2018-2019 Graduate Bulletin

Arts and Culture Management

Office: University College Student Support Center
Mail Code: 2211 S. Josephine St., Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-2291, 800-347-2042
Email: ucolsupport@du.edu  
Web Site: http://www.universitycollege.du.edu

The Arts and Culture program helps transform students by enhancing their ability to support and lead both public and private sector creative and cultural industries. The program's larger aim is to help students strengthen communities through the dissemination of artistic and cultural creations that address and celebrate diverse constituencies, whether based on age, ethnic background, religious/philosophical identity, or political commitments. The program fosters the study of best practices in areas such as governance, budgeting, organizational development, marketing, fundraising, advocacy, education, facilities management, and community outreach. The program also develops critical and creative thought through a combination of academic and applied inquiry to fully understand the needs of communities and organizations and to meet those needs the most effective possible ways.

Program Outcomes

This program prepares students to:

  • Develop careers in public and/or private arts and culture organizations
  • Implement arts and culture best practices in areas ranging from advocacy and education to marketing and organizational leadership
  • Cultivate strong connections between arts and culture organizations and the communities they serve
  • Effectively deliver well-planned programs and events tailored to particular audiences

Master of Liberal Studies in Arts and Culture with a concentration in Arts Development and Program Management

The Arts Development and Program Management concentration teaches students to plan, sustain, and develop strategic marketing and funding methodologies for arts organizations, both nonprofit and for-profit. Expert instructors who work in the fields in which they teach will provide industry insight and help students achieve the practical knowledge needed to work as effective arts managers. Customize your Arts and Culture master's degree through the innovative Professional Options Curriculum using our convenient online degree builder tool, which allows you to select courses that cater to your specific career needs.

This degree prepares students to:

  • Plan events that promote arts and culture

  • Determine, develop, and retain key audiences in the community

  • Evaluate the opportunities and build a strategic marketing plan using various forms of media
  • Create plans and strategies to gain funding through grants, fundraising, and donations

Certificate in Arts and Culture with a concentration in Arts Development and Program Management

The graduate certificate in Arts Development and Program Management concentration is offered on campus at the University of Denver in the evenings, online, or in a combination of both, to meet the needs of busy adults. Designed specifically for professionals in the arts management and cultural fields, the graduate certificate in Arts Development and Program Management concentration focuses on the entrepreneurial skills needed to excel within an arts organization, such as funding and leadership techniques. With a graduate certificate in Arts Development and Program Management concentration, students will be prepared for vibrant careers as managers or facilitators in an arts organization. Applied, hands-on courses delivered online or on campus in the evenings, or in a combination of both, will prepare students for a fast-paced arts and culture career. Learn best practices for the arts and culture industry and utilize them in arts organization innovation and event planning, as well as marketing and fundraising. Credits earned through this graduate certificate may apply toward a master’s degree in Arts and Culture.

This certificate prepares students to:

  • Plan events that promote arts and culture

  • Determine, develop, and retain key audiences in the community

  • Evaluate the opportunities and build a strategic marketing plan using various forms of media
  • Create plans and strategies to gain funding through grants, fundraising, and donations

Master of Arts in Professional Creative Writing with a Concentration in Professional Creative Nonfiction Writing, Professional Dramatic Writing, Professional Fiction Writing. Professional Poetry Writing

Master's Degree Admission

Application Deadlines

  • Fall 2018 Final Submission Deadline: July 20, 2018
  • Fall 2018 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: June 15, 2018
  • Winter 2019 Final Submission Deadline: October 26, 2018
  • Winter 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: September 28, 2018
  • Spring 2019 Final Submission Deadline: February 8, 2019
  • Spring 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: January 11, 2019
  • Summer 2019 Final Submission Deadline: April 26, 2019
  • Summer 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: March 29, 2019

Admission Requirements

  • Online admission application
  • $75.00 Application Fee
  • University Minimum Degree and GPA Requirements
  • Transcripts: One official transcript from each post-secondary institution.
  • Letters of Recommendation: Two (2) letters of recommendation are required. Letters should be submitted by recommenders through the online application.
  • Personal Statement: A personal statement (two pages double spaced, 450-550 words) is required. The statement should include information on how the degree will enhance career plans and meet educational goals. Some questions to consider are (a) what do you expect to learn and achieve in your degree program? (b) what kind of professional position do you anticipate having five years after you earn this degree? (c) what experiences have you had that form the foundation for these career or educational goals? Sharing personal experiences, abilities, achievements, and goals is encouraged. This document has considerable influence in the decision to admit applicants with attention given to written communication skills, clarity, and organization.
  • Résumé: The résumé (or C.V.) should include work experience, research, and/or volunteer work.

Additional Standards for Non-Native English Speakers

Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. The minimum TOEFL/IELTS/CAE test score requirements for the degree program are:

  • Minimum TOEFL Score (paper-based test): 550
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (internet-based test): 80 with minimum of 20 on each subscore
  • Minimum IELTS Score: 6.5 with minimum of 6.0 on each band score
  • Minimum CAE Score: 176 with minimum of 169 on each band score
  • English Conditional Admission Offered: Master's degree applicants who do not meet the required level of English proficiency may be considered for conditional acceptance if all other admission criteria are met. Prior to enrolling in any graduate-level coursework, English Conditional Acceptance (ECA) requires an evaluation by the University of Denver's English Language Center (ELC) and successful completion of intensive ELC English courses including the Graduate Preparation Program. Academic classes may not be taken while students are enrolled at the English Language Center. As an alternative to the English Language Center, an applicant may become fully admitted by submitting sufficient TOEFL/Academic IELTS/CAE scores.

Read the English Language Proficiency policy for more details.

Read the English Conditional Admission (ECA) policy for more details.

Read the Required Tests for GTA Eligibility policy for more details.

