2016-2017 Graduate Bulletin

Teaching and Learning Sciences

Office: Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall, 110
Mail Code: 1999 E. Evans Avenue, Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-2509
Email: edinfo@du.edu
Web Site: morgridge.du.edu/programs/

Doctor of Philosophy in Child, Family, and School Psychology

The CFSP PhD degree – School Psychology (PhD-SP) prepares professionals in all aspects of doctoral-level school psychology services. All graduates are eligible for a Colorado Department of Education license in School Psychology and the National Association of School Psychologist’s National Certification (NCSP) after the successful completion of all coursework and passing the Praxis II/National Association of School Psychology licensing exam.  PhD-SP students are required to pass comprehensive examinations and to complete a dissertation.

Program Accreditation

This degree is fully approved by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP).

Doctor of Philosophy in Child, Family, and School Psychology - Pathway for EDS Professionals

The CFSP PhD - Pathway for EdS Professionals is a unique PhD program designed for EdS professionals who wish to deepen their expertise in the dynamic field of education and school psychology. This degree program meets the needs of experienced professionals and recent graduates with an Educational Specialist (EdS) from a National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) approved program interested in enhancing their careers through the development of applied research and leadership skills. It is intended to link professional knowledge and research with the world of practice in a chosen specialty area of study. Students take a flexible array of advanced courses in child and family studies, family and systems service delivery, organizational management, research and program evaluation and policy development that are designed to develop expertise matched to individual interests and proficiency.

Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction

PhD students take a wide range of courses in the areas of curriculum, instruction, foundations, diversity and research.The PhD is particularly well suited for students interested in becoming higher education faculty in schools and colleges of education. Dissertation topics cover a broad assortment of theoretical and practical topics in schools or associated institutions or community groups. Additionally, students are encouraged to consider enrolling in courses in other academic units in the Morgridge College of Education and throughout the University in order to enhance or expand their educational experience. There are specializations in three areas: Curriculum Studies, Gifted Education, and Mathematics Education.

Doctor of Education in Curriculum and Instruction 

The EdD in Curriculum and Instruction is designed to prepare educational practitioners as experts of curriculum and instruction, capable of engaging in problems and challenges in a variety of education institutions and contexts particularly at the school or district level. The aim of this program is to produce graduates who are leaders and innovators in education (broadly defined), equipped with cutting-edge applied research skills, creative educational visions based on established academic disciplines, moral imagination, curricular expertise and commitments to issues of equity and social responsibility. There are specializations in three areas: Curriculum Studies, Gifted Education, and Mathematics Education.

Educational Specialist Degree in Child, Family and School Psychology with a Concentration in School Psychology

The CFSP Educational Specialist degree – School Psychology Generalist (EdS-G) prepares professionals in all aspects of School Psychology services to work with children and families from birth to age 21 in school or community settings. All graduates of the EdS program are eligible for a Colorado Department of Education license in School Psychology and the National Association of School Psychologist’s National Certification (NCSP) after the successful completion of all coursework and passing the Praxis II/National Association of School Psychology licensing exam.

Program Accreditation

The Ed.S. degree is fully approved by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP).

Educational Specialist degree in Child, Family, and School Psychology with a Concentration in Early Childhood School Psychology

The CFSP Educational Specialist degree – School Psychology with Early Childhood Concentration (EdS-EC) prepares professionals in all aspects of School Psychology services to work with children and families from birth to age 21. This degree requires an additional 12 hours of integrated core and practical coursework, beyond that required for the EdS- Generalist degree. All graduates of the EdS program are eligible for a Colorado Department of Education license in School Psychology and the National Association of School Psychologist’s National Certification (NCSP) after the successful completion of all coursework and passing the Praxis II/National Association of School Psychology licensing exam.

Program Accreditation

The Ed.S. degree is fully approved by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP).

Masters of Arts in Child, Family, and School Psychology

The CFSP Master’s (MA) degree prepares students interested in working in community agencies or educational settings that emphasize policy as it relates to direct service to young children and families. Licensure as a school psychologist is not available with the MA in CFSP degree. The MA courses are aligned with the CFSP School Psychology Doctoral degree and prepare students for further study.

Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction

This degree program is designed with the individual student’s background and career goals in mind. Most students prepare for traditional and non-traditional positions in education that require planning, consulting, research, curriculum development, evaluation and policy-making. Instructional coaching is established in a profession that is increasingly gaining national attention. Many school districts across the US, including several in Colorado, are implementing instructional coaching as a component of transformative school reform.

Master of arts in Curriculum and Instruction with a Concentration in Teacher Education Program-Elementary/Secondary/K-12

The Teacher Education Program concentrations offer an intensive, integrated, professional preparation experience. The program is structured similar to clinical preparation models where course work and field experiences are purposeful, connected, gradual, and cumulative. Program features such as small class sizes, built-in peer support, high academic standards, and a year-long residency in closely supervised field experiences in linguistically and culturally diverse settings promote student success in mastering the competencies of an effective teacher.  Apprentice teachers can complete this program in five quarters (52 credits), earning both a teaching licensure and a master's degree.

Apprentice teachers are required to complete 840 hours of field experience in diverse public school classrooms. Apprentice teachers are required to be at their fieldwork site three days a week during fall and winter quarters and four-five days a week in the spring quarter. A gradual release of responsibility leads to solo teaching throughout the year-long residency.

The mission of the University of Denver Morgridge College of Education (MCE) Teacher Education Program (TEP) concentrations is to provide an extensive, integrated, professional experience that supports apprentice teachers in developing the dispositions, knowledge, and skills of an effective teacher of diverse learners in underserved K-12 schools. Ultimately, effective teachers engage, plan, teach, and lead to promote the growth and development of all learners, and they take an active role in their own professional development.

Dual Undergraduate-Graduate Program in Teacher Education

The Dual Undergraduate-Graduate Degree program in Teacher Education concentration is an approved program in which a University of Denver undergraduate student begins taking classes toward a teaching license and a graduate degree program prior to earning a baccalaureate degree. Both degrees must be earned within five years of matriculation into the undergraduate degree program.  Dual degree students in the program take nine hours of graduate course work in their senior year (all nine hours double-count as undergraduate and graduate level course work). The nine hours of MCE course work can be spread across the fall, winter, or spring quarter; or stacked into one or two quarters. Dual degree students should initiate the admissions process in the winter of their junior year. 

Program Accreditation

The program is accredited by the Colorado Department of Education (CDE).

Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction with a Concentration in Urban Education

The Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in Urban Education, Denver Teacher Residency (DTR) is an innovative, hands-on teacher preparation program designed to cultivate and support exceptional teachers in high-needs schools within Denver Public Schools (DPS). DTR leads DPS efforts to recruit, prepare and retain high-quality urban educators to effectively meet the diverse needs of each student, improve academic achievement, and serve as leaders in Denver’s schools, district and community.

The Denver Teacher Residency’s progressive approach to recruitment and training reflects the diverse ethnic, racial, socioeconomic and linguistic needs of DPS’ learning community. DTR residents are paired with mentor teachers in classrooms serving a variety of high needs, including elementary English Language Acquisition (English and Spanish), Special Education, secondary mathematics or secondary science. This hands-on approach to teacher training and certification prepares you to meet the linguistic, communication and special learning needs found in any DPS classroom.

Graduation Requirements: The 52 quarter credit hour program includes a residency requirement in Denver Public Schools in elementary or secondary contexts. Upon successful completion of coursework, you will be eligible to apply for an initial Colorado teaching license (you must meet the Colorado Department of Education – CDE requirements for a Colorado initial teacher license and apply for the license with the CDE).

Approximate Completion Time:  12 months or four quarters (begins in the summer quarter with completion in the following spring quarter). At the end of the program, you will become eligible to apply for an initial Colorado teaching license (students must meet the Colorado Department of Education – CDE requirements for a Colorado initial teacher license and apply for the license with the CDE).

Master of Arts in Early Childhood Special Education

The master’s degree in Early Childhood Special Education (EC SPED) is a four quarter (one to two year) program that focuses on expanding opportunities for specialized work with young children, youth, and families in school and community settings. It also is a pipeline to licensure and non-licensure degrees including a doctoral degree. Students in the M.A. in EC SPED degree program develop the knowledge and practical skills needed to work successfully within the early childhood school and community agencies that serve the birth to eight-years-old age group.

Our goal is to prepare highly competent, collaborative, ethical, and self-reflective Early Childhood Special Education Specialists who will serve young children with special needs and their families in schools, districts, and in community organizations. This program will facilitate your training and development as a scientist-practitioner who can solve problems and share decision-making with others to optimize social-emotional, cognitive, academic, and behavioral outcomes for children from birth to age eight with special needs, and their families.

Certificate in Curriculum and Instruction with a Concentration in the Teacher Education Program - Elementary/Secondary/K-12

The Teacher Education Program concentrations offer an intensive, integrated, professional preparation experience. The program is structured similar to clinical preparation models where course work and field experiences are purposeful, connected, gradual, and cumulative. Program features such as small class sizes, built-in peer support, high academic standards, and a year-long residency in closely supervised field experiences in linguistically and culturally diverse settings promote student success in mastering the competencies of an effective teacher.  Upon completion of the certificate program (43 credits, four quarters) the student will be eligible to apply for teacher licensure through the Colorado Department of Education.

Apprentice teachers are required to complete 840 hours of field experience in diverse public school classrooms. Apprentice teachers are required to be at their fieldwork site three days a week during fall and winter quarters and four-five days a week in the spring quarter. A gradual release of responsibility leads to solo teaching throughout the year-long residency.

The mission of the University of Denver Morgridge College of Education (MCE) Teacher Education Program (TEP) concentrations is to provide an extensive, integrated, professional experience that supports apprentice teachers in developing the dispositions, knowledge, and skills of an effective teacher of diverse learners in underserved K-12 schools. Ultimately, effective teachers engage, plan, teach, and lead to promote the growth and development of all learners, and they take an active role in their own professional development.

Program Accreditation

The program is accredited by the Colorado Department of Education (CDE).

Certificate in Early Childhood Special Education

The Early Childhood Special Education Certificate is a 24-credit hour program that is aligned with the Masters of Arts in Early Childhood Special Education.  As with the MA ECSE program, the candidates in the ECSE Certificate program are required to complete 600 hours of practicum over three age-levels (infant-toddler, preschool, school-age), pass the PLACE ECSE test or Praxis II, and apply to the state for the Early Childhood Special Education Specialist Endorsement. 

Doctor of Philosophy in Child, Family, and School Psychology WITH A CONCENTRATION IN School Psychology

Following are the simple steps to apply for graduate study in Child, Family and School Psychology at the University of Denver. If you have any questions about the process, please contact the Office of Graduate Studies.

Apply Online / Application Deadlines

  • Applications for graduate study at the University of Denver must be submitted online. Apply online.
  • All online materials must be received, and all supplemental materials including transcripts must be on file in the Office of Graduate Studies, by the program’s stated deadline: Priority deadline: December 15, 2015; Final deadline: April 1, 2016 for Fall 2016 (201670). The program will review well-qualified applicants after the deadline until the remaining space has been filled.
  • A $65 non-refundable application fee is required for an application to be processed. Application fee waivers are available for McNair Scholars.

Course and Degree Prerequisites and Requirements

  • Applicants must earn and submit proof of earning the equivalent of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution prior to beginning graduate coursework at DU. Applicants to the PhD must have an earned master’s degree prior to matriculating into the doctoral program.

Transcripts

  • Applicants are required to submit an official transcript from each post-secondary institution they have attended, or are presently attending, where two quarter hours (or one semester hour) or more were completed including study abroad and college coursework completed in high school.

  • The applicant is responsible for obtaining all transcripts. Applicants who have earned a degree outside the U.S. must submit transcripts accompanied by certified English translations, if not normally issued in English. DU students and alumni do not need to provide DU transcripts.

  • Official study abroad transcripts are required unless the course titles, grades and credit earned abroad appear on another transcript. Transcripts from outside of the U.S. are evaluated by the Office of International Student Admission. This process can take three to four weeks and must be complete by the program’s stated deadline. Therefore, applicants with a degree from outside of the U.S. are encouraged to apply early. Applicants educated outside the U.S. are encouraged to contact the Office of Graduate Studies for assistance regarding transcript-related materials.

  • The University of Denver will consider electronic transcripts official from a domestic institution provided by the following approved agencies: Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcript System (AARTS); Docufide/Parchment; National Student Clearinghouse; Naviance; Royall and Company; and, Scrip-Safe.
  • Paper transcripts should be sent to the following address:

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

Language Proficiency

  • Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. Applications will not be processed until the required TOEFL or IELTS score is received. The TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. The minimum TOEFL score accepted by the University is 80 (iBT) or 550 (paper-based). The institution code for the University of Denver is 4842. The minimum IELTS score accepted by the University is 6.0. Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) must demonstrate fluency in spoken English by scoring a 26 on the TOEFL speaking section or 8.0 on the IELTS speaking section. Please see the Graduate Policy Manual for complete English language proficiency requirements.
  • Applicants may be exempted from English proficiency test requirements if by the time of matriculation they have earned a post-secondary degree from a formally-recognized/accredited university where the language of instruction and examination is English. Such applicants may be exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement but not from other standardized graduate entrance examinations. There are no exemptions for graduate teaching assistants.
  • Students whose native language is not English and who are required to submit TOEFL/IELTS scores will be assessed by the University of Denver English Language Center (ELC) prior to matriculation.

Test Scores

  • The Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is required. Scores must be received directly from the appropriate testing agency by the program’s stated deadline. DU’s ETS Institution Code is 4842.

Statement of Professional Goals

  • A statement is required should be submitted via upload through the online application process.

Resume / C.V.

  • A resume or C.V. is required. This should include work experience, research, and/or volunteer work. The resume should be submitted via upload through the online application process.

Recommendation Letters

  • Three letters of recommendation are required. Letters should be solicited and uploaded by recommenders through the online application system. Requests for letters should be sent to recommenders well in advance so the letters are on file by the application deadline.

Financial Support

  • To be considered for financial support, domestic applicants should apply early and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by the priority deadline; February 15. Information about financial aid can be found on the Office of Financial Aid Website. International students are not eligible for federal financial aid.

Application Status

  • We encourage you to be actively engaged in the admission process. You can check your application status online at PioneerWeb. Applicants will receive login information post application submission.

Contact Information

  • Mail official transcripts and any supplemental admission materials not submitted with the online application to:

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

  • Electronic transcripts should be sent to gradinfo@du.edu.
  • For more information call (303) 871-2706

International Applicants

  • For complete international applicant information, please visit the Office of Graduate Studies International Student Application Information. International applicants are strongly encouraged to have their applications complete, with all materials on file in the admission office, at least eight weeks prior to the program’s application deadline.

The Graduate Policies and Procedures provides complete details regarding admission requirements.

