2016-2017 Undergraduate Bulletin

Psychology (PSYC)

 

Courses

PSYC 1001 Foundations of Psychological Science (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of mind and behavior. It includes topics such as the biological basis of behavior, the developmental transitions from infancy through old age, the principles underlying perception, learning and memory, and the ways in which behavior is affected by its physical, social, and cultural context. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PSYC 1700 Topics in Psychology (4 Credits)

PSYC 1701 Topics in Psychology (4 Credits)

PSYC 1702 Topics in Psychology (4 Credits)

PSYC 1703 Topics in Psychology (4 Credits)

PSYC 1704 Topics in Psychology (4 Credits)

PSYC 1992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

PSYC 2031 Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience (4 Credits)

The goal of this course is to examine the relations between brain and behavior to better understand how complex behavior is mediated by the brain. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2040 Cognition and Learning (4 Credits)

Overview of behavioristic and cognitive science approaches to learning process; includes conditioning and human information processing. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2070 Child and Lifespan Development (4 Credits)

This course explores physical, cognitive, social and emotional development across the lifespan, from the prenatal period through death. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2090 Human Sexuality (4 Credits)

Physiological, behavioral and social aspects of human behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2109 Depression (4 Credits)

Phenomenology of depression, as expressed in literature and as experienced ourselves; demographics of sufferers; psychological theories that attempt to explain its etiology and guide its treatment. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2112 Reseach Apprenticeship (1-5 Credits)

Through this course, students receive course credit for an internship in which they work as a research assistance. Permission of instructor required.

PSYC 2300 Introduction to Statistics (4 Credits)

Elementary statistical methods in psychology and education. Required for all students, but especially important for students planning graduate work in psychology. Recommended: knowledge of basic algebra. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2500 Abnormal Psychology (4 Credits)

Nature, causes, treatment and prevention of patterns of abnormal behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2510 Personality (4 Credits)

Structure and development of human personality, primary emphasis on psychodynamic conceptual formulations. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2520 Introduction to Clinical Psychology (4 Credits)

Eclectic survey of clinical roles, theory and research; function and dilemmas of clinical psychologists. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2530 Child Psychopathology (4 Credits)

Child Psychopathology surveys the latest theory and research in the field of developmental psychopathology, which is the study of abnormal behavior from a developmental perspective. Students learn about what the emotional and behavioral disorders of childhood and adolescence are, what causes them, and how they are treated. Additionally, the course covers how we judge what is considered to be abnormal or atypical, how we classify abnormal or atypical behavior, and how we acquire knowledge about developmental psychopathology. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2540 The Psychology of Couples Relationships: From Dating to Mating and Beyond (4 Credits)

The primary complaints of couples in therapy include: "We can't communication." "We fight too much." "We have grown apart and have no sex." "He/she cheats on me and /or is aggressive." We cover research on these issues, as well as how to help couples select great mates and have a lifetime loving healthy relationship. Throughout the course we cover overarching themes including the influence of popular culture (listening to music, watching movie clips) diversity in relationships (e.g., Same-sex Marriage). Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2700 Topics in Psychology (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2701 Topics in Psychology (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2702 Topics in Psychology (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2703 Topics in Psychology (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2704 Topics in Psychology (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2710 Gender Development: Biological, Cognitive and Social Perspectives (2 Credits)

This course is designed to provide a stimulating environment in which all students participate actively to analyze critically and discuss research on gender development. The course focuses on empirically supported biological, cognitive and social perspectives on gender development. It is also designed to assist students to develop critical analysis skills, which are necessary for both producing and consuming research.

PSYC 2740 Social Psychology (4 Credits)

Concepts, data and principles regarding social influences on human behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2751 Junior Honors Research Seminar (1-4 Credits)

First course in a two-year sequence. Research, design and methodology to facilitate a senior research thesis. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and acceptance to psychology distinction program.

PSYC 2752 Junior Honors Research Seminar (1-4 Credits)

Second course in a two-year sequence. Research, design and methodology to facilitate a senior research thesis. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and acceptance to psychology distinction program.

PSYC 2760 Field Experiences in Learning & Applied Behavior Analysis (4 Credits)

Introduction to the application of learning principles and applied behavior analysis. Students obtain first-hand experiences working in a community setting. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

PSYC 3020 Adolescence (4 Credits)

Development, behavior, special problems, and characteristics of early and late adolescence. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001, PSYC 2070 or PSYC 2050 or PSYC 2051; must be a Psychology major/minor with sophomore standing.

