2019-2020 Graduate Bulletin

Liberal Studies (MALS)

 

Courses

MALS 4020 Graduate Research and Writing (4 Credits)

Critical thinking, accomplished through solid research and clear writing, is paramount to success in one’s academic and professional pursuits. This course enables students to develop clear analytic and rhetorical writing skills at the graduate level; these skills are utilized throughout the curriculum in all degree areas. Each student organizes and produces a focused paper on a topic related to the student’s degree field that contains a continuing argument centered around a clear thesis statement supported by the work of experts. Sources are evaluated for validity and incorporated in the paper with regard to the absence of plagiarism and proper Turabian author-date documentation. Focusing on the thesis statement, students research and analyze current data and trends in the field, build a rhetorical argument, and draw conclusions. The course stresses editing and revision for mechanics, style, and language. It is designed to improve writing and communication skills for use in academic and professional settings. This course is required of all degree seeking students and should be taken in the first two quarter of enrollment. A final grade of B or better must be earned in this course to meet degree requirements.

MALS 4050 World Visual & Performance Art (4 Credits)

This course draws upon global artistic traditions of visual art and performance in conveying how human beings express ideas, themes, and emotions. Students view and experience artistic forms and movements throughout history and from a variety of traditions across the world, critically analyzing art movements and forms across time. They synthesize ideas across cultures, traditions, and types of creative expression and make connections and distinctions between genres and art forms. A different, rich, artistic theme is the focus each time the course is taught.

MALS 4200 Grant Writing for Arts and Culture (4 Credits)

This course explores the unique approaches to grant writing required by a variety of government and private entities that offer support for the arts and humanities. By identifying the special character of each entity's mission, its funding history, its place in the funding ecosystem, and the personalities involved, students learn how to produce effective funding proposals that align the goals of the funding entity with the programming goals of arts and culture organizations.

MALS 4210 Inspiring Individual Donations for Arts and Culture (4 Credits)

Students in this course learn the most effective ways to cultivate relationships with individuals in their community who are engaged with arts and culture and then inspire them to donate both time and money to organizations that align with their interests.

MALS 4220 Acquiring Sponsorships for Arts and Culture (4 Credits)

Students in this course learn how to identify businesses in their communities that care about arts and culture programming and value their programming enough to sponsor their efforts. The course presents case studies of sponsorship acquisitions, and students develop approaches of their own based on the most successful methods used by similar organizations.

MALS 4280 Funding Arts and Culture Programming and Development (4 Credits)

Arts organizations must always consider funding when developing programming. Organizational strategic planning is analyzed, and fundraising is examined as a major component of that planning. Various tools and techniques for fundraising, including communication and planning skills, are analyzed and applied to case studies. Students explore different forms of fundraising and their implications for programming, which may include private or public grants, governmental funding, fundraising events, and private donations.

MALS 4281 Event Planning (4 Credits)

Events and festivals play a large role in promoting the arts and developing links between the arts community and wider audiences and patrons. Students address various topics associated with event and festival planning and management, such as program development, marketing and audience development, venue considerations, and building partnerships. Students create an event program and plan.

MALS 4283 Strategic Marketing Planning for Arts and Culture (4 Credits)

This course provides a strategic approach to audience and markets. Students study basic principles of marketing and audience identification. They build strategic marketing plans that are cohesive with the mission and programming of the organization, utilizing various forms of media. Audience characteristics are examined from various perspectives, and theories of creating commitment to the arts are studied. Students create an arts marketing plan for an organization or event.

MALS 4284 Arts and Culture Entrepreneurship (4 Credits)

In any sector of the Arts and Culture field, whether government, non-profit, or for profit, it is essential to be able to develop programs and/or organizations from conception through implementation and assessment. This development requires the clear communication of what is needed to develop, implement, and sustain this plan over time. In this course, students take an entrepreneurial approach to develop a program or organization in the arts and culture field. Students develop and present a comprehensive business plan to define, map, structure, and assess the program / organization in either the non-profit or for profit sector.

MALS 4285 Basics of Arts and Culture Marketing (4 Credits)

This course provides a strategic approach to audiences and markets through an arts and cultural lens. Students will study basic principles of marketing, audience characteristics, and theories of creating commitment to the arts.

MALS 4286 Social Media and Digital Marketing for Arts and Culture (4 Credits)

Marketing arts and culture in the digital age is an art unto itself. Today's arts marketers are expected to produce visual, audio, and written content that matches the quality of the art, on stage or in the gallery, or the cultural programming presented to the public. This course provides students with a framework for producing engaging digital campaigns that build communities around art and culture, a skill that is immediately marketable in their job search after graduation.

