2016-2017 Graduate Bulletin

English

Office: Sturm Hall
Mail Code: 2000 E. Asbury Ave., Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-2266
Email: kheeps@du.edu
Web Site: http://www.du.edu/english

The Department of English offers a PhD in English with concentrations in creative writing and literary studies, as well as an MA with a concentration in literary studies.

Our major areas for dissertation research include creative writing; modern and contemporary British literature; American literature; American multicultural literature and Anglophone literatures; genre studies; and literary theory and rhetoric. We also offer course work in traditional literary fields, cultural studies, ethnic literatures and gender studies.

The University of Denver’s Department of English is small and intimate, with 22 faculty members, who all publish widely and seek to translate their learning into shared experiences by working closely with students in and out of the classroom.

Because of our relatively small faculty, the department has the flexibility to allow students to tailor their degrees to their specific talents and interests. We do so with a distinctive curriculum that offers not only typical graduate seminars but also writing workshops, individually designed tutorials and colloquia devoted to teaching and professional development. Such a curriculum encourages students to cross genre boundaries in their writing, to relate theory to practice and to work creatively with scholarly projects.

Master of Arts in English With a Concentration IN Literary Studies

Following are the simple steps to apply for the Master of Arts in English at the University of Denver. If you have any questions about the process, please contact the Office of Graduate Studies.

Apply Online / Application Deadlines

  • Applications for graduate study at the University of Denver must be submitted online. Apply online.
  • All online materials must be received, and all supplemental materials including transcripts must be on file in the Office of Graduate Studies, by the program’s stated deadline: January 1. The program admits for the fall quarter only.
  • A $65 non-refundable application fee is required for an application to be processed. Application fee waivers are available for McNair Scholars.

Course and Degree Prerequisites and Requirements

  • Applicants must earn and submit proof of earning the equivalent of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution prior to beginning graduate coursework at DU. A Bachelor of Arts degree (BA), from a regionally accredited college or university, showing satisfactory preparation, grades and potential for advanced study are required for the master's program.

Transcripts

  • Applicants are required to submit an official transcript from each post-secondary institution they have attended, or are presently attending, where two quarter hours (or one semester hour) or more were completed including study abroad and college coursework completed in high school.
  • The applicant is responsible for obtaining all transcripts. Applicants who have earned a degree outside the U.S. must submit transcripts accompanied by certified English translations, if not normally issued in English. DU students and alumni do not need to provide DU transcripts.
  • Official study abroad transcripts are required unless the course titles, grades and credit earned abroad appear on another transcript. Transcripts from outside of the U.S. are evaluated by the Office of International Student Admission. This process can take three to four weeks and must be complete by the program’s stated deadline. Therefore, applicants with a degree from outside of the U.S. are encouraged to apply early. Applicants educated outside the U.S. are encouraged to contact the Office of Graduate Studies for assistance regarding transcript-related materials.
  • The University of Denver will consider electronic transcripts official from a domestic institution provided by the following approved agencies: Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcript System (AARTS); Docufide/Parchment; National Student Clearinghouse; Naviance; Royall and Company; and, Scrip-Safe.
  • Paper transcripts should be sent to the following address:

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

Language Proficiency

  • Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are required of all graduate applicants, regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not a native language. Applications will not be processed until the required TOEFL or IELTS score is received. The TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. The minimum TOEFL score accepted by the graduate programs in English at DU is 88 (iBT) or 570 (paper-based). The institution code for the University of Denver is 4842. The minimum IELTS score accepted by English is 6.5. Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) must demonstrate fluency in spoken English by scoring a 26 on the TOEFL speaking section or 8.0 on the IELTS speaking section. Please see the Graduate Policy Manual for complete English language proficiency requirements.
  • Applicants may be exempted from English proficiency test requirements if by the time of matriculation they have earned a post-secondary degree from a formally-recognized/accredited university where the language of instruction and examination is English. Such applicants may be exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement but not from other standardized graduate entrance examinations. There are no exemptions for Graduate Teaching Assistants.
  • Students whose native language is not English and who are required to submit TOEFL/IELTS scores will be assessed by the University of Denver English Language Center (ELC) prior to matriculation.

