2018-2019 Graduate Bulletin

Leadership and Organizations

Office: University College Student Support Center
Mail Code: 2211 S. Josephine St., Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-2291, 800-347-2042
Email: ucolsupport@du.edu  
Web Site: www.universitycollege.du.edu

Master of Science in Leadership and Organizations with a concentration in Human Capital Organizations

The Human Capital in Organizations master's degree concentration is offered entirely online to meet the needs of busy adults. Students will learn to determine, cultivate, and maintain the symbiotic relationship between individuals and the organizations for which they work and lead. Strategic human capital can be the winning element of a successful organization; master the process of developing and retaining employees to engage and achieve objectives, innovate, and maximize organizational and individual success. The master's degree concentration in Human Capital in Organizations prepares students to ethically develop and maintain human capital while learning the best practices to do so.

Led by instructors who work in the fields in which they teach, classes introduce students to innovative and creative approaches to structuring and sustaining the development of human capital. Students explore knowledge and information management, communication tactics, vertical and horizontal partnerships, and organizational learning to promote the successful development of capital. Students will define the attributes, challenges, and advantages of human capital and strategies for leveraging each while integrating personal and organizational achievement. Customize your Leadership and Organizations master's degree through the innovative Professional Options Curriculum using our convenient online degree builder tool, which allows you to select courses that cater to your specific career needs.

This degree prepares students to do the following:

  • Analyze organizational partnerships both vertically and horizontally
  • Create a strategy for leveraging the attributes, challenges, and advantages of human capital
  • Critique the theories and processes used for integrating knowledge management and organizational learning as a concept for enhancing personal and organizational success
  • Evaluate the opportunities, challenges and options to have employees participate in decision making through the use of various techniques
  • Assess best practices in ethically developing and maintaining human capital

Master of Science in Leadership and Organizations with a concentration in Organizational Development

The Organizational Development master's degree concentration is offered online or on campus at the University of Denver in the evenings, or in a combination of both, to meet the needs of busy adults. Students learn about organizations. Successful organizations are dynamic entities--adjusting goals, structure, and strategies due to needs and influences. Sometimes these adjustments are large, but quite often there are a series of small to mid-size changes that affect employees and processes, resulting in the need for an organizational development (OD) intervention. Students learn the history, challenges, and successes of OD and the different models and techniques to warrant a productive culture in a variety of organizational sizes, sectors, and types. An OD intervention strategy is created by defining the role of the practitioner as an internal or external consultant and constructing a diagnosis plan, synthesizing data from interviews and observations, and effectively communicating the findings in various applicable formats. Finally, a personal philosophy regarding change is developed and then examined through the context of analyzing organizational values and ethics, culture, and the human impact of change on employees.

The importance of culture and effective intervention strategies is discussed throughout the Organizational Development master’s degree concentration. Customize your Leadership and Organizations master's degree through the innovative Professional Options Curriculum using our convenient online degree builder tool, which allows you to select courses that cater to your specific career needs.

This degree prepares students to do the following:

  • Articulate and define organizational development, history of OD, and challenges and possibilities using an intentional OD intervention.
  • Develop and defend a personal philosophy of organizational change.
  • Evaluate the impact of organizational culture and core values on OD interventions.
  • Integrate the contract for a successful OD intervention with the organizational culture and determine the role of an OD practitioner in each stage of an OD intervention, distinguishing between an internal and external consultant.
  • Assess, compare, and contrast different models of change and describe the impact of each model on an OD process.
  • Define and organize OD strategies for different types of organizations (sectors, life cycle, size, industry, types of innovation, or other defining characteristics) for maximizing impacts of OD interventions.
  • Summarize the importance and impact of the different organizational structures and design on OD strategy and interventions.
  • Construct an organizational diagnosis plan by using interviewing, group facilitation, process observation, synthesis of data, and writing effective reports, with providing effective presentations of the findings.
  • Analyze the human side of change and build strategies for successful implementation of an OD intervention that honor the loss, resistance and acceptance of changes.

Master of Science in Leadership and Organizations with a concentration in Philanthropic Leadership

The Philanthropic Leadership master's degree concentration is offered online or on campus at the University of Denver in the evenings, or in a combination of both, to meet the needs of busy adults seeking fundraising and philanthropic strategy and implantation techniques. Designed specifically for professionals who currently or aspire to work in or manage a non−profit or charitable organization development function, the master's in Leadership and Organizations with a concentration in Philanthropic Leadership prepares students to lead dynamic organizations. Students learn to strengthen and enhance their organization’s reputation, build vital support through strong and lasting leadership, and sustain donor relationships resulting in a robust development function with a master's degree.

Leadership classes are led by faculty who work in the field in which they teach and provide students industry insight to help them thrive in the tight−knit field of development and fundraising. Students learn strategies of fiscal responsibility and transparency that lead to community support, and identify the goals and plans necessary to uphold a successful organization. From budget planning to legal issues, useful technology to ethics, the practical guidance provided in the master's concentration in Philanthropic Leadership at University College prepares non−profit leaders with the knowledge and skills needed to succeed as professional development leaders in the philanthropic sector. Customize your Leadership and Organizations master's degree through the innovative Professional Options Curriculum using our convenient online degree builder tool, which allows you to select courses that cater to your specific career needs.