Doctor of Philosophy in Child, Family, and School Psychology with a Concentration in School Psychology (Pathway for EdS Professionals Program)

Following are the simple steps to apply for the PhD and EDS programs in Child, Family and School Psychology at the University of Denver. If you have any questions about the process, please contact the Office of Graduate Studies.

Apply Online / Application Deadlines

  • Applications for graduate study at the University of Denver must be submitted online. Apply online.
  • All online materials must be received, and all supplemental materials including transcripts must be on file in the Office of Graduate Studies, by the program’s stated deadline: Priority deadline: December 15, 2015; Final deadline: April 1, 2016 for Fall 2016 (201670). The program will review well-qualified applicants after the deadline until the remaining space has been filled.
  • A $65 non-refundable application fee is required for an application to be processed. Application fee waivers are available for McNair Scholars.

Course and Degree Prerequisites and Requirements

  • Applicants must earn and submit proof of earning the equivalent of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution prior to beginning graduate coursework at DU. Applicants to the PhD must have an earned master’s degree prior to matriculating into the doctoral program.

Transcripts

  • Applicants are required to submit an official transcript from each post-secondary institution they have attended, or are presently attending, where two quarter hours (or one semester hour) or more were completed including study abroad and college coursework completed in high school.

  • The applicant is responsible for obtaining all transcripts. Applicants who have earned a degree outside the U.S. must submit transcripts accompanied by certified English translations, if not normally issued in English. DU students and alumni do not need to provide DU transcripts.

  • Official study abroad transcripts are required unless the course titles, grades and credit earned abroad appear on another transcript. Transcripts from outside of the U.S. are evaluated by the Office of International Student Admission. This process can take three to four weeks and must be complete by the program’s stated deadline. Therefore, applicants with a degree from outside of the U.S. are encouraged to apply early. Applicants educated outside the U.S. are encouraged to contact the Office of Graduate Studies for assistance regarding transcript-related materials.

  • The University of Denver will consider electronic transcripts official from a domestic institution provided by the following approved agencies: Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcript System (AARTS); Docufide/Parchment; National Student Clearinghouse; Naviance; Royall and Company; and, Scrip-Safe.
  • Paper transcripts should be sent to the following address:

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

Language Proficiency

  • Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. Applications will not be processed until the required TOEFL or IELTS score is received. The TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. The minimum TOEFL score accepted by the University is 80 (iBT) or 550 (paper-based). The institution code for the University of Denver is 4842. The minimum IELTS score accepted by the University is 6.0. Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) must demonstrate fluency in spoken English by scoring a 26 on the TOEFL speaking section or 8.0 on the IELTS speaking section. Please see the Graduate Policy Manual for complete English language proficiency requirements.
  • Applicants may be exempted from English proficiency test requirements if by the time of matriculation they have earned a post-secondary degree from a formally-recognized/accredited university where the language of instruction and examination is English. Such applicants may be exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement but not from other standardized graduate entrance examinations. There are no exemptions for graduate teaching assistants.
  • Students whose native language is not English and who are required to submit TOEFL/IELTS scores will be assessed by the University of Denver English Language Center (ELC) prior to matriculation.

Test Scores

  • The Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is required. Scores must be received directly from the appropriate testing agency by the program’s stated deadline. DU’s ETS Institution Code is 4842.

Statement of Professional Goals

  • A statement is required should be submitted via upload through the online application process.

Resume / C.V.

  • A resume or C.V. is required. This should include work experience, research, and/or volunteer work. The resume should be submitted via upload through the online application process.

Recommendation Letters

  • Three letters of recommendation are required. Letters should be solicited and uploaded by recommenders through the online application system. Requests for letters should be sent to recommenders well in advance so the letters are on file by the application deadline.

Program-Specific Admission Requirements

  • When possible, these requirements should be submitted via upload through the online application process.

    • Employer/Supervisor Evaluation

    • In-service or Training Presentation

    • Case Study in NASP Format

Financial Support

  • To be considered for financial support, domestic applicants should apply early and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by the priority deadline; February 15. Information about financial aid can be found on the Office of Financial Aid website. International students are not eligible for federal financial aid.

Application Status

  • We encourage you to be actively engaged in the admission process. You can check your application status online at PioneerWeb. Applicants will receive login information post application submission.

Contact Information

  • Mail official transcripts and any supplemental admission materials not submitted with the online application to:

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

  • Electronic transcripts should be sent to gradinfo@du.edu.
  • For more information call (303) 871-2706

International Applicants

  • For complete international applicant information, please visit the Office of Graduate Studies International Student Application Information. International applicants are strongly encouraged to have their applications complete, with all materials on file in the admission office, at least eight weeks prior to the program’s application deadline.

The Graduate Policies and Procedures provides complete details regarding admission requirements.

Master of Arts in Child, Family, and School Psychology; Education specialist degree in child, family, and school psychology with a concentration in school psychology, concentration in early childhood school psychology

Following are the simple steps to apply for graduate study in Child, Family and School Psychology at the University of Denver. If you have any questions about the process, please contact the Office of Graduate Studies.

Apply Online / Application Deadlines

  • Applications for graduate study at the University of Denver must be submitted online. Apply online.
  • All online materials must be received, and all supplemental materials including transcripts must be on file in the Office of Graduate Studies, by the program’s stated deadline: Priority Deadline for MA: January 16, 2016; Priority Deadline for EDS: December 15, 2015; Final Deadline: April 1, 2016 for Fall 2016 admit (201670). The program will review well-qualified applicants after the deadline until the remaining space has been filled.
  • A $65 non-refundable application fee is required for an application to be processed. Application fee waivers are available for McNair Scholars.

Course and Degree Prerequisites and Requirements

  • Applicants must earn and submit proof of earning the equivalent of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution prior to beginning graduate coursework at DU.

Transcripts

  • Applicants are required to submit an official transcript from each post-secondary institution they have attended, or are presently attending, where two quarter hours (or one semester hour) or more were completed including study abroad and college coursework completed in high school.

  • The applicant is responsible for obtaining all transcripts. Applicants who have earned a degree outside the U.S. must submit transcripts accompanied by certified English translations, if not normally issued in English. DU students and alumni do not need to provide DU transcripts.

  • Official study abroad transcripts are required unless the course titles, grades and credit earned abroad appear on another transcript. Transcripts from outside of the U.S. are evaluated by the Office of International Student Admission. This process can take three to four weeks and must be complete by the program’s stated deadline. Therefore, applicants with a degree from outside of the U.S. are encouraged to apply early. Applicants educated outside the U.S. are encouraged to contact the Office of Graduate Studies for assistance regarding transcript-related materials.

  • The University of Denver will consider electronic transcripts official from a domestic institution provided by the following approved agencies: Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcript System (AARTS); Docufide/Parchment; National Student Clearinghouse; Naviance; Royall and Company; and, Scrip-Safe.
  • Paper transcripts should be sent to the following address:

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

Language Proficiency

  • Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. Applications will not be processed until the required TOEFL or IELTS score is received. The TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. The minimum TOEFL score accepted by the University is 80 (iBT) or 550 (paper-based). The institution code for the University of Denver is 4842. The minimum IELTS score accepted by the University is 6.0. Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) must demonstrate fluency in spoken English by scoring a 26 on the TOEFL speaking section or 8.0 on the IELTS speaking section. Please see the Graduate Policy Manual for complete English language proficiency requirements.
  • Applicants may be exempted from English proficiency test requirements if by the time of matriculation they have earned a post-secondary degree from a formally-recognized/accredited university where the language of instruction and examination is English. Such applicants may be exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement but not from other standardized graduate entrance examinations. There are no exemptions for graduate teaching assistants.
  • Students whose native language is not English and who are required to submit TOEFL/IELTS scores will be assessed by the University of Denver English Language Center (ELC) prior to matriculation.

Test Scores

  • The Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is required. Scores must be received directly from the appropriate testing agency by the program’s stated deadline. DU’s ETS Institution Code is 4842.

Statement of Professional Goals

  • A statement is required should be submitted via upload through the online application process.

Resume / C.V.

  • A resume or C.V. is required. This should include work experience, research, and/or volunteer work. The resume should be submitted via upload through the online application process.

Recommendation Letters

  • Two letters of recommendation are required and three are recommended. Letters should be solicited and uploaded by recommenders through the online application system. Requests for letters should be sent to recommenders well in advance so the letters are on file by the application deadline.

Financial Support

  • To be considered for financial support, domestic applicants should apply early and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by the priority deadline; February 15. Information about financial aid can be found on the Office of Financial Aid website. International students are not eligible for federal financial aid.

Application Status

  • We encourage you to be actively engaged in the admission process. You can check your application status online at PioneerWeb. Applicants will receive login information post application submission.

Contact Information

  • Mail official transcripts and any supplemental admission materials not submitted with the online application to:

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

  • Electronic transcripts should be sent to gradinfo@du.edu.
  • For more information call (303) 871-2706.

International Applicants

  • For complete international applicant information, please visit the Office of Graduate Studies International Student Application Information. International applicants are strongly encouraged to have their applications complete, with all materials on file in the admission office, at least eight weeks prior to the program’s application deadline.

The Graduate Policies and Procedures provides complete details regarding admission requirements.

Doctor of Philosophy in Child, Family, and School Psychology with a Concentration in School Psychology

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

Developmental and Psychological Foundations15 credits
CFSP 4304Diversity in School and Community Settings3
CFSP 4310Infant Development3
CFSP 4312Learning Application and Analysis3
CFSP 4311Child Development3
CNP 4641Adolescent Development3
Research, Measurement, Program Evaluation and Technology33 credits minimum
RMS 4951Mixed Method Research Design4
RMS 4930Empirical Research Methods3
RMS 4910Introductory Statistics5
Research Courses: Intermediate Level8 credits
Choose at least 8 credits from the following courses:
RMS 4911Correlation and Regression4
RMS 4912Analysis of Variance5
RMS 4922Item Response Theory3
RMS 4932Meta-Analysis Social Science Research3
RMS 4942Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis4
RMS 4944Action Research3
RMS 4961Program Development & Evaluation3
Research Courses: Advanced level3 credits
Choose at least 3 credits from the following courses:
RMS 4913Multivariate Analysis5
RMS 4914Structural Equation Modeling5
RMS 4915Hierarchical Linear Modeling4
RMS 4916Latent Growth Curve Modeling4
RMS 4919Topics in Statistics1-5
RMS 4929Topics in Psychometrics1-3
RMS 4939Topics in Quantitative Research Methods1-5
RMS 4945Community-Based Research4
RMS 4946Advanced Qualitative Research4
RMS 4947Arts-Based Research3
RMS 4949Topics in Qualitative Research1-5
RMS 4959Topics in Research Design1-5
RMS 4969Topics in Program Evaluation1-5
Dissertation10 credits
CFSP 5995Dissertation Research10
Learning Theory, Educational Foundations, and Special Education Leadership12 credits
CFSP 4303Risk, Resiliency & Prevention3
CFSP 4305Exceptional Child: Biomedical & Psycho-Social Aspects3
or CFSP 4308 Early Academic Competencies
CFSP 4338Low-Incidence Disability and Intervention3
CFSP 4342Crisis, Intervention and Prevention3
Legal, Ethical and Professional Foundations6 credits
CFSP 4301Professional and Ethical Issues in School Psychology3
CFSP 4302Legal Issues in Education3
Evaluation and Assessment18 credits
CFSP 4363Child, Family, School Psychlogy Program Development and Evaluation3
CFSP 4322Psycho-Educational Assessment I4
CFSP 4323Psycho-Educational Assessment II4
CFSP 4324Assessment III4
Collaborative Consultation with Families and Schools19 credits
CFSP 4330Family-School Partnering and Consultation3
CFSP 4340Counseling Children and Adolescent4
CFSP 4332Classroom Management and Consultation4
CFSP 4337School-Age Academic Competencies4
CFSP 4343School Mental Health Counseling II4
Applied Coursework17 credits
CFSP 4349Community Practicum2
CFSP 4353School Practicum2
CFSP 4353School Practicum2
CFSP 4353School Practicum2
CFSP 4361Seminar: CFSP Supervision (take during one quarter)2
CFSP 4355School Psychology Internship (1 yr full-time or 2 yrs half-time; 1500 hours)3
Cognate Courses15 credits
Approved OptionsMinimum of five courses in a defined advanced specialization selected in consultation with advisor15
Total Credits135

The 135 minimum credit requirement is from the baccalaureate degree.

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Passing of Praxis Exam
  • Comprehensive Examination
  • Dissertation
  • Oral defense of Dissertation

Doctor of Philosophy in Child, Family, and School Psychology with a Concentration in School Psychology  (Pathway for EDS Professionals)

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

Research, Measurement, Program Evaluation36 credits minimum
Student must complete the following four courses for 15 credits :
CFSP 4363Child, Family, School Psychlogy Program Development and Evaluation3
RMS 4930Empirical Research Methods3
RMS 4910Introductory Statistics5
RMS 4941Introduction to Qualitative Research4
Research Courses: Intermediate level8 credits min.
Select 8 credits from the following list of courses:
RMS 4911Correlation and Regression4
RMS 4912Analysis of Variance5
RMS 4922Item Response Theory3
RMS 4932Meta-Analysis Social Science Research3
RMS 4942Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis4
RMS 4944Action Research3
RMS 4961Program Development & Evaluation3
Research Courses: Advanced level3 credits min.
Select 3 credits from the following list of courses:
RMS 4913Multivariate Analysis5
RMS 4914Structural Equation Modeling5
RMS 4915Hierarchical Linear Modeling4
RMS 4916Latent Growth Curve Modeling4
RMS 4919Topics in Statistics1-5
RMS 4929Topics in Psychometrics1-3
RMS 4939Topics in Quantitative Research Methods1-5
RMS 4945Community-Based Research4
RMS 4946Advanced Qualitative Research4
RMS 4947Arts-Based Research3
RMS 4949Topics in Qualitative Research1-5
RMS 4951Mixed Method Research Design4
RMS 4959Topics in Research Design1-5
RMS 4969Topics in Program Evaluation1-5
Dissertation10 credits
CFSP 5995Dissertation Research10
Applied Coursework2 credits
CFSP 4361Seminar: CFSP Supervision2
CFSP 4355School Psychology Internship (OPTIONAL, not required - 1 yr internship - must be taken for further PhD licensing)Optional
Cognate Courses14 credits min.
Possible concentrations include: Data-based Decision Making, Assessment and Evaluation Prevention, Intervention, and Consultation Advanced Developmental Theory Advocacy, Policy and Leadership14
Total Credits52

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Comprehensive Exam
  • Dissertation
  • Oral Defense of Dissertation

Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction

Degree Requirements

Coursework requirements

A. Required Courses15 credits
CUI 4020Introduction to Curriculum (Required)3
CUI 4039Transformational Teaching and Learning3
CUI 4160Race, Class and Gender in Education3
CUI 4035Critical Perspectives: Democracy, Power, and Privilege3
CUI 4022Curriculum Theory into Practice3
B. Foundations6 credits
Select two of the following courses:
CUI 4180History of Education in the United States3
CUI 4130Philosophy of Education3
CUI 4155Special Topics3
C. Specialization18 credits minimum
See advisor for courses
D. Electives12 credits minimum
See advisor for courses
E. Research39 credits minimum
Introductory Research12 credits
RMS 4941Introduction to Qualitative Research4
RMS 4930Empirical Research Methods3
RMS 4910Introductory Statistics5
Intermediate Research8 credits minimum
Select from the following courses for a minimum total of 8 credits:
RMS 4911Correlation and Regression4
RMS 4912Analysis of Variance5
RMS 4922Item Response Theory3
RMS 4932Meta-Analysis Social Science Research3
RMS 4942Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis4
RMS 4944Action Research3
RMS 4961Program Development & Evaluation3
Advanced Research3 credits minimum
Select from the following courses for a minimum total of 3 credits:
RMS 4913Multivariate Analysis5
RMS 4914Structural Equation Modeling5
RMS 4915Hierarchical Linear Modeling4
RMS 4916Latent Growth Curve Modeling4
RMS 4919Topics in Statistics1-5
RMS 4929Topics in Psychometrics1-3
RMS 4939Topics in Quantitative Research Methods1-5
RMS 4945Community-Based Research4
RMS 4946Advanced Qualitative Research4
RMS 4947Arts-Based Research3
RMS 4949Topics in Qualitative Research1-5
RMS 4951Mixed Method Research Design4
RMS 4959Topics in Research Design1-5
RMS 4969Topics in Program Evaluation1-5
Dissertation Research16 credits minimum
CUI 4050Curriculum & Instr Rsrch Sem3
CUI 5994Seminar in Dissertation Organization and Research3
CUI 5995Dissertation Research10
Minimum Total Number of Credits Required90

A minimum of 90 credit hours is required beyond the earned master's degree.  No credit hours from the earned master's degree can be transferred into the PhD.