Test Scores

  • Satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) for both the general test and the Advanced Literature subject test are required. Scores must be received directly from the appropriate testing agency by the program's stated deadline. The institution code for the University of Denver is 4842.

Essay

  • An academic essay is required. The essay should be submitted via upload through the online application process.

Statement

  • A statement of intent is required. The statement should be submitted via upload through the online application process.

Recommendation Letters

  • Three letters of recommendation from college instructors that speak to the applicant’s scholarly and/or creative work are required. Letters should be solicited and uploaded by recommenders through the online application system. Requests for letters should be sent to recommenders well in advance so the letters are on file by the application deadline.

Financial Support

  • To be considered for financial support, domestic applicants should apply early and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by the priority deadline, February 15. Information about financial aid can be found on the Office of Financial Aid website. International students are not eligible for federal financial aid.

Application Status

  • We encourage you to be actively engaged in the admission process. You can check your application status online. Applicants will receive login information post application submission.

Contact Information

  • Mail official transcripts and any supplemental admission materials not submitted with the online application to:

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

  • Electronic transcripts should be sent to mailto:gradinfo@du.edu.
  • For more information call (303) 871-2706.

International Applicants

  • For complete international applicant information, please visit the Office of Graduate Studies International Student Application Information. International applicants are strongly encouraged to have their applications complete, with all materials on file in the admission office, at least eight weeks prior to the program’s application deadline.

The Graduate Policies and Procedures provides complete details regarding admission requirements.

Doctor of Philosophy in English with a Concentration in Creative Writing or Literary Studies

Following are the simple steps to apply for graduate study in the Doctor of Philosophy in English at the University of Denver. If you have any questions about the process, please contact the Office of Graduate Studies.

Apply Online / Application Deadlines

  • Applications for graduate study in English at the University of Denver must be submitted online. Apply online.
  • All online materials must be received, and all supplemental materials including transcripts must be on file int he Office of Graduate Studies, by the program’s stated deadline: January 1. The program admits for the fall quarter only.
  • A $65 non-refundable application fee is required for an application to be processed. Application fee waivers are available for McNair Scholars.

Course and Degree Prerequisites and Requirements

  • Applicants must earn and submit proof of earning the equivalent of a baccalaureate degree and a master’s degree from a regionally accredited institution prior to beginning graduate coursework at DU. A Master of Arts degree (MA) or Master of Fine Arts (MFA), from a regionally accredited college or university, showing satisfactory preparation, grades and potential for advanced study are required for the doctoral program.

Transcripts

  • Applicants are required to submit an official transcript from each post-secondary institution they have attended, or are presently attending, where two quarter hours (or one semester hour) or more were completed including study abroad and college coursework completed in high school.
  • The applicant is responsible for obtaining all transcripts. Applicants who have earned a degree outside the U.S. must submit transcripts accompanied by certified English translations, if not normally issued in English. DU students and alumni do not need to provide DU transcripts.
  • Official study abroad transcripts are required unless the course titles, grades and credit earned abroad appear on another transcript. Transcripts from outside of the U.S. are evaluated by the Office of International Student Admission. This process can take three to four weeks and must be complete by the program’s stated deadline. Therefore, applicants with a degree from outside of the U.S. are encouraged to apply early. Applicants educated outside the U.S. are encouraged to contact the Office of Graduate Studies for assistance regarding transcript-related materials.
  • The University of Denver will consider electronic transcripts official from a domestic institution provided by the following approved agencies: Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcript System (AARTS); Docufide/Parchment; National Student Clearinghouse; Naviance; Royall and Company; and, Scrip-Safe.
  • Paper transcripts should be sent to the following address:

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

Language Proficiency

  • Official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are required of all graduate applicants,regardless of citizenship status, whose native language is not English or who have been educated in countries where English is not the native language. Applications will not be processed until the required TOEFL or IELTS score is received. The TOEFL and IELTS scores are valid for two years from the test date. The minimum TOEFL score accepted by the graduate programs in English at DU is 88 (iBT) or 570 (paper-based). The institution code for the University of Denver is 4842. The minimum IELTS score accepted by English is 6.5. Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) must demonstrate fluency in spoken English by scoring a 26 on the TOEFL speaking section or 8.0 on the IELTS speaking section. Please see the Graduate Policy Manual for complete English language proficiency requirements.
  • Applicants may be exempted from English proficiency test requirements if by the time of matriculation they have earned a post-secondary degree from a formally-recognized/accredited university where the language of instruction and examination is English. Such applicants may be exempt from the TOEFL/IELTS requirement but not from other standardized graduate entrance examinations. There are no exemptions for graduate teaching assistants.
  • Students whose native language is not English and who are required to submit TOEFL/IELTS scores will be assessed by the University of Denver English Language Center (ELC) prior to matriculation.

Test Scores

  • Satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) for both the general test and the Advanced Literature subject test are required. Scores must be received directly from the appropriate testing agency by the program's stated deadline. The institution code for the University of Denver is 4842.

Essay

  • An academic essay is required. The essay should be submitted via upload through the online application process.

Statement

  • A statement of intent is required. The statement should be submitted via upload through the online application process.

Recommendation Letters

  • Three letters of recommendation from college instructors that speak to the applicant’s scholarly and/or creative work are required. Letters should be solicited and uploaded by recommenders through the online application system. Requests for letters should be sent to recommenders well in advance so the letters are on file by the application deadline.

Program-Specific Admission Requirements

  • Applicants for the creative writing concentration must also submit representative samples of creative work. These may be submitted via upload through the online application process.

Financial Support

  • To be considered for financial support, domestic applicants should apply early and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by the priority deadline, February 15. Information about financial aid can be found on the Office of Financial Aid website. International students are not eligible for federal financial aid.
  • Teaching fellowships are three-year awards that include a stipend and full tuition waiver.Applicants are considered for fellowship and may also be nominated for other awards including the Doctoral Fellowship, a grant to an exceptional PhD candidate; the Doctoral Fellowship for Inclusive Excellence; Graduate Studies Dissertation Fellowship, and The Evan Frankel Dissertation Fellowship, a stipend for a fourth-year doctoral student to work full-time on completion of the dissertation. All teaching assistantships and fellowships require full-time attendance. Also, all assistantships and fellowships require that students remain in good standing and meet all major requirements on schedule.

Application Status

  • We encourage you to be actively engaged in the admission process. You can check your application status online. Applicants will receive login information post application submission.

Contact Information

  • Mail official transcripts and any supplemental admission materials not submitted with the online application to:

University of Denver
Office of Graduate Studies
Mary Reed Building, Room 5
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO 80208-4802

  • Electronic transcripts should be sent to gradinfo@du.edu.
  • For more information call (303) 871-2706

International Applicants

  • For complete international applicant information, please visit the Office of Graduate Studies International Student Application Information. International applicants are strongly encouraged to have their applications complete, with all materials on file in the admission office, at least eight weeks prior to the program’s application deadline.

The Graduate Policies and Procedures provides complete details regarding admission requirements.