Additional Standards for International Applicants

Per Student & Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) regulation, international applicants must meet all standards for admission before an I-20 or DS-2019 is issued, [per U.S. Federal Register: 8 CFR § 214.3(k)] or is academically eligible for admission and is admitted [per 22 C.F.R. §62]. Read the Additional Standards For International Applicants policy for more details.

Financial Aid

There are many different options available to finance your education. Most University of Denver graduate students are granted some type of financial support. Our Office of Financial Aid is committed to helping you explore your options.

 Master of Liberal Studies in Arts and Culture with a Concentration in Art, Literature and Culture and Arts Development and Program Management

Master's Degree Admission

Application Deadlines

  • Fall 2018 Final Submission Deadline: July 20, 2018
  • Fall 2018 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: June 15, 2018
  • Winter 2019 Final Submission Deadline: October 26, 2018
  • Winter 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: September 28, 2018
  • Spring 2019 Final Submission Deadline: February 8, 2019
  • Spring 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: January 11, 2019
  • Summer 2019 Final Submission Deadline: April 26, 2019
  • Summer 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: March 29, 2019

Admission Requirements

  • Online admission application
  • $75.00 Application Fee
  • University Minimum Degree and GPA Requirements
  • Transcripts: One official transcript from each post-secondary institution.
  • Letters of Recommendation: Two (2) letters of recommendation are required. Letters should be submitted by recommenders through the online application.
  • Personal Statement: A personal statement (two pages double spaced, 450-550 words) is required. The statement should include information on how the degree will enhance career plans and meet educational goals. Some questions to consider are (a) what do you expect to learn and achieve in your degree program? (b) what kind of professional position do you anticipate having five years after you earn this degree? (c) what experiences have you had that form the foundation for these career or educational goals? Sharing personal experiences, abilities, achievements, and goals is encouraged. This document has considerable influence in the decision to admit applicants with attention given to written communication skills, clarity, and organization.
  • Résumé: The résumé (or C.V.) should include work experience, research, and/or volunteer work.

Additional Standards for Non-Native English Speakers

Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. The minimum TOEFL/IELTS/CAE test score requirements for the degree program are:

  • Minimum TOEFL Score (paper-based test): 550
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (internet-based test): 80 with minimum of 20 on each subscore
  • Minimum IELTS Score: 6.5 with minimum of 6.0 on each band score
  • Minimum CAE Score: 176 with minimum of 169 on each band score
  • English Conditional Admission Offered: Master's degree applicants who do not meet the required level of English proficiency may be considered for conditional acceptance if all other admission criteria are met. Prior to enrolling in any graduate-level coursework, English Conditional Acceptance (ECA) requires an evaluation by the University of Denver's English Language Center (ELC) and successful completion of intensive ELC English courses including the Graduate Preparation Program. Academic classes may not be taken while students are enrolled at the English Language Center. As an alternative to the English Language Center, an applicant may become fully admitted by submitting sufficient TOEFL/Academic IELTS/CAE scores.

 

Read the English Language Proficiency policy for more details.

Read the English Conditional Admission (ECA) policy for more details.

Read the Required Tests for GTA Eligibility policy for more details.

Additional Standards for International Applicants

Per Student & Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) regulation, international applicants must meet all standards for admission before an I-20 or DS-2019 is issued, [per U.S. Federal Register: 8 CFR § 214.3(k)] or is academically eligible for admission and is admitted [per 22 C.F.R. §62]. Read the Additional Standards For International Applicants policy for more details.

Financial Aid

There are many different options available to finance your education. Most University of Denver graduate students are granted some type of financial support. Our Office of Financial Aid is committed to helping you explore your options.

Certificate in Professional Creative Writing with a Concentration in PROFESSIONAL CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING, PROFESSIONAL DRAMATIC WRITING, PROFESSIONAL FICTION WRITING. PROFESSIONAL POETRY WRITING

Certificate Admission

Application Deadlines

  • Fall 2018 Final Submission Deadline: July 20, 2018
  • Fall 2018 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: June 15, 2018
  • Winter 2019 Final Submission Deadline: October 26, 2018
  • Winter 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: September 28, 2018
  • Spring 2019 Final Submission Deadline: February 8, 2019
  • Spring 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: January 11, 2019
  • Summer 2019 Final Submission Deadline: April 26, 2019
  • Summer 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: March 29, 2019

Admission Requirements

Admission Standards for Non-Native English Speakers

Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. The minimum TOEFL/IELTS/CAE test score requirements for the degree program are:

  • Minimum TOEFL Score (paper-based test): 550
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (internet-based test): 80 with minimum of 20 on each subscore
  • Minimum IELTS Score: 6.5 with minimum of 6.0 on each band score
  • Minimum CAE Score: 176 with minimum of 169 on each band score
  • English Conditional Admission Offered: No, University College certificate programs do not offer English Conditional Admission.

 

Read the English Language Proficiency policy for more details.

Read the English Conditional Admission (ECA) policy for more details.

Read the Required Tests for GTA Eligibility policy for more details.

Additional Standards for International Applicants

Per Student & Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) regulation, international applicants must meet all standards for admission before an I-20 or DS-2019 is issued, [per U.S. Federal Register: 8 CFR § 214.3(k)] or is academically eligible for admission and is admitted [per 22 C.F.R. §62]. Read the Additional Standards For International Applicants policy for more details.

Financial Aid

There are many different options available to finance your education. Most University of Denver graduate students are granted some type of financial support. Our Office of Financial Aid is committed to helping you explore your options.

Certificate in Arts and CUlture with a Concentration in Art, Literature and Culture and Arts Development and Program Management

Certificate Admission

Application Deadlines

  • Fall 2018 Final Submission Deadline: July 20, 2018
  • Fall 2018 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: June 15, 2018
  • Winter 2019 Final Submission Deadline: October 26, 2018
  • Winter 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: September 28, 2018
  • Spring 2019 Final Submission Deadline: February 8, 2019
  • Spring 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: January 11, 2019
  • Summer 2019 Final Submission Deadline: April 26, 2019
  • Summer 2019 Deadline for Applicants Educated Outside the U.S.: March 29, 2019

Admission Requirements

Admission Standards for Non-Native English Speakers

Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. The minimum TOEFL/IELTS/CAE test score requirements for the degree program are:

  • Minimum TOEFL Score (paper-based test): 550
  • Minimum TOEFL Score (internet-based test): 80 with minimum of 20 on each subscore
  • Minimum IELTS Score: 6.5 with minimum of 6.0 on each band score
  • Minimum CAE Score: 176 with minimum of 169 on each band score
  • English Conditional Admission Offered: No, University College certificate programs do not offer English Conditional Admission.