This degree prepares students to do the following:

  • Analyze the processes and content of organizations that meet the description of philanthropic organizational excellence
  • Develop an organizational policy as it relates to donor relationships and local, state, and federal requirements
  • Summarize the steps identified to reach a  greater level of personal and professional cultural competence in the field of philanthropic leadership
  • Analyze donor support that aligns with the ethics, mission, vision, and values of the organization
  • Compare and contrast different fundraising strategies, including grants, major gifts, planned giving, and annual campaigns
  • Evaluate and select the most effective structure for an organization regarding fundraising
  • Critique a plan for the roles of staff, board, and volunteers in a philanthropic organization against a best practices model

Master of Science in Leadership and Organizations with a concentration in Project Management

The Project Management master's degree concentration is offered online or on campus at the University of Denver in the evenings, or in a combination of both, to meet the needs of busy adults. Students receive hands−on, practical instruction from professional practitioners who work in the fields in which they teach on the tools and techniques of effective project management. Students learn how to develop a clear plan that places a project in the context of an organization's strategic plan, while considering budgetary, scheduling, and human capital implications.

The content for the Project Management concentration has been developed to parallel the Project Management Institute's (PMI® Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) Guide. It covers all of the relevant areas and prepares the student to do well on the PMI® Project Management Professional (PMP) Certification Exam. In addition, the master's degree concentration provides practical experience in using the tools and techniques of effective project management. You'll learn the basic principles of project management and become proficient in the use of project management software and understand how to develop a plan that clearly places a project in the context of an organization’s strategic plan.

This degree prepares students to do the following:

  • Summarize and apply the basic principles of project management and become proficient in the use of project management software
  • Analyze and apply agile concepts and techniques
  • Design a comprehensive risk management plan for a project
  • Create strategies to manage the complexity inherent in large-scale projects
  • Relate project scope to cost, time, and resource requirements
  • Develop procurement plans and assess project contracts

Master of Science in Leadership and Organizations with a concentration in Strategic Innovation & Change

The Strategic Innovation and Change master's degree concentration is offered online or on campus at the University of Denver in the evenings, or in a combination of both, to meet the needs of busy adults. Students learn tactical innovation and change management using vision, values, and mission as an overall guide. Led by professional practitioners who work in the fields in which they teach, leadership classes provide professionals the skills to manage change, encourage innovation, and develop effective strategic initiatives while fulfilling an organization's mission.

Students can expect to develop environmental scanning skills to identify and evaluate external factors that affect an organization on a micro or macro level and prepare them to be solution−oriented leaders. While learning to take advantage of current realities and seize opportunities for an organization through strategy, degree−seekers explore the change theories and concepts required for effective and ethical change leadership while understanding how the relationships within an organization are affected.

The importance of mission and vision is discussed throughout the Strategic Innovation and Change master's degree concentration. Customize your Leadership and Organizations master's degree through the innovative Professional Options Curriculum using our convenient online degree builder tool, which allows you to select courses that cater to your specific career needs.

This degree prepares students to do the following:

  • Analyze the roles of mission, vision, values, and goals as a start of strategic planning
  • Summarize the advantages and limitations of the strategic planning process
  • Create strategies to address organizational challenges when implementing innovation and change and assess how this plan relates to customers, competitors, suppliers, and technology
  • Evaluate the change theories,  concepts, and skills required for effective and ethical change leadership and how the relationships within an organization are affected
  • Align financial management strategies and budget and planning requirements with the vision, values, and goals of an organization

Certificate in Leadership and Organizations with a concentration in Human Capital Organizations

The graduate certificate in Human Capital in Organizations concentration is offered entirely online to meet the needs of busy adults seeking to expand their skillset or credentials to include leadership knowledge on managing human capital. Certificate students learn to lead, determine, cultivate, and maintain the symbiotic relationship between individuals and the organizations they work for. The graduate certificate in Human Capital in Organizations concentration prepares students to ethically develop and maintain human capital while learning the best practices to do so. Strategic human capital can be the winning element of a successful organization; master the process of developing and retaining employees to engage and achieve objectives, innovate, and maximize organizational and individual success.

Explore knowledge and information management, communication tactics, vertical and horizontal partnerships, and organizational learning to promote the successful development of capital. Led by instructors who work in the field they teach in, certificate classes introduce students to innovative and creative approaches to structuring and sustaining the development of human capital. Students define the attributes, challenges, and advantages of human capital and strategies for leveraging each while integrating personal and organizational achievement. Credits earned through this graduate certificate may apply toward a master’s degree in Leadership and Organizations.

CERTIFICATE IN LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONS With a Concentration in Organizational Development

The graduate certificate in Organizational Development is offered online or on campus at the University of Denver in the evenings, or in a combination of both, to meet the needs of busy adults. Students learn about organizations. Successful organizations are dynamic entities--adjusting goals, structure, and strategies due to needs and influences. Sometimes these adjustments are large, but quite often there are a series of small to mid-size changes that affect employees and processes resulting in the need for an organizational development (OD) intervention. Students learn the history, challenges, and successes of OD and the different models and techniques to warrant a productive culture in a variety of organizational sizes, sectors, and types. An OD intervention strategy is created by defining the role of the practitioner as an internal or external consultant and constructing a diagnosis plan, synthesizing data from interviews and observations, and effectively communicating the findings in various applicable formats. Finally, a personal philosophy regarding change is developed and then examined through the context of analyzing organizational values and ethics, culture, and the human impact of change on employees.

The importance of culture and effective intervention strategies is discussed throughout the Organizational Development master’s degree concentration. Customize your Leadership and Organizations master's degree through the innovative Professional Options Curriculum using our convenient online degree builder tool, which allows you to select courses that cater to your specific career needs.