PSYC 3029 Imaging the Mind (4 Credits)

Imaging Cognition is an introductory course to the basic theory and data analysis techniques used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). It will cover basic brain anatomy, the basic physics of MRI, experimental design, data processing and the issues associated with data processing, and interpretation of fMRI data. Students in this course will receive hands-on experience in processing a data set from start to finish. They will apply different image preprocessing techniques, statistical design parameters, and statistical models to determine how these factors influence the outcome of the data and how these factors influence the interpretation of that data. In this manner, each student will be exposed individually to the decision issues and interpretation pitfalls involved in fMRI data analysis. In class, students will use the smart-to- the-seat classroom. Cross listed with PSYC 4255. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2031, must be a major or minor in psychology, must have at least sophomore standing.

PSYC 3032 Introduction to Neural Networks (4 Credits)

Introduction to basic principles and computational methods in artificial neural network modeling; neural models of cognitive and psychological processes examined and evaluated. Cross listed with PSYC 4254. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001, must be a major or minor in psychology, must have at least sophomore standing.

PSYC 3035 Seminar: Cognitive Neuroscience (2 Credits)

This seminar is for students in the cognitive neuroscience program. The goal of the seminar is to provide an opportunity for junior- and senior-level cognitive neuroscience majors to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in other courses to current cutting-edge topics in the field. Prerequisite: cognitive neuroscience concentration.

PSYC 3045 The Developing Brain (4 Credits)

This course presents an overview of current research and methods in the field of developmental cognitive/affective/social neuroscience. The course examines what the brain tells us about development and what development tells us about the brain. Topics include sensitive periods for neuroplasticity, pediatric neuroimaging methods, attention, language, affective and social development. Cross-listed with PSYC 4045. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001; PSYC 2031 and PSYC 2070; major/minor in psychology; junior standing.

PSYC 3050 Research Methods (4 Credits)

Survey of research methods and research designs in psychology used to study behavior. Required for all students, especially those planning graduate work in psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001, PSYC 2300, and INFO 1020.

PSYC 3055 The Neuroscience and Psychology of Parenthood and Parent-Child Relationships (4 Credits)

This course explores the theory, research and issues relevant to parenthood and parent-child relationships. The course overviews the evolutionary, neurobiological, and psychological perspective of parent-child relationships with a focus on the understanding of recent advances in neuroscience research. Topics include neuroplasticity of parental brain, maternal vs. paternal biology for parenting, and social and biological determinants of parent-child relationships. Emphasis is placed on discussion of current research, evaluation of the findings, and proposals and ideas of new research in the field. The goal is not to memorize facts but rather to learn to think like a developmental cognitive/social neuroscientist. Cross-listed with course PSYC 4055. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2031; major/minor in psychology; junior standing.

PSYC 3060 Eating Disorders (4 Credits)

Overview of etiology, clinical presentation, prevention and treatment of eating disorders. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2500, must be a major or minor in psychology, must have at least sophomore standing.

PSYC 3080 Drugs and Behavior (4 Credits)

Nature of licit and illicit drugs; their short- and long-term biological and psychological effects. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2031, must be a major or minor in psychology, must have at least sophomore standing.

PSYC 3090 Infancy and Early Childhood (4 Credits)

The objective of this course is to introduce the study of early development focusing on the prenatal and infant periods. This course considers the exciting changines that take place during pregnancy for both mom and fetus. This course considers biological, cognitive, social, and physical development. This course is part of the field of Developmental Science. The prominent theories and research in the filed are considered. Questions developmental psychologists currently and historically study and the research they conduct to help answer these questions are explored. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2070 or PSYC 2050 or PSYC 2051. Must be either a major or minor in psychology. Must at least have sophomore standing.

PSYC 3109 Depression (4 Credits)

This course extends knowledge acquired in PSYC 1001 and in PSYC 2500 to the in-depth study of mood disorders (unipolar and bipolar depression) across the lifespan. It covers in depth various topics, including description and classification of mood disorders, the various causes of these emotional disturbances (e.g., psychosocial, biological, genetic), and treatments of these disorders across the lifespan. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2500, must be a major or minor in psychology, must have at least sophomore standing.

PSYC 3112 Advanced Research Apprenticeship (1-5 Credits)

This course provides an opportunity for students who have already completed 10 hours of PSYC 2112 research apprenticeship to gain advanced experience in a current research laboratory in psychology. Prerequisites: 10 hours of PSYC 2112, 40 credit hours in psychology, and permission of instructor.

PSYC 3120 The Science of Love (4 Credits)

This course explores the theory, research and issues relevant to love in parent-child and romantic relationships. Prerequisites: a minimum of 12 credit hours in psychology courses and Junior or Senior standing.