 

Read the English Language Proficiency policy for more details.

Read the English Conditional Admission (ECA) policy for more details.

Read the Required Tests for GTA Eligibility policy for more details.

Additional Standards for International Applicants

Per Student & Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) regulation, international applicants must meet all standards for admission before an I-20 or DS-2019 is issued, [per U.S. Federal Register: 8 CFR § 214.3(k)] or is academically eligible for admission and is admitted [per 22 C.F.R. §62]. Read the Additional Standards For International Applicants policy for more details.

Financial Aid

There are many different options available to finance your education. Most University of Denver graduate students are granted some type of financial support. Our Office of Financial Aid is committed to helping you explore your options.

Master of Arts in Professional writing with a Concentration in Professional Creative Nonfiction Writing

Degree Requirements

Core coursework requirements:
PWRI 4500The Writing Life: Concepts, Practices, and Professionalism4
PWRI 4510Literary Genres for Writers4
PWRI 4520The Writers Workshop4
PWRI 4917Professional Research for Creative Writers4
PWRI 4901Professional Creative Writing Capstone Project4
or PWRI 4920 Portfolio Capstone
Concentration requirements:
PWRI 4100Masterworks: Creative Nonfiction4
PWRI 4110Writing Creative Nonfiction: Foundational Concepts, Skills, and Practice4
PWRI 4120Writing the Personal Essay4
PWRI 4130Writing the Memoir4
Elective requirements (Choose three courses):12
Natural Science and Literature
Literature to Film
Writing and Healing
Literary Translation: Crossing Borders to Enrich Your Own Writing
Children's Literature: From Picture Books to Books for Young Adults
From Romance to Realism
Topics in Literature
Topics in Writing
Total Credits48

Minimum number of credits required: 48

Students will work with their personal academic advisor to determine the best set of courses to choose for their electives.

A satisfactory quality of achievement with a grade point average of “B” (3.0) or better is required in graduate coursework accepted for the degree. The average is determined on the basis of the University’s grading system. In no case, may more than one-fourth of the hours accepted toward the degree be of “C” grade. A grade lower than “C” renders the credit unacceptable for meeting degree requirements. Students must earn a grade of B- or better in the Capstone Project or Capstone Seminar.

Master of Arts in Professional writing with a Concentration in Professional Dramatic Writing

Core coursework requirements:
PWRI 4500The Writing Life: Concepts, Practices, and Professionalism4
PWRI 4510Literary Genres for Writers4
PWRI 4520The Writers Workshop4
PWRI 4917Professional Research for Creative Writers4
PWRI 4901Professional Creative Writing Capstone Project4
or PWRI 4920 Portfolio Capstone
Concentration requirements:
PWRI 4300Masterworks: Drama4
PWRI 4310Writing Drama: Foundational Concepts, Skills, and Practice 4
PWRI 4320Writing the Screenplay4
PWRI 4330Writing for Personal Performance4
Electives (Choose three courses):12
Natural Science and Literature
Literature to Film
Writing and Healing
Literary Translation: Crossing Borders to Enrich Your Own Writing
Children's Literature: From Picture Books to Books for Young Adults
From Romance to Realism
Topics in Literature
Topics in Writing
Total Credits48

Minimum number of credits required: 48

Students will work with their personal academic advisor to determine the best set of courses to choose for their electives.

A satisfactory quality of achievement with a grade point average of “B” (3.0) or better is required in graduate coursework accepted for the degree. The average is determined on the basis of the University’s grading system. In no case, may more than one-fourth of the hours accepted toward the degree be of “C” grade. A grade lower than “C” renders the credit unacceptable for meeting degree requirements. Students must earn a grade of B- or better in the Capstone Project or Capstone Seminar.

Master of Arts in Professional writing with a Concentration in Professional Fiction Writing

Core coursework requirements:
PWRI 4500The Writing Life: Concepts, Practices, and Professionalism4
PWRI 4510Literary Genres for Writers4
PWRI 4520The Writers Workshop4
PWRI 4917Professional Research for Creative Writers4
PWRI 4901Professional Creative Writing Capstone Project4
or PWRI 4920 Portfolio Capstone
Concentration requirements:
PWRI 4000Masterworks: Fiction4
PWRI 4010Writing Fiction: Foundational Concepts, Skills, and Practice4
PWRI 4020Writing the Short Story4
PWRI 4030Writing the Novella4
Elective requirements (Choose three courses):12
Natural Science and Literature
Literature to Film
Writing and Healing
Literary Translation: Crossing Borders to Enrich Your Own Writing
Children's Literature: From Picture Books to Books for Young Adults
From Romance to Realism
Topics in Literature
Topics in Writing
Total Credits48

Minimum number of credits required: 48

Students will work with their personal academic advisor to determine the best set of courses to choose for their electives.

A satisfactory quality of achievement with a grade point average of “B” (3.0) or better is required in graduate coursework accepted for the degree. The average is determined on the basis of the University’s grading system. In no case, may more than one-fourth of the hours accepted toward the degree be of “C” grade. A grade lower than “C” renders the credit unacceptable for meeting degree requirements. Students must earn a grade of B- or better in the Capstone Project or Capstone Seminar.