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Portfolio

  • Doctoral Comprehensive Examination

  • Dissertation

  • Oral Defense of Dissertation

Doctor of Education in Curriculum and Instruction

Degree Requirements

Coursework requirements

A. Required Courses12 credits
CUI 4020Introduction to Curriculum (Required)3
CUI 4039Transformational Teaching and Learning3
CUI 4160Race, Class and Gender in Education3
CUI 4035Critical Perspectives: Democracy, Power, and Privilege3
B. Foundations3
Choose from the following courses for 3 credits:
CUI 4180History of Education in the United States3
CUI 4130Philosophy of Education3
CUI 4155Special Topics3
C. Specialization24 minimum
See advisor for courses
D. Research24 minimum
Required Research Coursework*6 credits minimum*
RMS 4940Structural Foundations of Research in Social Sciences3
RMS 4930Empirical Research Methods3
Research Sequences (Choose only one of the two options):8-9 credits minimum
OPTION 1 (8 credits):
RMS 4941Introduction to Qualitative Research4
RMS 4942Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis4
OPTION 2 (8-9 credits):
RMS 4910Introductory Statistics5
and one of the following courses:
RMS 4911Correlation and Regression4 or 3 hours
or RMS 4931 Survey and Design Analysis
Doctoral Research Courses (10 credits)10 credits
CUI 5980Research as Problem Analysis3
CUI 5981Research as Intervention3
CUI 5982Applied Research4
Minimum Total Number of Credits Required**65**

Please note: the numbers in each category above are either a minimum or range of credit hours required. The 65 minimum credit requirement is only for students with an earned master's degree. No credit hours from the earned Master's degree can be transferred into the EdD.

*As part of Required Research Coursework, a recommended prerequisite is: RMS 4920 Educational Measurement (3 credits)

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Online Portfolio

  • Doctoral Comprehensive Exam

  • Doctoral Research Paper

  • Oral Defense of Dissertation

Education Specialist in Child, Family, and School Psychology with a Concentration in School Psychology

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

Developmental and Psychological Foundations12 credits
CFSP 4304Diversity in School and Community Settings3
CFSP 4310Infant Development3
CFSP 4311Child Development3
CNP 4641Adolescent Development3
Learning Theory, Educational Foundations, and Special Education9 credits
CFSP 4305Exceptional Child: Biomedical & Psycho-Social Aspects3
CFSP 4312Learning Application and Analysis3
CFSP 4338Low-Incidence Disability and Intervention3
Legal, Ethical, and Professional Foundations6 credits
CFSP 4301Professional and Ethical Issues in School Psychology3
CFSP 4302Legal Issues in Education3
Research, Measurement, and Program Evaluation8 credits
RMS 4910Introductory Statistics5
CFSP 4363Child, Family, School Psychlogy Program Development and Evaluation3
Individual Evaluation and Assessment12 credits
CFSP 4322Psycho-Educational Assessment I4
CFSP 4323Psycho-Educational Assessment II4
CFSP 4324Assessment III4
Prevention, Wellness Promotion, Counseling and Crisis Intervention21 credits
CFSP 4303Risk, Resiliency & Prevention3
CFSP 4308Early Academic Competencies3
CFSP 4337School-Age Academic Competencies4
CFSP 4340Counseling Children and Adolescent4
CFSP 4342Crisis, Intervention and Prevention3
CFSP 4343School Mental Health Counseling II4
Collaborative Consultation with Families and Schools
CFSP 4330Family-School Partnering and Consultation3
CFSP 4332Classroom Management and Consultation4
Applied Courses12 credits minimum
CFSP 4349Community Practicum2
CFSP 4349Community Practicum2
CFSP 4349Community Practicum2
CFSP 4353School Practicum2
CFSP 4353School Practicum2
CFSP 4353School Practicum2
Culminating Field Experience3 credits
CFSP 4355School Psychology Internship (1200 hours one year full-time OR two years half-time)3
Final Assessment
Praxis II/NASP Exam (score of 165 or greater)PASS
Total Credits90

Minimum number of credits required for degree: 90

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Passing score on PRAXIS exam

Education Specialist in Child, Family, and School Psychology with a Concentration in Early Childhood School Psychology

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

Developmental and Psychological Foundations12 credits
CFSP 4304Diversity in School and Community Settings3
CFSP 4310Infant Development3
CFSP 4311Child Development3
CNP 4641Adolescent Development3
Learning Theory, Educational Foundations, and Special Education9 credits
CFSP 4305Exceptional Child: Biomedical & Psycho-Social Aspects3
CFSP 4312Learning Application and Analysis3
CFSP 4338Low-Incidence Disability and Intervention3
Legal, Ethical, and Professional Foundations6 credits
CFSP 4301Professional and Ethical Issues in School Psychology3
CFSP 4302Legal Issues in Education3
Research, Measurement, and Program Evaluation8 credits
RMS 4910Introductory Statistics5
CFSP 4363Child, Family, School Psychlogy Program Development and Evaluation3
Individual Evaluation and Assessment12 credits
CFSP 4322Psycho-Educational Assessment I4
CFSP 4323Psycho-Educational Assessment II4
CFSP 4324Assessment III4
Prevention, Wellness Promotion, Counseling and Crisis Intervention21 credits
CFSP 4303Risk, Resiliency & Prevention3
CFSP 4308Early Academic Competencies3
CFSP 4337School-Age Academic Competencies4
CFSP 4340Counseling Children and Adolescent4
CFSP 4342Crisis, Intervention and Prevention3
CFSP 4343School Mental Health Counseling II4
Collaborative Consultation with Families and Schools
CFSP 4330Family-School Partnering and Consultation3
CFSP 4332Classroom Management and Consultation4
Applied Courses12 credits minimum
CFSP 4349Community Practicum2
CFSP 4349Community Practicum2
CFSP 4349Community Practicum2
CFSP 4353School Practicum2
CFSP 4353School Practicum2
CFSP 4353School Practicum2
Culminating Field Experience3 credits
CFSP 4355School Psychology Internship (1200 hours one year full-time OR two years half-time)3
Final Assessment
Praxis II/NASP Exam (score of 165 or greater)PASS
Concentration in Early Childhood Special Education12 credits
CFSP 4315Professional and Ethical Issues in Early Childhood Special Education3
CFSP 4320Infant Assessment3
CFSP 4326Preschool Assessment3
CFSP 4336Preschool Interventions3
Total Credits102

Minimum number of credits required for degree: 102

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Passing score on PRAXIS exam

Master of Arts in Child, Family, and School Psychology

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

Developmental and Psychological Foundations18 credits
CFSP 4304Diversity in School and Community Settings3
CFSP 4310Infant Development3
CFSP 4311Child Development3
CFSP 4312Learning Application and Analysis3
CFSP 4305Exceptional Child: Biomedical & Psycho-Social Aspects3
CNP 4641Adolescent Development3
Legal, Ethical, and Professional Foundations3 credits
CFSP 4302Legal Issues in Education3
Evaluation and Assessment15 credits
CFSP 4301Professional and Ethical Issues in School Psychology3
RMS 4900Education Research and Measurement4
CFSP 4322Psycho-Educational Assessment I4
CFSP 4323Psycho-Educational Assessment II4
Collaborative Consultation with Families and Schools7 credits
CFSP 4308Early Academic Competencies3
or CFSP 4336 Preschool Interventions
Applied Coursework
CFSP 4349Community Practicum2
CFSP 4349Community Practicum2
CFSP 4349Community Practicum2
Applied Project/Capstone (S)PASS
Total Credits45

Minimum number of credits required for degree: 45

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Capstone

Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

A. Required18 credits
CUI 4020Introduction to Curriculum3
CUI 4039Transformational Teaching and Learning3
CUI 4160Race, Class and Gender in Education3
CUI 4058Teacher as Researcher3
CUI 4035Critical Perspectives: Democracy, Power, and Privilege3
CUI 4022Curriculum Theory into Practice3
B. Foundations6
Select two of the following courses:
CUI 4180History of Education in the United States3
CUI 4130Philosophy of Education3
CUI 4155Special Topics3
C. Specialization12 credits minimum
See advisor for courses
D. Research9 credits minimum
RMS 4930Empirical Research Methods3
RMS 4940Structural Foundations of Research in Social Sciences3
And choose one of the following courses:
RMS 4900Education Research and Measurement4
RMS 4920Educational Measurement3
RMS 4910Introductory Statistics5
Minimum Total Number of Credits Required45

Minimum number of credits required for degree: 45

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Comprehensive Paper

Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction with A Concentration in Teacher Education Program-Elementary

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

TEP Field Experience9 credits
TEP 4690Field Experience2
TEP 4690Field Experience3
TEP 4690Field Experience4
TEP Coursework, Curriculum & Assessment34 credits
CUI 4031Teaching and Learning3
CUI 4540Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Theroy and Practice I3
CUI 4541Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice II3
CUI 4542Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice III2
TEP 4010Education and Psychology with Special Children3
CUI 4411Wkshp: Gifted & Talented Educ2
CUI 4502Elementary Science and Social Studies Methods for Cultural Linguistic Diversity4
CUI 4503Elementary Math Methods for Cultural Linguistic Diversity3
CUI 4529Foundations of Education for Linguistically Diverse Learners3
TEP 4590Literacy Instruction I3
TEP 4591Literacy Instruction II3
CUI 4506Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I2
Cognate Requirement9 credits
Complete 3 courses from one of the approved TEP cognates listed below.
Elementary Mathematics
CUI 4507Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II3
CUI 4508Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers III3
CUI 4509Mathematics for Middle School Teachers3
Aesthetics
CUI 4170Engaging Learners through the Arts3-5
CUI 4172Aesthetic Foundation in Education3
CUI 4155Special Topics (Aesthetics and STEM Education)1-10
Gifted Education
CUI 4400Nature and Needs of Gifted Learners3
CUI 4401Psychological Aspects of Giftedness3
CUI 4403Instructional Strategies for Gifted Learners3
Special Education
CUI 4451Teaching the Exceptional Child3
CUI 4452Low Incidence Disabilities and Behavior Intervention3
CUI 4453Curriculum Adaptations and Assessments for Children with Disabilities3
Culturally and Linguistically Diverse
CUI 4531Supporting English Language Learners Across the Curriculum3,4
CUI 4536Linguistic and Cultural Issues in Linking Assessment and Instruction3-4
CUI 4538Language, Literacy & Culture3,4
Total Credits52

Minimum number of credits required for degree: 52

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Comprehensive Paper for M.A. degree
  • 840 hours of field experience in diverse public school classrooms

 Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction with a Concentration in Teacher Education Program-Secondary

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements 

TEP Field Experience9 credits
TEP 4690Field Experience (Three quarters)2
TEP 4690Field Experience3
TEP 4690Field Experience4
TEP Coursework, Curriculum & Assessment34 credits
CUI 4031Teaching and Learning3
CUI 4411Wkshp: Gifted & Talented Educ2
CUI 4529Foundations of Education for Linguistically Diverse Learners3
CUI 4505Mathematics for Secondary Teachers2
CUI 4540Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Theroy and Practice I3
CUI 4541Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice II3
CUI 4542Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice III2
TEP 4010Education and Psychology with Special Children3
TEP 4590Literacy Instruction I3
TEP 4591Literacy Instruction II3
TEP 4600Introduction to Secondary Methods3
TEP 4610English in Secondary School4
or TEP 4620 Social Science in Secondary School
or TEP 4630 Science in Secondary School
or TEP 4640 Math in Secondary School
Cognate Requirement9 credits
Complete 3 courses from one of the approved TEP cognates listed below.
Elementary Mathematics
CUI 4507Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II3
CUI 4508Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers III3
CUI 4509Mathematics for Middle School Teachers3
Aesthetics
CUI 4170Engaging Learners through the Arts3-5
CUI 4172Aesthetic Foundation in Education3
CUI 4155Special Topics (Aesthetics and STEM Education)1-10
Gifted Education
CUI 4400Nature and Needs of Gifted Learners3
CUI 4401Psychological Aspects of Giftedness3
CUI 4403Instructional Strategies for Gifted Learners3
Special Education
CUI 4451Teaching the Exceptional Child3
CUI 4452Low Incidence Disabilities and Behavior Intervention3
CUI 4453Curriculum Adaptations and Assessments for Children with Disabilities3
Culturally and Linguistically Diverse
CUI 4531Supporting English Language Learners Across the Curriculum3,4
CUI 4536Linguistic and Cultural Issues in Linking Assessment and Instruction3-4
CUI 4538Language, Literacy & Culture3,4
Total Credits52

Minimum number of credits required for degree: 52

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Comprehensive Paper for M.A. degree
  • 840 hours of field experience in diverse public school classrooms

 Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction with a Concentration in Teacher Education Program-K-12 Art-Music-Spanish