MALS 4287 Managing Demand and Pricing for Arts and Culture (4 Credits)

Tomorrow's arts leaders need to be prepared to face the emotional subject of pricing in a way that is responsive to the community yet supports a sustainable business model. This class takes an evidence-based approach to determining demand for arts and culture programming and setting prices for programs and events offered by arts and culture organizations. Students will explore dynamic pricing strategies, approaches to communicating the relationship between price and value, and how artistic and cultural programming enriches the broader community.

MALS 4300 Operational Strategy for Arts and Culture (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the operational challenges faced by leaders in arts and culture organizations. Operational leaders shape the structures and systems that help organizations realize their strategies and objectives. These structures and systems enable creative solutions at every level of the organization, cultivating a relatively open culture that encourages individual commitment and innovation as well as effective group collaboration. Students learn to analyze and assess productive operational strategies based on understanding the organization’s goals; its financial, technical, and regulatory constraints, and the limitations and opportunities presented by the communities it seeks to serve.

MALS 4310 Program and People Management (4 Credits)

In this course, students learn a variety of approaches to managing people and programs in arts and culture organizations, with the aim of encouraging creative engagement and commitment to the mission of the organization as expressed in its programming.

MALS 4340 Arts and Culture Leadership for Social Change (4 Credits)

Arts and Culture organizations historically have been at the forefront of social change. In this course, students examine the role of arts and humanities in inspiring and shaping social change and learn how to integrate social change goals into the programming of arts and culture organizations.

MALS 4410 Writing and Healing (4 Credits)

Many writers attest to the emotional, spiritual, and even physical benefits of writing. In this course, students will explore a variety of ways in which written expression can help them navigate the human journey. Students learn leading theoretical models of journal and poetry therapy (interactive bibliotherapy), assess poems based on their usefulness in personal growth contexts, and participate in experiential discussions and writing exercises. Students focus on the writing and healing process rather than their own self-explorations of healing through writing. Students submit a portfolio of reflection writings, as well as complete a final paper on a writing topic that intersects with a personal growth experience or interest. Cross-listed with PWRI 4410 Writing and Healing.

MALS 4440 Artists on Art (4 Credits)

This course explores the professional life of the artist, including how artists conceive of a vision for their work, organize their time and space, and communicate about their art. Students read significant works (diaries, correspondence, and essays) by and about artists, and have opportunities to interact with working artists. Students keep and produce a journal to explore ideas, plan projects, and describe methods and media to be used in their current or proposed work.

MALS 4444 Emerging Trends in Art (4 Credits)

This course focuses on what is "going on" in the arts: contemporary trends, what's hot, what's not, and why. Selected themes in modern and contemporary art are reviewed to help students discover how their art will fit into or counter emerging trends in art. The latest cutting edge developments in art are explored, and students are challenged to describe the place and purpose for their work.

MALS 4470 Arts and Culture: History, Context, and Trends (4 Credits)

This course examines the significant and growing economic, social, and educational impact of the arts in today’s rapidly changing environment. Discussion of current and historical trends in the visual, performing, literary, and media arts provide a context for practical applications in the field.

MALS 4475 Organizational Vibrancy and Measurement (4 Credits)

As database and analytics systems for arts organizations grow ever more sophisticated, arts leaders must be literate in basics concepts of statistics, finance, and data analysis. This course will prepare students to examine data critically, explore the stories that data can tell, and determine how to measure success and vibrancy.

MALS 4480 Arts and Culture: Best Practices and Practical Skills (4 Credits)

This course provides a comprehensive overview of nonprofit best practices with specific applications to arts and culture organizations. Governance, budget planning and management, organizational development, advocacy, marketing and fundraising, community and rural development, event planning and facilities management are discussed using exemplary and diverse arts organizations as case studies.

MALS 4485 Legal Landscape of Arts and Culture (4 Credits)

Professionals in arts and culture, whether they are artists, managers, directors, or others working in the private, government, or nonprofit sector, will encounter a variety of legal issues during their careers. Through readings, case studies, assignments, and research, students will be introduced to a complex interdisciplinary system of relevant laws that impact and, in some cases, govern arts and culture organizational activities.

