2016-2017 Undergraduate Bulletin

Art History (ARTH)

 

Courses

ARTH 1010 Images of Culture (4 Credits)

This course looks at artistic creations as an expression of cultural traditions and beliefs. Instead of viewing art as the result of unique geniuses, the fruit of inspired individuals, we explore how artistic objects reflect the ideas of the times and social values held by the society in which they appear. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 1020 Highlights of Medieval Art (4 Credits)

The era known as the Middle Ages spans over a thousand years and includes many significant works in the history of art. This class endeavors to investigate the ways in which works of medieval art construct and convey meaning. In order to explore these ideas in greater depth, the class focuses on specific works of art that illustrate the rich complexities of the ways in which images convey meaning and the ways of understanding these meanings. As such, it is intended to provide an introduction to ways of reading and interpreting images. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 1030 Highlights of Renaissance Art (4 Credits)

The period known as the Renaissance witnessed the production of a tremendous number of artistic masterpieces, but also the formulation of the study of the history of art and the development of art theory. This class endeavors to investigate the ways in which works of Renaissance art construct and convey meaning. In order to explore these ideas in greater depth, the class focuses on specific works of art that illustrate the rich complexities of the ways in which images convey meaning and the ways of understanding these meanings. As such, it is intended to provide an introduction to ways of reading and interpreting images. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 1040 Sacred Spaces in Asia (4 Credits)

This course explores a variety of natural and man-made "Sacred Spaces" as it introduces the civilizations and major artistic traditions of India, China and Japan. Illustrated lectures consider public and private environments, their philosophical contexts and religious functions as well as the changing nature of their use and perceived meanings over time. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 1050 Highlights of American Art (4 Credits)

This course introduces American art by focusing on a single work of art each week. Through readings, illustrated lectures, discussion and museum visits, we explore the social, political, historical and cultural contexts of each masterwork; learn something about the featured artist's life and artistic processes; and discover related examples of fine and popular art from the seventeenth century to the present. In the process, participants refine their ability to look, describe, analyze and critique the visual. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 1060 Contemporary Art Worlds (4 Credits)

Have you ever wondered how a calf suspended in formaldehyde can sell at an art auction for nearly twenty-four million dollars? This class introduces the contemporary art world and explores how art functions within our society. Topics include the art market, the politics of museums, censorship and public funding, and popular cultural representations of the artist. We also look at how contemporary artists are engaging with some of the most important issues of our day. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 1070 Artists on Film (4 Credits)

Artists with turbulent lives have often captured the popular imagination. Typically, novels, plays and films about such artists perpetuate myths of tormented souls overcoming hardships, enduring romantic catastrophes and struggling with their creative genius. Usually, the reality is quite different as an artist's path is one of developing talent, hard work, persistence and great personal courage. This class explores the lives and works of several famous artists. We evaluate the myths and the realities of their lives by comparing their art to films and documentaries that have been made about them. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 1992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

ARTH 2613 Excavating Italy (4 Credits)

This class provides an introduction to the art, history and literature of the Italian cities of Rome, Florence and Venice from classical antiquity through the High Renaissance, as well as visual and literary responses to Italy by artists and writers. Students are encouraged to recognize the importance of classical architecture and sculpture as the artistic precedents for Renaissance art. We see how religious and literary themes provided much of the iconography of Renaissance painting. Students are also encouraged to become intimately acquainted with the works of a few selected major artists, such as Giotto, Botticelli and Michelangelo, while also developing a wider understanding of the general stylistic features of Italian Renaissance art. The literature component focuses on a variety of genres from classical texts to Shakespeare's Italian plays to British travelers' impressions of Italian artists and scenes. This is a team-taught course. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with ENGL 2613.

ARTH 2801 World Art I: Prehistory to c. 1000 (4 Credits)

This is the first quarter in a three-quarter foundation course in world art. Students will become familiar with significant examples of art, architecture and material culture emerging out of Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa from the Paleolithic era to approximately the year 1000. Students will consider the crucial role of these images and objects in the formation of their respective historical and cultural contexts.