PSYC 3130 Couples Therapy and Relationship Education: Current Status and Future Directions (4 Credits)

There are two major approaches to helping couples achieve happy and healthy relationships over time: Couples Therapy and Couples Relationship Education. Whereas therapy helps distressed couples improve an unhappy relationship, relationship education serves as a preventative intervention designed to help happy couples protect and preserve their happiness. This course covers the major research-based approaches to couples therapy, including Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Integrative-Behavioral Couples Therapy and Emotional-Focused Couples Therapy. In addition, the class covers the major research-based approaches to couples relationship education, including PREP, CouplesCare, and Relationship Education. The class also focuses on both common and distinctive challenges that couples face, including: long-distance relationships, having a child, overseas deployments for military couples, psychological issues, substance abuse, medical issues, infidelity, aggression, dealing with social media and aging. Finally, the class covers issues related to diversity, including same-sex couples, interracial couples and couples from other countries and cultures. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001, PSYC 2300, PSYC 2740, must be a major or minor in psychology, must have at least sophomore standing.

PSYC 3150 Senior Honors Research Seminar (1-5 Credits)

In conjunction with senior research thesis. Prerequisites: PSYC 2750, PSYC 2751 and PSYC 2752.

PSYC 3151 Senior Honors Research Seminar (1-5 Credits)

In conjunction with senior research thesis. Prerequisites: PSYC 2750, PSYC 2751 and PSYC 2752.

PSYC 3152 Senior Honors Research Seminar (1-5 Credits)

In conjunction with senior research thesis. Prerequisites: PSYC 2750, PSYC 2751 and PSYC 2752.

PSYC 3155 Motivation and Emotion (4 Credits)

Social and biological approaches to study of motivation and emotion in humans and lower animals. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2031. Must be either a major or minor in psychology. Must at least have sophomore standing.

PSYC 3160 Emotion Regulation (4 Credits)

This course covers the current state of psychological and neuroscience research on how we're able to control our emotions (emotion regulation). This topic includes studies of different types of emotion regulation strategies, such as cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression, stress and coping, as well as self-regulation more broadly. This is a service learning course; students are required to give presentations to the class and to community members. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2031, must be either a major or minor in psychology, must have at least sophomore standing.

PSYC 3262 Affective Neuroscience (4 Credits)

Affective neuroscience is the study of emotions in the brain. In this course, we explore how new frontiers in emotion research, from brain scans to psychoactive drugs to monkey colonies, have changed the way we think about emotions and moods. We aim to learn how scientists ask these new questions: How and what can we learn about emotion from animal models, patient studies, genetic studies, brain scans, and drugs? We learn and debate different theories about what emotions are: When are emotions helpful and harmful? Why do we have them? How many are there? Can we control how we feel? Finally, we learn how to think about emotions scientifically: What kind of evidence matters? How do emotion scholars talk about their work? What kind of questions can we ask, and what kind can we hope to answer? Cross listed with PSYC 4262. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001, PSYC 2031, must be either a major or minor in psychology, must have at least sophomore standing.

PSYC 3350 Cultural Psychology (4 Credits)

This seminar examines how people's sociocultural context shapes their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. To approach this question, we read and discuss classic as well as recent theoretical and empirical articles from the field of cultural psychology. Topics include defining culture; dimensions of cultural variation; culture-biology interactions; methodological considerations; cultural influences on cognition, emotion, the self, moral judgment, and health; cultural neuroscience; cultural approaches to race and ethnicity; and mechanisms of cultural influence. Throughout, this course emphasizes sociocultural diversity in psychological processes. Students are encouraged to develop empirically tractable ways of asking and answering questions relating to cultural psychology and to apply concepts of cultural psychology to their own research. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001, must be either a major or minor in psychology, must at least have sophomore standing.

PSYC 3440 Gender and Society (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: PSYC 1001, must be a psychology major or minor, must have at least sophomore standing.

PSYC 3520 Introduction to Clinical Psychology (4 Credits)

Overview of clinical roles theory and research; function and dilemmas of clinical psychologists. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2500.

PSYC 3530 Child Psychopathology (4 Credits)

Child Psychopathology surveys the latest theory and research in the field of developmental psychopathology, which is the study of abnormal behavior from a developmental perspective. Students learn about what the emotional and behavioral disorders of childhood and adolescence are, what causes them, and how they are treated. Additionally, the course covers how we judge what is considered to be abnormal or atypical, how we classify abnormal or atypical behavior, and how we acquire knowledge about developmental psychopathology. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2500, must be either a major or minor in psychology, must at least have sophomore standing.