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements 

TEP Field Experience9 credits
TEP 4690Field Experience2
TEP 4690Field Experience3
TEP 4690Field Experience4
TEP Coursework, Curriculum & Assessment34 credits
CUI 4031Teaching and Learning3
CUI 4411Wkshp: Gifted & Talented Educ2
CUI 4505Mathematics for Secondary Teachers2
or CUI 4506 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I
CUI 4529Foundations of Education for Linguistically Diverse Learners3
CUI 4540Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Theroy and Practice I3
CUI 4541Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice II3
CUI 4542Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice III2
TEP 4010Education and Psychology with Special Children3
TEP 4590Literacy Instruction I3
TEP 4591Literacy Instruction II3
TEP 4781Elementary Art Methods3
or TEP 4581 Elementary Music Methods
or TEP 4600 Introduction to Secondary Methods
TEP 4782Secondary Art Methods4
or TEP 4582 Secondary Music Methods
or TEP 4650 Foreign Language Methods in K-12 Schools
Cognate Requirement9 credits
Complete 3 courses from one of the approved TEP cognates listed below.
Elementary Mathematics
CUI 4507Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II3
CUI 4508Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers III3
CUI 4509Mathematics for Middle School Teachers3
Aesthetics
CUI 4170Engaging Learners through the Arts3-5
CUI 4172Aesthetic Foundation in Education3
CUI 4155Special Topics (Aesthetics and STEM Education)1-10
Gifted Education
CUI 4400Nature and Needs of Gifted Learners3
CUI 4401Psychological Aspects of Giftedness3
CUI 4403Instructional Strategies for Gifted Learners3
Special Education
CUI 4451Teaching the Exceptional Child3
CUI 4452Low Incidence Disabilities and Behavior Intervention3
CUI 4453Curriculum Adaptations and Assessments for Children with Disabilities3
Culturally and Linguistically Diverse
CUI 4531Supporting English Language Learners Across the Curriculum3,4
CUI 4536Linguistic and Cultural Issues in Linking Assessment and Instruction3-4
CUI 4538Language, Literacy & Culture3,4
Total Credits52

Minimum number of credits required for degree: 52

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Comprehensive Paper for M.A. degree
  • 840 hours of field experience in diverse public school classrooms

 Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction with a Concentration in Urban Education

Degree Plan: Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in Urban Education

Eligible for State Elementary and Special Education Certificate

CUI 4521Urban Education II: School, Student, Family and Community Influences on Student Learning3
CUI 4450Education and Psychology of Exceptional Children3
CUI 4031Teaching and Learning3
CUI 4529Foundations of Education for Linguistically Diverse Learners3
CUI 4536Linguistic and Cultural Issues in Linking Assessment and Instruction3
CUI 4540Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Theroy and Practice I3
CUI 4457Behavior Intervention3
CUI 4500Elementary Literacy: Theory and Practice I3
CUI 4504Elementary Math, Science, and Social Studies Methods Cultural Linguistic Diversity3
CUI 4530Second Language Acquisition3
CUI 4541Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice II2
CUI 4501Elementary Literacy: Theroy and Practice II3
CUI 4532Culturally Responsive Pedagogy3
CUI 4455Assessment of Students with Special Needs3
CUI 4542Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice III2
CUI 4527Supporting English Language Learners and Students with Special Needs Across Content Areas3
CUI 4538Language, Literacy & Culture3
CUI 4459Curriculum, Collaboration, and Transitions in K-12 Schools3
Total Credits52

Degree Plan: Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in Urban Education

Eligible for State Secondary Mathematics Certificate 

CUI 4521Urban Education II: School, Student, Family and Community Influences on Student Learning3
CUI 4450Education and Psychology of Exceptional Children3
CUI 4031Teaching and Learning3
CUI 4529Foundations of Education for Linguistically Diverse Learners3
CUI 4536Linguistic and Cultural Issues in Linking Assessment and Instruction3
CUI 4540Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Theroy and Practice I3
CUI 4457Behavior Intervention3
CUI 4511Secondary Literacy: Reading and Writing Across Content Areas3
TEP 4600Introduction to Secondary Methods3
CUI 4530Second Language Acquisition3
CUI 4541Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice II2
TEP 4640Math in Secondary School3
CUI 4532Culturally Responsive Pedagogy3
CUI 4455Assessment of Students with Special Needs3
CUI 4542Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice III2
CUI 4527Supporting English Language Learners and Students with Special Needs Across Content Areas3
CUI 4538Language, Literacy & Culture3
CUI 4459Curriculum, Collaboration, and Transitions in K-12 Schools3
Total Credits52

Degree Plan: Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in Urban Education

Eligible for State Secondary Science Certificate 

CUI 4521Urban Education II: School, Student, Family and Community Influences on Student Learning3
CUI 4450Education and Psychology of Exceptional Children3
CUI 4031Teaching and Learning3
CUI 4529Foundations of Education for Linguistically Diverse Learners3
CUI 4536Linguistic and Cultural Issues in Linking Assessment and Instruction3
CUI 4540Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Theroy and Practice I3
CUI 4457Behavior Intervention3
CUI 4511Secondary Literacy: Reading and Writing Across Content Areas3
TEP 4600Introduction to Secondary Methods3
CUI 4530Second Language Acquisition3
CUI 4541Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice II2
TEP 4630Science in Secondary School3
CUI 4532Culturally Responsive Pedagogy3
CUI 4455Assessment of Students with Special Needs3
CUI 4542Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice III2
CUI 4527Supporting English Language Learners and Students with Special Needs Across Content Areas3
CUI 4538Language, Literacy & Culture3
CUI 4459Curriculum, Collaboration, and Transitions in K-12 Schools3
Total Credits52

Master of Arts in Early Childhood Special Education

Degree Requirements

Coursework Requirements

The M.A. in Early Childhood Special Education program requires a minimum of 55 quarter hours depending on prior individual experiences and coursework.

Developmental and Psychological Foundations18 credits
CFSP 4304Diversity in School and Community Settings3
CFSP 4305Exceptional Child: Biomedical & Psycho-Social Aspects3
CFSP 4310Infant Development3
CFSP 4311Child Development3
CFSP 4312Learning Application and Analysis3
CFSP 4338Low-Incidence Disability and Intervention3
Legal, Ethical and Professional Foundations6 credits
CFSP 4302Legal Issues in Education3
CFSP 4315Professional and Ethical Issues in Early Childhood Special Education3
Evaluation and Assessment13 credits
CFSP 4320Infant Assessment3
CFSP 4326Preschool Assessment3
CFSP 4308Early Academic Competencies3
RMS 4900Education Research and Measurement4
Collaborative Consultation with Families and Schools12 credits
CFSP 4330Family-School Partnering and Consultation3
CFSP 4335Infant & Family Interventions3
CFSP 4336Preschool Interventions3
CFSP 4317Learning Differences in P-33
Applied Courses6 credits
CFSP 4357Early Childhood Practicum (600 minimum hours taken over three quarters covering infant, toddler, preschool, and/or kindergarten-3rd grade ; 2 credit hours each)2
CFSP 4357Early Childhood Practicum2
CFSP 4357Early Childhood Practicum2
Praxis II Elementary or ECSE PLACE ExamPASS
Total Credits55

Minimum number of credits required for degree: 55

Non-coursework Requirements

  • Pass PRAXIS Elementary PLACE Exam.

Certificate in Curriculum and Instruction with a Concentration in Teacher Education Program-Elementary

Program Requirements

TEP 4690Field Experience (Three quarters)9
CUI 4540Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Theroy and Practice I3
CUI 4541Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice II3
CUI 4542Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice III2
CUI 4031Teaching and Learning3
TEP 4010Education and Psychology with Special Children3
TEP 4590Literacy Instruction I3
TEP 4591Literacy Instruction II3
CUI 4529Foundations of Education for Linguistically Diverse Learners3
CUI 4503Elementary Math Methods for Cultural Linguistic Diversity3
CUI 4502Elementary Science and Social Studies Methods for Cultural Linguistic Diversity4
CUI 4411Wkshp: Gifted & Talented Educ2
CUI 4506Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I2
Total Credits43

Minimum number of credits required for degree:  43

Certificate in Curriculum and Instruction with a Concentration in Teacher Education Program-Secondary 

Program Requirements

TEP 4690Field Experience (Three quarters)9
CUI 4540Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Theroy and Practice I3
CUI 4541Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice II3
CUI 4542Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice III2
CUI 4031Teaching and Learning3
TEP 4010Education and Psychology with Special Children3
TEP 4590Literacy Instruction I3
TEP 4591Literacy Instruction II3
CUI 4529Foundations of Education for Linguistically Diverse Learners3
TEP 4600Introduction to Secondary Methods3
TEP 4610English in Secondary School4
or TEP 4620 Social Science in Secondary School
or TEP 4630 Science in Secondary School
or TEP 4640 Math in Secondary School
CUI 4411Wkshp: Gifted & Talented Educ2
CUI 4505Mathematics for Secondary Teachers2
Total Credits43

Minimum number of credits required for degree:  43

Certificate in Curriculum and Instruction with a Concentration in Teacher Education Program-K-12

Program Requirements

TEP 4690Field Experience (Three quarters)9
CUI 4540Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Theroy and Practice I3
CUI 4541Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice II3
CUI 4542Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice III2
CUI 4031Teaching and Learning3
TEP 4010Education and Psychology with Special Children3
TEP 4590Literacy Instruction I3
TEP 4591Literacy Instruction II3
CUI 4529Foundations of Education for Linguistically Diverse Learners3
TEP 4781Elementary Art Methods3
or TEP 4581 Elementary Music Methods
or TEP 4600 Introduction to Secondary Methods
TEP 4782Secondary Art Methods4
or TEP 4582 Secondary Music Methods
or TEP 4650 Foreign Language Methods in K-12 Schools
CUI 4411Wkshp: Gifted & Talented Educ2
CUI 4505Mathematics for Secondary Teachers2
or CUI 4506 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I
Total Credits43

Minimum number of credits required for degree:  43

Certificate in Early Childhood Special Education 

Program Requirements

Developmental and Psychological Foundations6 credits
CFSP 4305Exceptional Child: Biomedical & Psycho-Social Aspects3
CFSP 4338Low-Incidence Disability and Intervention3
Legal, Ethical and Professional Foundations3 credits
CFSP 4315Professional and Ethical Issues in Early Childhood Special Education3
Evaluation and Assessment9 credits
CFSP 4320Infant Assessment3
CFSP 4326Preschool Assessment3
CFSP 4308Early Academic Competencies3
Collaborative Consultation with Families and Schools3 credits
(Choose one of the following courses)
CFSP 4335Infant & Family Interventions 13
or CFSP 4336 Preschool Interventions
Applied Coursework3 credits
CFSP 4357Early Childhood Practicum (600 minimum hours taken over three quarters covering infant, toddler, preschool, and/or kindergarten-3rd grade ; 1 credit hour each ) 23
Praxis II Elementary of ECSE PLACE exam (comprehensive exam)PASS
Total Credits24
1

Students have a choice of taking either of these courses to meet Colorado Department of Education competencies depending on their previous coursework. This is subject to faculty approval.

2

The ECSE Practicum has flexibility based on student needs and should be distributed between infant (200 hours), toddler (200 hours), and preschool (200 hours) ages across a number of quarters.

Child, Family & School Psych Courses

CFSP 3900 Child Guidance (5 Credits)

Students in this class explore effective child guidance theories and factors that impact their classroom application with young children from birth to age 8. Empirically-based positive guidance techniques and strategies are reviewed and applied to everyday practice, especially as they relate to establishing prosocial environments, classroom management, and meeting the needs of children and families from diverse backgrounds.

CFSP 3910 Early Childhood Nutrition (3 Credits)

Young children have specific nutritional and physical needs. This course covers the nutritional needs of children, such as how to ensure that they get all the nutrients they need to stay healthy. The course explores what consists of safe foods at various stages in childhood, especially when not all foods can be eaten by infants and toddlers. Learn about the best practices in the field of early education regarding what foods to serve young children that promote positive health, hygiene and physical development.

CFSP 3991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

CFSP 3992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

CFSP 4000 Assessment for Non-Psychologists (2 Credits)

Foundation and methodology of assessment are considered in the context of informing practices of professionals who construct a variety of test formats including assessment of cognitive abilities, achievement testing, vocational assessment, and assessment of personality.

CFSP 4301 Professional and Ethical Issues in School Psychology (3 Credits)

This course examines professional issues pertinent to working with early childhood through adolescent populations in school and community settings. Professional issues and contemporary service models pertinent to the field of early childhood and school psychology are reviewed, including an introduction to ethical issues, federal mandates, professional training, and roles and responsibilities. Students learn and are involved in casework discussion pertinent to the application of best practices in the delivery of assessment, intervention, and consultation services. Special emphasis is given to current mental health and education regulations and reforms. Controversial issues highlighted in the field are covered including differential issues facing early childhood and school psychology professionals in urban and rural settings. Students become acquainted with a variety of ethical issues affecting practice in the public schools; in hospital, agency, and private settings; and in higher education. Attention is focused on ethical standards, reasoning processes, and conduct in applied settings.

CFSP 4302 Legal Issues in Education (3 Credits)

This course is designed to acquaint students with a variety of legal issues affecting practice in the public schools; in hospital, agency, and private settings; and in higher education. Attention is focused on federal and state legislation, special and regular education case law, psychological practice case law, and ethical standards, reasoning processes, and conduct in applied settings. Special consideration is given to the nonequivalence of ethical standards of practice as they relate to legal mandates and court decisions concerning practice in the schools.

CFSP 4303 Risk, Resiliency & Prevention (3 Credits)

This course examines the history and theoretical bases of resiliency research and the characteristics of children at significant risk of delays, disorders, and low-incidence disabilities. Participants obtain practical information regarding the assessment, identification, amelioration, facilitative responses, and intervention in school and community settings for these populations. The course moves beyond a pathology approach that focuses on the deficits of children and families to an empowerment perspective that focuses on strengths. The course is grounded in child development research and educational and family systems Prevention principles, curriculum, and policy agendas are discussed that build on a model of collaboration between and among disciplines in community and school settings.

CFSP 4304 Diversity in School and Community Settings (3 Credits)

This course explores diversity in children and families, and the impact of culture on personal and family development. Emphasis is placed on the intersection of school and community settings' cultures and those of children and families, and how this affects learning and development for individuals and groups of children. Attention is given to students' cultures and cultural experiences, and how these affect the work they do with children and families in school and community settings.

CFSP 4305 Exceptional Child: Biomedical & Psycho-Social Aspects (3 Credits)

This course provides a broad survey of the field of exceptionality and special education. Included are discussions of current issues and controversies in the field, characteristics, classification, diagnosis, and educational interventions for early childhood and school-aged children with high-incidence and low-incidence disabilities who have exceptional educational needs. Biomedical and psychosocial etiologies are reviewed. Implications for child and family interventions and supports also are addressed.