Doctor of Philosophy in English with a Concentration in Creative Writing 

Degree Requirements

Course Requirements

Coursework Requirements
48 hours of course work must be in formal classes, excluding ENGL 5995 and ENGL 5991 and tutorials (ENGL 4100)
Five courses distributed over three literary periods. Students must take at least one course in one period and at least two courses in the other two periods. Students must petition to count more than two 3000- graduate level courses towards graduate study.
Courses listed below are representative examples. Students may consult the department for additional course options.
Before 1700
Old English
Special Topics in Medieval Lit
Special Topics-Early Mod Lit
Advanced Studies in Early Modern Literature
Seminar-Studies in Shakespeare
1700-1900
Advanced Studies in 18th Century Literature
Spc Tpcs: 18th Cent Literature
Topics in English: 19th Century Literature
Antebellum American Literature
American Romanticism
Spc Tpc: Antebellum Amer Lit
After 1900
Adv Studies -20th Cent Lit
Adv Studies-20th C. Literature
Special Topics: 20th Cent Lit
Graduate Tutorials (Students may take up to 5 tutorials, 10 credits total)
Graduate Tutorial
Three Graduate Professional Seminars (count towards the 48 hours of course work)6
Seminar: Teaching and Writing Literature
Topics in English (Crit Imag)
Colloquium
Three writing workshops: two in the genre of specialization, one in another12
Sem Creative Writing-Poetry
Sem Creative Writing-Fiction
Travel Writing
Special Topics: 20th Cent Lit (Translation)
Total Credits 90

Minimum number of credits required for the degree: 90 graduate-level quarter hours beyond the master’s degree

Non-Course Requirements:

  • Preliminary advancement to candidacy
  • Advancement to candidacy
  • A dissertation of publishable quality that makes a significant contribution to its field. This will take the form of an extended scholarly and critical work (usually between 150 and 250 pages) OR a creative work (fiction or poetry). The creative dissertation must include a critical preface that situates the dissertation in its literary context.
  • Oral defense. When the dissertation is completed, it must be defended by the candidate. The defense must take place by April 30. No dissertation defenses will be held during the summer quarter. The candidate is therefore advised to set the defense date as far in advance as possible. The defense takes the form of a discussion with the committee concerning the content, context and implications of the work.
  • Tool (reading knowledge of one language) proficiency may be established by completing any one of the following:
  • Passing a standard reading examination accredited by the Department
  • Passing, with a grade of B or better, a 3000-level literature course in the language.
  • Successful completion of the Bibliography and Research Methods class in the Department of English.
  • Selection and successful completion of a cognate course in another department that will augment specific skills. This course must be approved by the Graduate Committee.
  • Successful completion of Old English (4 credits), followed by a “Beowulf” tutorial (2 credits), followed by an intermediate Old English tutorial (2 credits). (This option will no longer require a petition to the Graduate Committee.)
  • Successful completion of a graduate translation class (students must secure approval of instructor)

The Tool requirement must be completed one quarter before graduation.

  • Proposal & Prospectus review. By the end of the Fall quarter of the third year, students must submit a Dissertation Area Proposal to the director of graduate studies. This proposal is a brief description (250-300 words) of the proposed area of the dissertation; it must be signed by at least two dissertation committee members. Before the end of the Winter quarter of the third year of study, all students should complete the prospectus review. This is an oral discussion based on the written dissertation prospectus and conducted by a committee consisting of the first two readers of the dissertation. The prospectus should be approximately 2,500–3,000 words and should be presented to the exam committee well in advance of the exam. For creative writing students, the prospectus should discuss the theoretical and generic origins of the project, its methodology and artistic goals.
  • Written comprehensive exam. At the beginning of the third year of study, and after 48 hours of completed course work, all students will take a written comprehensive exam covering three (out of four) areas of study: (1) an author or major figure; (2) a genre; (3) a period; and (4) a second period or special topic. All choices must be approved by examiners and the graduate director. Students will prepare a reading list for each area in consultation with examiners. All lists must be signed by both examiners and on file with the graduate director by May 1 or the student will not be allowed to take the exam the following fall.