CERTIFICATE IN LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONS With a Concentration in Philanthropic Leadership

The graduate certificate in Philanthropic Leadership concentration is offered online or on campus at the University of Denver in the evenings, or in a combination of both, to meet the needs of busy adults. Students learn to develop fundraising and philanthropic strategy and implementation techniques as they learn to manage a non-profit or charitable organization development function. The certificate in Philanthropic Leadership concentration prepares students to lead dynamic organizations and strengthen an organization's reputation, build vital support through strong and lasting leadership, and sustain donor relationships resulting in a robust development function.

Certificate students learn from faculty who work in the fields in which they teach as they provide students with industry insight to help them thrive in the tight−knit field of development and fundraising. From budget planning to legal issues, useful technology to ethics, the practical guidance provided in the certificate program will prepare non−profit leaders with the knowledge and skills needed to succeed as professional development leaders in the philanthropic sector. Credits earned through this graduate certificate may apply toward a master's degree in Leadership and Organizations.

Certificate in Leadership and Organizations with a concentration in Strategic Innovation & Change

The graduate certificate in Strategic Innovation and Change concentration is offered online or on campus at the University of Denver in the evenings, or in a combination of both, to meet the needs of busy adults. Students learn tactical innovation and change management using vision, values, and mission as an overall guide. Led by professional practitioners who work in the fields in which they teach, leadership classes provide professionals the skills to manage change, encourage innovation, and develop effective strategic initiatives while fulfilling an organization's mission.

Students explore the change theories and concepts required for effective and ethical change leadership while understanding how the relationships within an organization are affected. Certificate students can expect to develop environmental scanning skills to identify and evaluate external factors that affect an organization on a micro or macro level and prepare them to be solution−oriented leaders. Organizations are analyzed from the viewpoint of strategic alignment of their critical frameworks of operation including financial management, budget, and planning. The concept of innovation not being a one−time event, but instead an organizational view and structure as part of an organizational strategy, will be explored. Credits earned through this graduate certificate may apply toward a master's degree in Leadership and Organizations.

Master's Degree Admission

Application Deadlines

  • Fall 2018 Final Submission Deadline: July 20, 2018
  • Fall 2018 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: June 15, 2018
  • Winter 2019 Final Submission Deadline: October 26, 2018
  • Winter 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: September 28, 2018
  • Spring 2019 Final Submission Deadline: February 8, 2019
  • Spring 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: January 11, 2019
  • Summer 2019 Final Submission Deadline: April 26, 2019
  • Summer 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: March 29, 2019

Admission Requirements

  • Online admission application
  • $75.00 Application Fee
  • University Minimum Degree and GPA Requirements
  • Transcripts: One official transcript from each post-secondary institution.
  • Letters of Recommendation: Two (2) letters of recommendation are required. Letters should be submitted by recommenders through the online application.
  • Personal Statement: A personal statement (two pages double spaced, 450-550 words) is required. The statement should include information on how the degree will enhance career plans and meet educational goals. Some questions to consider are (a) what do you expect to learn and achieve in your degree program? (b) what kind of professional position do you anticipate having five years after you earn this degree? (c) what experiences have you had that form the foundation for these career or educational goals? Sharing personal experiences, abilities, achievements, and goals is encouraged. This document has considerable influence in the decision to admit applicants with attention given to written communication skills, clarity, and organization.
  • Résumé: The résumé (or C.V.) should include work experience, research, and/or volunteer work.

Additional Standards for Non-Native English Speakers

Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. The minimum TOEFL/IELTS/CAE test score requirements for the degree program are:

  • Minimum TOEFL Score (paper-based test): 550
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (internet-based test): 80 with minimum of 20 on each subscore
  • Minimum IELTS Score: 6.5 with minimum of 6.0 on each band score
  • Minimum CAE Score: 176 with minimum of 169 on each band score
  • English Conditional Admission Offered: Master's degree applicants who do not meet the required level of English proficiency may be considered for conditional acceptance if all other admission criteria are met. Prior to enrolling in any graduate-level coursework, English Conditional Acceptance (ECA) requires an evaluation by the University of Denver's English Language Center (ELC) and successful completion of intensive ELC English courses including the Graduate Preparation Program. Academic classes may not be taken while students are enrolled at the English Language Center. As an alternative to the English Language Center, an applicant may become fully admitted by submitting sufficient TOEFL/Academic IELTS/CAE scores.

 

Certificate Admission

Application Deadlines

  • Fall 2018 Final Submission Deadline: July 20, 2018
  • Fall 2018 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: June 15, 2018
  • Winter 2019 Final Submission Deadline: October 26, 2018
  • Winter 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: September 28, 2018
  • Spring 2019 Final Submission Deadline: February 8, 2019
  • Spring 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: January 11, 2019
  • Summer 2019 Final Submission Deadline: April 26, 2019
  • Summer 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: March 29, 2019

Admission Requirements

Admission Standards for Non-Native English Speakers

Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. The minimum TOEFL/IELTS/CAE test score requirements for the degree program are:

  • Minimum TOEFL Score (paper-based test): 550
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (internet-based test): 80 with minimum of 20 on each subscore
  • Minimum IELTS Score: 6.5 with minimum of 6.0 on each band score
  • Minimum CAE Score: 176 with minimum of 169 on each band score
  • English Conditional Admission Offered: No, University College certificate programs do not offer English Conditional Admission.

 

Read the English Language Proficiency policy for more details.

Read the English Conditional Admission (ECA) policy for more details.

Read the Required Tests for GTA Eligibility policy for more details.

Additional Standards for International Applicants

Per Student & Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) regulation, international applicants must meet all standards for admission before an I-20 or DS-2019 is issued, [per U.S. Federal Register: 8 CFR § 214.3(k)] or is academically eligible for admission and is admitted [per 22 C.F.R. §62]. Read the Additional Standards For International Applicants policy for more details.

