course, aimed at developing student's personal awareness, knowledge, and skills.

CPSY 4682 Ethical and Legal Issues (3 Credits)

This course introduces the students to the ethical principles, codes, and standards related to the profession of sport and performance psychology. This includes an overview of the regulation of the practice of psychology, the relationships between ethical codes and legal statutes, and the development of a personal model for ethical decision-making.

CPSY 4683 Group Interventions (3 Credits)

This course is a survey of group counseling methods and techniques from a theoretical and applied perspective. The course will include practical application of group counseling interventions. Prerequisites: demonstrated knowledge of ethical principles and departmental consent.

CPSY 4684 Team and Organizational Dynamics (3 Credits)

This course examines the principles, theories, and research of human functioning in performance related teams and organizations. It explores the social and psychological factors influencing behavior in organizations, along with individual differences, dyadic relations and small group behavior. Students learn about the dynamics of team and organizational diagnosis, feedback and learning, intervention, and planned change.

CPSY 4685 Human Growth & Development (3 Credits)

This course is a comprehensive analysis of theories and research relating to human psychological development and learning across the lifespan. It explores the cognitive, affective, academic, physiological, moral, and social/cultural/racial domains. An emphasis is placed on a) the theoretical models underlying character and moral development, and b) adolescent and college student development theories.

CPSY 4686 Practicum in Sport and Performance Psychology: Professional Practice (3 Credits)

This course provides an examination of the critical components of successful and ethical professional practice and career building in sport and performance psychology in conjunction with intensive provision of sport and performance psychology services. The entire body of sport and performance psychology theoretical and applied knowledge as well as the skills that the students have acquired will be utilized. Additionally, rigorous self-reflective activities and ethical decision-making will increase the student professional and personal growth as directly related to effectiveness in the sport and performance psychology practice. Emphasis will be placed on diversifying and integrating theoretical knowledge and applied strategies and skills while simultaneously engaging in supervised independent work in real life sport and performance settings.

CPSY 4687 Psychology of Injury (3 Credits)

This course examines the psychological factors involved in injury, rehabilitation, and return to performance. The effects upon social, personal, and performance adjustment are addressed. The course covers how relevant theory and research can be used to inform practical applications to help the injured performer's rehabilitation and return. It presents the major medical aspects of injury and the rehabilitation process.

CPSY 4688 Seminar in Sport and Performance Psychology (3 Credits)

Advanced seminars offered by sport and performance psychology faculty on topics relevant to the practice and science of sport and performance psychology area.

CPSY 4689 Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (2 Credits)

This course explores the underlying mechanisms and psychophysical determinants of behavior in sport and performance settings. Students learn the use of biofeedback in achieving voluntary self-regulation and control of stress related behaviors.

CPSY 4690 Sport and Performance Psychology Interventions (3 Credits)

This course is designed to familiarize students with the application of sport and performance psychology interventions. Students experience the building of a sport and performance psychology program. This program includes the cardinal skills of relaxation, concentration, imagery, self-talk, and mental routine; followed by broader topics such as goal setting, motivation, confidence, cohesion, engagement, and mastery. The instructor briefly reviews relevant theory and research followed by demonstrations of techniques and strategies, after which students learn by doing. Specific attention is given to blending the science of peak performance with the art of applying science.

CPSY 4691 Practice Development in Sport and Performance Psychology (3 Credits)

The primary goal is to acquaint students with the skills needed to develop and implement a private practice in the profession of sport or performance psychology. The course takes students through the process of business development by using the traditional business plan model, from the necessary startup expenses to the executive summary. Throughout the course students learn the What, When, Where, and How of starting their own consulting practice, while learning the basic components of branding, marketing, and operations. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in the MASPP program or instructor approval.

CPSY 4692 Entrepreneurship in Sport and Performance Psychology (2 Credits)

The primary goal of this course is to provide students with an overview of skills necessary to succeed in the entrepreneurial profession of sport and performance psychology. The course is flexibly designed to accommodate the students' desired career paths. Topics covered may include: sales and marketing, developing a practice, job search and interviewing skills, and understanding the job market.

CPSY 4700 Organization and Administration of Sport (4 Credits)

Graduate level course to educate students on the organization and administration of sport and sport coaching. Course content includes emergency action planning, facility management, human resource management, evaluation and development, legal responsibilities, record keeping, fianance, and public relations. Students will learn how to lead organizations and coaching staffs to develop fair and safe participation.

CPSY 4705 Sociocultural Aspects of Sport Coaching (4 Credits)

Graduate level course to educate students on the sociocultural and social-psychological aspects of sport coaching and athletic performance. Students will understand how to analyze and apply social, sociological and social-psychological theory to sport coaching and athletic performance. Consideration will be given to developing a critical understanding of sport coaches’ knowledge development, and how to implement multiple, effective and ethical strategies to enhance coach and athletic performance.

CPSY 4710 Motor Learning and Sport Pedagogy (4 Credits)

Graduate level course to educate students on the science and practice of how athletes learn motor skills and how coaches can facilitate skill acquisition. Course content includes the scientific and theoretical frameworks of motor learning, with a secondary examination of motor control and development. Applied course content will focus on how coaches can use learning strategies such as demonstration, instruction, feedback, and practice planning to improve athletic performance.

CPSY 4715 Strength, Conditioning, and Injury Prevention Program Design (4 Credits)

Graduate level course to educate students on the scientific, theoretical and practical foundations of strength, conditioning and injury prevention. Students will learn how to design strength and conditioning programs to enhance athletic performance and reduce and lessen the severity of injury. This course is also intended to help students become familiar with the National Strength and Conditioning Association’s (NSCA) Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) exam, and position statements from several national governing bodies on athlete safety and physical performance.

CPSY 4720 Psychology of Athletic Performance (4 Credits)

Graduate level course to educate students on the psychological aspects of athletic performance, and secondarily coach performance. Course content includes the theoretical and practical application of established mental skills (e.g., motivation, efficacy, arousal, anxiety, focus, self-awareness, goal-setting, imagery, team cohesion). Concepts will be applied to the evaluation and creation of practice and training plans to enhance athletic performance.

CPSY 4725 Philosophy, Leadership and Legal Issues of Sport (4 Credits)

Graduate level course to educate students on the social foundations of sport and coaching. Course content includes the history and formation of sport and sport coaching, social issues (e.g., race, class, gender, inclusivity, etc.), how sport is used for (un)desirable ends and the public good, the coach's role in demonstrating and encouraging ethical behavior, and legal concepts and the coach's role in reducing negligence and promoting a healthy and safe environment for numerous stakeholders. Additional topics include themes across leadership theory (e.g., transformational and servant-leadership, emotional intelligence, athlete-centered coaching) and the relationship between educational institutions and sport/athletics. There are no prerequisites for this course.