Doctor of Philosophy in English with a Concentration in Literary Studies 

Degree Requirements

Course Requirements

Coursework Requirements
48 hours of course work must be in formal classes, excluding ENGL 5995, non-ENGL courses and tutorials (ENGL 4100)
Five courses distributed over three literary periods: before 1700; 1700– 1900; and after 1900. Students must take at least one course in one period and at least two courses in the other two periods. Students must petition to count more than two 3000-graduate level courses towards graduate study.
Courses listed below are representative examples. Students may consult the department for additional course options.
Before 1700
Old English
Special Topics in Medieval Lit
Special Topics-Early Mod Lit
Advanced Studies in Early Modern Literature
Seminar-Studies in Shakespeare
1700-1900
Advanced Studies in 18th Century Literature
Spc Tpcs: 18th Cent Literature
Topics in English: 19th Century Literature
Antebellum American Literature
American Romanticism
Spc Tpc: Antebellum Amer Lit
After 1900
Adv Studies -20th Cent Lit
Adv Studies-20th C. Literature
Special Topics: 20th Cent Lit
Graduate Tutorials (Students may take up to 5 tutorials, 10 credits total)
Graduate Tutorial
Three Graduate Professional Seminars (count towards the 48 hours of course work)6
Colloquium
Topics in English (Crit Imag)
Seminar: Teaching and Writing Literature
Total Credits90

Minimum number of credits required for the degree: 90 graduate-level quarter hours beyond the master’s degree

Non-Course Requirements:

  • Preliminary advancement to candidacy
  • Advancement to candidacy
  • A dissertation of publishable quality that makes a significant contribution to its field. This will take the form of an extended scholarly and critical work (usually between 150 and 250 pages).
  • Oral defense. When the dissertation is completed, it must be defended by the candidate. The defense must take place no later than April 30. No dissertation defenses will be held during the summer quarter. The candidate is therefore advised to set the defense date as far in advance as possible. The defense takes the form of a discussion with the committee concerning the content, context and implications of the work.
  • Tool (reading knowledge of one language) proficiency may be established by completing one of the following:
    • Passing a standard reading examination accredited by the Department
    • Passing, with a grade of B or better, a 3000-level literature course in the language
    • Successful completion of the Bibliography and Research Methods class in the Department of English
    • Selection and successful completion of a cognate course in another department that will augment specific skills. This course must be approved by the Graduate Committee.
    • Successful completion of Old English, followed by a two-credit “Beowulf” tutorial, followed by an intermediate Old English tutorial. (This option will no longer require a petition to the Graduate Committee.)
    • Successful completion of a graduate translation class (students must secure approval of instructor)

The Tool requirement must be completed one quarter before graduation.

  • Proposal & Prospectus review. By the end of the Fall quarter of the third year, students must submit a Dissertation Area Proposal to the director of graduate studies. This proposal is a brief description (250-300 words) of the proposed area of the dissertation; it must be signed by at least two dissertation committee members. Before the end of the Winter quarter of the third year of study, all students should complete the prospectus review. This is an oral discussion based on the written dissertation prospectus and conducted by a committee consisting of the first two readers of the dissertation. The prospectus should be approximately 2,500–3,000 words and should be presented to the exam committee well in advance of the exam.
  • Written comprehensive exam. At the beginning of the third year of study, and after 48 hours of completed course work, all students will take a written comprehensive exam covering three (out of four) areas of study: (1) an author or major figure; (2) a genre; (3) a period; and (4) a second period or special topic. All choices must be approved by examiners and the graduate director. Students will prepare a reading list for each area in consultation with examiners. All lists must be signed by both examiners and on file with the graduate director by May 1 or the student will not be allowed to take the exam the following fall.

Master of Arts in English with a Concentration in Literary Studies

Degree Requirements

Course Requirements

  • 45 hours of course credit, up to 13 hours of which may be taken in graduate tutorials (ENGL 4100), independent research (ENGL 4995) and/or cognate courses outside the department.
  • All course work for the MA should be taken at the University of Denver, but, in rare exceptions, a maximum of 10 credit hours may be transferred to count for the requirements if approved by the director of graduate studies and meet the University's transfer of credit policy.
  • While students have no specific course requirements beyond the 32-hour minimum within the Department of English and the 13 hours of tutorials or cognate courses, they are advised to work closely with an adviser to determine a balance between coverage and focus. They may take both 3000- and 4000-graduate level courses in literary studies, but students must petition to count more than two 3000-graduate level courses towards graduate study.
  • Courses must be completed within three years of enrollment (excluding ENGL 4995).
Coursework Requirements
Minimum of 32 classroom hours (eight courses) is required.
Up to 13 credits may be taken in graduate tutorials (ENGL 4100), independent research (ENGL 4995) and/or cognate courses outside the department.
Total Credits45