Financial Aid

There are many different options available to finance your education. Most University of Denver graduate students are granted some type of financial support. Our Office of Financial Aid is committed to helping you explore your options.

Master of Science in Leadership and Organizations with a Concentration in Human Capital Organizations

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
ORL 4500Leadership Development4
ORL 4510Building the 21st-Century Organization4
ORL 4520Principles of Financing for Organizations4
ORL 4910Research Practices and Applications4
ORL 4901Capstone Project4
or ORL 4902 Capstone Seminar
or ORL 4904 Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar
Concentration requirements
ORL 4160Integrating Personal and Organizational Success4
ORL 4170Developing Human Capital in Organizations4
ORL 4190Value Driven Decision Making4
ORL 4550Strategic Organizational Partnerships4
Elective requirements (Choose three courses):12
Fundamentals of Organizational Development
Organizational Culture and Organizational Development Impacts
Team Interventions
Evaluate and Sustain Change
Leading Change for Transformation
Leading a Culture of Organizational Innovation
Internship
Total Credits48

Minimum number of credits required: 48

Students will work with their personal academic advisor to determine the best set of courses for their electives.

A satisfactory quality of achievement with a grade point average of “B” (3.0) or better is required in graduate coursework accepted for the degree. The average is determined on the basis of the University’s grading system. In no case, may more than one-fourth of the hours accepted toward the degree be of “C” grade. A grade lower than “C” renders the credit unacceptable for meeting degree requirements. Students must earn a grade of B- or better in the Capstone Project or Capstone Seminar.

Master of Science in Leadership and Organizations with a Concentration in Organizational Development

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
ORL 4500Leadership Development4
ORL 4510Building the 21st-Century Organization4
ORL 4520Principles of Financing for Organizations4
ORL 4905Graduate Social Research Methods4
ORL 4901Capstone Project4
or ORL 4902 Capstone Seminar
or ORL 4904 Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar
Concentration requirements
ORL 4110Fundamentals of Organizational Development4
ORL 4115Organizational Culture and Organizational Development Impacts4
ORL 4120Team Interventions4
ORL 4125Evaluate and Sustain Change4
Elective requirements (Choose three courses):12
Individual Interventions
Large Scale Interventions
Leading Strategic Planning in Organizations
Leading Change for Transformation
Leading a Culture of Organizational Innovation
Total Credits48

Minimum number of credits required: 48

Students will work with their personal academic advisor to determine the best set of courses for their electives.

A satisfactory quality of achievement with a grade point average of “B” (3.0) or better is required in graduate coursework accepted for the degree. The average is determined on the basis of the University’s grading system. In no case, may more than one-fourth of the hours accepted toward the degree be of “C” grade. A grade lower than “C” renders the credit unacceptable for meeting degree requirements. Students must earn a grade of B- or better in the Capstone Project or Capstone Seminar.

Master of Science in Leadership and Organizations with a Concentration in Philanthropic Leadership

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
ORL 4500Leadership Development4
ORL 4510Building the 21st-Century Organization4
ORL 4520Principles of Financing for Organizations4
ORL 4905Graduate Social Research Methods4
ORL 4901Capstone Project4
or ORL 4902 Capstone Seminar
or ORL 4904 Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar
Concentration requirements
ORL 4600Philanthropy Roles and Practices4
ORL 4610Cultivating and Sustaining Donor Relations4
ORL 4615Principles of Finance for Fundraising4
ORL 4620Principles of Strategic Fundraising4
Elective requirements (Choose three courses):12
Fundamentals of Organizational Development
Organizational Culture and Organizational Development Impacts
Team Interventions
Evaluate and Sustain Change
Research and Writing for Fundraising
Advanced Board Development
Internship
Total Credits48

Minimum number of credits required: 48

Students will work with their personal academic advisor to determine the best set of courses for their electives.

A satisfactory quality of achievement with a grade point average of “B” (3.0) or better is required in graduate coursework accepted for the degree. The average is determined on the basis of the University’s grading system. In no case, may more than one-fourth of the hours accepted toward the degree be of “C” grade. A grade lower than “C” renders the credit unacceptable for meeting degree requirements. Students must earn a grade of B- or better in the Capstone Project or Capstone Seminar.

Master of Science in Leadership and Organizations with a Concentration in Project Management

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
ORL 4500Leadership Development4
ORL 4510Building the 21st-Century Organization4
ORL 4520Principles of Financing for Organizations4
ORL 4905Graduate Social Research Methods4
ORL 4901Capstone Project4
or ORL 4902 Capstone Seminar
or ORL 4904 Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar
Concentration requirements
ICT 4100Principles of Project Management4
ICT 4105Project Contracts and Procurement4
ICT 4110Project Management Tools and Techniques4
ICT 4115Project Management Dynamics4
Elective requirements (Choose three courses):12
Managing Technology for Strategic Value
Strategic Alliances in the Technology Sector
Advanced Methods for Complex Projects
Total Credits48

Minimum number of credits required: 48

Students will work with their personal academic advisor to determine the best set of courses for their electives.

A satisfactory quality of achievement with a grade point average of “B” (3.0) or better is required in graduate coursework accepted for the degree. The average is determined on the basis of the University’s grading system. In no case, may more than one-fourth of the hours accepted toward the degree be of “C” grade. A grade lower than “C” renders the credit unacceptable for meeting degree requirements. Students must earn a grade of B- or better in the Capstone Project or Capstone Seminar.