ARTH 2802 World Art II: c.1000-1700 (4 Credits)

This is the second quarter of the three-quarter foundation course in world art. Students will become familiar with significant examples of art, architecture and material culture emerging out of Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa from approximately the year 1000 to 1700. Students will consider the crucial role of these images and objects in the formation of their respective historical and cultural contexts.

ARTH 2803 World Art III: 1700 to the Present (4 Credits)

This is the third quarter of the three-quarter foundation course in world art. Students will become familiar with significant examples of art, architecture and material culture emerging out of Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa from approximately the year 1700 to the present. Students will consider the crucial role of these image and objects in the formation of their respective historical and cultural contexts.

ARTH 2814 Medieval Art (4 Credits)

This course examines the art produced in Western Europe and the eastern Mediterranean from the 4th to 14th centuries. From the transition of the Late Roman Empire into new political and artistic climates of the Early Medieval period up through the lavish expanse of Late Gothic art we will explore the religious, political, cultural and artistic forces that shaped the creation of artistic monuments for over an thousand years. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 2819 Survey of Art I: Caves to Renaissance (4 Credits)

An introduction to the painting, sculpture, architecture and book illustration of Europe from prehistoric times to 1500. The art of prehistory, the ancient Near East, Egypt, ancient Greece, ancient Rome, as well as Early Christian, Byzantine, Carolingian, Romanesque, Gothic and early Renaissance periods are explored. Major monuments are analyzed according to style, technique and iconography. Attention is paid to the historical and cultural context in which works of art were produced and used. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 2820 Survey of Art II: Renaissance to Present (4 Credits)

An introduction to the art and architecture of Europe and North America from 1500 through the present. The major artists and architects of the following movements are covered: High Italian Renaissance and Northern Renaissance; 17th-century Northern and Southern Baroque, 18th-century Rococo to Revolution; 19th-century Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism; 20th-century Cubism and Abstraction, Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art and various contemporary art movements. Students develop their ability to analyze the stylistic, iconographic, culture and technical aspects of art works, while obtaining historical perspectives of the movements and artists covered within the class.

ARTH 2840 Survey of Asian Art (4 Credits)

An introduction to major monuments, traditions and civilizations of India, China and Japan. This class may be used to fulfill the non-Western requirement for majors in the School of Art and Art History. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTH 2992 Directed Study (1-5 Credits)

ARTH 3300 Seminar in Art History (4 Credits)

This seminar is primarily designed to introduce students to the advanced research techniques and methods of art history. The thematic content of this course changes. Students develop skills to analyze scholarly literature, to refine research papers and to deliver oral presentations.

ARTH 3652 Internship (1-4 Credits)

By arrangement, advanced undergraduate art history students may intern in an art gallery, small museum, historic house, non-profit art organization, archive or library. See guidelines and contract form in the School of Art and Art History office.

ARTH 3656 Curatorial Practicum (4 Credits)

Students will work in curatorial teams to plan and execute an effective exhibition of contemporary art. This process may include choosing a theme and selecting works of art, researching artists and themes, budgets, scheduling, developing an exhibition checklist, modeling the gallery, visual exhibition design, conservation and collections management factors, shipping, installation, educational outreach to the public, publicity and other issues related to exhibition planning.

ARTH 3661 Learning in Museums (4 Credits)

Comprehensive introduction to museum education. Examines informal education, learning theories, interactive education, exhibits and programs. Cross-listed with ANTH 3661.

ARTH 3701 Topics in Art History (1-4 Credits)

Selected themes and topics from the history of art. Content changes and course may be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits.

ARTH 3812 From New Republic to the Gilded Age: 19th Century American Art (4 Credits)

This is a thematic study of American art and architecture, 1790-1910, including national identity, domesticity, nature, industrialization, death and mourning, westward expansion, Civil War, spirituality, and internationalism. Lectures, discussions and field trips.