Minimum number of credits required for the degree: 45

Non-Course Requirements

  • Advancement to candidacy
  • A thesis of at least 18,000 words. The thesis for an MA in literary studies is either a single scholarly/critical essay or two 30-page scholarly/critical essays. The thesis adviser must approve a prospectus for the thesis.
  • Oral Defense. The defense takes the form of a discussion on the content, context and implications of the work.  
 

Courses

ENGL 3000 Advanced Creative Writing-Poetry (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3001 Advanced Creative Writing-Poetry (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3002 Advanced Creative Writing-Poetry (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3003 Advanced Creative Writing-Poetry (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3010 Advanced Creative Writing-Fiction (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3011 Advanced Creative Writing-Fiction (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3012 Advanced Creative Writing-Fiction (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3013 Adv Creative Writing-Fiction (4 Credits)

Technique, writing practice and criticism.

ENGL 3015 Advanced Creative Writing: Non-Fiction (4 Credits)

ENGL 3017 Travel Writing-Fiction & Fact (4 Credits)

A study of European, American and other narratives of travel. This course examines relevant postcolonial and literary theories of travel and nationhood.

ENGL 3040 Introduction to Publishing (4 Credits)

Cross listed with ENGL 2040, MFJS 3140.

ENGL 3101 Non-Chaucerian Middle English Literature (4 Credits)

A study of Chaucer's near-contemporaries, Gower, Langland, and the Pearl poet as well as drama and lyrics.

ENGL 3121 Chaucer: Canterbury Tales (4 Credits)

Life, culture, language and literary trends of Chaucer's age as reflected in "The Canterbury Tales".

ENGL 3320 Oral Literature and Orality in Literature (4 Credits)

The term "oral literature" generally refers to narratives and poems--including songs--performed and disseminated orally from one generation to the other. Oral literature is, in some respects, the foundational 'text' of written literature. Some of the questions that we therefore explore in this course are as follows: How did oral literature develop? What are its types and their characteristics? How has oral literature been shaped by time and place? How is it distinct from as well as related to written literature? To answer these questions, we explore different forms of oral literature--from the traditional (such as folklore) to the contemporary (such as spoken work poetry). We also study the use of orality as a literary device in written literature. Our studies involve the examination of material and texts from different parts of the world.

ENGL 3402 Early Romantics (4 Credits)

ENGL 3404 England and Empire: Ambivalent Imperialism in Victorian and Edwardian Literature (4 Credits)

A course investigating the literary accounts of and responses to British imperialism in Victorian and Edwardian England in which students read works by Conrad, Kipling and Forster as well as several 20th-21st works by post Commenwealth authors in London.

ENGL 3405 Postmodern Visions of Israel (4 Credits)

This course investigates how representation of Israel as a modernist utopia have been replaced in contemporary literature with images of Israel as a dystopia. The class discusses the historical context that gave rise to visions of an idealized Israel, and the role the Hebrew language played in consolidating and connecting narration to nation. Next the class considers how belles-lettres from recent decades have reimagined Israel as a series of multilingual “multiverses.” A selection of fiction translated from Hebrew forms the core of class reading. Theoretical exploration of postmodernism help us conceptualize the poetics of postmodern literature. No knowledge of Israeli history or Jewish culture is necessary to succeed in this course. Cross listed with JUST 3405.

ENGL 3706 Writing the American West (4 Credits)

Explores historical and contemporary writing produced in and about the American West.

ENGL 3711 20th-Century American Fiction (4 Credits)

Fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction on selected themes by 20th and 21st century American writers. Topics for study may include issues related to regionalism, ethnicity and gender, as well as specific social and historical concerns.