Master of Science in Leadership and Organizations with a Concentration in Strategic Innovation and Change

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements
ORL 4500Leadership Development4
ORL 4510Building the 21st-Century Organization4
ORL 4520Principles of Financing for Organizations4
ORL 4905Graduate Social Research Methods4
ORL 4901Capstone Project4
or ORL 4902 Capstone Seminar
or ORL 4904 Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar
Concentration requirements
ORL 4400Leading Strategic Planning in Organizations4
ORL 4410Principles of Environmental Scanning4
ORL 4420Leading Change for Transformation4
ORL 4530Leading a Culture of Organizational Innovation4
Elective requirements (Choose three courses):12
Fundamentals of Organizational Development
Organizational Culture and Organizational Development Impacts
Team Interventions
Evaluate and Sustain Change
Developing Human Capital in Organizations
Strategic Organizational Partnerships
Internship
Total Credits48

Minimum number of credits required: 48

Students will work with their personal academic advisor to determine the best set of courses for their electives.

A satisfactory quality of achievement with a grade point average of “B” (3.0) or better is required in graduate coursework accepted for the degree. The average is determined on the basis of the University’s grading system. In no case, may more than one-fourth of the hours accepted toward the degree be of “C” grade. A grade lower than “C” renders the credit unacceptable for meeting degree requirements. Students must earn a grade of B- or better in the Capstone Project or Capstone Seminar.

 

Certificate in Leadership and Organizations with a Concentration in Human Capital Organizations

Program Requirements

Concentration requirements
ORL 4160Integrating Personal and Organizational Success4
ORL 4170Developing Human Capital in Organizations4
ORL 4190Value Driven Decision Making4
ORL 4550Strategic Organizational Partnerships4
Elective requirements (Choose two courses):8
Fundamentals of Organizational Development
Organizational Culture and Organizational Development Impacts
Team Interventions
Evaluate and Sustain Change
Leading Change for Transformation
Leading a Culture of Organizational Innovation
Internship
Total Credits24

Minimum number of credits required: 24 

Certificate in Leadership and Organizations with a Concentration in Organizational Development

Program Requirements

Concentration requirements
ORL 4110Fundamentals of Organizational Development4
ORL 4115Organizational Culture and Organizational Development Impacts4
ORL 4120Team Interventions4
ORL 4125Evaluate and Sustain Change4
Elective requirements (Choose two courses):8
Individual Interventions
Large Scale Interventions
Leading Strategic Planning in Organizations
Leading Change for Transformation
Leading a Culture of Organizational Innovation
Total Credits24

Minimum number of credits required: 24

Certificate in Leadership and Organizations with a Concentration in Philanthropic Leadership

Program Requirements

Concentration requirements
ORL 4600Philanthropy Roles and Practices4
ORL 4610Cultivating and Sustaining Donor Relations4
ORL 4615Principles of Finance for Fundraising4
ORL 4620Principles of Strategic Fundraising4
Elective requirements (Choose two courses):8
Fundamentals of Organizational Development
Organizational Culture and Organizational Development Impacts
Team Interventions
Evaluate and Sustain Change
Research and Writing for Fundraising
Advanced Board Development
Internship
Total Credits24

Minimum number of credits required: 24 

Certificate in Leadership and Organizations with a Concentration in Strategic Innovation and Change

Program Requirements

Concentration requirements
ORL 4400Leading Strategic Planning in Organizations4
ORL 4410Principles of Environmental Scanning4
ORL 4420Leading Change for Transformation4
ORL 4530Leading a Culture of Organizational Innovation4
Elective requirements (Choose two courses):8
Fundamentals of Organizational Development
Organizational Culture and Organizational Development Impacts
Team Interventions
Evaluate and Sustain Change
Developing Human Capital in Organizations
Strategic Organizational Partnerships
Internship
Total Credits24

Minimum number of credits required: 24

Leadership & Org Studies Courses

Organizational Leadership Courses

ORL 4110 Fundamentals of Organizational Development (4 Credits)

This course explores the history of organizational development (OD), definitions, models, approaches, and how OD is and can be used in organizations today. An organizational development professional requires a multitude of skills to be effective. Students will assess their own skills and develop a plan to develop or increase required skills.

ORL 4115 Organizational Culture and Organizational Development Impacts (4 Credits)

Organizational culture encompasses the organization’s vision, mission, values, systems, symbols, structures, language, beliefs, and norms. This course proposes organizational development strategies that match, support, or are synergetic with organizational cultures.

ORL 4120 Team Interventions (4 Credits)

This course explores the theory and practice of working with and leading teams. When people think about the characteristics of great leaders and team players, invariably they are described more in terms of their soft skills--i.e., communication skills, and giving and receiving feedback effectively--rather than their technical abilities. Therefore, in addition to introducing team process skills and facilitation techniques, this course also focuses on developing the crucial communication skills that will benefit all leaders and team members, both personally and professionally.

ORL 4125 Evaluate and Sustain Change (4 Credits)

Organizational Development is change. This course explores organization impacts and change processes that are inherent in organizational development in an organization.

ORL 4130 Individual Interventions (4 Credits)

This course explores the theory and practice of an organizational development process as part of an individual intervention, based on unique organizational considerations. This course examines the roles of organizational structure, type of organization, and the depth and breadth of the organizational change affecting individual development strategy and interventions.

ORL 4135 Large Scale Interventions (4 Credits)

This course explores the theory and practice of a large-scale or organization-wide organizational development process--including entering the organization, assessing a strategy for a unique organizational culture, and presenting results--while understanding the human side of change. There are many organizational development strategies that can be used based on unique organizational considerations. This course examines the roles of organizational structure, type of organization, and the depth and breadth of the organizational change affecting organizational development strategy and large-scale interventions.