CPSY 4730 Biomechanics of Athletic Performance (4 Credits)

Graduate level course to educate students on the biomechanics of athletic performance. Students will learn quantitative and qualitative methods of biomechanics to analyze and enhance athletic performance and prevent injury. Course content includes knowledge of the musculoskeletal system, force development and how additional factors such as body composition and joint structures influence athletic performance and injuries.

CPSY 4735 Understanding Sport Research (4 Credits)

Graduate level couse to educate students on understanding and doing sport research. The primary focus of this course is on facilitating student's understanding of research methods commonly used in sport research. Secondarily, the course will examine how research is actually done, including reviewing the literature and writing and referencing scholarly work. Course content will cover topics such as paradigms and philosophy of science, epistemology and the creation of knowledge, and numerous research designs, methodologies and methods. Content will also include understanding statistics and qualitative methods.

CPSY 4740 Practicum 1 in Sport Coaching (1 Credit)

Practicum 1 in Sport Coaching helps students to gain the knowledge, skills and attitudes to become a quality coach and reflective practitioner through experiential learning. Students will draw upon MASC course content and their coaching experiences to reflect upon the complexities of sport coaching to integrate their knowledge and skills to identify and solve problems. Students must complete at least 50 hours of coaching for every one hour of credit enrolled. This course provides basic to intermediate level content and prepares students for Practicum 2. Prerequisites: Passed background check, submitted current CPR/First Aid certificate at level in which student is coaching and valid for the full quarter while enrolled. Student must be enrolled in the MASC program.

CPSY 4745 Practicum 2 in Sport Coaching (1 Credit)

Practicum 2 in Sport Coaching helps students to gain an advanced understanding of the knowledge, skills and attitudes to become a quality coach and reflective practitioner through experiential learning. Students will draw upon MASC course content and their coaching experiences to reflect upon the complexities of coaching to solve vital problems. Students must complete at least 50 hours of coaching for every one hour of credit enrolled. Prerequisites--one earned credit of Practicum 1, passed background check, submitted current CPR/First Aid certificate at level in which student is coaching and valid for the full quarter while enrolled. Student must be enrolled in the MASC program.

CPSY 4750 Sport Coaching Capstone (2-4 Credits)

Capstone literally means "a finishing stone or a structure." Similarly, students will complete a project that demonstrates the student’s initiative and excellence. To help explore the student's interest and refine a suitable topic, students are encouraged to discuss the capstone project with course instructors early and throughout their time in the MASC program. Students may build off a previous course activity or assignment, but the Capstone Project must reflect new and substantive work appropriate to the number of hours enrolled. While students have the autonomy to negotiate new project ideas, sample projects could include: thesis or original research, review of literature paper, presentation at conference, leading a service-learning event, writing a book chapter, authoring a novel or other creative writing, or a webinar. Prerequistes: Students must have completed at least 16 credit hours towards the MASC degree and have completed or being enrolled concurrently in Understanding Sport Research.

CPSY 4991 Independent Study (1-17 Credits)

CPSY 4992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

CPSY 4995 Independent Research (1-17 Credits)

CPSY 5000 Rad Behav/Func Contextl Models (3 Credits)

CPSY 4000 is designed to provide a historical, philosophical and conceptual background to better understand and appreciate Behaviorist views of "being-in-the world". The course lays the foundation for the sophisticated application of a science of behavior-its theories and methods-to the assessment of clinical problems and the art of doing psychotherapy. The course will invite a little discomfort, disturb some preconceptions, and compel students to address some difficult questions and thorny issues. Among the goals of this course are to see students commit to being more than a psychologist technician, to encourage them to develop a guiding philosophical core in their practice as a psychologist; to assist them in clarifying or deepening whatever philosophical worldview they may hold; and that they will have achieved an informed understanding of radical behaviorism/functional contextualism - whether or not they choose to further pursue these models.

CPSY 5010 Cognitive & Affective Models (3 Credits)

This is the first in a three part sequence that includes Psychophysiology and Clinical Neuropsychology and is designed to introduce students to the current research in cognitive neuroscience and consciousness. This first course focuses on sensation/perception, learning, memory, emotion, language and other higher cognitive functions. Lectures will emphasize current technologies and historical inquiry and the unique contributions made by psychosocial and cultural variables.

CPSY 5020 Psychoanalytic Models (3 Credits)

Psychoanalytic theories, including Freud's topographic and structural theories, ego psychology, object relations theory and modern relational theories, including self-psychology and intersubjectivity.

CPSY 5030 Systems Models (3 Credits)

Basic concepts of general systems theory and their applications in psychology, focusing on family systems, groups and organizations.

CPSY 5040 History and Systems in Psych (2 Credits)

Basic psychological concepts surveyed from a historical point of view, tracing development of psychological bases of professional practice.

CPSY 5050 Advanced Statistics (3 Credits)

CPSY 5051 Statistics I Lab (1 Credit)

CPSY 5070 Research Methods (2 Credits)

Sequential course that cover fundamentals of structuring, analyzing and critiquing research reports and proposals; strategies to guide and facilitate the writing process; attitude and thinking skills necessary for function as a local clinical scientist; research design tools, methods and strategies for answering different types of questions.

CPSY 5071 Research Methods II (2 Credits)

Sequential courses that cover fundamentals of structuring, analyzing and critiquing research reports and proposals; strategies to guide and facilate the writing process; attitudinal and thinking skills necessary for function as a local clinical scientists; research design tools, methods and strategies for answering different types of questions.

CPSY 5073 Qualitative Research Methods (2 Credits)

Qualitative research involves obtaining in-depth information about the behaviors and beliefs of people in naturally occurring social settings. This course introduces students to the philosophical underpinnings, history, and key elements of five qualitative approaches: narrative research, phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, and case study. We compare theoretical frameworks and methodologies, experience the use of data, and discuss writing strategies. In addition, we read articles that are exemplars or each approach.

CPSY 5075 Program Evaluation Technique (3 Credits)

Theory and techniques for developing management information and assessment systems for human service programs.

CPSY 5080 Diagnosis and Classification (2 Credits)

An overview of major DSM diagnostic categories, as well as an introduction to ICD and noncategorical classification.

