2020-2021 Graduate Bulletin

Organizational Leadership (ORL)

 

ORL 4110 Fundamentals of Organization Development (4 Credits)

This course explores the history of organizational development (OD), definitions, models, approaches, and how OD is and can be used in organizations today. An organizational development professional requires a multitude of skills to be effective. Students will assess their own skills and develop a plan to develop or increase required skills.

ORL 4115 Organizational Culture and Organizational Development Impacts (4 Credits)

Organizational culture encompasses the organization’s vision, mission, values, systems, symbols, structures, language, beliefs, and norms. This course proposes organizational development strategies that match, support, or are synergetic with organizational cultures.

ORL 4120 Team Interventions (4 Credits)

To be successful, organizations of all types depend on teams of people who work together to complete tasks, achieve goals, and to help accomplish organizational change and strategy. As a result, focusing on the effectiveness of teams is a key value in organizational development. In this course, students learn how teams work and what makes them effective. Students investigate the tools and methods needed to conduct team assessments, diagnose the symptoms, and prescribe and evaluate targeted interventions that help teams achieve goals that impact organizational outcomes.

ORL 4125 Evaluate and Sustain Change (4 Credits)

This course explores organization impacts and change processes that are inherent in organizational development. Students will analyze various change models and assess how they explain the impact of change on organizations and their stakeholders. Students will also evaluate leadership and managerial practices that play a role in sustaining organizational change.

ORL 4130 Individual Interventions (4 Credits)

This course explores the theory and practice of an organizational development process as part of an individual intervention, based on unique organizational considerations. This course examines the roles of organizational structure, type of organization, and the depth and breadth of the organizational change affecting individual development strategy and interventions.

ORL 4135 Large Scale Interventions (4 Credits)

This course explores the theory and practice of a large-scale or organization-wide organizational development process--including entering the organization, assessing a strategy for a unique organizational culture, and presenting results--while understanding the human side of change. There are many organizational development strategies that can be used based on unique organizational considerations. This course examines the roles of organizational structure, type of organization, and the depth and breadth of the organizational change affecting organizational development strategy and large-scale interventions.

ORL 4160 Integrating Personal and Organizational Success (4 Credits)

This class explores the dynamics where the organization and the individual are successful and what is the role of the teacher. It analyzes options and opportunities, including the use of a systems thinking model, organizational learning, knowledge management, appreciative inquiry and building an ethical model for success at all levels of an organization; public, private or non-profit.

ORL 4170 Developing Human Capital in Organizations (4 Credits)

Human capital represents the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to implement the strategy of any organization – public, private or nonprofit. Unlike other forms of capital such as financial and equipment, human capital resides within the individual. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the strategic role and typical responsibilities that organization leadership, along with human resources, play in unleashing the potential of employees. Developing Human Capital examines current challenges and trends in developing talent as new core competencies and ways to work emerge, technology enables collaboration, and demographics shift employee expectations. The Developing Human Capital in Organizations course provides a talent management and human capital development framework that demonstrates and supports integrated processes and systems that position and enhance employee and leadership development. Students explore the role of leaders and HR in unleashing talent, an organization's most important source of competitive advantage. Students will assess, analyze and apply concrete strategies that ensure talent development is strategic, relevant, culturally sustainable, and competency-driven.

ORL 4190 Values-Driven Decision Making (4 Credits)

This course explores both objective and subjective decision making models. Emphasis is placed on decision making for organizational effectiveness. The rational approach will be taught via maximization of expected outcomes and decision tree analysis. The course will also explore managers’ preferred decision making styles. The irrational side of decision-making will be covered through demonstrations and discussion of decision bias and judgment heuristics. Decision making is a complex and challenging process. The need for an effective and efficient methodology that is simple, systematic, and logical is more important today than ever. This course is an answer to that problem by using examples from our text and up-to-date articles on decision making from experts in the field.

ORL 4400 Leading Strategic Planning in Organizations (4 Credits)

Beginning with a clear mission, strategic planning is an iterative, dynamic process of translating the mission into a series of goals and outcomes in public, private, and non-profit organizations. The organization’s vision, values, mission, and goals are the core of the process; strategic planning involves a series of options, understanding opportunities, evaluating risks, developing the plan and building in ethics, communication, implementation, and evaluation. The strengths and limitations of rational planning processes are explored and strategies for coping with unintended consequences are developed. The role of the leader in the process is also discussed.

ORL 4410 Principles of Environmental Scanning (4 Credits)

Environmental scanning is the process of identifying and evaluating external factors that may affect an organization; public, private, or nonprofit; on either a micro or a macro level. The micro level includes the immediate and global competitive environment and the macro level encompasses external trends dealing with the economy, politics, social changes or technology. This course provides students the opportunity to develop a process for environmental scanning and learn to use tools to evaluate trends and the significance of a trend. Casual loop diagrams, systems archetypes and scenario planning are discussed. These tools are useful in all sectors.