ORL 4160 Integrating Personal and Organizational Success (4 Credits)

This class explores the dynamics where the organization and the individual are successful and what is the role of the teacher. It analyzes options and opportunities, including the use of a systems thinking model, organizational learning, knowledge management, appreciative inquiry and building an ethical model for success at all levels of an organization; public, private or non-profit.

ORL 4170 Developing Human Capital in Organizations (4 Credits)

This course explores why, with the changes in the workforce, organizations; public, private, and nonprofit; are looking internally for innovation, creativity and strategic change. Based on the premise that organizations continue to evolve or they will become extinct, this course examines the reasons behind developing human capital and discusses concrete strategies for this development, in a sustaining and ethical manner. This course evaluates the advantage of a connected workforce; a shared mission, vision and information, knowledge, reward and communication structures. Stressing that people are an organization's most important resource, this course identifies the role of the leader in developing and retaining human capital.

ORL 4185 Enterprise Management (4 Credits)

The enterprise management course provides a contextual basis for the application of effective cross-functional management methods within the enterprise. The topics taught in this course come from the traditional academic areas of business, industrial engineering, applied statistics, and project management. This course is designed to present and integrate these fundamental knowledge areas into a multi-dimensional enterprise management knowledge base and skill set.

ORL 4190 Value Driven Decision Making (4 Credits)

This course explores both objective and subjective decision making models. Emphasis is placed on decision making and risk assessment for organizational effectiveness in public, private and nonprofit organizations. The rational approach is taught via maximization of expected outcomes and decision tree analysis. The irrational side of decision-making is covered through demonstrations and discussion of decision bias and judgment heuristics. The role of the leader is discussed.

ORL 4400 Leading Strategic Planning in Organizations (4 Credits)

Beginning with a clear mission, strategic planning is an iterative, dynamic process of translating the mission into a series of goals and outcomes in public, private, and nonprofit organizations. The organization's vision, values, mission and goals are the core of the process; strategic planning involves a series of options, understanding opportunities, evaluating risk, developing the plan and building in ethics, communication, implementation and evaluation. The strengths and limitations of rational planning processes are explored and strategies for coping with unintended consequences are developed. The role of the leader in this process is also discussed.

ORL 4410 Principles of Environmental Scanning (4 Credits)

Environmental scanning is the process of identifying and evaluating external factors that may affect an organization; public, private, or nonprofit; on either a micro or a macro level. The micro level includes the immediate and global competitive environment and the macro level encompasses external trends dealing with the economy, politics, social changes or technology. This course provides students the opportunity to develop a process for environmental scanning and learn to use tools to evaluate trends and the significance of a trend. Casual loop diagrams, systems archetypes and scenario planning are discussed. These tools are useful in all sectors.

ORL 4420 Leading Change for Transformation (4 Credits)

Change is occurring in every type of organization, but since all organizations are composed of people, it is the people who have to change for the organization to change. We'll explore this relationship throughout the course, and give you the tools to become a change leader. The only thing that is constant is change. Beginning with this premise, this class explores the exciting and opportunity-filled world of change and transition. This course will explore the basic change theories and concepts and skills required for effective and ethical change leadership. Students will examine the notion of transformational change, the various stages of individual and organizational change, essential relationships between leadership and management, and assorted organizational models for leading change. The concept of an adaptive organization for producing extraordinary results will be discussed.

ORL 4500 Leadership Development (4 Credits)

This course explores leadership as a dynamic relationship with the organizational environment, stakeholders, and followers, in public, private, and non-profit organizations. Leadership in context is an essential concept, as well as the core leadership practice that effective leaders exemplify. Notable leaders from corporate 500, small business, non-profit, military and political organizations are studied to assess their core leadership practices and those attributes that may vary due to the organizational context. The importance of ethical, strategic, and system wide decision making is examined. Strategies used to implement change and move organizations forward are addressed. Students assess their own leadership attributes, characteristics and skills and construct a personal leadership development plan.

ORL 4510 Building the 21st-Century Organization (4 Credits)

This course examines the purpose and roles of organizations in today's global economy. The main focus is on the design and structure of organizations based on their industry; the internal and external environment; type of culture; degree of complexity and use of technology; routine and non-routine processes; size; and whether they are global, national or local. Differences between public, private and governmental organizations are illustrated. Organizational culture and its effect on ethics, change management, and innovation are examined. The sources of conflict in organizations are explained and students learn how power, political tactics, and collaboration can be used to resolve conflict. Contemporary challenges facing organizations are identified along with the design and structure options that help mitigate these challenges. Students develop an Organization Design Plan that enables a selected organization to effectively operate within its environment at optimal performance. Designing for performance, sustainability and innovation are key aspects of this course.

ORL 4520 Principles of Financing for Organizations (4 Credits)

This course is designed to enable students to discover how basic financial concepts are similar and different across public, private and non-profit organizations. Students compare and contrast the use of these concepts and processes in different organizational types and structures.

ORL 4530 Leading a Culture of Organizational Innovation (4 Credits)

This course examines a proven process of innovation and how it applies to private, public and non-profit organizations; leading to entrepreneurship. The course identifies how organizational culture can have a positive or negative effect on innovation. The role of the leader is also discussed. Determining the right strategy for effective innovation and how to structure organizations to innovate best is explored. Students describe how to implement management systems to assess ongoing innovation, using metrics throughout the process, and determine how to incentivize innovation in work teams. Using the seven rules of innovation, students assess a selected organization on its degree of innovation and propose a plan for integrating innovation.

ORL 4550 Strategic Organizational Partnerships (4 Credits)

Partnerships extend the capability of the organization; public, private or nonprofit; and help to leverage available resources. Strategic partnerships also provide an alternative to vertical integration and a way to complement the organization's core competencies. This course defines and discusses the roles of various types of organizational partnerships, including internal and external, strategic partnerships, and joint ventures, and explores strategies for ethically managing these external and internal organizational relationships.