CPSY 5108 Introduction to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) (2 Credits)

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) belongs to the movement in clinical psychological science that sees acceptance and openness to experience as an essential addition to change-focused psychotherapeutic treatment strategies. Although consciously based on behavior-analytic thinking, ACT is a hybrid in terms of approach and technique, bringing together aspects of Zen Buddhism, Gestalt therapy, and humanist-existential though. The paradox upon which ACT is founded is that only radical acceptance of what cannot be changed empowers people to recognize and change the things that they can. The ACT approach is about embracing necessary suffering in order to make more committed, life-affirming choices and live in accordance with personal values. ACT emphasizes that in a very deep sense all human beings are in the same boat. The technical and theoretical bases of ACT are through normal didactics, but the heart and art of the approach occurs through experiential exercises, group process, and from observation and modeling. Prerequisite: CPSY 5000.

CPSY 5120 Introduction to Animal-Assisted Interventions (3 Credits)

This course serves as an introduction to animal-assisted interventions (AAI) as they are commonly used by mental health care professionals. It is designed to provide students with an overview of the foundations of AAI, the variety of ways in which this modality is used, international perspectives on AAI, various perspectives on ethics and animal welfare, and researchers' current understanding of the role of the human-animal bond in facilitating AAI treatment efficacy. General topics to be addressed include the characteristics of the species used in AAI, the basic principles of AAI, the use of AAI with a variety of populations, and animal abuse issues. A number of guest lecturers will share their knowledge and experiences with students throughout the quarter.

CPSY 5130 Issues in Measurement (3 Credits)

Validity, reliability and standardization issues in psychological testing; statistical properties of commonly used tests.

CPSY 5131 Issues in Measurement Lab (1 Credit)

Optional. Focused assistance with basic math skills; review and clarification of class topics.

CPSY 5170 Life Cycle: Inf to Mid Childhd (3 Credits)

Understanding normal development of children (0-12 years), integrating theory, research and a phenomenological perspective.

CPSY 5180 Life Cycle: Adolescent - Adult (2 Credits)

CPSY 5200 Life Cycle: Late Adulthood (3 Credits)

Theories of aging; social, psychological and biological changes; assessment and intervention methods, emphasizing issues impacting older adults. (65 years and above).

CPSY 5230 Group Dynamics & Interventions (3 Credits)

Provides psychologists in training with multiple learning experiences highlighting that groups and organizations are intensely psychological environments in which most psychologists function professionally and personally and have the potential to impact positively.

CPSY 5231 Social Psychology (3 Credits)

CPSY 5250 Existential and Humanistic Theory and Therapy (2 Credits)

Historical roots and basic assumption of existential and humanistic views. Students encouraged to integrate materials with their personal valves and assumptions about human nature and their interaction with clients.

CPSY 5270 Physiological Psychology I (3 Credits)

Terminology and principles of and research in physiological psychology. Where possible, application made to content and practice of clincal psychology.

CPSY 5271 Physiological Lab I (1 Credit)

Optional. Assistance with material covered in CPSY 4170.

CPSY 5273 Physiological Lab II (1 Credit)

CPSY 5290 Clinical Neuropsychology (3 Credits)

Historical, conceptual and clinical foundation for, as well as current developments related to, the field of clinical neuropsychology. Includes exposure to: developmental neuropsychology and neuroanatomy; higher cognitive functions; neuropsychologically informed interviews and standard neuropsychological test batteries; neuropsychological profiles associated with a variety of acquired disorders (both classical neuropsychological and psychological in nature); ethnic, cultural, age and gender considerations; and current status of a variety of professional/ethical issues. Prerequisite: CPSY 5270.

CPSY 5310 Ethical Issues in Psychology (3 Credits)

In-depth consideration of ethical standards applicable to the science and practice of psychology; pertinent laws and legal standards governing the practice of psychology; areas in which legal and ethical standards suggests contradictory actions on the part of the clinical psychologist.

CPSY 5320 Professional Issues in Psych (2 Credits)

Issues, concerns and controversies impacting current practice of professional psychology at the state and national levels; preparation for future alternative systems of service delivery. Emphasis is on professional life after the PsyD. Required for first year students.

CPSY 5340 Social Psychology of Racism and Oppression (3 Credits)

Theoretical and experimental nature of racism and oppression, primarily in the United States, definition of such terms as stereotypes, prejudice. racism, white supremacy and privilege; exploration of various theories regarding these terms and how they manifest themselves historically and contemporarily.

CPSY 5360 Racial/Ethnic Identity Dvlpmnt (3 Credits)

This course will explicate the concept of ethnic identification, and the process by which this central aspect of a person's overall identity develops. Accordingly, the two central questions that this course will address are: a. who are they? and b. how did they get that way? These questions will be examined utilizing a Descriptive Psychology perspective.

CPSY 5370 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Issues (3 Credits)

Various aspects of gay, lesbian life explored cross- culturally; nature of homosexuality, including the controversy of heredity vs. choice. Issues of oppression and discrimination will also be explored. The role of psychology and the politics of homosexuality will be studied. Students will also be asked to explore their personal awareness regarding homosexuality in their everyday lives and in a therapeutic context.

CPSY 5380 Culturally Competent Psychotx (3 Credits)

As the final class in the year-long multicultural course sequence, this class will integrate the theoretical content of the preceding classes and focus on their psychotherapeutic implications. This course will address psychotherapy with the following groups - African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and the GLBT community.

CPSY 5385 Pro Sem: Beg. Psychotherapy (2 Credits)

This is a clinical and didactic seminar on beginning psychotherapy. The focus will be on case formulation and developing a therapeutic relationship with the client.

CPSY 5386 Pro Sem: Child & Ad Psychother (2 Credits)

This seminar involves the evaluation and treatment of children, adolescents and their parents in the Professional Psychology Center. Supervision is provided from an integrative perspective, and topics relevant to child and adolescent psychotherapy are discussed.

CPSY 5388 Pro Sem:Psychological Assessmt (2 Credits)

Assessment is a central feature of the work of the clinical psychologist. This seminar is an opportunity to hone your knowledge and skills in personality and cognitive assessment. It will involve some lecture, but mainly focus on supervision of assessment cases obtained through the Professional Psychology Clinic. You will be expected to complete four assessments during the year - you certainly can do more if you wish. You also will have the opportunity to present a case you have completed to the seminar during the Spring quarter.

CPSY 5389 Pro Sem: Behavior Therapy (2 Credits)

This advanced professional seminar draws upon pragmatic philosophy and contextualistic worldview as it informs and guides contemporary behavior analytic theory and practice. Students gain experiences using functional analysis as a method for describing and integrating clinical observations and learn to implement a variety of evidence based, acceptance inspired interventions designed to facilitate psychological flexibility and values-congruent living in clients from diverse backgrounds. Therapeutic work is conducted in an atmosphere of care, respect, compassion, and commitment, and challenges the client (and therapist) to be more open, aware, vulnerable, and present in their lives.