CFSP 4308 Early Academic Competencies (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of early academic competencies across diverse settings and stakeholders, such as families, teachers/providers, programs, and communities. A comparative analysis of evidence-based early literacy strategies, environments, curriculum, and a review of current evaluation and instructional language and math literacy practices for working with teachers, families, and young children is undertaken. Play-based and other informal methods of assessment and intervention are covered, including the integration of technology and strategies to promote early skill development with language and math with infants, toddlers and preschoolers in natural environments.

CFSP 4310 Infant Development (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of theoretical, research, and practice issues in the field of child development. Attention is given to sensorimotor, cognitive, language, and social-emotional development. The focus of the course is on typical development of children from early childhood to early adolescence. The course will emphasize the synthesis of past research into current findings and accepted theories and will allow the student to broaden their understanding of the impact of research on current policies and practices.

CFSP 4311 Child Development (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of the growth and development of the child from conception to twelve years. Attention is given to physical/sensorimotor, cognitive, language, and social-emotional development domains with a focus on typical as well as atypical development. Research and policy are reviewed as it relates to developmentally appropriate practice addressing the whole child and the creation of supportive environmental contexts. Guided observation and individual case work allow for application and integration of developmental theory and practice.

CFSP 4312 Learning Application and Analysis (3 Credits)

This course examines learning theories and applied behavioral principles. Students learn to apply theories to case studies and fieldwork relating to infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and school-age children with and without disabilities. Students work in teams to analyze and solve problems relating to learning and behavior at home and school, and to develop positive behavioral support and effective learning plans.

CFSP 4315 Professional and Ethical Issues in Early Childhood Special Education (3 Credits)

This course provides students with an understanding of the role of an Early Childhood Special Educator Specialist and serves as the foundation for students who are interested in pursuing this as a profession. This includes the profession's ethical and professional practice standards, and understanding of the multiple roles and complex situations across wide age and developmental ranges. This course also covers the historical laws and legal issues associated with the profession. The course also highlights why special educators engage in professional activities and learning communities that benefit individuals with developmental issue and their families, colleagues, and their own professional growth. This course promotes the idea that special educators are lifelong learners and regularly reflect on and adjust their practice.

CFSP 4317 Learning Differences in P-3 (3 Credits)

This course reviews the challenges that arise in early childhood classrooms (preschool- 3 grade) related to children who exhibit academic and behavioral differences and delays. Academic and behavioral interventions and differentiation strategies will be addressed. Additionally, the course will cover the approaches for addressing children who require additional academic and behavioral support in the classroom.

CFSP 4320 Infant Assessment (3 Credits)

This course is designed to teach students how to assess infants using a variety of standardized and non-standardized methods. The entire assessment process including screening, evaluating, writing results, and interpreting the results to families and to professionals are addressed. Tests are examined with consideration for when and why specific instruments should be used. Students are trained in-depth in the administration and interpretation of a variety of instruments for assessment of cognitive, language, social-emotional and motor development. Prerequisite: CFSP 4310.

CFSP 4322 Psycho-Educational Assessment I (4 Credits)

This course is one of two required courses designed to provide students in School Psychology with expertise in individual intelligence and achievement test administration, scoring, interpretation, and report writing. Each student has an opportunity to administer various cognitive and achievement measures, with particular emphasis on the Wechsler Scales. Contemporary issues pertinent to the assessment of intelligence are covered. Emphasis is placed synthesizing and integrating information from cognitive and achievement assessment with other sources to produce effective educational recommendations. In addition, the role of these tools in the special education qualification process is highlighted. Important issues regarding the use of such tests are discussed, as well as the use of tests in schools and clinical practice. The focus of the class is primarily on the assessment of school-aged children. Lab fee required.

CFSP 4323 Psycho-Educational Assessment II (4 Credits)

This course is the second of two required courses designed to provide students in School Psychology with expertise in individual intelligence and achievement test administration, scoring, interpretation, and report writing. Each student has an opportunity to administer various cognitive and achievement measures, with particular emphasis on the Woodcock Johnson Scales. Nontraditional forms of assessment, as well as adaptive behavior measures, are also covered. Integrating results of assessments with other data to provide effective educational recommendations continues to be an emphasis. The focus of the class is on the assessment of school-aged children. Lab fee required.

CFSP 4324 Assessment III (4 Credits)

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of the major approaches to assess a school-aged student's social and emotional status. Instruction includes underlying theories, use and interpretation of interviewing techniques, observation methods, objective behavior ratings, self-report measures, sociometric procedures and selected projectives. Emphasis is placed on the integration and interpretation of multimethod, multisource and multisetting data to improve diagnostic accuracy, and the use of assessment results in developing effective intervention strategies. Students learn to incorporate such assessment information using case studies. In addition, students develop skills in writing case reports and in making effective presentations of social-emotional assessment results. Consideration is given to contemporary issues in the assessment of children's social emotional functioning. Lab fee required.

CFSP 4326 Preschool Assessment (3 Credits)

This course is designed to teach students how to assess preschoolers using a variety of standardized and non-standardized methods. The entire assessment process including screening, evaluating, writing results, and interpreting the results to families and to professionals are addressed. Tests are examined with consideration for when and why specific instruments should be used. Students are trained in-depth in the administration and interpretation of a variety of instruments for assessment of cognitive, language, social-emotional and motor development. Prerequisites: CFSP 4311 and CFSP 4320.

CFSP 4330 Family-School Partnering and Consultation (3 Credits)

This course is designed to familiarize educational, mental health, and early childhood service providers with essential attitudes, approaches, and actions necessary to form successful family-school-community partnerships that can foster development and learning, especially for children with disabilities. Ecological, family systems, and family-centered theory and principles serve as the foundation for working collaboratively with families from diverse cultural and social backgrounds within school and community settings. Students gain skills in family interviewing; consultation to identify family strengths, needs, and resources; collaborative problem-solving; and multi-systemic learning. Evidence-based family involvement, education, and intervention strategies contribute to positive family-school partnering relationships are reviewed within a multi-tiered, school-based service delivery framework.

CFSP 4332 Classroom Management and Consultation (4 Credits)

This course is designed to acquaint students with current directions in classroom management and school-based consultation. Covered are issues related to consultant and consultee characteristics, consultation practices and processes, models and stages of consultation, facilitating desired outcomes in consultation, and evaluation of consultation outcomes. Special emphasis is also given to problems of classroom management and collaboration with parents, teachers and other educational and community personnel. Case analysis and practice are required.

CFSP 4335 Infant & Family Interventions (3 Credits)

This course will describe various models for intervention with infants and toddlers with disabilities, emphasizing intervention within natural environments. Working with children and families in home, childcare, and other community settings will be emphasized and contrasted with intervention in more clinical settings. Students learn how to consult with parents and community professionals in providing coordinated transdisciplinary services when working with children in home and community settings. All areas of development will be addressed. Field experiences with children and families are expected to practice the skills addressed in class. Families will be asked to share their experiences to enable students to gain the "human" side of theory and practice.

CFSP 4336 Preschool Interventions (3 Credits)

This course covers early childhood interventions applicable within community, preschool and home environments. A hierarchy of intervention strategies is addressed including universal, targeted, and intensive approaches. There is a focus on building supportive networks, routine-based intervention strategies, and collaboration to enhance family resources. Students review empirically validated early interventions and curriculum for young children exhibiting both normal and delayed development.

CFSP 4337 School-Age Academic Competencies (4 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to review theories of learning disability and response to intervention approaches that incorporate environmental, curriculum-based, standardized, analytical or diagnostic assessments. Students learn to link assessment data to targeted empirically-valid learning and behavioral; interventions and strategies for students exhibiting difficulties or delays in literacy, written language, or math skills. Students evaluate learning environments, formulate instructional hypotheses, and plan interventions and strategies in regards to phonemic awareness, decoding/phonics, word recognition, reading fluency, listening/reading comprehension, study skills, written expression, mathematical calculation or problem-solving. Guidelines to promote differentiated classroom instruction and for working with students with limited English proficiency are reviewed. Effective family-school partnering and home-school consultation practices are highlighted to further facilitate learning. These goals are accomplished through critical readings and assignments, classroom case discussion, demonstrations, modeling, practice with hypothetical cases, and individualized tutoring with a referred student.

CFSP 4338 Low-Incidence Disability and Intervention (3 Credits)

This course reviews a wide range of neurodevelopmental disorders and low-incidence disabilities including autism, fragile X syndrome, and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, visual and hearing impairment, along with syndromes associated with chromosomal deletions. Implications for assessment and intervention are outlined including diagnostic criteria, prevalence, and treatment and intervention strategies. Research on identification and treatment including state of the art interventions and assistive technology are addressed. Experts and researchers on specific disabilities, from the community will be used as guest lecturers. Students observe children within community sites and also work with local families affected by low-incidence disabilities.

CFSP 4339 Introduction to Play Therapy (3 Credits)

This course examines the history and theoretical bases of major theories of play to enhance children's social-emotional and adaptive functioning. Child-centered, interpretive, and structured play therapy models are reviewed. Information is covered regarding preparation, selection of materials and toys, playroom characteristics, facilitative responses, and how to adapt play therapy in school, home and clinical settings. The play therapy process is illustrated from the initial referral and contact through termination, including observing and responding during sessions, facilitation and interpretation, therapeutic limit setting, and group play therapy strategies. Case studies, role play, video and script analysis are incorporated as is brief play therapy and applications with special populations. Efficacy, evaluation and future areas for professional development are reviewed. This course is designed as an introductory experience to prepare students for further supervised practica in play therapy.

CFSP 4340 Counseling Children and Adolescent (4 Credits)

School Mental Health Counseling I is designed to provide in-depth knowledge of major theories behind contemporary school-based mental health counseling approaches for children and adolescents. Students will learn developmentally informed and empirically driven individual and group counseling strategies to enhance interpersonal, emotional, and social functioning within a multi-tiered system of support. Guidelines and ethical principles are reviewed to guide school-based practice and to help build collaborative partnerships between school, home, and community settings. These goals are accomplished through self and peer reflection, critical analysis of therapy research, evaluation of case studies, video modeling, and in-vivo practice and feedback. This course and its contents are a prerequisite to prepare students for School Mental Health Counseling II, an advanced class that incorporates supervised counseling experience.

CFSP 4342 Crisis, Intervention and Prevention (3 Credits)

This course provides the knowledge and skills needed to respond effectively and to be a member of a school or community crisis team. Crisis theory, models, conceptualizations and current research are covered with a focus on the components of the crisis response and specific individual and group counseling skills needed to provide crisis intervention and postvention. Essential guidelines and components of a comprehensive community/ school safety and crisis play, national and local policies and programs and effective prevention strategies are reviewed.

CFSP 4343 School Mental Health Counseling II (4 Credits)

School Mental Heath Counseling II is designed as an advanced counseling class that incorporates supervised counseling experiences to improve interpersonal, emotional and social functioning in young children to adolescents. Students learn to design, deliver and evaluate evidence-based prevention and intervention approaches and consultative mental health services. By working alongside a field site supervisor, students engage in case review, analysis, and delivery of counseling services designed to mirror expectations placed on mental health professionals in school and community settings. Self-reflection, transcript analysis, and peer, instructor, and supervisor feedback are employed to develop professional and personal individual and group counseling skills within a multi-tiered system of support.

CFSP 4349 Community Practicum (2 Credits)

Taken during the first year of entry, the Practica is a supervised initial year field experience designed to expose students to a variety of home-, community- and school-based settings that serve families with children who have developmental and special needs, and in the CFSP Clinic. Each week for up to four hours, students are expected to attend, observe, and participate in a range of site-specific team meetings and services offered to families and children. For the MA in Educational Psychology degree, students, during the fall or winter quarter, identify, develop and initiate a research project with input from the faculty. The MA project culminates during the fourth quarter (summer) and serves as the final project in lieu of a comprehensive exam.

CFSP 4351 CFSP Clinic (2-3 Credits)

Supervised field experience in the CFSP Clinic working with preschool through high school-aged students and their families. Casework includes assessment, intervention, and consultation on a variety of psychoeducational problems of school-aged children and youth.

CFSP 4353 School Practicum (2 Credits)

This is a 300-500 hour supervised field experience taken after the successful completion of core courses and Practica I experience. Practica is considered a critical professional transition year to help consolidate learning and professional competencies in preparation for a subsequent Internship. Students work throughout the year with Clinic Faculty and a licensed Field Supervisor within the University of Denver psycho-educational clinic and infant, preschool, elementary, middle or high school settings and also attend weekly Practicum seminars or individual supervision sessions with a University Faculty member. Supervision is designed to provide ongoing professional feedback, case analysis, peer consultation, continued professional development pertinent to the successful practice of School Psychology in urban and rural settings.

CFSP 4354 Child, Family and Community Internship (1-6 Credits)

Supervised advanced Child and Family field experience in a community medical, mental health, or educational agency setting.

CFSP 4355 School Psychology Internship (1-6 Credits)

Supervised advanced School Psychology field experience in a public or private school/community setting. Advanced standing in the program and 1200 clock hours of intership experience required.

CFSP 4356 School Psych Field Experience (4,8 Credits)

Part-time, 20-hour-per-week or full-time, 40-hour-per-week supervised advanced School Psychology field experience in a public or private school or community setting. Students register for 4 credit hours for half-time enrollment or for 8 credit hours for full-time enrollment. This course is not graded. Advanced standing in the program and 600 or 1200 hours of internship experience is required. Department approval is required for registration. Must be registered with CFSP 4355.

CFSP 4357 Early Childhood Practicum (1-4 Credits)

This course provides students with a field experience in an Early Childhood environment for students who are interested in pursuing a profession in Early Childhood Special Education. Field Practicum in Early Childhood Special Education is an off-campus, 600-hour minimum supervised experience taken throughout your coursework. Field Practicum is designed to broaden one’s professional skills and is considered a critical transition of substantial growth. Each student is required to successfully complete 3 practica; an infant/toddler, (Birth to 3 years) a preschool (3-5 years) and an early elementary focused (Kindergarten through 3rd grade). Practicum seminar is designed to facilitate case analysis, ongoing self-reflection, and to provide peer consultation and professional feedback relevant to best practice. The field practicum is considered a critical professional transition to help consolidate learning and professional competencies in preparation for employment. All students work with a licensed Field Supervisor. Students will be placed in infant, preschool, elementary school settings. During practicum, students provide direct and indirect services that support children and/or families in a variety of settings. All students attend weekly practicum seminars facilitated by a University Supervisor. Supervision is designed to provide ongoing professional feedback, case analysis, peer consultation, and continued professional development and experiences pertinent to successful practice. This course promotes the idea that special educators are lifelong learners and regularly reflect on and adjust their practice.

CFSP 4361 Seminar: CFSP Supervision (1-2 Credits)

This is an advanced seminar for Ph.D. students in Child, Family and School Psychology focusing on supervision of psychological and educational service provision in school, hospital, and community agency settings.