Master of Arts in Professional writing with a Concentration in Professional Poetry Writing

Core coursework requirements:
PWRI 4500The Writing Life: Concepts, Practices, and Professionalism4
PWRI 4510Literary Genres for Writers4
PWRI 4520The Writers Workshop4
PWRI 4917Professional Research for Creative Writers4
PWRI 4901Professional Creative Writing Capstone Project4
or PWRI 4920 Portfolio Capstone
Concentration requirements:
PWRI 4200Masterworks: Poetry4
PWRI 4210Writing Poetry: Foundational Concepts, Skills, and Practice4
PWRI 4220Writing Traditional Verse and Contemporary Song Lyrics4
PWRI 4230Writing Improvisational Verse and Prose Poetry4
Elective requirements (Choose three courses):12
Natural Science and Literature
Literature to Film
Writing and Healing
Literary Translation: Crossing Borders to Enrich Your Own Writing
Children's Literature: From Picture Books to Books for Young Adults
From Romance to Realism
Topics in Literature
Topics in Writing
Total Credits48

Minimum number of credits required: 48

Students will work with their personal academic advisor to determine the best set of courses to choose for their electives.

A satisfactory quality of achievement with a grade point average of “B” (3.0) or better is required in graduate coursework accepted for the degree. The average is determined on the basis of the University’s grading system. In no case, may more than one-fourth of the hours accepted toward the degree be of “C” grade. A grade lower than “C” renders the credit unacceptable for meeting degree requirements. Students must earn a grade of B- or better in the Capstone Project or Capstone Seminar.

 

Master of Liberal Studies in Arts and Culture with a Concentration in Arts Development and Program Management

Degree Requirements

Core course requirements:
MALS 4470Arts and Culture: History, Context, and Trends4
MALS 4480Arts and Culture: Best Practices and Practical Skills4
MALS 4490Cultural Participation and Program Planning4
MALS 4905Graduate Social Research Methods4
MALS 4901Capstone Project4
or MALS 4902 Capstone Seminar
or MALS 4904 Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar
Concentration requirements (Choose four courses):
MALS 4280Funding the Arts and Program Development4
MALS 4281Event Planning4
MALS 4283Strategic Planning for Arts and Culture Marketing 4
MALS 4284Arts and Culture Entrepreneurship4
Elective requirements (Choose three courses): 12
World Visual & Performance Art
Emerging Trends in Art
Masterworks: Fiction
Natural Science and Literature
Literature to Film
Writing and Healing
The Writing Life: Concepts, Practices, and Professionalism
Literary Genres for Writers
Children's Literature: From Picture Books to Books for Young Adults
From Romance to Realism
Total Credits48

Minimum number of credits required: 48

Students will work with their personal academic advisor to determine the best set of courses to choose for their electives.

A satisfactory quality of achievement with a grade point average of “B” (3.0) or better is required in graduate coursework accepted for the degree. The average is determined on the basis of the University’s grading system. In no case, may more than one-fourth of the hours accepted toward the degree be of “C” grade. A grade lower than “C” renders the credit unacceptable for meeting degree requirements. Students must earn a grade of B- or better in the Capstone Project or Capstone Seminar.

Certificate in Arts and Culture with a Concentration in Arts Development and Program Management

Program Requirements

Concentration requirements:
MALS 4280Funding the Arts and Program Development4
MALS 4281Event Planning4
MALS 4283Strategic Planning for Arts and Culture Marketing 4
MALS 4284Arts and Culture Entrepreneurship4
Elective requirements (Choose two courses):8
World Visual & Performance Art
Emerging Trends in Art
Literature to Film
Literary Genres for Writers
Total Credits24

Minimum number of credits required: 24

certificate in Professional writing with a Concentration in Professional Creative Nonfiction Writing

Degree Requirements

Concentration requirements:
PWRI 4100Masterworks: Creative Nonfiction4
PWRI 4110Writing Creative Nonfiction: Foundational Concepts, Skills, and Practice4
PWRI 4120Writing the Personal Essay4
PWRI 4130Writing the Memoir4
Elective requirements (Choose two courses):8
Natural Science and Literature
Literature to Film
Writing and Healing
Literary Translation: Crossing Borders to Enrich Your Own Writing
The Writing Life: Concepts, Practices, and Professionalism
Literary Genres for Writers
The Writers Workshop
Children's Literature: From Picture Books to Books for Young Adults
From Romance to Realism
Topics in Literature
Topics in Writing
Total Credits24

Minimum number of credits required: 24

certificate in Professional writing with a Concentration in Professional Dramatic Writing

Concentration requirements:
PWRI 4300Masterworks: Drama4
PWRI 4310Writing Drama: Foundational Concepts, Skills, and Practice 4
PWRI 4320Writing the Screenplay4
PWRI 4330Writing for Personal Performance4
Electives (Choose two courses):8
Natural Science and Literature
Literature to Film
Writing and Healing
Literary Translation: Crossing Borders to Enrich Your Own Writing
The Writing Life: Concepts, Practices, and Professionalism
Literary Genres for Writers
The Writers Workshop
Children's Literature: From Picture Books to Books for Young Adults
From Romance to Realism
Topics in Literature
Topics in Writing
Total Credits24

Minimum number of credits required: 24

certificate in Professional writing with a Concentration in Professional Fiction Writing

Concentration requirements:
PWRI 4000Masterworks: Fiction4
PWRI 4010Writing Fiction: Foundational Concepts, Skills, and Practice4
PWRI 4020Writing the Short Story4
PWRI 4030Writing the Novella4
Elective requirements (Choose two courses):8
Natural Science and Literature
Literature to Film
Writing and Healing
Literary Translation: Crossing Borders to Enrich Your Own Writing
The Writing Life: Concepts, Practices, and Professionalism
Literary Genres for Writers
The Writers Workshop
Children's Literature: From Picture Books to Books for Young Adults
From Romance to Realism
Topics in Literature
Topics in Writing
Total Credits24

Minimum number of credits required: 24

certificate in Professional writing with a Concentration in Professional Poetry Writing