ARTH 3813 Arts of the American West (4 Credits)

This class covers a wide range of art objects and styles from the 17th century to the present in the West of the United States, from buffalo robe paintings and baskets to cowboy art and contemporary abstract landscapes. Particular attention is paid to the diversity of art traditions--Native American, Spanish and Mexican, European, Asian and Latin American--as they converge in this geographic space.

ARTH 3815 American Art and Religion (4 Credits)

This class examines sacred art forms, as well as art that documented or commented upon religious experience in the U.S., from the 17th century to the present. In includes fine, decorative, and popular arts as well as architecture, in slide-lecture-discussions and field trips. The diversity of religious experience and spirituality in American art is emphasized.

ARTH 3817 Gothic Art (4 Credits)

This course examines the art of the Late Middle Ages in Europe, from roughly 1140 to 1400. Gothic architecture, sculpture, painting, stained glass and the sumptuous arts (metal, textiles) are examined within their broader social, political and religious contexts. Particular attention is paid to the Gothic Cathedral - that quintessential window into the medieval world--its beliefs, aspirations, social and political realities.

ARTH 3818 Art of Renaissance Europe (4 Credits)

This course provides an examination of the artistic cultures in Europe during the Renaissance (15th and 16th centuries). Depending upon the quarter, this course will be a general survey of European art during the Renaissance or a more focused exploration of a sub-period, such as painting in fifteenth-century Italy. Chronological and geographic factors determine the overall theme and structure of the course. Students gain both a sound knowledge of key artistic monuments of the period, as well as a conceptual framework according to which they may organize their knowledge. This class may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

ARTH 3822 Northern Renaissance Art (4 Credits)

This course explores the dramatic developments in the arts (particularly panel painting, manuscript illumination and sculpture) in Northern Europe from around 1350 to 1550. From lavishly decorated Books of Hours and the development of stunningly naturalistic oil paintings on panel in the early 15th century through the development of printing and the rise of self-portraiture, genre and landscape depictions, this class traces the important role played by Dutch, Flemish, German and French artists in the transition from late medieval to early modern artistic forms and practices. The role of art in shaping and expressing religious, civic, political and economic concepts are explored, as well as the rise of the social and intellectual standing of the artist. Among the artists examined include Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, Albrecht Dürer, Hieronymus Bosch and Pieter Bruegel the Elder.

ARTH 3823 17th-Century European Art (4 Credits)

This course considers European arts of the 17th century. Depending upon the quarter it may be a general survey of European art during the seventeenth century or a more focused exploration of a sub-period, such as Italian Baroque or the Old Dutch Masters: Rembrandt, Vermeer and Frans Hals. This class may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

ARTH 3832 19th-Century Art (4 Credits)

This course surveys the major art movements in Europe from the late 18th century to the end of the 19th century. Major painters, sculptors, printmakers and architects of the following movements will be presented: Neo-classicism, Romanticism, Academic Painting, Realism, the Pre-Raphaelites, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Symbolism and Art Nouveau. Their works will be studied in light of the social, political and cultural milieu in which they appeared. Special attention will be paid to representations of race, class, gender and colonialism.

ARTH 3833 20th-Century Art (4 Credits)

This class studies the development of early 20th-century art in Europe and the U.S., as the center of the avant-garde shifted to America around World War II. The class follows the development of modernism and its theories from 1900 to around 1960. Artists and movements will be considered according to stylistic and theoretical development, and also in relation to social, political and cultural developments of their time.

ARTH 3834 Contemporary Art (4 Credits)

This course surveys the development of contemporary art, focusing primarily on recent decades, but making connections to earlier movements from 1970 to the present. This includes painting, sculpture, performance art, installations and new media art. Students become familiar with various issues of recent art theory and criticism to put these works into a theoretical perspective. In addition to an in-depth look at the broad stylistic movements of the past forty years, this course also examines those figures whose work has come to define the major approaches and concerns for the art of our time.