CFSP 4363 Child, Family, School Psychlogy Program Development and Evaluation (3 Credits)

This course focuses on theory and practice of program development and evaluation in school and community agency settings. Both qualitative and quantitative methods of program evaluation are discussed. Students have the opportunity to collaborate on a comprehensive evaluation of a specific educational, health, or mental health program.

CFSP 4991 MA Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

This course allows MA or EdS Child, Family, and School Psychology students to study a specific topic area in detail in conjunction with a cooperating faculty member.

CFSP 4992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

CFSP 4995 Research - M.A. Thesis (1-10 Credits)

This course is for students whose program requires completion of a masters level thesis.

CFSP 5991 PhD Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

This course allows PhD Child, Family, and School Psychology students to study a specific topic area in detail in conjunction with a cooperating faculty member.

CFSP 5992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

CFSP 5995 Dissertation Research (1-20 Credits)

This course is for PhD Child, Family, and School Psychology students engaged in completing their doctoral dissertation.

Curriculum and Instruction Courses

CUI 3055 Human Rights & Education (3 Credits)

Emphasis on human rights, both domestic and international, for the field of education; study of writings and research of leading educators encompassing concepts of human rights; focus on educational issues involving human rights, the Right of the Child, work of UNICEF, and implications of human rights for educational practice. Cross listed with CUI 4055.

CUI 3801 Current Issues in K-12 Education (3 Credits)

This course introduces prospective K-12 educators to the contemporary social, political, pedagogical and curricular context of schooling. Major areas of analysis and discussion will include: gender, social class, cultural competency, linguistically diverse education, funding, sexual orientation, educational policy, and diversity. The course will attempt a critical, reflective, and balanced view of schooling for the purpose of helping students develop the ability to interpret and respond to the challenges associated with teaching in modern schools. Coursework will be paired with a service-learning field experience in an urban educational setting characterized as linguistically and culturally diverse.

CUI 3802 Teacher Identity (3 Credits)

The most effective teachers combine the outer technical aspects of teaching (lesson plans, differentiated instruction, culturally responsive pedagogy, and content knowledge) with the inner non-technical elements (passion, heart, beliefs, and calling). In this course we examine the "inner-life" of the teacher with an emphasis on how understanding the themes of teacher selfhood impact the technical aspects of teaching. Key questions to examine include the following: How do the gifts, talents, and inner capacities of the teacher impact and influence communication and learning in the classroom; why do I teach; what will continue to fuel my passion for teaching; and what vision of the future do I hold for schools? Students should expect to complete 10-20 hours per week of service learning in area education settings.

CUI 3990 Service Learning in Community (1-4 Credits)

This course provides students with the opportunity to serve in the community and to reflect on their service experiences in a classroom setting through structured and meaningful reflection sessions. Students will examine a variety of topics, including the nature and significance of service-learning, motives for service, community action as a means for positive social change, and the relationship between service-learning, social justice, and civic responsibility. Cross-listed with AH 3580, SS 3580.

CUI 3991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

CUI 3992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

CUI 3995 Urban Education (5 Credits)

Historical, political and sociological influences that shape and socially construct urban schools. Characteristics, opportunities, and needs of students in urban schools and examples of current effective practice.

CUI 3996 Urban Youth Development (5 Credits)

This course examines urban youth development from several perspectives, including the social-psychological, the cognitive/creative, the physical and health-related, and the philosophical. Cross listed with CUI 3996.

CUI 4020 Introduction to Curriculum (3 Credits)

Introduces curriculum theory and curriculum as a field of study; includes study of issues such as standards, cognition, diversity, ecology, and social justice, among others.

CUI 4021 Models of Curriculum (3 Credits)

Reflects on ways various curriculum orientations may resolve modern issues or problems, with students' independent pursuit of one or two orientations in depth; orientations examined include cognitive pluralism, developmentalism, rational humanism and reconceptualism, among others. Recommended prerequisite: CUI 4020.

CUI 4022 Curriculum Theory into Practice (3 Credits)

Helps students move from theoretical concepts and decisions involved in curriculum development to actual construction of curricula; survey of potential components encompassed in a variety of curricula followed by participation in designing a curriculum as a member of a student team; final facet requires students to develop a curriculum. Prerequisites: CUI 4020 and 4021 or instructor's permission.

CUI 4027 Implementing Curriiculum: A Practicum (3 Credits)

Opportunity to experience authentic role of curriculum on site; work at the Denver Zoo, the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, other museums and school sites; to develop and implement curriculum.

CUI 4028 Literacy Instruction and Assessment (3 Credits)

Organized around a developmental continuum for literacy acquisition. Addresses best research-based practices that allow teachers to assess students' abilities and to select appropriate instructional strategies leading to communicative competence for all children.

CUI 4029 Issues in Literacy (3 Credits)

Prepares educators to participate thoughtfully and critically in often-contentious discourse about literacy. Examines the research base that supports sound policy and practice regarding literacy instruction for all children.

CUI 4031 Teaching and Learning (3 Credits)

Takes a disciplinary approach (e.g., sociological, historical, philosophical, and anthropological) to the analysis of teaching and learning environments in response to broad questions such as: What are effective teaching and learning environments? For whom and under what circumstances? How can we create such environments?.

CUI 4032 Analysis of Teaching (3 Credits)

Provides a systematic introduction to the research base that characterizes effective practice and to the array of research methods that can be employed to study teaching and teacher development.

CUI 4033 The Practice of Teaching (3 Credits)

Course explores personal, conceptual, and empirical understandings of "teaching practice." Topics addressed have included: metaphors for teaching practice, best practices for equity and social justice, professional development practices.

CUI 4034 Curriculum & Cultural Context (3 Credits)

This course will address the influence of cultural, political, sociological, and economic factors on curriculum at the instructional, situational, societal, and ideological levels. Students should be interested and willing to explore these issues through readings and discussion. We will be exploring various perspectives, including our own, which inform the discussion on this critical area of education.

CUI 4035 Critical Perspectives: Democracy, Power, and Privilege (3 Credits)

In this course, students will examine issues related to democracy, power, and privilege in public education. Specifically, students will learn about how anti-democratic groups are working to undermine public education in the U.S. Students will explore White privilege, racism, classism (and other "isms") and the impact they have had and continue to have in public school settings, particularly at schools that serve historically marginalized and oppressed students. Theoretical frameworks such as Critically Relevant Teaching and Critical Race Theory will be introduced in this class as well.

CUI 4038 Urban Youth Development (3 Credits)

This course examines urban youth development from several perspectives, including the social-psychological, the cognitive/creative, the physical and health-related, and the philosophical. We will explore the emerging field of youth development in an urban context, integrate theory and practice, and analyze youth policies and their implications. Cross listed with CUI 3996.

CUI 4039 Transformational Teaching and Learning (3 Credits)

This course takes an exploratory approach to the analysis of transformation teaching and learning. It asks questions such as "What are effective teaching and learning environments?" "For whom and under what circumstances?" "How can we create such environments?" We will explore how patterns of activities in the classroom can be designed to achieve simultaneously all of the major goals of educational reform. The term classroom is not restricted to the physical classroom space but "classroom" in the sense of the organized instructional activities that can extend outside of the school building into the community.

CUI 4041 School and Curricular Reform (3 Credits)

A look into school reform movements, why most fail and only a few succeed.

CUI 4042 Instructional Design & Web Development for Educators (3 Credits)

Introduces presentation software, basic HTML, and web page development software. Focuses on various Learning, Instructional Design, and Learning Style Theories and how they relate to the development of technology supported pedagogy. Students will create individualized instructional web pages for use in practice.

CUI 4043 Development of Technology Enhanced Educational Environments (3 Credits)

Utilizing emerging Learning Theories and complex Instructional Design Theories, students will move into advanced educational web page development including designing with style sheets and layers. Several customized technology mediated lessons or professional projects will be created for use in practice. Various tools, designed to enhance learning environments, will be explored.

CUI 4045 Technology Practicum (2 Credits)

Under the supervision of the professor, students will generate technological applications relevant to their own work settings using ideas and concepts learned in CUI 4040.

CUI 4046 Technology Leadership (3 Credits)

Explores the role of ethics, values, social, legal, and power issues associated with technology in education. Analyzes how technology is transforming learning, equitable distribution of information, and the implications for providing optimal education to diverse learning populations.

CUI 4050 Curriculum & Instr Rsrch Sem (0-3 Credits)

Students write proposals and learn about current relevant research in curriculum. Students learn about the proposal and dissertation process as well as current research in curriculum.

CUI 4051 Seminar in Dissertation (1-5 Credits)

Individualized assistance in developing the dissertation topic, issue, problem; guidance in preparation for proposal orals and application to the Institution Review Board (IRB), direction for dissertation chapter organization, writing and completion. This seminar is targeted for the student who needs support in completing the dissertation.

CUI 4055 Human Rights & Education (3 Credits)

Emphasis on human rights, both domestic and international, for the field of education; study of writings and research of leading educators encompassing concepts of human rights; focus on educational issues involving human rights, the Rights of the Child, work of UNICEF, and implications of human rights for educational practice. Cross listed with CUI 3055.

CUI 4058 Teacher as Researcher (3 Credits)

Emerging philosophical and methodological issues that arise when school practitioners undertake research within their own sites; range of research traditions including quantitative, statistical research and qualitative methodologies; mastering relevant skills and accessing resources for students to be better prepared to conduct their own inquiries and understand and solve problems.

CUI 4070 Clinical Internship (1-9 Credits)

CUI 4100 Sociocultural Foundation of Education (3 Credits)

Examination of the expanded conceptions of diversity to include difference based on ethnicity, biethnicity, and multiethnic identity; social class, differently-abled, age, gender, and sexual orientation; implications of terrorism on America for ethnically diverse populations in our schools and on educational establishments around the world; attention to the interactions of ethnicity with social class and gender identifications in the school setting; implications of the learning of another language as well as the impact of language diversity in our schools; consideration of new conceptual frameworks for multicultural and diversity education for educators for the 21st century.

CUI 4130 Philosophy of Education (3 Credits)

Focuses on 3-4 philosophers and examines the contributions their philosophical ideas have on education. Philosophers studied have included John Dewey, Cornel West, Nel Noddings and Maxine Greene.

CUI 4131 Spirituality in Education (3 Credits)

This course will explore the role of spirituality in education from both the student and educator point of view through an examination of the big questions that are held close to the heart; the ones that guide us toward meaning making in the world. The primary goal of the course is to plumb the depths of spirituality, a deep sense of inner meaning making, that calls us toward a particular profession. The course will focus on the interface between spirituality in education through the lenses of curriculum and instruction.

CUI 4150 Sociology of Education (3 Credits)

Sociology of education emphasizes the importance of the process of socialization on education, the interactions of ethnicity, gender, and social class in education, the formal roles and statuses within the bureaucracy of the school, the informal or "hidden" curriculum, the system of higher education and comparative views of educational systems around the world, and the impact on teaching and schools in an era of terrorism. Objectives of this course: to apply major concepts and theories in sociology to the institution of education; to interpret the applications of sociological theory to the school and the broader educational enterprise; and for personal expansion of philosophy and worldview through humanistic and social science perspectives.

CUI 4153 Practicum: Curriculum and Instruction (1-5 Credits)

Designed to fit the educational needs of the individual student who may choose from a wide variety of practicum (internship) experiences, including teaching, curriculum development, museum internships or research projects in curriculum and instruction.

CUI 4155 Special Topics (1-10 Credits)

Special topics in the field of education.

CUI 4159 Educating Multiethnic Populations (3 Credits)

Emphasizing a worldwide view in considering how education should be delivered to children and youth for life in the 21st century, especially since the World Trade Center Disaster of September, 2001. It is incumbent on those in teaching to find creative policies for working together with those in government and business, strategies that acknowledge our human diversity within and overall context of equality and peacefulness. This begins with raising social justice issues in the classroom in ways that encourage students to openly examine difficult and personally challenging materials, facilitating communication and understanding between members of diverse and unequal social groups.

CUI 4160 Race, Class and Gender in Education (3 Credits)

Ethnicity, Class & Gender in Education applies the concepts and theories of social science disciplines - sociology, social psychology, anthropology, historical perspectives and philosophical orientations - to the inclusive examination of the issues of racism, classism, sexism, and homophobia in education. This course seeks to conceptualize ethnicity, gender and social class as interactive systems, not as separate and independent variables, that impact students, teachers, school systems and the educational enterprise. We examine educational systems and practices that historically have disadvantaged women and peoples of color and discuss strategies and techniques for empowerment of the members of these groups.

CUI 4161 Ethnicity, Gender & Diversity in the Curriculum (3 Credits)

The focus of this course is to examine and explore the complexities of teaching in contemporary educational settings in which the forces of sexism, racism and classism are found. In our society where wide diversity characterizes our student population, it has become an imperative to recognize difference and relate effective teaching to these conditions. Major trends and influences that are impacting the school curriculum are explored.

CUI 4170 Engaging Learners through the Arts (3-5 Credits)

This seven day institute is designed to engage participants in a challenging exploration of the creative process through workshops with professional artists in the disciplines of dance, visual arts, creative writing, music, and theatre, and to provide a greater understanding of the theory and practical applications of school reform.

CUI 4171 The Arts in Education:Stage II (3-5 Credits)

CUI 4172 Aesthetic Foundation in Education (3 Credits)

Educational enterprise from aesthetic viewpoints; examination of a number of aesthetic theories and exploration of implications for curriculum, teaching, and evaluation.

CUI 4180 History of Education in the United States (3 Credits)

Traces historical context and development of K-12 schools in the United States from initial discovery of North and South America by Europeans to the present; understanding through examination of central issues that strongly influenced our current educational systems - evolution of schools, religion, social and political reform, women's issues, nationalism and ethnicity, industrialization of the nation and world.

CUI 4400 Nature and Needs of Gifted Learners (3 Credits)

This course is designed to provide participants with an understanding of 1) conceptual foundations and definitions of giftedness, 2) how intelligence, creativity, and non-intelligence factors are related to giftedness, 3) the nature, development, types, and needs of gifted individuals, 4) principles and issues in the identification of gifted individuals, and 5) the major issues and tensions in the education of gifted and talented individuals. Lectures, discussions, and other class activities and assigned readings and projects will include topics such as the history and nature of the giftedness construct; theories of intelligence and creativity and their relationship to conceptions of giftedness; types of giftedness; the diversity of gifted individuals and their personal and educational needs; the role of identification in the education and development of gifted children and youth; and purposes and perspectives in gifted education.

CUI 4401 Psychological Aspects of Giftedness (3 Credits)

The psychological development of gifted children is examined through a study of current theories, models, research, and case histories. Understanding of psychological development creates a foundation for applications and practices that nurture the psycho-social-emotional development of gifted individuals. Specific topics include the psychological nature and needs of the gifted; perfectionism, stress, and underachievement; special issues for gifted boys and gifted girls; highly gifted; and pertinent theories of psychological development. Emphasis is placed on synthesis of theories and application to specific situations.