Concentration requirements:
PWRI 4200Masterworks: Poetry4
PWRI 4210Writing Poetry: Foundational Concepts, Skills, and Practice4
PWRI 4220Writing Traditional Verse and Contemporary Song Lyrics4
PWRI 4230Writing Improvisational Verse and Prose Poetry4
Elective requirements (Choose two courses):8
Natural Science and Literature
Literature to Film
Writing and Healing
Literary Translation: Crossing Borders to Enrich Your Own Writing
The Writing Life: Concepts, Practices, and Professionalism
Literary Genres for Writers
The Writers Workshop
Children's Literature: From Picture Books to Books for Young Adults
From Romance to Realism
Topics in Literature
Topics in Writing
Total Credits24

Minimum number of credits required: 24

Courses

MALS 4020 Graduate Research and Writing (4 Credits)

Critical thinking, accomplished through solid research and clear writing, is paramount to success in one’s academic and professional pursuits. This course enables students to develop clear analytic and rhetorical writing skills at the graduate level; these skills are utilized throughout the curriculum in all degree areas. Each student organizes and produces a focused paper on a topic related to the student’s degree field that contains a continuing argument centered around a clear thesis statement supported by the work of experts. Sources are evaluated for validity and incorporated in the paper with regard to the absence of plagiarism and proper Turabian author-date documentation. Focusing on the thesis statement, students research and analyze current data and trends in the field, build a rhetorical argument, and draw conclusions. The course stresses editing and revision for mechanics, style, and language. It is designed to improve writing and communication skills for use in academic and professional settings. This course is required of all degree seeking students and should be taken in the first two quarter of enrollment. A final grade of B or better must be earned in this course to meet degree requirements.

MALS 4050 World Visual & Performance Art (4 Credits)

This course draws upon global artistic traditions of visual art and performance in conveying how human beings express ideas, themes, and emotions. Students view and experience artistic forms and movements throughout history and from a variety of traditions across the world, critically analyzing art movements and forms across time. They synthesize ideas across cultures, traditions, and types of creative expression and make connections and distinctions between genres and art forms. A different, rich, artistic theme is the focus each time the course is taught.

MALS 4070 The Writing Life: Concepts, Practices, and Professionalism (4 Credits)

This course aims to provide aspiring writers a basic knowledge of the creative and professional tools they will need to succeed, whatever their individual goals or life situation. This course tackles questions and challenges common to all writers at one time or another. Primary considerations include: What exactly does it mean to be a writer? What are my motivations for wanting to write? How can I identify and prioritize writing projects? How do I move my writing projects forward from concept to completion? These primary challenges require writers to narrow their creative focus and to cultivate habits of thought and behavior that sustain creative efforts in a world full of distractions, obligations, and competing claims on their time.

MALS 4080 Literary Genres for Writers: Drama, Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Poetry (4 Credits)

This course deals with the four core literary genres: Drama, Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, and Poetry. These genres are distinguished from one another in two ways: first, by the relative weight each genre gives to the key cross-genre elements, and secondly, by each genre's distinctive approach to structure and form. Within each genre, subgenres have evolved over time, each recognizable by particular patterns, each playing by a distinct set of rules. Whether writing within or across or even against those rules, writers need to understand how literary genres work in order to write effectively. This course aims to foster that understanding and prepare students to shape their writing in ways that align with their creative vision.

MALS 4090 Writing for the Stage: Fundamentals of Writing Drama (4 Credits)

This course uses readings of dramatic texts, brief lectures, writing assignments, and the performance of those writings to develop the skills required to write for the stage. Students learn the essentials of drama, including the design of effective plots, the creation of vivid characters, and the writing of performable dialogue. Students also explore the effects of drama’s necessarily collaborative process and varieties of stagecraft on the way playwrights shape their texts. Examples illustrate successful uses of key dramatic techniques and help students explore various approaches to expressing themselves fully and clearly through a range of open-ended exercises. Students also develop practical critiquing skills with the aim of helping themselves and their classmates create compelling plays that appeal to both theater professionals and theatrical audiences.

MALS 4120 Writing Non-Fiction (4 Credits)

This course concentrates on the craft of writing nonfiction, which includes genres and approaches such as memoir, the personal essay, narrative nonfiction, travel writing, humor, criticism, and experimental forms. Class discussions involve some lecture but are structured more as a workshop. Students learn about writing and write about learning. Members of the class are expected to express their ideas about the craft and to workshop their writing. The class is a safe place for writers to share their work with others and to learn from one another.

MALS 4130 Fiction Fundamentals (4 Credits)

Effective, powerful writing requires skills that can be acquired. This course is a combination of workshops and lectures focusing on the interplay of plot, characterization, and pacing. Students learn to turn personal experience into story structure and tap the psychological well-spring which enables writers to sustain momentum. The instructor utilizes literary examples to illustrate successful uses of these concepts. Students are invited to bring material at any stage of development to the first class. During the course, development and critique of each student’s material is encouraged.

MALS 4150 Poetry: The Voice Within (4 Credits)

This course is a combination of readings in poetry and poetics, brief lectures, and open discussions focused on the interplay of image, metaphor, rhythm, emotions and ideas in the expressive form of writing called poetry. Students learn to tap the imaginative sources that all creative writing springs from and flow those energies into poetic form. Examples illustrate successful uses of key poetic concepts and help students explore various approaches to expressing themselves fully and clearly through a range of open-ended exercises. Students develop practical critiquing skills with the aim of helping themselves and their classmates write with greater subtlety and power.

MALS 4163 Writing the Screenplay (4 Credits)

Screenwriting is the art of telling a story in images. This class focuses on elements of form and structure, with particular emphasis on format, character development, plot and dialogue. Movies are studied to illustrate genre, fixed and fluid characters, tragic flaw, the dynamic of relationships, development of protagonist and antagonist, and other screen elements. Numerous in-class exercises, discussions, workshops and screenings enable students to find the dramatic essence of stories, write a detailed film synopsis, treatment, and the first act of a feature-length screenplay.