CPSY 5390 Pro Sem: Forensic Issues (2 Credits)

This seminar will introduce students to the various areas and ways in which psychology interacts with the legal and criminal justice systems. Students will develop their capacity to perform evaluations relating to psychological questions, dilemmas, and disputes that are most frequently requested of forensic psychologists. Focus of the seminar will be on assisting students in clarifying their role as an evaluator and consultant to attorneys, judges, and criminal justice personnel; exploring the ethical responsibilities therein; learning to compose reports for a legal rather than a clinical audience; and preparing to testify as an expert witness. Students will formulate and deliver case presentations, participate in a “mock” testimony experience, and submit reports. Students in past seminars have conducted child custody evaluations, mental status at time of offense evaluations, Social Security disability evaluations, asylum, T-visa, and U-visa evaluations, animal abuse, competency and juvenile placement evaluations; these evaluations allow students the opportunity to conduct full battery psychological assessments, and learn how to apply findings to a legal context. In addition, we have been getting more court mandated therapy clients. Thus, students will get assessment experience as well as individual therapy experience with adults and children. Assessment experience required. If you have not completed all assessment courses, please speak to Lavita. Students are required to complete a combination of 4 assessments/therapy clients during the course of the year. Please note that the forensic seminar requires a substantial time commitment because assessments requires longer sessions with clients to administer tests, time to score and interpret tests, and report writing.

CPSY 5391 Professional Seminar: Psychodynamic Therapy (2 Credits)

This seminar focuses on psychodynamic psychotherapy - that is, individual adult psychotherapy with the aim of bringing about meaningful and lasting psychological concepts as they apply to your patients, with a practical, "hands on" focus - for example, what to do and say when your patient shuts down, threatens suicide, act out, comes on to you, misses appointments, gets worse, throws up in your office, and all the other troubling and fascinating things people do from time to time in psychotherapy. Prior or current personal psychotherapy is highly desirable and strongly recommended. Students should be prepared to discuss their clinical work candidly - and help foster an environment of mutual trust, compassion, and respect, in which candid discussion can take place.

CPSY 5392 Pro Sem: Couple and Family (2 Credits)

This seminar allows students more in-depth training in working with systems including couples and families. Students should take Couples Therapy and Family Therapy either before or concurrent with the seminar. Special topics covered include divorce, step families parenting, sex therapy, multicultural issues, and ethics, as well as more general couple and family therapy work.

CPSY 5393 Pro Sem: ACT (2 Credits)

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a pragmatically based, relatively new and highly experiential form of therapy whose overarching goals are to a) assist clients (and therapists) in accepting what cannot be changed (i.e., the form or frequency of certain private events), while b) helping them fully commit to behaving in accordance with idiosyncratic values. Although consciously based on behavior -analytic thinking, ACT is a hybrid therapy in terms of approach and technique, bringing together aspects of Zen Buddhism, Gestalt therapy, and humanist-existential thought. In the seminar, students will learn the technical and theoretical bases of ACT through group process, individual and small group supervision, as well as from observation and modeling. Prerequisite: Behavioral Models course.

CPSY 5394 Professional Seminar: Cognitive Therapy (2 Credits)

This is a year-long seminar in cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT). Trainees learn the theory and practice of CBT through readings, didactic presentations, discussion, and especially case presentations. Small-group supervision is also required. Other orientations to therapy and common factors are also covered.

CPSY 5396 Pro Sem: Adv. Psychotherapy (2 Credits)

Seminar will focus on the individual therapy treatment of adult cases. Particular emphasis will be placed on conceptualizing cases from a developmental perspective with no particular emphasis on object relations and the psychology of self. We will evaluate culture, role of trauma, issues of sexual orientation, and developmental history. Students will be encouraged to look at their own and other's responses in a supportive environment that will foster discussion on counter-transference responses. An in depth exploration of client's needs will be assessed and model the treatment to those needs, rather than applying the same treatment model to all patients. Previous exposure and readings on the psychology of self and object relations is helpful. Readings to deepen our understanding of the above will be assigned. Must have taken or be currently enrolled in Adult Psychopathology sequence. Prerequisite: Psychoanalytic Models course.

CPSY 5399 Professional Seminar: Gender Issues (2 Credits)

This seminar will focus on gender issues from developmental and psychodynamic perspectives. Topics will include issues relevant to women, men, and transgendered/intersexed individuals. Clients may include adolescents and adults with a variety of presenting concerns including relationship problems, identity issues, eating disorders, pregnancy and postpartum work, parenthood, mood and anxiety disorders, and aging.

CPSY 5404 Prof Sem: Integrative Therapy (2 Credits)

This advanced seminar examines various integrative models of psychotherapy, and students will have the opportunity to develop their own therapeutic "voice" by integrating the major theories already learned at the GSPP. While the seminar will be theoretical in nature, one goal is to help students prepare for practice in the real world by exploring the common factors of therapy, and how to work collaboratively in a client-directed fashion. Clients may include adults, adolescents, and children with a wide variety of presenting concerns, in individual, couples, family, or group therapy. Students will be expected to present their work regularly on DVD and (in Dr Cornish's supervision), occasionally behind the two-way mirror. Competency areas covered include: professionalism, reflective practice, scientific knowledge and methods, relationships, individual and cultural diversity, ethical/legal standard and policy, assessment, and intervention. In addition to supervision on psychotherapy, there may be an option for students to be supervised on their supervision of a first year student in the PPC.

CPSY 5405 Advanced Relational Psychodynamic Seminar (2 Credits)

This seminar focuses on relational psychotherapy from the perspectives of self-psychology and intersubjective systems theory in working with adults. We examine the co-creation of the therapeutic relationship, the making of meaning, emphatic listening, attuning to the other's affective experience and putting the other's subjective experience into words. We develop treatment plans and case formulations that are consistent with this perspective.

CPSY 5406 Professional Seminar: Health Psychology (2 Credits)

This advanced seminar focuses on the ways that clients’ physical health concerns affect psychosocial and emotional well-being. We focus on the relationship between the mind and the body and take a holistic and contextual approach to understanding work with clients, keeping in mind relational and cultural variables throughout the seminar. Clients in the PPC that have been in this seminar have had cancer, mltiple sclerosis, diabetes, heart failure, chronic pain, autoimmune diseases, etc. As relevant to our work with clients, we discuss pain management, mindfulness, differential diagnosis of depression and anxiety, sleep hygiene, psychosocial oncology, grief and loss, and other empirically supported treatments for issues that clients present. The overarching theoretical framework of the course is relationship-focused, client-centered, and strengths-based. We draw on rehabilitation psychology and medical psychology, and explore diversity issues in a variety of ways, including examining disability as a multicultural issue. We use readings from interpersonal psycholotherapy, feminist and multicultural therapy, positive-psychology, meaning-centered psychotherapy, humanistic/existential therapy, client-centered therapy and post-traumatic growth to guide discussions. Particular attention is paid to helping clients enhance their strengths and find meaning in their lives during times of transition. Since many health settings are focused on a short-term model of treatment, students in seminar have the option of taking on shorter-term cases and we explore the use of time-limited psychotherapy in a health setting. It is expected that most studetns take on new cases in this seminar.