CUI 4402 Curriculum for Gifted Learners (3 Credits)

This course is designed to provide participants with an understanding of the conceptual foundations in the design and development of curriculum for gifted and talented students. Includes theories, models and processes for curriculum modification and curriculum design; strategies for adapting educational content, process, product, and learning environment based on the educational characteristics and needs of gifted learners; and curriculum design and development approaches that are effective in the intellectual and personal growth of gifted and talented learners. Content in this course is aligned with appropriate instructional strategies and techniques recommended for use with gifted and talented learners. Lectures, discussions, class activities, assigned reading and projects include topics such as a general overview of curricular principles and perspectives; critical analysis of general curriculum; issues of diversity in curriculum development and modification including cultural congruence; recommended models of curriculum development for gifted and talented learners; and national trends in gifted education.

CUI 4403 Instructional Strategies for Gifted Learners (3 Credits)

This course provides a basic understanding of how to adapt curriculum for gifted learners through various instructional strategies. Strategies studied include: acceleration, enrichment, differentiation, compacting, grouping, independent study, and service learning. By selecting instructional strategies based on assessed learner needs, educators can reach many types of gifted learners in their classrooms including gifted students of poverty and gifted learners of cultural and ethnic diversity. The objectives of this class are that participants: know about and be able to define instructional strategies that meet assessed academic and affective needs of gifted learners and be able to adapt curriculum for gifted learners using learned instructional strategies.

CUI 4404 Twice-Exceptional Students (3 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the various areas of exceptionalities typically encountered with gifted students and to provide classroom related techniques to assist the teacher in identifying and working with twice-exceptional children in an effective manner. Environmental, behavioral, motivational, emotional and educational needs are addressed. Legal responsibilities, parent communication and staff development will be emphasized.

CUI 4405 Practicum in Gifted Education (1-3 Credits)

Students wishing to earn credit for the Practicum in Gifted Education must complete an experience in three of the five areas (Teaching, Assessment, Administration, Research, or Policy). Students must submit a Practicum Proposal outlining the intended practicum experiences. This Proposal must be approved by the practicum faculty supervisor when the practicum experiences are begun.

CUI 4407 Current Issues in Gifted Education: Identification (3 Credits)

This course focuses on the screening and selecting of gifted and talented students. It is designed for practicing professionals - teachers, counselors, psychologists, and administrators - who must make decisions about the identification and serving of gifted and talented students. Course uses multiple assessments, both quantitative and qualitative, to identify gifted students within an increasingly diverse population (including culturally- and ethically-diverse, high-potential, linguistically-different students with unique affective needs as well as high-potential economically-disadvantaged students). Students will use data to diagnose educational needs, prescribe appropriate educational strategies and to incorporate appropriate identification strategies for identifying gifted and talented students. Legal responsibilities and parent communication as well as staff development are emphasized. Students are required to develop an identification model based on relevant theory and current practices to be used in their particular setting.

CUI 4408 Creativity: Theory & Practice (3 Credits)

The essence of innovation is creativity, in thought, process and outcome. Classic and current theories provide a foundation for analysis of the concept of creativity. This course is designed to provide participants with an understanding of 1) the conceptual foundations and definitions of creativity; 2) how intelligence, creativity, and non-intellective factors are related to the constructs of giftedness; 3) documented brain research underlying exceptional cognition and/or creativity; 4) principles and issues in the identification and appropriate programming for creative individuals; and 5) the multiple perspectives and manifestations of creativity. Salon discussion groups, lectures, class activities and assigned readings and projects focu on the history and nature of the construct of creativity, theories of creativity, the role of innovation and transformation, assessment and measurement tools, environmental support of the creative process and creativity, and teaching and learning applications.

CUI 4410 Prog Dev/Ldrshp/Comm Gifted Ed (3 Credits)

This course emphasizes the concepts and practices involved in development and management of school- and district-based programs for the special education of gifted and talented children and youth. The course leads to in-depth understanding of program components and systems, program planning and evaluation, program leadership, advocacy in gifted education, and communications. In addition, emphasis is placed on planning and development of staff development in relation to gifted children. This course includes extensive in-class discussion and field applications.

CUI 4411 Wkshp: Gifted & Talented Educ (2-3 Credits)

This course is designed to provide participants with an overview of the education of gifted and talented students. Areas of focus within the course include definitions of gifted and talented students, characteristics, educational and psycho/social needs, common identification methods and concepts and common practices in curriculum and instructional differentiation.

CUI 4417 Independent Study: Gifted Educ (1-3 Credits)

CUI 4450 Education and Psychology of Exceptional Children (3 Credits)

Characteristics of students with moderate needs and state criteria used to determine eligibility for special education population.

CUI 4451 Teaching the Exceptional Child (3 Credits)

This course provides a broad overview of the field of exceptionality and special education. Included are discussions of current issues and controversies in the field, characteristics, classification, diagnosis, and educational interventions for early childhood and school-aged children with high-incidence and low-incidence disabilities who have exceptional education needs. This course also explores the characteristics of students with various disabilities, the history of Special Education, The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and its current implications, the Response to Intervention Model (Rtl) and the Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Prerequisite: CUI 4450.

CUI 4452 Low Incidence Disabilities and Behavior Intervention (3 Credits)

This course reviews a wide range of neurodevelopmental disorders and low-incidence disabilities including fragile X syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, along with syndromes associated with chromosomal deletions. Implications for assessment and intervention are outlined including diagnostic criteria, prevalence and treatment. Research on identification and treatment including state of the art interventions and assistive technology are addressed. This class also addresses theories, research, effective practices, and background information needed to implement successful behavior intervention programs for whole classroom management and for students identified with behavioral needs. Preerquisites: TEP 4010 and CUI 4451.

CUI 4453 Curriculum Adaptations and Assessments for Children with Disabilities (3 Credits)

This course applies theories, research, effective practices, and background information for assessment for students with disabilities, monitoring student academic progress, and transition planning for students exiting K-12 schools.

CUI 4455 Assessment of Students with Special Needs (3 Credits)

Theories, research, effective practices and background information needed to develop, implement, analyze, and apply assessment data for mild/moderate-needs students.

CUI 4457 Behavior Intervention (3 Credits)

Theories, research, effective practices, and background information needed to implement successful behavior intervention programs for mild/moderate-needs students.

CUI 4459 Curriculum, Collaboration, and Transitions in K-12 Schools (3 Credits)

Knowledge, techniques to develop independent skills for K-12 moderate/mild-needs students and transitions across grade levels.

CUI 4500 Elementary Literacy: Theory and Practice I (1-3 Credits)

This course provides an introduction and overview to the many components that make up a quality balanced literacy program. During the course students will analyze current research and theory in reading and writing instruction. This course will use students' classroom placements to create a foundational understanding on which to build solid literacy philosophy as well as instructional ideas and strategies.

CUI 4501 Elementary Literacy: Theroy and Practice II (1-3 Credits)

This course is an extension of Elementary Literacy I and concentrates on the continued development of theories and practical strategies for teaching literacy in diverse classrooms. This course will supply K-6 teachers with the skills to assess student abilities, select appropriate instructional strategies, and design effective instructional programs that lead to increased listening, speaking, reading and writing achievement of all children.

CUI 4502 Elementary Science and Social Studies Methods for Cultural Linguistic Diversity (3-4 Credits)

This course will enable students to develop a deeper understanding of science and social studies content and curriculum in the elementary classroom. Students will explore a range of instructional materials and develop teaching strategies with the guidance of state content standards and research on effective classroom instruction for culturally and linguistically diverse students. This course will revolve around discussion of key questions in the following eight areas: The Role of Social Studies and Science; Instruction; Standards; Content Knowledge; Curriculum Integration; Technology; Culturally Responsive Pedagogy; Sheltered Instruction.

CUI 4503 Elementary Math Methods for Cultural Linguistic Diversity (3,4 Credits)

This course will prepare pre-service elementary teachers to engage students in mathematical learning activities guided by Colorado State Mathematics Content Standards and research. Pre-service teachers will develop an understanding of how students in the elementary grades construct meaning through active engagement in purposeful activities. In addition, students will develop an understanding of infusing best practice for culturally and linguistically diverse students into the math curriculum in terms of culturally relevant pedagogy and sheltered instruction. This course will revolve around the discussion of key questions in the following seven areas: Content Standards; Instruction; Assessment; Differentiated Instruction; Technology; Culturally Responsive Pedagogy; and Sheltered Instruction.

CUI 4504 Elementary Math, Science, and Social Studies Methods Cultural Linguistic Diversity (3 Credits)

This course prepares students to develop a deeper understanding of math, science, and social studies content and curriculum in the elementary classroom as guided by Colorado Model Content Standards and research on effective sheltered content instruction for culturally and linguistically diverse students, and differentiated instruction for diverse learners.

CUI 4505 Mathematics for Secondary Teachers (2,3 Credits)

In this class, prospective secondary teachers study fundamental mathematical ideas typically taught at the secondary level. Students learn about the five fraction sub-constructs and solve problems in all five areas. In addition, students study ideas that are fundamental to understand algebra. For instance, students learn how to build rules to represent functions. Finally, students learn about inquiry-based approached to teaching that they can use in their secondary classrooms with their students.

CUI 4506 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I (2,3 Credits)

In this class, prospective elementary school teachers experience an in-depth look at the representations of rational numbers, including base-ten and decimal numbers, integers, fractions, and arithmetic operations on these sets. Problem solving is emphasized throughout. Students also learn about inquiry-based approaches to teaching that they can use in their classrooms with their students.

CUI 4507 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II (3 Credits)

In this class, prospective elementary school teachers study fundamental mathematical ideas typically taught in grades 5-8. Students learn about visualization and its importance in geometry. Students study geometric shapes and solve a variety of problems involving geometric shapes. In addition, students learn some fundamental ideas of measurement and study length, area, volume, dimension, error and precision. Students also solve problems involving area, learn about solid shapes, and solve volume and surface area problems. Finally, students learn about inquiry-based approaches to teaching that they can use in their classrooms with their students. Prerequisite: CUI 4506.

CUI 4508 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers III (3 Credits)

In this class, prospective elementary school teachers study fundamental mathematical ideas typically taught in grades 5-8. Students learn about visualization and its importance in geometry. Students study geometric shapes and solve a variety of problems involving geometric shapes. In addition, students learn some fundamental ideas of measurement and study length, area, volume, dimension, error and precision. Students also solve problems involving area, learn about solid shapes, and solve volume and surface area problems. Finally, students learn about inquiry-based approaches to teaching that they can use in their classrooms with their students. Prerequisites: CUI 4506.

CUI 4509 Mathematics for Middle School Teachers (3 Credits)

Mathematics education for middle school teachers. Meets Common Core State Standards.

CUI 4510 Adolescent Literacy (3 Credits)

This course provides secondary teacher candidates an understanding of the essential elements of adolescent literacy. Students learn how literacy develops in reading, writing, and oral language and will be able to relate this information to teaching reading and writing in all content areas for both middle school and high school students.

CUI 4511 Secondary Literacy: Reading and Writing Across Content Areas (1-6 Credits)

Students learn how literacy develops in reading, writing, and oral language and will be able to relate this information to teaching reading and writing in all content areas for both middle school and high school students. This course addresses specific strategies for assessing adolescent's literacy skills/abilities and design appropriate literacy instruction in all content areas.

CUI 4512 High School Mathematics from an Advanced Perspective (3 Credits)

High School mathematics education. Meets Common Core State Standards.

CUI 4520 Urban Education I: Diversity and Social Justice (1 Credit)

This class will address questions about multicultural and social diversity in the classrooms, curricular and pedagogical theories and practices, access and equity, and the politics of education.

CUI 4521 Urban Education II: School, Student, Family and Community Influences on Student Learning (2-4 Credits)

This course will consider how teachers are able to foster meaningful connections between the educational goals of the schools and the personal and cultural experiences of young people. Students will study the child in relation to family, school, and community, as well as the relationships between teacher and pupil. We will emphasize the cultural complexity of an urban society and pay special attention to ways that curriculum, language, and literacy affect school success.

CUI 4522 Urban Education III: Sources of Pressures and Possibilities in High Poverty Schools (2,3 Credits)

This course will focus on the sources of problems in high poverty schools and examine educational reform efforts that attempt to transform high poverty schools and classrooms.

CUI 4527 Supporting English Language Learners and Students with Special Needs Across Content Areas (3 Credits)

This course evaluates similarities and differences in theory, methods, approaches, and techniques in meeting the needs of diverse learners including English Language Learners, special needs, and/or gifted. Differentiated instruction, Sheltered instruction, and Response to Intervention (RTI) are key methodologies in meeting needs of diverse learners.

CUI 4529 Foundations of Education for Linguistically Diverse Learners (3 Credits)

This course will examine the essential knowledge and orientations educators must possess to effectively meet the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) learners through the analysis of historical, political, ethical, and legal foundations of language education in the United States. This course will explore the immigrant experience and the experience of CLD learners in schools in order to understand how the psychosocial aspects of the immigrant experience can impact second language learning.

CUI 4530 Second Language Acquisition (1-3 Credits)

CUI 4531 Supporting English Language Learners Across the Curriculum (3,4 Credits)

This course will evaluate methods, approaches, and techniques in language teaching. This course will also explore classroom strategies and practices for content-area instruction through sheltered instruction, and socio-cultural context of second language acquisition in U. S. public schools including how teachers can support bilingualism, multilingualism, biculturalism, and multiculturalism in the mainstream classroom. Furthermore, this course will explore the needs of special education and gifted culturally and linguistically diverse learners.

CUI 4532 Culturally Responsive Pedagogy (3,4 Credits)

This course examines the intricate web of variables that interact in the effort to create culturally responsive pedagogy. It examines the need and establishes a definition for culturally responsive pedagogy; and includes an examination of one's conception of self and "others;" conception of social relations; and conception of knowledge teaching and learning in a culturally diverse context. Furthermore, it cultivates the practice of culturally responsive teaching as well as explores the reality of implementing cultural responsive pedagogy in an era of standardization. In sum, this course helps practicing teachers acquire the dispositions, cultural knowledge, and competencies to adapt their curriculum and instructional skills for culturally responsive classroom practice.

CUI 4533 Research Issues in the Education of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners (3,4 Credits)

In this course, students will act as teacher-researchers in order to explore issues that impact the achievement of culturally and linguistically diverse learners. This course will allow students to use functional research tools that can inform practice and lead to better teaching and learning in urban schools, and access resources to enable educators to define and address challenges in their teaching. More importantly, classrooms will become sites for educational reform in that, essentially, educators will act as advocates for change.

CUI 4534 Language Teaching Lab (1 Credit)

This course will critically examine elements of best practice for culturally and linguistically diverse learners through formal observations of three exemplary teachers and evaluate their classroom practices, instructional strategies, assessment practices, and communication strategies. This course will apply our conceptual knowledge of first and second language acquisition and our knowledge of the foundations of the English language to critically analyze each classroom context.