MALS 4175 Literary Translation (4 Credits)

Translation is essential for a genuine exchange of ideas between people of different linguistic and cultural backgrounds. Besides being an essential service for cultural understanding, literary translation is also a form of creative writing. This course includes readings in the history, theory, and practice of literary translation, along with analysis of sample translations by leading translators. Students will also practice translation of literary texts, including poetry and short works of fiction and nonfiction. While increasing the student's awareness of the art of literary translation as an end in itself, the course also demonstrates translation’s value in enriching a writer’s development in his or her own work. Students should have basic skills in the source language of their choice, but full fluency is not required.

MALS 4190 The Writer's Workshop (4 Credits)

A writer writes" is the universal mantra of the writing life, but one of the critical steps in developing a work in progress is getting constructive feedback. Unfortunately, all too often, a writer ends up disappointed because the feedback received is superficial, too polite, or little more than proofreading. This course teaches students to workshop in a meaningful way, responding to content, focus, coherence, and organizational issues. Students learn to elicit more feedback from their workshop colleagues, demonstrating the relationship between reader and writer. The class explores a variety of genres, and each student produces short exercises and longer projects that demonstrate a grasp of various aspects of the writing craft. Periodically, guest authors with different writing specialties join the class to discuss the writing experience and shed light on the workshop process.

MALS 4260 Writing the Short Story (4 Credits)

The dramatic elements of the short story are distinct from any other form of fiction. This workshop is for writers who plan to seriously study the form of the contemporary short story, and to apply their learning to their own projects. Students focus equally on reading published works and writing/revising an original short story, as well as discussing aspects of publishing. Weekly writing exercises, readings, and workshops of student stories are combined to provide the most direct, effective training in this dynamic form. Prerequisite: MALS 4130 (Fiction Fundamentals).

MALS 4270 Writing & Healing (4 Credits)

Many writers attest to the emotional, spiritual, and even physical benefits of writing. In this course, we explore a variety of ways written expression can help us navigate the human journey. Students learn leading theoretical models of journal and poetry therapy (interactive bibliotherapy), assess poems for use in personal growth contexts, and participate in experiential discussions and writing exercises. Students focus on the writing and healing process rather than their own self-explorations of healing through writing. Students submit a portfolio of reflection writings, as well as complete a final paper on a writing topic that intersects with a personal growth experience or interest.

MALS 4280 Funding the Arts and Program Development (4 Credits)

Arts organizations must always consider funding when developing programming. Organizational strategic planning is analyzed, and fundraising is examined as a major component of that planning. Various tools and techniques for fundraising, including communication and planning skills, are analyzed and applied to case studies. Students explore different forms of fundraising and their implications for programming, which may include private or public grants, governmental funding, fundraising events, and private donations.

MALS 4281 Event Planning (4 Credits)

Events and festivals play a large role in promoting the arts and developing links between the arts community and wider audiences and patrons. Students address various topics associated with event and festival planning and management, such as program development, marketing and audience development, venue considerations, and building partnerships. Students create an event program and plan.

MALS 4283 Marketing the Arts: Audience Development and Retention (4 Credits)

This course provides a strategic approach to audience and markets. Students study basic principles of marketing and audience identification. They build strategic marketing plans that are cohesive with the mission and programming of the organization, utilizing various forms of media. Audience characteristics are examined from various perspectives, and theories of creating commitment to the arts are studied. Students create an arts marketing plan for an organization or event.

MALS 4284 Arts and Culture Entrepreneurship (4 Credits)

In any sector of the Arts and Culture field, whether government, non-profit, or for profit, it is essential to be able to develop programs and/or organizations from conception through implementation and assessment. This development requires the clear communication of what is needed to develop, implement, and sustain this plan over time. In this course, students take an entrepreneurial approach to develop a program or organization in the arts and culture field. Students develop and present a comprehensive business plan to define, map, structure, and assess the program / organization in either the non-profit or for profit sector.

MALS 4440 Artists on Art (4 Credits)

This course explores the professional life of the artist, including how artists conceive of a vision for their work, organize their time and space, and communicate about their art. Students read significant works (diaries, correspondence, and essays) by and about artists, and have opportunities to interact with working artists. Students keep and produce a journal to explore ideas, plan projects, and describe methods and media to be used in their current or proposed work.

MALS 4444 Emerging Trends in Art (4 Credits)

This course focuses on what is "going on" in the arts: contemporary trends, what's hot, what's not, and why. Selected themes in modern and contemporary art are reviewed to help students discover how their art will fit into or counter emerging trends in art. The latest cutting edge developments in art are explored, and students are challenged to describe the place and purpose for their work.

MALS 4470 Arts and Culture: History, Context, and Trends (4 Credits)

This course examines the significant and growing economic, social, and educational impact of the arts in today’s rapidly changing environment. Discussion of current and historical trends in the visual, performing, literary, and media arts provide a context for practical applications in the field.

MALS 4475 Organizational Vibrancy and Measurement (4 Credits)

As database and analytics systems for arts organizations grow ever more sophisticated, arts leaders must be literate in basics concepts of statistics, finance, and data analysis. This course will prepare students to examine data critically, explore the stories that data can tell, and determine how to measure success and vibrancy.

MALS 4480 Arts and Culture: Best Practices and Practical Skills (4 Credits)

This course provides a comprehensive overview of nonprofit best practices with specific applications to arts and culture organizations. Governance, budget planning and management, organizational development, advocacy, marketing and fundraising, community and rural development, event planning and facilities management are discussed using exemplary and diverse arts organizations as case studies.

MALS 4485 Legal Landscape of Arts and Culture (4 Credits)

Professionals in arts and culture, whether they are artists, managers, directors, or others working in the private, government, or nonprofit sector, will encounter a variety of legal issues during their careers. Through readings, case studies, assignments, and research, students will be introduced to a complex interdisciplinary system of relevant laws that impact and, in some cases, govern arts and culture organizational activities.