CPSY 5420 Behav-Analytic Prin 1 (2 Credits)

This course covers philosophical foundations, assumptions, and principles underlying major systems and models of behaviorism. Emphasis is given to the philosophy of science called radical behaviorism and its behavior-analytic functional-contextualistic tradition. Course I specifically targets contingency-shaping selection processes based upon Pavlovian and operant conditioning paradigms. Recommended prerequisite: CPSY 5000.

CPSY 5421 Behavioral Analysis Princ La (1 Credit)

CPSY 5422 Behav-Analytic Prin 2 (2 Credits)

This course covers philosophical foundations, assumptions, and principles relevant to cultural-linguistic practices. Emphasis is given to the philosophy of science called radical behaviorism and its behavior-analytic functional-contextualistic traditions. Course 2 specifically addresses verbal relational contingency selection processes based upon cultural and its verbal community. Prerequisite: CPSY 5420.

CPSY 5423 Behav-Analytic Assess/Case Frm (2 Credits)

This course covers the philosophical foundations, assumptions, and principles relevant to behavioral assessment and case formulation tactics. Emphasis is given to the philosophy of science called radical behaviorism and its behavior-analytic functional-contextualistic traditions. This course specifically targets an empirical data-driven approach to idiographic assessment for purposes of developing conceptual analyses from the contextual- functional analytic perspective. Prerequisites: CPSY 5420, CPSY 5422.

CPSY 5424 Behavior-Analytic Intervention (2 Credits)

This course provides an overview of issues, principles and methods basic to clinical practice and intervention. Emphasis is given to the philosophy of science called radical behaviorism and its behavior-analytic functional- contextualistic traditions. This course specifically targets a range of commonly used methods of intervention (e.g., counter-conditioning and exposure-based treatments, guided action strategies, acceptance-commitment approaches, Eastern interventions). Issues relevant to the structuring of therapy sessions, the therapeutic relationship, behavioral nonadherence, empirical research, and other topics of therapeutic interest will be reviewed. This course will incorporate the use of experiential exercises, modeled demonstration, and behavior rehearsal methods for training purposes. Prerequisites: CPSY 5420, CPSY 5422, CPSY 5423.

CPSY 5466 Health Psychology (2 Credits)

This course is designed to provide students with a broad overview of the salient empirical and theoretical aspects of health psychology and behavioral medicine. The course will emphasize the role that psychological variables play in the development, exacerbation, treatment and prognosis of both acute and chronic illness. We will also highlight sociopolitical and cultural discourse surrounding end-of-life decision making, healthcare accessibility and the phenomenology of a disabled population.

CPSY 5467 Health Psychology Service Learning Seminar (1 Credit)

The Health Psychology Service Learning Seminar provides the opportunity for students to gain clinical experience with the underserved/underrepresented populations covered in the Health Psychology course (CPSY 5466). Students who enroll in the Seminar must agree to complete 20 hours of supervised clinical service with an agency and supervisor of their choice.

CPSY 5468 Sport and Performance Psychology Practicum in Collegiate Athletics I (2 Credits)

This is the first course in a year long, three-part sequence. This course serves the purpose of providing: a) practice in sport and performance psychology in a NCAA Collegiate Athletic Department under the supervision of licensed practitioners; b) an opportunity for students to learn about sport and performance psychology through observation and experiential opportunities; and c) information on professional development and conduct. The course requires didactic and experiential activities. The didactic component covers the practice of sport and performance consulting, focusing on gaining entry and building working relationships. Current research is integrated with theory, emphasizing empirically validated approaches to best practice.

CPSY 5469 Sport and Performance Psychology Practicum in Collegiate Athletics II (1 Credit)

This is the second course in a year long, three-part sequence. This course serves the purpose of providing: a) practice in sport and performance psychology in a NCAA Collegiate Athletic Department under the supervision of licensed practitioners; b) an opportunity for students to learn about sport and performance psychology through observation and experiential opportunities; and c) information on professional development and conduct. The course requires didactic and experiential activities. Psychological consultation, best practices, and professional development issues in sport and performance psychology are addressed.

CPSY 5470 Sport and Performance Psychology Practicum in Collegiate Athletics III (2 Credits)

This is the third course in a year long, three-part sequence. This course serves the purpose of providing: a) practice in sport and performance psychology in a NCAA Collegiate Athletic Department under the supervision of licensed practitioners; b) an opportunity for students to learn about sport and performance psychology through observation and experiential opportunities; and c) information on professional development and conduct. The course requires didactic and experiential activities. Psychological consultation, best practices, and professional development issues in sport and performance psychology are addressed.

CPSY 5480 Integrated Primary Care (2 Credits)

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the field of Integrated Primary Care (IPC). Primary health care physicians currently serve as the de-facto mental health care providers for approximately 50-80% of the patients they serve. Psychologists are desperately needed to support primary care, yet traditional clinical training does not adequately prepare them to work in this field. Students in this course can expect to acquire a solid knowledge in IPC that will enable them to function effectively in the primary care culture. A clinical exposure component are required so students can experience the pace and problem range seen in the primary care office. Class size is limited. Students not enrolled in the PsyD program must petition the instructor for approval to register.

CPSY 5482 Health Psychology Service-Learning: Clinical Practice in Integrated Primary Care (1 Credit)

This course will be a clinical and didactic seminar for students who are involved in service-learning projects in integrated primary care clinics in the community. Students will participate in service-learning, clinical rotations, and administrative and consultation duties outside of the course time. The course format will include time for clinical supervision of community cases, didactic training on topics of relevance to integrated primary care settings, and lectures from interprofessional community preceptors from the clinics. Prerequisite: Health Psychology CPSY 5466 or permission or the instruction.

CPSY 5500 Diagnosis & Treatment of Children (2 Credits)

CPSY 5505 Diagnosis & Treatment of Adolescents (2 Credits)

CPSY 5550 Couples Therapy (2 Credits)

Theory, techniques and research relating to couples therapy, including theoretical perspectives: behavioral couples therapy, emotionally-focused couples therapy and object relations couples therapy. The course also addresses specific problem areas, including domestic violence, infidelity, depression, anxiety, substance abuse and personality disorders. Prerequisite: CPSY 5030.