MALS 4490 Cultural Participation and Program Planning (4 Credits)

In this course, students explore changing attitudes and participation in the arts and the need for innovative approaches to engage audiences. Audience development and involvement is explored, especially in terms of arts education. The connection between cultural participation and program planning is closely examined. Various models are discussed on a theoretical level, and diverse arts organizations serve as case studies for practical applications.

MALS 4701 Topics in Literature (4 Credits)

The content of this course varies each term. The topics may include time-sensitive issues in the area of literature, elective courses that are not scheduled regularly during the course of the year, or advanced inquiry into core-course subjects. Each time the course is offered, the specific content is announced in the quarterly course schedule. Depending on the subject matter, students may be required to have completed prerequisite courses.

MALS 4702 Topics in Writing (1-4 Credits)

The content of this course varies each time it is offered. The topics may include time-sensitive issues in the areas of writing and literature, elective courses that are not scheduled regularly during the course of the year, or advanced inquiry into core-course subjects. Each time the course is offered, the specific content is announced in the quarterly course schedule. Depending on the subject matter, students may be required to have completed prerequisite courses.

MALS 4703 Topics in Film (1-5 Credits)

The content of this course varies each time it is offered. The topics may include time-sensitive issues from the film industry, elective courses that are not scheduled regularly during the course of the year, or advanced inquiry into core-course subjects. Each time the course is offered, the specific content is announced in the quarterly course schedule. Depending on the subject matter, students may be required to have completed prerequisite courses.

MALS 4704 Topics in Art (1-5 Credits)

The content of this course varies each time it is offered. The topics may include time-sensitive issues from the film industry, elective courses that are not scheduled regularly during the course of the year, or advanced inquiry into core-course subjects. Each time the course is offered, the specific content is announced in the quarterly course schedule. Depending on the subject matter, students may be required to have completed prerequisite courses.

MALS 4740 Natural Science and Literature (4 Credits)

The natural sciences have inspired some of the most entertaining, creative and provocative works in international literature. Writers like Thoreau, Gould, McPhee, Kingsolver and others have explored some of the most complex theories that explain the majesty of the physical world. Students read and analyze many works in this popular genre. Specifically, the class looks at how these writers use story to shape their work, how they introduce and explain multifaceted theories for the layperson, and how recent scientific theory has shaped our culture. Students also have an opportunity to write about scientific subjects in their own voice.

MALS 4745 Children's Literature (4 Credits)

This course is an introductory study of all levels of children's literature for the student who is interested in literature, the student who is planning to teach, and for those who are or will be parents. This course introduces students to types, genres, and varieties of literature for reading to children as well as reading by children. The main focus is to remember the joys and wonders of reading as a child and young adult, and to approach the literature selected not as "just a kid's book," but as literature with real quality standards and room for critical and analytical discussions.

MALS 4750 Literature to Film (4 Credits)

In this course, we examine the adaptation of literary works into films. We closely study selected modern literary works and the film interpretations of each work. Focusing on the transition from one narrative form to another, the course aims at enhancing the critical skill of students as well as their creative ability. Therefore, we also have mini scripting workshops as a way of imaginatively highlighting the sort of considerations that go into the making of the film script.

MALS 4755 World Literature (4 Credits)

In this course, students take a literary tour of the world in 70 days. Stops along the way include classic works of the 20th-Century from Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America - fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. As with any whirlwind tour, students learn a little about "the other" and a lot about themselves. An emphasis can help us see our own literary and cultural assumptions with new eyes. Students are also asked to reflect on thematic relationships and differences among texts from different times and places.

MALS 4901 Capstone Project (4 Credits)

The Capstone Project provides students the opportunity to research a topic, problem, or issue within their field of study, and work individually with a Capstone advisor. Similar in weight to a thesis, but more flexible, this final project will synthesize and apply core concepts acquired from the program. The student will select an appropriate Capstone advisor who is knowledgeable in the field of study to work closely with and whom can guide the research project. Evaluation will be focused on the quality and professionalism of applied research and writing; critical and creative thinking; problem-solving skills; knowledge of research design, method, and implementation; and contribution to the field and topic of study. Please see the Capstone Guidelines for additional details. Prerequisites: A Capstone Proposal that has been approved by both the Capstone Advisor and the Academic Director, acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. A final grade of B- or better is required to pass.