ARTH 3838 Connoisseurship (4 Credits)

In this class the historical roots, theoretical and philosophical underpinnings, and actual practice of connoisseurship are studied using objects from the museum's collection.

ARTH 3839 Topics in Modern Art (4 Credits)

Selected themes and topics from the 18th century to the present. Topics change, and the course may be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits.

ARTH 3841 Topics in Chinese Art (4 Credits)

Selected topics in Chinese art. Content changes. This class may be used to fulfill the non-Western requirement for majors in the School of Art and Art History. Course may be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits. Cross listed with ASIA 2102.

ARTH 3842 Topics in Japanese Art (4 Credits)

Selected topics in Japanese art. Content changes. This class may be used to fulfill the non-Western requirement for majors in the School of Art and Art History. Course may be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits. Cross listed with ASIA 2105.

ARTH 3845 Chinese Painting: Masters and Masterpieces (4 Credits)

This course explores pictorial art in China from the third century BCE to the present. Cross listed with ASIA 2106.

ARTH 3846 Dada and Surrealism (4 Credits)

This course will survey the development of Dada and Surrealist art from 1916 through 1939, focusing on the painting, sculpture, graphics, photography and films of these movements. The relationships between Dada and Surrealist artists and literary figures will be discussed as well as their shared interests in psychoanalysis, dreams, sexuality and automatic methods of creativity. Cross listed with ASIA 2106.

ARTH 3850 Art and the History of Science (4 Credits)

This class explores the connections between art and the history of science, using a broad span of visual material, mainly European art from the Middle Ages to the present. Coverage of the material is thematic, focusing on three major categories: Art and the Natural World; Art and the Human Body; and Art and the Human Mind. We read a wide variety of art historical articles and selected chapters that examine works of art related in the first section to astrology, astronomy and alchemy; botanical, zoological and geological illustration; and color theory, perspective, optics, maps, contemporary earthworks and ecology. In the second section, we explore the evolution of anatomic illustration, as well as mythic, religious and genre images related to medicine, pharmacy and healing as well as works by contemporary artists who are concerned with genetic codes, hybridization and cloning. In the third section, we examine depictions of human temperaments, emotions and madness through the images of selected artists.

ARTH 3862 Mesoamerican Art (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the art and archaeology of the native peoples of Mesoamerica in Pre-Columbian times, or from about 2000 BC to AD 1521. Cultures covered include the Olmec, Teotihuacan, Mixtec, Zapotec, Aztec and others. This class presents the cultural sequence of Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica and explores how the various civilizations of Mesoamerica shared aspects of world-view, cosmology and daily life. Students will be able to identify and discuss how these elements manifested in the art and architecture of Mesoamerican cultures. Furthermore, the course investigates issues of shamanism, kingship and power, warfare, and human sacrifice. This class may be used to fulfill the non-Western requirement for majors in the School of Art and Art History.

ARTH 3863 Art of the Maya (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the art and archaeology of the Maya from about 300 BC to the present. The Maya are perhaps the most famous of the several cultures comprising what is known as Mesoamerica. A highly advanced culture, they built soaring temples, carved elaborate portraits of their kings and developed a complex writing system including a calendar. The course explores these things with a constant eye to understanding the Maya worldview, cosmology and daily life. By the conclusion of the class, students should be able to read their intricate pictures, discuss the strategies of powerful Maya rulers and understand how Maya art and architecture reflect their concepts of time and the cosmos. This class may be used to fulfill the non-Western requirement for majors in the School of Art and Art History.

ARTH 3864 Buddhism and the Fine Arts (4 Credits)

This survey examines the history, practices, ritual contexts, aesthetics and artistic traditions of Buddhism including architecture, calligraphy, sculpture and painting, in terms of its social and historical context, political and religious functions, as well as issues including artistic production, changing techniques and symbols, and the market/audience. The primary goal is to understand Buddhism as reflected in art and culture.