ORL 4580 Innovation and Entrepreneurial Development (4 Credits)

This course examines a proven process of innovation and how it applies to private, public and non-profit organizations, leading to entrepreneurship . The course identifies how organizational culture can have a positive or negative effect on innovation. Determining the right strategy for effective innovation and how to structure organizations to innovate best is explored. Students describe how to implement management systems to assess ongoing innovation, using metrics throughout the process, and determine how to incentivize innovation in work teams. Using the 7 rules of innovation, students assess a selected organization on its degree of innovation and propose a plan for integrating innovation.

ORL 4600 Philanthropy Roles and Practices (4 Credits)

This course critically reviews the history of the philanthropic sector in the United States and how this sector has influenced the development of American socio-political values and continues to influence discussions in the present day. This course critically assesses the impact philanthropy has made in the socio-political movements in the U.S. and around the world such as women's suffrage, racial segregation, LGBTQ advocacy, and world hunger and poverty. Topics covered will include, but are not limited to: -History of philanthropy in the US -Global philanthropy -Legal and tax considerations -Mission driven organizations -Philanthropic influence in political discussions -Differences nonprofit driven services for a community versus government/public providing those services -The role of the leader in achieving excellence.

ORL 4610 Cultivating and Sustaining Donor Relations (4 Credits)

This course answers the questions of why donors are needed and how to establish and sustain donors for the organization. This class explores the practice of identifying donors and establishing the relationship in an ethical and sustainable manner. Donors may be business, other organizations, individuals or foundations. Based on the premise that first there is involvement, and then transparency and finally donations, how effectively an organization established and sustains donors supports the long term existence of the organization.

ORL 4615 Principles of Finance for Fundraising (4 Credits)

This course provides fundraising professionals an understanding of financial statements, budgets and IRS issues. Topics include: accounting principles, managing the accounting process, cash flow, cost accounting and analyzing financial statements.

ORL 4620 Principles of Strategic Fundraising (4 Credits)

Beginning with a clear mission, strategic fundraising is an iterative, dynamic process of translating the mission into a series of outcomes and support for the organization. With the organization's vision, values, mission and goals as the core of the process, the fundraising is done with high ethical standards, ensuring accountability to the donors and compliance with all applicable Federal, State and local Laws. Various fundraising strategies and vehicles are discussed, along with the role of the staff and the board in fundraising. Last, there is some discussion of the current larger issues in fundraising.

ORL 4630 Organizing for Successful Fundraising (4 Credits)

Most organizations are unsuccessful with their fundraising efforts, not because their cause isn't worthy of support, but because they simply are not organized to fundraise. This course covers the basic elements of a mission statement, preparing the case for support by donors, the roles of staff, board, volunteers, and the legal and ethical issues involved. Organizational structures are discussed, with the balance between bureaucracy and innovation/creativity. The role of technology is illustrated. The local, state and federal laws that govern fundraising are discussed.

ORL 4640 Research and Writing for Fundraising (4 Credits)

This course is an in depth exploration of researching and writing effective proposals and grants. Principles of the Institutional Review Board (IRB) are studied and basic training completed. Funding sources are analyzed and the process of competing for a grant is discussed. At the conclusion, students have the knowledge to research, prepare, and present a grant proposal. Prerequisite: ORL 4620.

ORL 4650 Advanced Board Development (4 Credits)

This course explores the opportunities and challenges with a board of directors from a staff perspective. This course evaluates the value of a knowledgeable and effective board of directors in the success of the organization. The role of the board of directors and the role of a staff member, especially in fundraising, is often unclear and the need for clarity and differences in the roles will be discussed. How to develop and maintain a working relationship with the board of directors’ members to move the organization forward is analyzed. Lastly, this course evaluates how to choose members for the board and explores how to design and implement a development plan. Prereq -- ORL 4600 - Philanthropy Roles and Practices.

ORL 4660 Database Management and Technology for Fundraising (4 Credits)

This course explains why having reliable information with regular updates is essential in the development and sustaining of a donor base for nonprofits. All aspects of effective technology uses, including: research, email, electronic contributions, volunteer contact lists and mail generation are discussed. Legal, ethical and costs considerations are investigated. Prerequisites: ORL 4600, ORL 4615 and ORL 4620.

ORL 4670 Advanced Fundraising (4 Credits)

This course provides the opportunity for students to build on the knowledge gained in Principles of Strategic Fundraising. Topics include: current trends, legal concerns, professional development for fundraisers and alternative revenue sources. There is an emphasis on understanding and explaining the financial structure of the organization. Prerequisites: ORL 4600, ORL 4615 and ORL 4620.

ORL 4680 Advanced Volunteer Management (4 Credits)

This course focuses on the recruitment, training and retention of the organization's volunteers, be it public, private or nonprofit. Including a cost benefit analysis, this course is an in-depth analysis of a volunteer program. There is a discussion of the legal and ethical considerations, advantages and disadvantages, of using volunteers in an organization. Prerequisite: ORL 4600.

ORL 4701 Topics in Leadership and Organizations (4 Credits)

The content of this course varies each time it is offered. The topics may include time-sensitive issues, elective courses that are not scheduled regularly during the course of the year, or advanced inquiry into core-course subjects. Each time the course is offered, the specific content is announced in the quarterly course schedule. Depending on the subject matter, students may be required to have completed prerequisite courses.

