2016-2017 Undergraduate Bulletin

Communication Arts

Office: University College Student Support Center
Mail Code: 2211 S. Josephine St. Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-2291, 800-347-2042
Email: ucolsupport@du.edu  
Web Site: http://www.universitycollege.du.edu

A bachelor’s degree in the field of communication provides students with the skills and strategies needed in the business world, such as creating and delivering effective presentations, crafting a well-reasoned argument, and building and enhancing dialogue between people and groups. The Bachelor of Arts in Communication Arts prepares graduates to solve problems, resolve conflict and increase communication options. A communication degree allows students to explore how the media, entertainment industry and commercial institutions affect individuals and society. In addition, students will enrich their understanding of verbal and non-verbal communication, such as writing, speaking, and body language; and students will learn how to use art, photographs and other media in presentations. Students complete their bachelor’s degree with a major in communication arts to improve written and verbal skills for personal and professional development. The communication degree requires an integrative project, in which students will synthesize their studies and demonstrate their communication skills. Classes are available as hybrid and/or online.

This degree prepares students to:

  • Demonstrate effective and persuasive oral, written, and non-verbal communication techniques using tone, and principles appropriate to the audience.

  • Apply communication theory and principles to formulate arguments in writing and speaking that contain a clear purpose; well-organized, relevant content; and a conclusion that directly reflects the purpose and strength of the content.

  • Employ art, photographs, and other visual media for appropriate use in communication strategies.

  • Use appropriate techniques and strategies to increase communication options in groups and teams.

  • Analyze media messages identifying and explaining a variety of possible differences such as bias, inclusion and exclusion of information, source, and type of presentation media.


Communication Arts

Bachelor of Arts Major Requirements

(180 credits required for the degree)

Major Courses (40 credits)
CA 3050Media and Society4
CA 3100Cross-Cultural Communication4
CA 3150Effective Presentations4
CA 3200Art and Interpretation4
CA 3250How the Body Talks4
CA 3300Creating Dialogue4
BACP 3350Directed Research4
BACP 3400Civic Engagement4
BACP 3450Integrative Project Design4
BACP 3500Integrative Project4
Total Credits40


CA 2050 Effective Communication (4 Credits)

Communication is at the heart of organizations, society, and personal life. This course cultivates an awareness of several key aspects of communication: making a well-reasoned argument, locating and using supporting evidence, speaking or writing persuasively, and using appropriate language and visual support. Communicating with different audiences, crafting well organized presentations, and using various media to express one's ideas and feelings creatively are the major focus of this course.

CA 2100 Creativity and Innovation (4 Credits)

Everyone has a creative core. It can become hidden or lost, but the ability to recognize one's creative source and tap into it at will provides an increased range of communication options. This course focuses on defining creativity and innovation, de-mystifying creativity and learning to cultivate creativity and innovation. We use the "whole brain" approach while learning about the current research showing the neurological pathways of creativity and practice accessing and stimulating these pathways. A critical aspect of this exploration is learning how to keep a mixed media journal and playing with expression that combines both text and visual elements. Students are challenged to solve problems, take risks, and look at themselves and their creative energies in new ways. The experiences and activities of this course build skills and confidence in using one's creativity and innovative thought.

CA 3050 Media and Society (4 Credits)

This course provides a critical examination of media forms and their impact on society. The representation of culture through print media (books, magazines, newspapers, and online media) and through various visual media (film, television, Internet) is explored. Students learn how informational, entertainment, literary, and commercial messages are crafted and transmitted. The focus is on messages, the institutions behind the messages, and their impact on society.

CA 3100 Cross-Cultural Communication (4 Credits)

In an increasingly global society and a world or growing international interaction, communicating effectively with people of different cultural and ethnic backgrounds becomes a challenge but also an opportunity. The ability to accept and transcend differences has personal and professional transformative powers. This course explores a range of communication concepts and theories such as cultural competency, identity theory salience, and the nature of prejudice and its impact on communication. Students have the opportunity to develop and practice skills and abilities that enhance sincere, sensitive, and effective communication across differences.

CA 3150 Effective Presentations (4 Credits)

Researching and refining ideas and then representing them effectively is an indispensable skill. This course focuses on crafting effective written and spoken presentations that employ appropriate organizational, visual, and physical elements. Students have opportunities to select visual elements such as images, graphs, and charts; to address physical considerations such as voice, gesture, and body language; and to relate text, movement, and visuals in effective professional presentations. Students become familiar with and be able to use PowerPoint, In-Design, and Photoshop in crafting and supporting presentations.

CA 3200 Art and Interpretation (4 Credits)

This course examines ways in which meaning is made and communicated through visual imagery. Students learn how to describe, analyze, and interpret visual information, using abundant examples from everyday life, such as photographs, comic books, graffiti, home furnishings, advertisements, buildings, and public art displays. In considering this array of creative effort, students address the difficult question: Is it Art? This course focuses on expanding skills in visual interpretation and developing and using aesthetic standards.

CA 3250 How the Body Talks (4 Credits)

How does body movement reveal or conceal true intent? Humans appear to be "hard-wired" to assess, examine, and respond to the physical language of others. Although this process is often automatic or unconscious, people can learn to identify and employ the elements of physical rhetoric (posture, stance, bearing, expression, and gait) in conscious ways to persuade others. If acting is the "truthful" revelation of character, what can be learned through proven performance techniques to enhance one's presentation of self in varied settings? This course helps students to become more informed readers of physical signs in others, more aware of their own habitual physical tendencies, and more able to present themselves authentically to others.

CA 3300 Creating Dialogue (4 Credits)

What happens when people speak, listen, and respond? Dialogue can occur between two or three people, in a group, across groups, and within and across organizations and communities. This course focuses on deliberative discussion: how to build and enhance dialogue, and how to repair it when it breaks down. Skills in both participation and facilitation are developed as well as strategies for resolving conflict. The goal of the course is to help students develop skills needed for productive and civil conversation in multiple settings.

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