ARTH 3867 Native American Art (4 Credits)

This course is designed as an introduction to the art and architecture of the native peoples of North America from the earliest signs of humans in North America to the present. Cultures covered include those from the Southwest, the Northwest, the Southeast Ceremonial Complex, the Plains and contemporary Native American artists. By the conclusion of the class, students will understand the cultural sequence and geographic dispersion of native North America. Students will also understand how the various civilizations of North America shared aspects of world-view, cosmology and daily life, and be able to identify and discuss how these elements manifested in the art and architecture of native North American cultures. This class may be used to fulfill the non-Western requirement for majors in the School of Art and Art History.

ARTH 3868 Art of the Andes (4 Credits)

This course is designed as an introduction to the art and architecture of the native Pre-Columbian peoples of the Andes. Cultures covered include Chavin, Nasca, Wari and the Inca.

ARTH 3869 Twentieth-Century Art in Latin America (4 Credits)

This course explores twentieth-century art movements in Latin America. Topics include modernism, indigenism, surrealism, neo-concretism, conceptualism, censorship under dictatorships, and issues in exile and displacement. We also analyze the cultural production of Latinos in the United States and its representation in cultural institutions. Organized both chronologically and geographically, the material has been structured to provide a basic understanding of the methods of art history in relation to Latin American art and to familiarize students with the significant artistic movements and styles that emerged from Latin America in the Twentieth Century.

ARTH 3871 Women in Art (4 Credits)

This course considers the roles of women in art and explores the impact of race, class and gender on art produced from the Middle Ages to the present with discussions of women artists, women patrons and images of women. Cross listed with GWST 3871.

ARTH 3872 Introduction to Conservation (4 Credits)

This lecture course familiarizes the student with the concepts and challenges of conservation, its role in museums and the care of collections. Specific emphasis is given to the materials, structure, deterioration and preservation of material culture. Field trips to various museums and/or workshops to make appropriate display mounts and storage containers enhance the understanding gained from readings and lectures.

ARTH 3873 The Goddess in Art (4 Credits)

This course surveys the image of the goddess in art from prehistoric times until the present day from a feminist perspective. Beginning with anthropological and art historical theories about the numerous female figurines of Paleolithic and Neolithic times, the course continues to explore representations of female goddesses from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Crete, Greece, and Rome. Polarized images of Eve, the Virgin Mary and several female saints during the Middle Ages will be examined. From the Renaissance through the Baroque periods, classical goddesses, especially Venus/Aphrodite, are revived and adapted to both Christian and secular contexts. Images of the sexualized female body will be explored, along with its counterpart, the witch, who was persecuted during the 16th and 17th centuries. This course is interspersed with examples of contemporary art inspired by the "Great Goddess," especially by feminist artists of the 1970s and 1980s. Some discussion of the goddess as she appears in contemporary popular culture concludes the class. Cross listed with GWST 3873.

ARTH 3875 History of Collections (4 Credits)

This course traces the history of collections from the Renaissance to the present, addressing the interconnections between artists, patrons, dealers, art markets, provenance, connoisseurship and the historical development of museums and private collections. Each week's readings of journal articles and chapters focus on different types of collections or themes, including royal and imperial collections, cabinets of curiosities, excavating and transporting antiquities, British country estates and the Grand Tour, the establishment of national museums, the relationship between American collectors and dealers, ethnographic objects in Western collections, Nazi looting, restorers and forgers, and artists' collections, to name a few.

ARTH 3910 Art History Travel (4 Credits)

A travel course to selected locations to study major monuments and collections of art and architecture. Location and content change. This class may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

ARTH 3991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

This class should be used for individual study of a special topic that is not offered in the art history curriculum described in this catalog. Permission/registration form is available from the Office of the Registrar.

ARTH 3992 Directed Study (1-5 Credits)

This class should only be used when a required ARTH course listed in this catalog is not offered in the quarter in which the student must take it. Permission of an instructor and the Director of the School of Art and Art History are required. Permission/registration form is available from the Office of the Registrar.

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