MALS 4490 Cultural Participation and Program Planning (4 Credits)

In this course, students explore changing attitudes and participation in the arts and the need for innovative approaches to engage audiences. Audience development and involvement is explored, especially in terms of arts education. The connection between cultural participation and program planning is closely examined. Various models are discussed on a theoretical level, and diverse arts organizations serve as case studies for practical applications.

MALS 4605 Sustainable Development (4 Credits)

Economic development, ecology and democracy are three volatile forces in the world today. Players in the tension between them include nations, large corporations, and a groundswell of farmers, workers, and ordinary people. This course looks at the model of sustainable development as a way for countries to make long-term and ethical decisions about how to use resources: earth, water, air, energy, as well as the most important resource, people. Contrasts will be drawn between Western economies humming along in the Digital Age and the emerging world attempting the leap from an agricultural paradigm to industrialization, while trying to avoid falling into the Malthus trap of overpopulation. Students will develop an understanding of the complex, intertwined relationship between economic growth, environment and humanity.

MALS 4701 Topics in Literature (4 Credits)

The content of this course varies each term. The topics may include time-sensitive issues in the area of literature, elective courses that are not scheduled regularly during the course of the year, or advanced inquiry into core-course subjects. Each time the course is offered, the specific content is announced in the quarterly course schedule. Depending on the subject matter, students may be required to have completed prerequisite courses.

MALS 4702 Topics in Writing (1-4 Credits)

The content of this course varies each time it is offered. The topics may include time-sensitive issues in the areas of writing and literature, elective courses that are not scheduled regularly during the course of the year, or advanced inquiry into core-course subjects. Each time the course is offered, the specific content is announced in the quarterly course schedule. Depending on the subject matter, students may be required to have completed prerequisite courses.

MALS 4703 Topics in Film (1-5 Credits)

The content of this course varies each time it is offered. The topics may include time-sensitive issues from the film industry, elective courses that are not scheduled regularly during the course of the year, or advanced inquiry into core-course subjects. Each time the course is offered, the specific content is announced in the quarterly course schedule. Depending on the subject matter, students may be required to have completed prerequisite courses.

MALS 4704 Topics in Art (1-5 Credits)

The content of this course varies each time it is offered. The topics may include time-sensitive issues from the film industry, elective courses that are not scheduled regularly during the course of the year, or advanced inquiry into core-course subjects. Each time the course is offered, the specific content is announced in the quarterly course schedule. Depending on the subject matter, students may be required to have completed prerequisite courses.

MALS 4705 Topics in Liberal Studies (1-5 Credits)

The content of this course varies each time it is offered. The topics may include time-sensitive issues from the film industry, elective courses that are not scheduled regularly during the course of the year, or advanced inquiry into core-course subjects. Each time the course is offered, the specific content is announced in the quarterly course schedule. Depending on the subject matter, students may be required to have completed prerequisite courses.

MALS 4740 Natural Science and Literature (4 Credits)

The natural sciences have inspired some of the most entertaining, creative and provocative works in international literature. Writers like Thoreau, Gould, McPhee, Kingsolver and others have explored some of the most complex theories that explain the majesty of the physical world. Students read and analyze many works in this popular genre. Specifically, the class looks at how these writers use story to shape their work, how they introduce and explain multifaceted theories for the layperson, and how recent scientific theory has shaped our culture. Students also have an opportunity to write about scientific subjects in their own voice.

MALS 4745 Children's Literature (4 Credits)

This course is an introductory study of all levels of children's literature for the student who is interested in literature, the student who is planning to teach, and for those who are or will be parents. This course introduces students to types, genres, and varieties of literature for reading to children as well as reading by children. The main focus is to remember the joys and wonders of reading as a child and young adult, and to approach the literature selected not as "just a kid's book," but as literature with real quality standards and room for critical and analytical discussions.

MALS 4750 Literature to Film (4 Credits)

In this course, we examine the adaptation of literary works into films. We closely study selected modern literary works and the film interpretations of each work. Focusing on the transition from one narrative form to another, the course aims at enhancing the critical skill of students as well as their creative ability. Therefore, we also have mini scripting workshops as a way of imaginatively highlighting the sort of considerations that go into the making of the film script.

MALS 4755 World Literature (4 Credits)

In this course, students take a literary tour of the world in 70 days. Stops along the way include classic works of the 20th-Century from Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America - fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. As with any whirlwind tour, students learn a little about "the other" and a lot about themselves. An emphasis can help us see our own literary and cultural assumptions with new eyes. Students are also asked to reflect on thematic relationships and differences among texts from different times and places.

MALS 4880 From Romance to Realism (4 Credits)

Nineteenth-century Britain witnessed wide-scale social, political, and cultural upheaval: the French Revolution, the expansion of empire, naval dominance, massive political reforms, and ongoing debate about women. This course explores the great writings of the period, examining the transition from the Romanticism of the early part of the century, characterized by the writing of William Wordsworth, S. T. Coleridge, Jane Austen, and Sir Walter Scott, to the realism of the later century employed by such writers as Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Robert Browning, and Alfred, Lord Tennyson. We explore the tensions, gaps, and overlaps between these two categories - Romanticism and realism - and their place in the writing of the authors whose works are frequently labeled as Romantic or realist. The course emphasizes both the literature itself and the cultural forces from which the literature developed.

MALS 4901 Capstone Project (4 Credits)

The Capstone Project provides students the opportunity to research a topic, problem, or issue within their field of study, and work individually with a Capstone advisor. Similar in weight to a thesis, but more flexible, this final project will synthesize and apply core concepts acquired from the program. The student will select an appropriate Capstone advisor who is knowledgeable in the field of study to work closely with and whom can guide the research project. Evaluation will be focused on the quality and professionalism of applied research and writing; critical and creative thinking; problem-solving skills; knowledge of research design, method, and implementation; and contribution to the field and topic of study. Please see the Capstone Guidelines for additional details. Prerequisites: A Capstone Proposal that has been approved by both the Capstone Advisor and the Academic Director, acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. A final grade of B- or better is required to pass.