CPSY 5560 Family Therapy (2 Credits)

Theory, techniques and research relating to family therapy, including several theoretical perspectives: behavioral, experiential, psychodynamic, multigenerational approaches. Special topics covered include working with community resources, addressing developmental issues of children, working with medical and school systems, utilizing cultural factors in planning programs and interventions and adults in family therapy. Prerequisite: CPSY 5030.

CPSY 5562 Psychological Consultation (2 Credits)

This course provides an overview of the practice of psychological consultation. Theories and models of consultation in various settings including businesses, organizations, health care, and schools are covered. The process and stages of consultation from entry to termination are analyzed. This class differentiates consultation from other types of psychological interventions. Important legal, ethical and multicultural issues in consultation are addressed throughout the course. Students develop their own model for conducting consultation and refine that model through work with local organizations. Students increase their awareness of their strengths and weaknesses in the practice of consultation. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, experiential exercises, and interactions with local organizations and professional consultants.

CPSY 5590 Adult Psychopathology I (2 Credits)

Theoretical understanding and treatment of adults within a developmental, ego analytic framework. First quarter-differences between the neuroses, borderline, and psychoses. Prerequisite: CPSY 5020.

CPSY 5591 Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (2 Credits)

Theoretical understanding and treatment of adults within a developmental, ego analytic framework. Second quarter - the neuroses. Prerequisite: CPSY 5020.

CPSY 5592 Adult Psychopathology III (2 Credits)

This course is a continuation of Adult Psychopathology I and II with an emphasis on complex trauma and the psychotic disorders. Diagnostic understanding, differential diagnosis, and treatment implications are emphasized within a psychoanalytic orientation. Prerequisites: CPSY 5590 and CPSY 5591 or instructor approval.

CPSY 5620 Intersubjective Systems Theory (2 Credits)

This course focuses on psychotherapy from the perspectives of intersubjective systems theory in working with adults. We examine the co-creation of the therapeutic relationship, the making of meaning, empahtic listening, attuning to the other's affective experience and putting the other's subjective experience into words. We develop treatment plans and case formulations that are consistent with this perspective.

CPSY 5680 Cognitive Assessment (4 Credits)

Theoretical, professional and clinical issues involving intelligence and its measurement; assessment of cognitive functioning and clinical interpretation of test results, focusing on the WAIS-III ( and child equivalents). Prerequisite: CPSY 5130.

CPSY 5685 Introduction to Pediatric Neuropsychological Assessment (2 Credits)

Pediatric neuropsychology integrates many basic sciences including behavioral Neurology, developmental psychology, neuroanatomy, psychopathology, and psychological assessment. The role of pediatric neuropsychologist is to provide comprehensive assessment, consultation, and intervention in the context of a developing child. The course will review important concepts, theories, and empirical research in the field of pediatric neuropsychology. Students will learn the basic rationale in conducting a pediatric neuropsychological evaluation, including a brief review of many common pediatric assessment measures. In addition, many common pediatric disorders will be reviewed from a neuropsychological perspective including: Dyslexia, Attention Deficit hyperactivity Disorder, Pervasive Development Disorders, Traumatic Brain Injury, Seizure Disorders, and Mental Retardation. Upon completion of the course the student will have a greater appreciation of a neuropsychological conceptual framework and have a better understanding of specific pediatric disorders.

CPSY 5686 Suicide Prevention, Intervention and Postvention (2 Credits)

Suicide is a serious public health issue and challenge for the nation, Colorado, and our local communities. In 2009, suicide claimed the lives of almost 34,000 people in the United States and is the second leading cause of death for college students and men ages 25-34. In Colorado, there are many more suicides than motor vehicle deaths. While most clinicians are focused on the assessment and treatment of people at high risk for suicide, a more comprehensive approach is needed to prevent people from becoming suicidal in the first place. This course covers best practices in suicide prevention, intervention and "postvention" (suicide crisis response) and will explore the particular issues of several vulnerable populations.

CPSY 5687 Contemporary Issues in Geropsychology (2 Credits)

This course addresses issues in aging. Topics include healthy aging, aging issues in diverse populations, contemporary options for care, challenges in service delivery, the interplay of medical and mental health needs, mental health treatment approaches and issues, and end-of-life issues.

CPSY 5690 Introduction to the Rorschac (4 Credits)

Exner's Comprehensive System for administering, scoring and development hypotheses with the Rorschach Test. Prerequisite: CPSY 5130.

CPSY 5692 Advanced Rorschach Analysis (2 Credits)

This course is an exploration of advanced topics in Rorschach interpretation. Topics will include: conceptual understanding of the Comprehensive System; content and sequence analysis; differential diagnosis; integrating alternative systems of interpretation with the Comprehensive System; development and use of special scales; appropriate use of computerized interpretation; and integration of Rorschach analysis with personality theory. Prerequisites include course work in Rorschach administration, scoring and basic interpretation; and in personality theory. Students will be expected to score, analyze, and present Rorschach protocols.

CPSY 5700 Adv Personality Assessment (3 Credits)

Projective techniques including Rorschach, storytelling tasks and projective drawings, with a focus both on test content and the patient-examiner relationship in the context of the diagnostic consultant. Prerequisites: CPSY 5130, CPSY 5680, CPSY 5690.

CPSY 5705 Self Report Assessment (3 Credits)

Construction and application of objective instruments, emphasizing the MMPI and MCMI. Students are required to submit test reposts. Prerequisite: CPSY 5130.

CPSY 5706 Self Report Assessment Lab (1 Credit)

Optional. For students anticipating a need for extra help with repost writing.

CPSY 5710 Intro to the Crisi Wartegg System for the WDCT: Administration, Scoring, and Basic Interpretation (2 Credits)

This course introduces the Crisi Wartegg System (CWS), a new methodology for the clinical use of the Wartegg Drawing Completion Test (WDCT). The WDCT is a projective drawing technique that can be completed in 5-10 minutes and is appropriate for children, adolescents, and adults. It is easy to administer and not overwhelming for clients to complete. The WDCT is not well known in the United States; however, a recent meta-analysis (Gronnerod & Gronnerod, 2011) attests to its validity in assessing personality and psychopathology. The course will review the history and theory of the WDCT, teach its administration, introduce the major features of the scoring system, and discuss basic interpretation. Prerequisites: CPSY 5680 Cognitive Assessment, CPSY 5705 Self Report Assessment, and CPSY 5690 Introduction to Rorschach.