ORL 4901 Capstone Project (4 Credits)

The Capstone Project provides students the opportunity to research a topic, problem, or issue within their field of study, and work individually with a Capstone advisor. Similar in weight to a thesis, but more flexible, this final project will synthesize and apply core concepts acquired from the program. The student will select an appropriate Capstone advisor who is knowledgeable in the field of study to work closely with and whom can guide the research project. Evaluation will be focused on the quality and professionalism of applied research and writing; critical and creative thinking; problem-solving skills; knowledge of research design, method, and implementation; and contribution to the field and topic of study. Please see the Capstone Guidelines for additional details. Prerequisites: A Capstone Proposal that has been approved by both the Capstone Advisor and the Academic Director, acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. A final grade of B- or better is required to pass.

ORL 4902 Capstone Seminar (4 Credits)

The Capstone Seminar is a graduate seminar in which students utilize the knowledge and skills gained through the degree program to create a culminating work that critically addresses a problem in their degree field of study. The students produce a Capstone of 7000-8000 words that presents a position on a relevant problem, supports the position with professional and academic literature, analyzes and tests the proposed solution, and discusses the findings as related to the field of study. The seminar is dependent upon quality, collegial discussion, and feedback of students’ research and work products, under the facilitation of a faculty member. The course structure guides the students through the process of independent, secondary research and writing of a Capstone. No primary research is allowed. Students generate the course content through ongoing discussion and peer feedback on the Capstone process and individual topic areas under investigation. Students professionally and academically communicate through written work and oral presentation. Students must have: acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. A final grade of B- or better is required in this course to meet degree requirements. Students must complete the Capstone Seminar in one quarter; no incomplete grades are assigned.

ORL 4904 Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar (4 Credits)

The Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar is a graduate seminar in which students utilize the knowledge and skills gained through the degree program to create a culminating work that critically addresses a problem or issue in the degree field of study. Members of the class will include students from various UCOL programs, representing multiple topics of study. On campus offerings of this course include required online components. The student produces a paper of 7000-8000 words that presents a position on a relevant problem or issue, supports the position with professional and academic work in the field, analyzes and tests the paper position, and discusses the role of the findings within the field of study. Students professionally and academically communicate their findings through written work and oral presentations. The seminar is dependent upon active and collegial discussion and critique of student research and work under the facilitation of a faculty member, and it is governed by the quality of participation and contributions of the students. Students must have: Acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. A final grade of B- or better is required in this course to meet degree requirements. Students must complete the Capstone Seminar in one quarter; no incomplete grades are assigned.

ORL 4905 Graduate Social Research Methods (4 Credits)

Graduate Social Research Methods is an exploration of the methods and purposes of social science research from the perspective of the researcher as well as that of the informed professional and consumer of information. Students will learn about the process of research, including the development of research questions, the purpose of various social science research methods, the role of professional ethics, and general approaches to the analysis and interpretation of data. Students will develop the ability to read and critique basic social science research articles and to implement simple research designs. Students will develop and write a research proposal around a specific research question informed by a review of the literature. Technical requirements include the ability to read and modify Microsoft Excel documents. This course is required of all degree-seeking students and should be taken in the first three quarters of enrollment.

ORL 4910 Research Practices and Applications (4 Credits)

This course develops competency in principles of research and measurement for use in the professional setting. As an initial course in the program of study, students will learn research methods to apply to program and systems design and evaluation to achieve successful measurement of outcomes and goals. Students will become critical consumers of pertinent literature to provide background and support for the choice and application of proper qualitative and quantitative research methods and data analysis for professional application. Critical thinking through comparing and contrasting cause and effect is used to build logic models. Research, design, and evaluation processes that address issues of implementation, feasibility, and sustainability are emphasized. At the conclusion of this course students will be prepared to apply and clearly communicate the practice of scientific research principles in the professional environment to ensure that the question being asked can be answered through rigorous research and the design and formative assessment of the program or system. Completion of Institutional Review Board (IRB) training via CITI Program is required as a basis for discussion of research ethics and IRB procedures. Competencies gained in this course, including practices of inquiry, self-analysis, and evaluation, will be applied and integrated throughout the course of study and demonstrated in the culminating capstone work of the master’s degree. This course is required of all degree-seeking students and should be taken in the first three quarters of enrollment.

ORL 4980 Internship (1-4 Credits)

The ORL internship is designed to offer students a practical educational experience in an industry related setting. The internship is an individualized learning experience that is directly related to the knowledge and skills covered in the ORL master’s degree program. Students are responsible for finding their own internship site and proposing their internship ideas. University College sends notification to all ORL students if they hear of internship possibilities. Students may also work through the DU career center to explore opportunities for internship experiences. The objectives, activities, responsibilities, and deliverables for the internship are defined in a training plan that is developed by the student jointly with the internship supervisor at the sponsoring organization. The training plan is approved by the academic director. Prerequisites: The student must be unconditionally accepted in the ORL degree program, have completed a minimum of 28 hours of graduate coursework, including at least two core courses, and have earned a GPA of 3.0 or better. Enrollment must be approved by the academic director.

ORL 4991 Independent Study (1-8 Credits)

This is an advanced course for students wishing to pursue an independent course of study. The student must be accepted into a degree program, have earned a grade point average of 3.0 or better, obtained the approval of the department director, and have completed the Independent Study form and filed the form with all appropriate offices before registering for the independent study. Independent study is offered only on a for-credit basis.

ORL 4992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

This is an advanced course for students wishing to pursue a directed course of study. The student must be accepted in a degree program, have earned a grade point average of 3.0 or better, obtained the approval of the department director, and have completed the Independent Study form and filed the form with all appropriate offices before registering for the independent study. Directed Study is offered only on a for-credit basis.

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