ENGL 3731 Topics in English (1-4 Credits)

ENGL 3732 Topics in English (1-4 Credits)

ENGL 3733 Topics in English (1-4 Credits)

Topics vary reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the department and studies of the faculty.

ENGL 3743 Modern Jewish Literature (4 Credits)

Stories, novels and memoirs by 20th-century Jewish writers; consideration of issues of generation, gender and idea of Jewish literature as a genre. Cross listed with JUST 3743.

ENGL 3744 African American Literature (4 Credits)

This course examines fiction, poetry, autobiography, and drama by African American writers, with strong consideration on the socio-historical conditions that gave rise to and continue to inform this literary tradition.

ENGL 3800 Bibliography/Research Method (4 Credits)

ENGL 3803 Modernism/Postmodernism (4 Credits)

ENGL 3813 History and Structure of the English Language (4 Credits)

A composite course studying both the structure of modern English and the history of the English language.

ENGL 3815 Studies in Rhetoric (4 Credits)

This course will examine the history and principles of rhetoric and how they pertain to theory and practice in the field of composition and rhetoric.

ENGL 3817 History of Rhetoric (4 Credits)

ENGL 3818 Composition Theory (4 Credits)

ENGL 3821 Literary Criticism: 19th Century-Present (4 Credits)

ENGL 3822 Literary Criticism: 20th Century (4 Credits)

Critical methods and philosophies of 20th-century critics; their relationship to traditions.

ENGL 3823 Interpretation Theory (4 Credits)

ENGL 3825 Cultural Criticism (4 Credits)

Cross listed with ENGL 2835.

ENGL 3852 Topics in Poetics (4 Credits)

ENGL 3982 Writers in the Schools (2,4 Credits)

This course operates mostly "in the field." Following the models of California Poets in the Schools and Teachers & Writers Collaborative, students are in training with a poet-in-residence, observing him as he conducts a residency in a public school. In addition, we have our own meetings to discuss pedagogy, classroom practices and management, teacher-writer relations, and all other necessary logistical planning. Placement in public schools is facilitated by Denver SCORES, an education program dedicated to increasing literacy in Denver's at-risk school population. For those wishing to work with middle or high school students, or in other community settings (e.g., homeless or women's shelters), special arrangements can be made. This course is a collaborative effort between CO Humanities, Denver SCORES, and the University of Denver.

ENGL 3991 Independent Study (1-17 Credits)

ENGL 3992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

ENGL 3995 Independent Research (1-10 Credits)

ENGL 4000 Colloquium (2 Credits)

ENGL 4001 Sem Creative Writing-Poetry (4 Credits)

ENGL 4011 Sem Creative Writing-Fiction (4 Credits)

ENGL 4012 History/Theory of Genre-Poetry (4 Credits)

ENGL 4017 Travel Writing (4 Credits)

ENGL 4050 The Critical Imagination (4 Credits)

This graduate level course explores poetry, fiction, and criticism as different facets of the imagination. This is a large and a necessarily vaguely defined topic. But in the world of literary studies, creativity and criticism are clearly symbiotic. Reading and writing are connected activities. The poet or fiction writer is often a critic, and there are numerous treatments of interpretation in the critical canon suggesting that the act of reading and interpreting is itself an imaginative and creative act. The course explores genre signatures and possibilities, as well as provides an introduction to some of the analytics through which texts, literary and otherwise, are interpreted.

ENGL 4100 Graduate Tutorial (2-4 Credits)

ENGL 4120 Beowulf (2 Credits)

Reading and translation of the Old English Beowulf. Prerequisite: ENGL 4125.

ENGL 4125 Old English (4 Credits)

This class introduces students to Old English grammar, prose, and poetry. This course is a prerequisite for ENGL 4120.