CPSY 5711 Introduction to the Crisi Wartegg System for the WDCT: Lab (1 Credit)

This lab accompanies the Crisi Wartegg System course (CWS). It supplements material presented in the class and provides an experiential component to training in the CWS. It will include applied practice of administration, scoring and calculations, as well as basic clinical case interpretation. Concurrent enrollment in the Crisi Wartegg System course is required. Prerequisites: CPSY 5680 Cognitive Assessment, CPSY 5705 Self Report Assessment, and CPSY 5690 Introduction to Rorschach.

CPSY 5740 Integrative Personality Assessment (2 Credits)

This course is the culmination of the assessment sequence, and integrates techniques, approaches and concepts covered in issues in Measurement, Cognitive Assessment, Objective Personality Assessment, and Rorschach. Aspects of the other core courses in the curriculum will also be brought to bear on the question of how to obtain and how to interpret information within various theoretical models for the purposes of answering referral questions and planning interventions. Projective testing will be introduced as a source of behavior samples for which the occasioning environment is known to the psychologist. There will be focus on distinguishing interpretable from irrelevant information, and on integrating interpretable information into meaningful patterns. The goal of using assessment to answer referral question and plan treatments will generate a special focus on report writing.

CPSY 5741 Therapeutic Assessment (2 Credits)

This course explores the advances made in understanding and enhancing the therapeutic impact that assessment can have on clients. We read broadly in the area: from the genesis of collaborative assessment fueled by Fischer to the empirical foundations and structure of Therapeutic Assessment provided by Finn to novel applications of the approach highlighted by Handler. This important movement in assessment is applicable to personality, cognitive, and neuropsychological assessment as well as any professional endeavor that aims to help clients understand themselves in life-changing ways. The course is designed for those with a solid foundation in assessment who wish to develop greater facility in helping their clients.

CPSY 5745 Human Sexuality (2 Credits)

The psychology of human sexuality is a survey of historical and contemporary psychological views on a wide variety of sexual behaviors; theory and research bearing on the relationship between life span, psychological development, psychological functioning, interpersonal processes, and sexual behaviors; political and social issues involved in current sexual norms and practices. Specific implications for clinical psychology will be discussed.

CPSY 5750 Supervision (2 Credits)

This course is designed to familiarize students with theories of supervision; provide practical, guided experience in peer supervision/consultation; help students understand and critically discuss the supervisory process; aid in gaining awareness of how multicultural issues may affect supervision; and familiarize students with ethical and legal issues in supervision.

CPSY 5755 Supervision Practicum I (1 Credit)

This is a four quarter sequence, 1 quarter credit hour/ quarter, in which advanced students will have the opportunity to supervise on beginning student under the overall supervision of a faculty member. Each quarter practicum will include appropriate level readings, group discussions and report writing. Admission to the course with instructor's approval.

CPSY 5756 Supervision Practicum II (1 Credit)

This is a four quarter sequence, 1 quarter credit hour/ quarter, in which advanced students will have the opportunity to supervise one beginning student under the overall supervision of a faculty member. Each quarter practicum will include appropriate level readings, group discussions and report writing. Admission to the course with instructor's approval.

CPSY 5757 Supervision Practicum III (1 Credit)

This is a four quarter sequence, 1 quarter credit hour/ quarter, in which advanced students will have the opportunity to supervise one beginning student under the overall supervision on a faculty member. Each quarter practicum will include appropriate level readings, group discussions and report writing. Admission to the course with instructor's approval.

CPSY 5758 Supervision Practicum IV (1 Credit)

This is a four quarter sequence, 1 quarter credit hour/ quarter, in which advanced students will have the opportunity to supervise one beginning student under the overall supervision of a faculty member. Each quarter practicum will include appropriate level readings, group discussions and report writing. Admission to the course with instructor's approval.

CPSY 5760 Professional Issues II (2 Credits)

This class provides an organized and comprehensive approach to pre-doctoral psychology internship selection, emphasizing an understanding of "fit." Topics covered include choosing sites; writing cover letters, CVs, and AAPI essays; preparing application materials; interviewing techniques; rank ordering sites; and dealing with emotions related to the process. The course syllabus includes important readings from the current literature. Lectures are balanced with guest appearances by DU Writing Center staff and others. Opportunities are given for role play among the students.

CPSY 5762 Qualitative Data Analysis (3 Credits)

This course, designed for psychology students who are completing their doctoral or masters' projects, focuses on qualitative data analysis. Throughout the course, we explore different research traditions including phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, case study and critical theory. In doing so, we discuss their differing philosophical assumptions, procedures for research, and methods for data collection and analyses. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in qualitative data analysis techniques such as indexing, coding and memo writing. Students also gain experience using qualitative data software (NVIVO 7) and exploring its utility for visual representations and other analytic approaches to understanding their data.

CPSY 5765 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (2 Credits)

This course focuses on clinical applications of cognitive-behavioral theory. Major theorists in the area are reviewed, including Ellis, Beck, Lazarus, and Meichenbaum. Research utilizing cognitive-behavioral therapy as an evidence-based practice are reviewed. In addition, key cognitive behavioral techniques are demonstrated and practiced.

CPSY 5770 Doctoral Paper Preparation (2 Credits)

CPSY 5775 Clinical Psychology Internsh (8 Credits)

CPSY 5815 Trauma and its Aftermath (2 Credits)

Conceptual model for treating trauma; incidence and specific treatment techniques for various types of trauma (e.g. combat vets, survivors of natural disaster and victims of childhood abuse); professional issues relating to trauma (e.g. secondary PTSD and ethical issues). Students exposed to a variety of reading and expected to integrate current research into clinical application. For advanced students who have both a clinical and conceptual background.

CPSY 5816 Int'l Psychology Externship (5 Credits)

International externship is one component of a yearlong advanced seminar. The five credit course offers students the opportunity to work with victims of disasters in an international setting.

CPSY 5825 Introduction to Latino Psychology and the Latino Experience (3 Credits)

This course will highlight the current psychosocial research and literature relevent to the mental health of Latina/o populations including influences of culture, acculturation, immigration, and language on utilization of psychological services. The course will explore the variables that can affect how different Latino groups respond in a unique way to the various services offered in the community. This course will familiarize the student with the personal, social, cultural and instituional forces that affect the psychology of Latinos, to include history, religion, gender roles, emotional processing, violence, bilingualism, and stigmitization and oppresion.

CPSY 5826 Therapy and Psychological Intervention with Latinos (3 Credits)

As the second course in GSPP's Latino Psychology sequence, this course examines the theories and models of research on psychotherapy with Latinos to prepare future therapists to engage in culturally responsive services with the growing U.S. Latino population. This course focuses on clinical interventions that address that particular mental health needs of Latinos in the United States. A particular emphasis is placed on the skills that are necessary in order to attain clinical competence treating members of the various Latino groups, by both Latino and non-Latino clinicians. Empirically-based psychological treatments for Latino patients will be examined. Creative ways will be discussed for adapting these interventions with Latinos. Discussion of clinical cases will be integrated into the course. Prerequisite: CPSY 5825.