CUI 4535 Language in Society and Schools (3,4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the discipline of sociolinguistics, including ways language and society impact one another, and how this interaction is reflected in schools. The focus of this course will be on current sociolinguistic theory and research on language variation and its social, political, and cultural significance. Topics include bilingualism and multilingualism in society; formal and informal types of language discourse; language and dialect; cross-cultural communication; and ways language both reflects and creates such constructs as power, culture, gender, ethnicity, and social class. In addition, this course will explore language ideology and language policy and planning.

CUI 4536 Linguistic and Cultural Issues in Linking Assessment and Instruction (3-4 Credits)

This course expands the educators' knowledge of the connection between data-based instruction and assessment. Educators assess student learning by utilizing strategies that provide continuous feedback on the effectiveness of instruction. Educators learn informal and formal assessment practices that promote student learning and achievement. Educators develop knowledge and understanding of initial assessment of culturally and linguistically diverse learners' skills and abilities in order to provide appropriate placement and instruction. Educators utilize native language tests to promote adequate placement/transition of students. This course also helps educators develop a framework to analyze and develop culturally responsive assessment practices in order to improve student achievement. Finally, this course integrates Response to Intervention (RTI) strategies to improve student assessment.

CUI 4537 Seminar & Practicum in LDE (1-6 Credits)

This course is to provide students with the opportunity to merge theory and practice in real classroom situations. This course is organized around two main components. The seminar consists primarily of discussions on connections between theory and practice. The practicum centers on educators' own respective teaching contexts. Students in this course are required to "log" 200 hours of direct teaching with linguistically diverse learners. Under the supervision of a practicum advisor, students will be evaluated for evidence of mastery of LDES standards.

CUI 4538 Language, Literacy & Culture (3,4 Credits)

Attaining age-appropriate English literacy skills poses many challenges to culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) learners. Educators must therefore develop proficiency in effective literacy instruction for CLD learners. Effective literacy instruction includes a repertoire of teaching practices designed to scaffold literacy and language across the content areas, and culturally relevant curriculum as an essential component to support the achievement of CLD learners. This course will focus on helping educators gain the necessary skills, orientations, and competencies to advance the literacy of CLD learners through linguistic and cultural knowledge.

CUI 4540 Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Theroy and Practice I (1-3 Credits)

This is the first quarter of an academic year-long weekly seminar to foster reflective, research-based classroom practice. Teacher candidates will deepen their understanding of teaching and learning in contemporary schools through a guided teaching apprenticeship with a trained mentor teacher, focused observations of a myriad of classrooms, readings, interviews, discussions, critical writing, and presentations.

CUI 4541 Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice II (1-4 Credits)

This is the second quarter of an academic year-long weekly seminar to foster reflective, research-based classroom practice. Teacher candidates will deepen their understanding of teaching and learning in contemporary schools through a guided teaching apprenticeship with a trained mentor teacher, focused observations of a myriad of classrooms, readings, interviews, discussions, critical writing, and presentations.

CUI 4542 Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Theory and Practice III (1-4 Credits)

This is the third and final quarter of an academic year-long weekly seminar to foster reflective, research-based classroom practice. Teacher candidates will deepen their understanding of teaching and learning in contemporary schools through a guided teaching apprenticeship with a trained mentor teacher, focused observations of a myriad of classrooms, readings, interviews, discussions, critical writing, and presentations.

CUI 4543 Educational Psychology: Learning and Development (1-3 Credits)

This course focuses on theories of learning and development, including behaviorism, cognition in context, and sociocultural perspectives, among others, as well as practical application of those theories. Issues of classroom management and student motivation are explored within the context of these theories.

CUI 4544 Ed Psych: Exceptional Child (1-3 Credits)

The focus of this course is on educating children and adolescents with special needs in the general education classroom. The intent is to enable future educators to better serve the needs of these children in their classrooms. Topics such as the special education process, information on specific disabilities, accommodations and modifications, behavior issues, mental health, and communicating with parents will be addressed.

CUI 4545 Perspectives on American Education I (1-3 Credits)

We expect that students will complete this 2-quarter-long class with an appreciation for and commitment to critical reflection, collegiality, ongoing professional growth, and educational reform. Through readings, reflective writing and activities, role-plays, case discussions, community-based field work, visits to a myriad of schools and classrooms, and guest presentations, we expect students to recognize and wrestle with the complexity that characterizes teaching in American society. Four central and recurring themes for this course include: democratic foundations of public schools, apprenticeship of observation, teaching as vocation, and the moral dimensions of teaching.

CUI 4546 Perspectives on American Education II (2 Credits)

We expect the students will complete this 2-quarter-long class with an appreciation for and commitment to critical reflection, collegiality, ongoing professional growth, and educational reform. Through readings, reflective writing and activities, role-plays, case discussions, community-based field work, visits to a myriad of schools and classrooms, and guest presentations, we expect students to recognize and wrestle with the complexity that characterizes teaching in American society. Four central and recurring themes for this course include: democratic foundations of public schools, apprenticeship of observation, teaching as vocation, and the moral dimensions of teaching.

CUI 4600 History and Philosophy in Mathematics Education (3 Credits)

Introduction to the effective integration of history and philosophy of mathematics into mathematics education.

CUI 4610 Learning and Teaching of Mathematics (3 Credits)

Introduction to foundational research literature on learning and teaching in mathematics education.

CUI 4620 Research on Diversity, Equity, and Social Justice in Mathematics Education (3 Credits)

Introduction to research related to issues of diversity, equity, and social justice in P-16 mathematics curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

CUI 4630 Learning Mathematics: Early Childhood (3 Credits)

Development of theories, materials, and methods used to teach mathematics in preschool to grade two and develop abilities in their use.

CUI 4640 Improving Elementary Math Instruction (3 Credits)

Teacher development of elementary mathematical content, pedagogy, curriculum, attitudes and power, and collaboration.

CUI 4700 Foundations of Education: Cognitive Theory I (3 Credits)

Introduction to cognitive research in education. Includes theories and research regarding the implementation of these theories in specific curricula.

CUI 4710 Foundations of Education: Cognitive Theory II (3 Credits)

Second course in cognitive research in education. Includes theories and research regarding the implementation of these theories in specific curricula. Prerequisite: CUI 4700.

CUI 4720 Discourse in the Mathematics Classroom (3 Credits)

The study of discourse as it relates to mathematics teaching and student learning.

CUI 4730 Mathematics and Instructional Technology (3 Credits)

Introduction to the principles of effective use of technology in mathematics instruction.

CUI 4740 Policy and Mathematics Education (3 Credits)

Introduction to educational politics and how those policies have influenced and continue to influence mathematics education.

CUI 4790 Seminar on Race in Mathematics Education (3 Credits)

Seminar course for advanced doctoral students on issues of race and mathematics education in the US.

CUI 4870 Education in International Settings (3 Credits)

Objectives of this course include: viewing education in the 21st century as cross-cultural and international; examining the role of schooling in shaping national identity and citizenship in nation-states around the globe; and identifying promising practices and exemplary curriculum material for teaching cross-cultural perspectives and world awareness.

CUI 4991 MA Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

CUI 4992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

CUI 4995 Research - M.A. Thesis (1-10 Credits)

CUI 5980 Research as Problem Analysis (3 Credits)

This course is the first of three culminating research courses for students in the Ed.D. in Curriculum and Instruction. This course is designed to guide candidates through the doctoral proposal process and introduce the initial stages of data collection and analysis.

CUI 5981 Research as Intervention (3 Credits)

This course is the second of three culminating research courses for students in the Ed.D. in Curriculum and Instruction and is designed to help candidates finish collecting their data and analyze their data. This course will also introduce and develop the evaluation or analysis section of the doctoral paper and the beginning steps of the dissemination of the research project.

CUI 5982 Applied Research (4 Credits)

This course is the final of three culminating research courses for students in the Ed.D. in Curriculum and Instruction and is designed to help candidates disseminate their project, reflect on their project, and defend their project. This course is specifically focused on writing the quasi-practical section of the doctoral paper and the dissemination of the research project to the community partner.

CUI 5991 PhD Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

CUI 5992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

CUI 5994 Seminar in Dissertation Organization and Research (1-5 Credits)

Individualized assistance in developing the dissertation topic, issue, problem; guidance in preparation for proposal orals and application to the Institution Review Board (IRB), direction for dissertation chapter organization, writing and completion. This seminar is targeted for the student who needs support in completing the dissertation.

CUI 5995 Dissertation Research (1-10 Credits)

Teacher Ed Prep Courses

TEP 4010 Education and Psychology with Special Children (2-4 Credits)

This course serves as the foundation for understanding children with special needs and the laws and policies that support them. Each teacher needs to be responsive to the needs and experiences children bring to the classroom, including those based on culture, community, ethnicity, economics, linguistics, and innate learning abilities. This course covers the foundations for learning exceptionalities and conditions that affect the rate and extend of student learning, and will provide strategies for adapting instruction for all learners. This cousre introduces the classroom teacher's role in implementing an IEP and in working with families. Characteristics of students with various disabilities, the history of Special Education, The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and its current implications, the Response to Intervention Model (RtI) and the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) are also addressed.

TEP 4561 Elementary Curriculum I (4-6 Credits)

Focuses on teaching and learning in the K-6 classroom and prepares teachers to design and implement effective classroom instruction. Frequently covered topics include: standards-based instruction, approaches to assessment, effective teaching strategies, sound lesson/unit planning, interdisciplinary instruction, individualizing instruction, technology, multicultural curriculum. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Teacher Education Program.

TEP 4562 Elementary Curriculum II (4-6 Credits)

Continuation of TEP 4561. Both must be completed for students planning to teach in elementary schools. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Teacher Education Program.

TEP 4581 Elementary Music Methods (3-6 Credits)

Prepares K-12 music teachers to design and implement effective instruction in the elementary school music classroom. Course introduces full array of sound teaching and assessment strategies for all aspects of music. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Teacher Education Program.

TEP 4582 Secondary Music Methods (3-4 Credits)

Prepares K-12 music teachers to design and implement effective instruction in the secondary school music classroom. Course introduces full array of sound teaching and assessment strategies for all aspects of music instruction. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Teacher Education Program.

TEP 4590 Literacy Instruction I (3,4 Credits)

Introduces developmental continuum for literacy. Prepares to assess students' abilities, to select appropriate instructional strategies and to design effective instructional programs leading to increased listening, speaking, reading and writing competencies for all children. At the elementary level, focuses on balanced approach to literacy instruction. At the secondary level, emphasizes reading and writing in the content areas and assistance of the struggling reader/writer. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Teacher Education Program.

TEP 4591 Literacy Instruction II (3-4 Credits)

Introduces developmental continuum for literacy. Prepares to assess students' abilities, to select appropriate instructional strategies and to design effective instructional programs leading to increased listening, speaking, reading and writing competencies for all children. At the elementary level, focuses on balanced approach to literacy instruction. At the secondary level, emphasizes reading and writing in the content areas and assistance of the struggling reader/writer. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Teacher Education Program and TEP 4590: Literacy Instruction I.

TEP 4600 Introduction to Secondary Methods (3-6 Credits)

Provides general introduction to principles of effective secondary instruction curriculum design and assessment. Frequently covered topics include: design of classroom environments, comparison of different instructional practices, purposes for and approaches to assessment, comparison of middle and high school philosophies, introduction to instructional unit plan development, and theories of instructional approach and design. Course lays a foundation for more specialized subject-matter methods courses. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Teacher Education Program.

TEP 4610 English in Secondary School (3-5 Credits)

Trends and developments in teaching English Language Arts. Frequently covered topics include: standards-based instruction, technology, subject-matter specific approaches to assessment, instruction and curriculum design. Course builds upon foundation laid in Introduction to Secondary Methods. Prerequisite: enrollment in Teacher Education Program.

TEP 4620 Social Science in Secondary School (3-5 Credits)

Trends and developments in teaching Social Science. Frequently covered topics include: standards-based instruction, technology, subject-matter specific approaches to assessment, instruction and curriculum design. Course builds upon foundation laid in Introduction to Secondary Methods. Prerequisite: enrollment in Teacher Education Program.

TEP 4630 Science in Secondary School (3-5 Credits)

Trends and developments in teaching science. Frequently covered topics include: standards-based instruction, technology, subject-matter specific approaches to assessment, instruction and curriculum design. Course builds upon foundation laid in Introduction to Secondary Methods. Prerequisite: enrollment in Teacher Education Program.

TEP 4640 Math in Secondary School (3-5 Credits)

Trends and developments in teaching math. Frequently covered topics include: standards-based instruction, technology, subject-matter specific approaches to assessment, instruction and curriculum design. Course builds upon foundation laid in Introduction to Secondary Methods. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Teacher Education Program.

TEP 4650 Foreign Language Methods in K-12 Schools (3-5 Credits)

Trends and developments in teaching foreign languages in K-12. Course content includes methods and materials of standards-based instruction, classroom and instructional management, assessment strategies, designing lessons using multiple intelligence and differentiated instruction, using technology in instruction, and integration of other content areas in teaching foreign language. Prerequisite: enrollment in Teacher Education Program.

TEP 4690 Field Experience (1-12 Credits)

Involves field experiences, including full-day teaching for 12 weeks in elementary or secondary school classroom and regularly scheduled seminar discussions with supervisor. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Teacher Education Program.

TEP 4781 Elementary Art Methods (3-6 Credits)

Prepares K-12 art teachers to design and implement effective instruction in elementary school classrooms. Course introduces full array of sound teaching and assessment strategies for all aspects of art. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Teacher Education Program.

TEP 4782 Secondary Art Methods (3-4 Credits)

Prepares K-12 art teachers to design and implement effective instruction in secondary school classrooms. Course introduces full array of sound teaching and assessment strategies for all aspects of art. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Teacher Education Program.

TEP 4991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

TEP 4992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

TEP 4995 Independent Research (1-10 Credits)

Faculty

Cynthia Hazel, Professor and Department Chair, PhD, University of Northern Colorado

Douglas Clements, Professor, PhD, University at Buffalo - State University of New York

Norma Hafenstein, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Denver

Richard Kitchen, Professor, PhD, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Janet Lear, Assistant Professor of the Practice of Education Leadership, University of California-Berkeley

Jessica Lerner, Assisistant Professor of the Practice of Education Leadership, EdS, University of Colorado at Denver

Paul Michalec, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Colorado Boulder

Gloria Miller, Professor, PhD, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Tara Raines, Assistant Professor, PhD, Georgia State University

Karen Riley, Associate Professor/Dean, PhD, University of Denver

Maria Salazar, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Colorado Boulder

Julie Sarama, Professor, PhD, University at Buffalo - State University of New York

Devadrita Talapatra, Assistant Professor, PhD, Georgia State University

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