MALS 4902 Capstone Seminar (4 Credits)

The Capstone Seminar is a graduate seminar in which students utilize the knowledge and skills gained through the degree program to create a culminating work that critically addresses a problem in their degree field of study. The students produce a Capstone of 7000-8000 words that presents a position on a relevant problem, supports the position with professional and academic literature, analyzes and tests the proposed solution, and discusses the findings as related to the field of study. The seminar is dependent upon quality, collegial discussion, and feedback of students’ research and work products, under the facilitation of a faculty member. The course structure guides the students through the process of independent, secondary research and writing of a Capstone. No primary research is allowed. Students generate the course content through ongoing discussion and peer feedback on the Capstone process and individual topic areas under investigation. Students professionally and academically communicate through written work and oral presentation. Students must have: Acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.A final grade of B- or better is required in this course to meet degree requirements. Students must complete the Capstone Seminar in one quarter; no incomplete grades are assigned.

MALS 4904 Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar (4 Credits)

The Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar is a graduate seminar in which students utilize the knowledge and skills gained through the degree program to create a culminating work that critically addresses a problem or issue in the degree field of study. Members of the class will include students from various UCOL programs, representing multiple topics of study. On campus offerings of this course include required online components. The student produces a paper of 7000-8000 words that presents a position on a relevant problem or issue, supports the position with professional and academic work in the field, analyzes and tests the paper position, and discusses the role of the findings within the field of study. Students professionally and academically communicate their findings through written work and oral presentations. The seminar is dependent upon active and collegial discussion and critique of student research and work under the facilitation of a faculty member, and it is governed by the quality of participation and contributions of the students. Students must have: Acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better A final grade of B- or better is required in this course to meet degree requirements. Students must complete the Capstone Seminar in one quarter; no incomplete grades are assigned.

MALS 4905 Graduate Social Research Methods (4 Credits)

Graduate Social Research Methods is an exploration of the methods and purposes of social science research from the perspective of the researcher as well as that of the informed professional and consumer of information. Students will learn about the process of research, including the development of research questions, the purpose of various social science research methods, the role of professional ethics, and general approaches to the analysis and interpretation of data. Students will develop the ability to read and critique basic social science research articles and to implement simple research designs. Students will develop and write a research proposal around a specific research question informed by a review of the literature. Technical requirements include the ability to read and modify Microsoft Excel documents. This course is required of all degree-seeking students and should be taken in the first three quarters of enrollment.

MALS 4915 Research in Humanities (4 Credits)

Graduate Social Research Methods is an exploration of the methods and purposes of social science research from the perspective of the researcher as well as that of the informed professional and consumer of information. Students will learn about the process of research, including the development of research questions, the purpose of various social science research methods, the role of professional ethics, and general approaches to the analysis and interpretation of data. Students will develop the ability to read and critique basic social science research articles and to implement simple research designs. Students will develop and write a research proposal around a specific research question informed by a review of the literature. Technical requirements include the ability to read and modify Microsoft Excel documents. This course is required of all degree-seeking students and should be taken in the first three quarters of enrollment.

MALS 4920 Portfolio Capstone (4 Credits)

The Portfolio Capstone course provides students the opportunity to reflect upon the work they have done throughout their graduate studies at University College and synthesize their learning. Students in the Portfolio Capstone produce deliverables that include: (1) a thorough annotation of their portfolio, a process requiring critical and creative thinking about their educational experience, and (2) a pinnacle project that identifies, analyzes, and elaborates significant themes in their program experience, evaluates their accomplishments, connects their coursework to their professional goals, and assesses those goals in the context of their chosen field. Students must complete the Portfolio Capstone with a grade of B or better.

MALS 4980 Internship (1-4 Credits)

The internship is designed to offer students a purposeful experience in a practical, industry-related setting. The internship is an individualized learning experience and a training plain is created for each student in conjunction with the internship site to provide experiences related to the skills and knowledge covered in the certificate and master's programs.

MALS 4991 Independent Study (1-8 Credits)

This is an advanced course for students wishing to pursue an independent course of study. The student must be accepted in a degree program, have earned a grade point average of 3.0 or better, obtained the approval of the department director, and have completed the Independent Study form and filed the form with all appropriate offices before registering for the independent study. Independent Study is offered only on a credit basis and only for degree candidates.

MALS 4992 Directed Study (1-8 Credits)

This is an advanced course for students wishing to pursue a directed course of study. The student must be accepted in a degree program, have earned a grade point average of 3.0 or better, obtained the approval of the department director, and have completed the Independent Study form and filed the form with all appropriate offices before registering for the independent study. Directed Study is offered only on a for-credit basis.

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