CPSY 5827 Assessment with Latinos (3 Credits)

As the third course in GSPP's Latino Psychology sequence, the Psychological Assessment with Latinos addresses the cultural considerations needed for interviewing and conducting psychological evaluations of Latinos. Clinical interviewing techniques and measures across all psychological assessment domains, including diagnosis, personality, and cognition, as well as more specialty-focused areas such as neuropsychological assessment, forensic assessment, and school-based assessment will be covered. The class will explore the strengths and limitations of each assessment measure with a particular focus on language, research and norming issues, and administration. Prerequisite: CPSY 5825 and CPSY 5826.

CPSY 5828 Latino Psychology Practicum (3 Credits)

This course is designed to sharpen your clinical skills by examining current cases and analyzing appropriate intervention and assessment techniques as a class. Students will formally present cases from their current caseload, in traditional case presentation format. We will base our following discussions in Latino psychological theory and orientations, and apply didactic material learned in the previous three courses of the Latino sequence. Case discussions will be sustained by students and will be positive, constructive, and ethical. It will be important for students to remain open to feedback, new approaches, constructive criticism, and exploring their strenghts and weaknesses as early clinicians among their peers and professor. This course is also designed to assist students in the management of their complete caseload and seek advisement from the class on professional issues encountered as a Latino psychologist, in order to maintain both an ethical and realistic professional perspective.

CPSY 5840 Psychopharmacology (2 Credits)

CPSY 5846 Military Culture & Psychology (2 Credits)

This course is intended to provide an introduction to military culture and military psychology. A primary focus will be on training the students to be culturally competent clinicians when providing services to veterans, service members and their families. Overall tenets of military culture will be reviewed; however, focus on the individual service member or veteran’s experience will also be highlighted as there are many subcultures within the military. The diversity of military experience is related to multiple factors, such as branch, job, rank, location of service, era, deployment experience, combat status and individual identity. An additional focus of the course will be on basic topics that are important to understanding military psychology. Some of these concepts include core military values, training, branches of the service, the assignment to specific jobs, military mental health services, preparation for high-risk operational assignments, occupational hazards and discharge related issues. Ethical and legal issues related to working with this population will also be discussed.

CPSY 5865 Introduction to Psychosocial Oncology (3 Credits)

In this course, students will be introduced to the field of Psychosocial Oncology. This course will include an overview of the physiological processes involved in cancer prevention, etiology, and treatment. Students will develop a better knowledge of the different types of cancer, staging, and treatment options. A brief history of the field of psychosocial oncology will also be presented. The psychological sequelae of cancer diagnosis, treatment, metastases and recurrence, and survivorship will be included in this course. Special topics will also include working with caregivers and family members of cancer patients, sexuality and cancer, and working with patients and families at the end of life. Common psychotherapeutic interventions and assessments for oncology settings will be explored. In addition, the variety of roles of a psychologist in oncology settings will be discussed. Themes that will be included throughout the course are ethical and reflective practice, working with cancer patients from a multicultural perspective, and reducing compassion fatigue.

CPSY 5880 Business Issues in Professional Psychology (2 Credits)

This course introduces students to business principles as they apply to professional psychology. Students think through various business practice decisions, such as starting, managing, marketing, and diversifying a psychology practice and consider the related legal, ethical, and financial issues.

CPSY 5989 Doctoral Paper Development (1 Credit)

This course is designed to facilitate the development and writing of the doctoral paper. Students are expected to adhere to the GSPP Doctoral Paper Guidelines and the APA style guidelines. A major feature of the class is student-to-student sharing and critiquing of doctoral project ideas and plans. Students are expected to take advantage of this opportunity to hone their writing skills and develop their doctoral paper proposal. Students have complete the proposal phase of their project further develop their research methodology.

CPSY 5991 Independent Study (1-17 Credits)

CPSY 5992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

CPSY 5993 Advanced Field Placement Experience (1-8 Credits)

All PsyD students are required to work as a Psychology Trainee in an outside agency each year prior to the internship year. The minimum total is 384 hours per year. Students are expected to arrange with a field placement to receive psychological clinical training, which could include the following types of experiences: psychotherapy, assessments, group therapy, individual therapy, family therapy, supervision, primary care psychology, intake evaluations, case management, consultation, testing, etc.

CPSY 5994 PsyD Internship (4,8 Credits)

The Graduate School of Professional Psychology (GSPP) requires that all students attend a yearlong or two half-time years of clinical internship. Internship is the clinical experience after the student has completed all courses, the clinical competency examination, and at least three years of residency at GSPP. Students typically apply through APPIC and are offered formal internships. Occasionally students create internships, but they must be approved formally through GSPP prior to the start of the internship. The basic experiences may include training in: psychotherapy, assessments, group therapy, individual therapy, family therapy, supervision, primary care psychology, intake evaluations, case management, consultation, testing, etc. To register, student must have departmental approval. Students can register half-time for 4 credit hours or full-time for 8 credit hours.

CPSY 5995 Independent Research (1-17 Credits)

Faculty

Mark Aoyagi, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Missouri-Columbia

Thomas Barrett, Clinical Professor, PhD, West Virginia University

Peter Buirski, Professor, EMERITUS, PhD, Adelphi University

Terri Davis, Associate Professor, PhD, The Ohio State University

Jenny Erickson Cornish, Associate Professor, PhD, California School of Professional Psychology

Judith Fox, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Kansas

Kim Gorgens, Clinical Associate Professor, PhD, Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Neil Gowensmith, Clinical Assistant Professor, PhD, Colorado State University

Lynett Henderson Metzger, Clinical Assistant Professor, PsyD, University of Denver

Melanie Heto, Clinical Assistant Professor, PsyD, The George Washington University

Michael Karson, Professor, PhD, University of Michigan

Fernand Lubuguin, Clinical Associate Professor, PhD, University of Colorado Boulder

Hale Martin, Clinical Associate Professor, PhD, University of Texas at Austin

John McNeill, Associate Professor, PsyD, University of Denver

Laura Meyer, Clinical Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Denver

Lavita Nadkarni, Professor, PhD, Adelphi University

Artur Poczwardowski, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Utah

Steve Portenga, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Missouri

Jamie Shapiro, Assistant Professor, PhD, West Virginia University

Ragnar Storaasli, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Denver

Nicole Taylor, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Maryland

Gwen Vogel, Lecturer, PsyD, University of Denver

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