PSYC 3610 Advanced Topics in Philosophy, Psychology, and Cognitive Science (4 Credits)

This course provides an advanced survey of conceptual and methodological issues that lie at the intersection of philosophy, psychology, and cognitive science. More specifically, our main goal is to engage in a critical discussion of how the study of the mind requires an interdisciplinary approach that integrates empirical findings with conceptual and philosophical theorizing. Cross listed with PHIL 3610. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and junior standing (or instructor approval).

PSYC 3660 Perception: A Cognitive Neuroscience Approach (4 Credits)

An introduction to human perception with a strong emphasis on visual perception. This course evaluates the current understanding of how neural activity in the brain allows people to perceive basic sensory features (e.g., brightness, color, size, position, depth, movement, loudness and pitch) as well as recognize and discriminate complex perceptual patterns (e.g., 2D-shapes, 3D-objects, faces, and scenes). The underlying mechanisms are discussed on the basis of behavioral, neurophysiological, and computational evidence. We attempt to understand how the brain creates what we see and hear. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2031, must be a major or minor in psychology, must at least have sophomore standing. Cross-listed with PSYC 4660.

PSYC 3666 Brain Development & Cognition (4 Credits)

Examines what the brain tells us about development and what development tells us about the brain. Topics include subcortical and cortical developments to the acquisition of language and drawing. Prerequisites: PSYC 2050 or PSYC 3031 or BIOL 3640 and 15 quarter hours in psychology, junior or senior standing.

PSYC 3688 Clinical Psychopharmacology (4 Credits)

This course offers an in-depth examination of medications used to treat mental disorders, including the neurobiology of these medications. Different options available for each disorder will be discussed, along with issues related to the effective use of psychiatric medications. Prerequisites: PSYC 3080 and instructor approval.

PSYC 3701 Topics in Psychology (1-4 Credits)

PSYC 3702 Psychology of Sexual Minorities (4 Credits)

This class is a thorough review of the state of the development, psychological and other social science knowledge of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered, and other sexual minority individuals. The course will employ a developmental approach in examining the lives of GLBT persons, their special needs, concerns, and vulnerabilities. Topics explored will include the psychology of sexual orientation identity, homophobia, heterosexism, and hate crimes, GLBT adolescents, romantic relationships, couples, parenting, and families. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 3759 Foundations for Field Experiences (2 Credits)

Students prepare for internships in the helping field by learning about various placement settings that provide services to client populations, learning basic therapeutic skills, and preparing to seek internships. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 or equivalent, PSYC 2500 or equivalent, 21 years old by October 1, psychology major, and permission of instructor. Corequisite: PSYC 3760.

PSYC 3760 Field Experiences in Psychology (1-2 Credits)

Students meet weekly with professor and complete an unpaid internship at a community organization. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 or equivalent, PSYC 2500 or equivalent, 21 years old by October 1, psychology major, and permission of instructor. Corequisite: PSYC 3759.

PSYC 3761 Field Experiences in Psychology (3-5 Credits)

Students meet weekly with professor and complete an unpaid internship at a community organization. This class has a service learning component. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 or equivalent, PSYC 2500 or equivalent, PSYC 3760, PSYC 3759, 21 years old by October 1, psychology major, and permission of instructor.

PSYC 3762 Field Experiences in Psychology (1-5 Credits)

Students meet weekly with professor and complete an unpaid internship at a community organization. This class has a service learning component. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 or equivalent, PSYC 2500 or equivalent, PSYC 3760, PSYC 3759, PSYC 3761, 21 years old by October 1, psychology major, and permission of instructor.

PSYC 3800 Internships in Psychology (4 Credits)

Students complete an internship in the mental health or social work field while simultaneously completing assignments via our online classroom environment aimed at enhancing their understanding of 1) the application of psychological knowledge, b) professional development issues, and c) ethical and legal guidelines that impact social service providers. Must be a psychology major. Permission of instructor required and written confirmation from an internship site that indicates they will provide an unpaid internship slot for the student during the course duration. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 or its equivalent, and PSYC 2500 or its equivalent.

PSYC 3991 Independent Study (1-10 Credits)

Maximum of 5 hours per quarter not to exceed a total of 10 quarter hours.

PSYC 3992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

PSYC 3999 Psychology Senior Assessment (0 Credits)

This course involves a required assessment of graduating psychology majors' knowledge of the discipline based on coursework taken one quarter prior to graduation. Prerequisites: at least any five of the following courses required for the major: PSYC 1001 or equivalent, PSYC 2300, 3050 or 2751-2752, PSYC 2500 or 2510 or 2520 or 2530, PSYC 2060 or 2040 or 3030, PSYC 2050 or PSYC 2055; PSYC 2031 or 2130, PSYC 2031 or 2150 or at least 163 total credit hours or at least 30 credits of psychology hours.

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