MALS 4902 Capstone Seminar (4 Credits)

The Capstone Seminar is a graduate seminar in which students utilize the knowledge and skills gained through the degree program to create a culminating work that critically addresses a problem in their degree field of study. The students produce a Capstone of 7000-8000 words that presents a position on a relevant problem, supports the position with professional and academic literature, analyzes and tests the proposed solution, and discusses the findings as related to the field of study. The seminar is dependent upon quality, collegial discussion, and feedback of students’ research and work products, under the facilitation of a faculty member. The course structure guides the students through the process of independent, secondary research and writing of a Capstone. No primary research is allowed. Students generate the course content through ongoing discussion and peer feedback on the Capstone process and individual topic areas under investigation. Students professionally and academically communicate through written work and oral presentation. Students must have: Acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.A final grade of B- or better is required in this course to meet degree requirements. Students must complete the Capstone Seminar in one quarter; no incomplete grades are assigned.

MALS 4903 Creative Capstone Seminar (4 Credits)

The Creative Capstone Seminar is a graduate seminar in which students utilize the knowledge and skills gained through the degree program to create a culminating creative work and a paper that critically addresses its context in the degree field of study. In the critical paper, the student presents writing and content motivations of the creative work, supports those motivations with professional and academic work in the field, analyzes the creative work in the context of the writing and literature fields, and reflects upon the creative process. The seminar is dependent upon collegial discussion of student writing process and drafts under the facilitation of a faculty member, and it is governed by the quality of participation and contributions of the students. The course structure, facilitated by the faculty member, guides the students through the creative process and writing of an analytical capstone paper; the instructor provides intensive feedback on the capstone process and papers. Students are responsible for generating the course content through ongoing discussion of and peer feedback on the capstone process and individual work, as well as the analysis and contextualization of focused student creative work and papers within the wider degree field of study. Students will professionally and academically communicate their creations and findings through written work and oral presentation.Students must have: Unconditional acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. A final grade of B- or better is required in this course to meet degree requirements. Students must complete the Capstone Seminar in one quarter; no incomplete grades are assigned.

MALS 4904 Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar (4 Credits)

The Interdisciplinary Capstone Seminar is a graduate seminar in which students utilize the knowledge and skills gained through the degree program to create a culminating work that critically addresses a problem or issue in the degree field of study. Members of the class will include students from various UCOL programs, representing multiple topics of study. On campus offerings of this course include required online components. The student produces a paper of 7000-8000 words that presents a position on a relevant problem or issue, supports the position with professional and academic work in the field, analyzes and tests the paper position, and discusses the role of the findings within the field of study. Students professionally and academically communicate their findings through written work and oral presentations. The seminar is dependent upon active and collegial discussion and critique of student research and work under the facilitation of a faculty member, and it is governed by the quality of participation and contributions of the students. Students must have: Acceptance as a degree candidate, completion of at least 40 quarter-hours (including all core courses) with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better A final grade of B- or better is required in this course to meet degree requirements. Students must complete the Capstone Seminar in one quarter; no incomplete grades are assigned.

MALS 4905 Graduate Social Research Methods (4 Credits)

Graduate Social Research Methods is an exploration of the methods and purposes of social science research from the perspective of the researcher as well as that of the informed professional and consumer of information. Students will learn about the process of research, including the development of research questions, the purpose of various social science research methods, the role of professional ethics, and general approaches to the analysis and interpretation of data. Students will develop the ability to read and critique basic social science research articles and to implement simple research designs. Students will develop and write a research proposal around a specific research question informed by a review of the literature. Technical requirements include the ability to read and modify Microsoft Excel documents. This course is required of all degree-seeking students and should be taken in the first three quarters of enrollment.

MALS 4915 Research in Humanities (4 Credits)

Graduate Social Research Methods is an exploration of the methods and purposes of social science research from the perspective of the researcher as well as that of the informed professional and consumer of information. Students will learn about the process of research, including the development of research questions, the purpose of various social science research methods, the role of professional ethics, and general approaches to the analysis and interpretation of data. Students will develop the ability to read and critique basic social science research articles and to implement simple research designs. Students will develop and write a research proposal around a specific research question informed by a review of the literature. Technical requirements include the ability to read and modify Microsoft Excel documents. This course is required of all degree-seeking students and should be taken in the first three quarters of enrollment.

MALS 4920 Portfolio Capstone (4 Credits)

The Portfolio Capstone course provides students the opportunity to reflect upon the work they have done throughout their graduate studies at University College and synthesize their learning. Students in the Portfolio Capstone produce deliverables that include: (1) a thorough annotation of their portfolio, a process requiring critical and creative thinking about their educational experience, and (2) a pinnacle project that identifies, analyzes, and elaborates significant themes in their program experience, evaluates their accomplishments, connects their coursework to their professional goals, and assesses those goals in the context of their chosen field. Students must complete the Portfolio Capstone with a grade of B or better.

MALS 4980 Internship (1-4 Credits)

The internship is designed to offer students a purposeful experience in a practical, industry-related setting. The internship is an individualized learning experience and a training plain is created for each student in conjunction with the internship site to provide experiences related to the skills and knowledge covered in the certificate and master's programs.

MALS 4991 Independent Study (1-8 Credits)

This is an advanced course for students wishing to pursue an independent course of study. The student must be accepted in a degree program, have earned a grade point average of 3.0 or better, obtained the approval of the department director, and have completed the Independent Study form and filed the form with all appropriate offices before registering for the independent study. Independent Study is offered only on a credit basis and only for degree candidates.

MALS 4992 Directed Study (1-8 Credits)

This is an advanced course for students wishing to pursue a directed course of study. The student must be accepted in a degree program, have earned a grade point average of 3.0 or better, obtained the approval of the department director, and have completed the Independent Study form and filed the form with all appropriate offices before registering for the independent study. Directed Study is offered only on a for-credit basis.

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