ORL 4420 Leading Change for Transformation (4 Credits)

Change is occurring in every type of organization, but since all organizations are composed of people, it is the people who have to change for the organization to change. We'll explore this relationship throughout the course, and give you the tools to become a change leader. The only thing that is constant is change. Beginning with this premise, this class explores the exciting and opportunity-filled world of change and transition. This course will explore the basic change theories and concepts and skills required for effective and ethical change leadership. Students will examine the notion of transformational change, the various stages of individual and organizational change, essential relationships between leadership and management, and assorted organizational models for leading change. The concept of an adaptive organization for producing extraordinary results will be discussed.

ORL 4500 Leadership Development (4 Credits)

This course explores leadership as a dynamic relationship with the organizational environment, stakeholders, and followers. Leadership in context is an essential concept, as well as the research-based core leadership competencies that effective leaders exemplify. Leaders from the public, private, and non-profit sectors will be studied in an inclusive context to assess their core leadership competencies and those practices that may vary due to the organizational structure. Relevant contemporary leadership topics will be examined to gain a broad perspective on leadership and considering the diversity of human interrelationships. The importance of ethical, strategic, and system wide decision-making is examined from the standpoint that leadership opportunities exist at all levels of organizations, in the community as well as the workplace. Strategies used to influence culture, promote learning, and implement change to move organizations forward are addressed. Students will assess their own leadership competencies and areas for growth to construct a personal leadership development plan.

ORL 4510 Building the 21st-Century Organization (4 Credits)

This course examines the purpose and roles of organizations in today's global economy. The main focus is on the design and structure of organizations based on their industry; the internal and external environment; type of culture; degree of complexity and use of technology; routine and non-routine processes; size; and whether they are global, national or local. Differences between public, private and governmental organizations are illustrated. Organizational culture and its effect on ethics, change management, and innovation are examined. The sources of conflict in organizations are explained and students learn how power, political tactics, and collaboration can be used to resolve conflict. Contemporary challenges facing organizations are identified along with the design and structure options that help mitigate these challenges. Students develop an Organization Design Plan that enables a selected organization to effectively operate within its environment at optimal performance. Designing for performance, sustainability and innovation are key aspects of this course.

ORL 4520 Principles of Financing for Organizations (4 Credits)

This course introduces basic financial concepts that lay the foundation for financial literacy. These financial concepts have varying relevance and different applications among public, private, and non-profit organizations. To understand these varying relationships, the course will focus on comparing and contrasting the use, non-use, and relevant application of financial concepts across sectors. Students will begin developing a skillset for applying these concepts appropriately to varying organizational types and structures. Additionally, the assessment of financial conditions will be combined with other indicators, such as an organization's strategy, to learn how to diagnose an organization's overall health.

ORL 4530 Leading a Culture of Organizational Innovation (4 Credits)

This course examines a proven process of innovation and how it applies to private, public and non-profit organizations; leading to entrepreneurship. The course identifies how organizational culture can have a positive or negative effect on innovation. The role of the leader is also discussed. Determining the right strategy for effective innovation and how to structure organizations to innovate best is explored. Students describe how to implement management systems to assess ongoing innovation, using metrics throughout the process, and determine how to incentivize innovation in work teams. Using the seven rules of innovation, students assess a selected organization on its degree of innovation and propose a plan for integrating innovation.

ORL 4550 Strategic Organizational Partnerships (4 Credits)

Partnerships extend the capability of the organization; public, private or nonprofit; and help to leverage available resources. Strategic partnerships also provide an alternative to vertical integration and a way to complement the organization's core competencies. This course defines and discusses the roles of various types of organizational partnerships, including internal and external, strategic partnerships, and joint ventures, and explores strategies for ethically managing these external and internal organizational relationships.

ORL 4701 Topics in Organizational Leadership (4 Credits)

The content of this course varies each time it is offered. The topics may include time-sensitive issues, elective courses that are not scheduled regularly during the course of the year, or advanced inquiry into core-course subjects. Each time the course is offered, the specific content is announced in the quarterly course schedule. Depending on the subject matter, students may be required to have completed prerequisite courses.

ORL 4901 Capstone Project (4 Credits)

The Capstone Project provides students the opportunity to research a topic, problem, or issue within their field of study, and work individually with a Capstone advisor. Similar in weight to a thesis, but more flexible, this final project will synthesize and apply core concepts acquired from the program. The student will select an appropriate Capstone advisor who is knowledgeable in the field of study to work closely with and whom can guide the research project. Evaluation will be focused on the quality and professionalism of applied research and writing; critical and creative thinking; problem-solving skills; knowledge of research design, method, and implementation; and contribution to the field and topic of study. Please see the Capstone Guidelines for additional details. Prerequisites: A Capstone Proposal that has been approved by both the Capstone Advisor and the Academic Director, acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. A final grade of B- or better is required to pass.

ORL 4902 Capstone Seminar (4 Credits)

The Capstone Seminar is a graduate seminar in which students utilize the knowledge and skills gained through the degree program to create a culminating work that critically addresses a problem in their degree field of study. The students produce a Capstone of 7000-8000 words that presents a position on a relevant problem, supports the position with professional and academic literature, analyzes and tests the proposed solution, and discusses the findings as related to the field of study. The seminar is dependent upon quality, collegial discussion, and feedback of students’ research and work products, under the facilitation of a faculty member. The course structure guides the students through the process of independent, secondary research and writing of a Capstone. No primary research is allowed. Students generate the course content through ongoing discussion and peer feedback on the Capstone process and individual topic areas under investigation. Students professionally and academically communicate through written work and oral presentation. Students must have: acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. A final grade of B- or better is required in this course to meet degree requirements. Students must complete the Capstone Seminar in one quarter; no incomplete grades are assigned.

ORL 4904 Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar (4 Credits)

The Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar is a graduate seminar in which students utilize the knowledge and skills gained through the degree program to create a culminating work that critically addresses a problem or issue in the degree field of study. Members of the class will include students from various UCOL programs, representing multiple topics of study. On campus offerings of this course include required online components. The student produces a paper of 7000-8000 words that presents a position on a relevant problem or issue, supports the position with professional and academic work in the field, analyzes and tests the paper position, and discusses the role of the findings within the field of study. Students professionally and academically communicate their findings through written work and oral presentations. The seminar is dependent upon active and collegial discussion and critique of student research and work under the facilitation of a faculty member, and it is governed by the quality of participation and contributions of the students. Students must have: Acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. A final grade of B- or better is required in this course to meet degree requirements. Students must complete the Capstone Seminar in one quarter; no incomplete grades are assigned.

ORL 4905 Graduate Social Research Methods (4 Credits)

Graduate Social Research Methods is an exploration of the methods and purposes of social science research from the perspective of the researcher as well as that of the informed professional and consumer of information. Students will learn about the process of research, including the development of research questions, the purpose of various social science research methods, the role of professional ethics, and general approaches to the analysis and interpretation of data. Students will develop the ability to read and critique basic social science research articles and to implement simple research designs. Students will develop and write a research proposal around a specific research question informed by a review of the literature. Technical requirements include the ability to read and modify Microsoft Excel documents. This course is required of all degree-seeking students and should be taken in the first three quarters of enrollment.

ORL 4910 Research Practices and Applications (4 Credits)

This course develops competency in principles of research and measurement for use in the professional setting. As an initial course in the program of study, students will learn research methods to apply to program and systems design and evaluation to achieve successful measurement of outcomes and goals. Students will become critical consumers of pertinent literature to provide background and support for the choice and application of proper qualitative and quantitative research methods and data analysis for professional application. Critical thinking through comparing and contrasting cause and effect is used to build logic models. Research, design, and evaluation processes that address issues of implementation, feasibility, and sustainability are emphasized. At the conclusion of this course students will be prepared to apply and clearly communicate the practice of scientific research principles in the professional environment to ensure that the question being asked can be answered through rigorous research and the design and formative assessment of the program or system. Completion of Institutional Review Board (IRB) training via CITI Program is required as a basis for discussion of research ethics and IRB procedures. Competencies gained in this course, including practices of inquiry, self-analysis, and evaluation, will be applied and integrated throughout the course of study and demonstrated in the culminating capstone work of the master’s degree. This course is required of all degree-seeking students and should be taken in the first three quarters of enrollment.

ORL 4980 Internship (1-4 Credits)

The ORL internship is designed to offer students a practical educational experience in an industry related setting. The internship is an individualized learning experience that is directly related to the knowledge and skills covered in the ORL master’s degree program. Students are responsible for finding their own internship site and proposing their internship ideas. University College sends notification to all ORL students if they hear of internship possibilities. Students may also work through the DU career center to explore opportunities for internship experiences. The objectives, activities, responsibilities, and deliverables for the internship are defined in a training plan that is developed by the student jointly with the internship supervisor at the sponsoring organization. The training plan is approved by the academic director. Prerequisites: The student must be unconditionally accepted in the ORL degree program, have completed a minimum of 28 hours of graduate coursework, including at least two core courses, and have earned a GPA of 3.0 or better. Enrollment must be approved by the academic director.

ORL 4991 Independent Study (1-8 Credits)

This is an advanced course for students wishing to pursue an independent course of study. The student must be accepted into a degree program, have earned a grade point average of 3.0 or better, obtained the approval of the department director, and have completed the Independent Study form and filed the form with all appropriate offices before registering for the independent study. Independent study is offered only on a for-credit basis.

ORL 4992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

This is an advanced course for students wishing to pursue a directed course of study. The student must be accepted in a degree program, have earned a grade point average of 3.0 or better, obtained the approval of the department director, and have completed the Independent Study form and filed the form with all appropriate offices before registering for the independent study. Directed Study is offered only on a for-credit basis.

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