ENGL 4150 Special Topics in Medieval Lit (4 Credits)

ENGL 4200 Special Topics-Early Mod Lit (4 Credits)

ENGL 4210 Holocaust Literature (4 Credits)

This seminar presents a multidisciplinary and transnational approach to literature of the Holocaust. Students consider memoir, fiction, and poetry drawn from a variety of national literatures and linguistic traditions. Works written by victims, survivors and 'witnesses through the imagination' are all considered. These readings are supplemented by secondary texts, including historical and philosophical materials, as well as relevant works from the social sciences.

ENGL 4213 Advanced Studies in Early Modern Literature (4 Credits)

ENGL 4220 Seminar-Studies in Shakespeare (4 Credits)

ENGL 4300 Advanced Studies in 18th Century Literature (4 Credits)

ENGL 4321 Spc Tpcs: 18th Cent Literature (4 Credits)

Special Topics courses will explore specific topics within historical periods, single authors, or theoretical/critical/ scholarly issues.

ENGL 4424 Topics in English: 19th Century Literature (4 Credits)

Special Topics courses will explore specific topics within historical periods, single authors, or theoretical/critical/ scholarly issues.

ENGL 4600 Adv Studies -20th Cent Lit (4 Credits)

ENGL 4621 Adv Studies-20th C. Literature (4 Credits)

This course will offer (and be required of) graduate students an advanced foundation in 20th century literature; the primary texts and their cultural/historical/ theoretical contexts.

ENGL 4650 Special Topics: 20th Cent Lit (4 Credits)

ENGL 4660 The Black Imagination (4 Credits)

Focusing mainly on Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas (especially the USA and the Caribbean/Latin America), this course explores and connects aspects of the black imagination. These aspects include oral performances, thought systems, literature, art, cinema, and critical discourses in different eras and in various places. Studied together, these existential and intellectual signposts provide an expanded insight into black (African and African diasporic) aesthetics from an intercontinental and an interdisciplinary perspective.

ENGL 4675 Interactive Fictions (4 Credits)

This class examines the border between traditional narrative texts and texts that require a higher degree of interactivity, collectively called 'configurational narratives,' 'works in movement' (Umberto Eco) or 'cyber texts' (Espen Aarseth). The goal is to identify what differences may exist between traditional and interactive literatures, and to analyze the possibilities of the future of narrative. Primary texts are drawn from experimental and avant-garde works of poetry, prose, drama, and games. Secondary texts survey recent critical theory and trace analyses of interactivity to determine how "literature is a combinatorial game" (Italo Calvino).

ENGL 4700 Antebellum American Literature (4 Credits)

ENGL 4701 Topics in English (2-5 Credits)

A topics class; topics may change.

ENGL 4702 Topics in English (2-5 Credits)

A topics class; topics may change.

ENGL 4730 American Romanticism (4 Credits)

ENGL 4732 Spc Tpc: Antebellum Amer Lit (4 Credits)

ENGL 4735 Sem: H. James & E. Wharton (4 Credits)

ENGL 4830 Seminar: Teaching and Writing Literature (2-4 Credits)

ENGL 4832 Sem: Teaching Writing & Lit (2 Credits)

ENGL 4840 Topics in Composition Studies (2-4 Credits)

Each offering of this course focuses on specific issues in theory, research, or pedagogy within the broad field of composition studies. Examples of topics include the development of writing abilities; genre theory and composing; multimodal texts and their intersections and disjunctions of rhetoric and composition; the history of composing theories and practices; realms of composing, including the academic, civic, vocational, aesthetic, and interpersonal; institutional formations and settings of composing; discourse theories; stylistics; race, gender, class and composing; and so on.

ENGL 4851 Publishing Institute (6 Credits)

ENGL 4852 Dissertation Colloquium (2 Credits)

This two-credit dissertation colloquium is offered in the winter and spring for third-year PhD students in English who are in the process of researching and writing their dissertations. In addition to having weekly presentations and discussions of work in progress, the group will peruse prefaces and introductions to former English Department dissertations, write and abstract for their own dissertation, and possibly revise and send out a piece from their dissertation. The class is open to both literary studies and creative writing students. Restricted to doctoral students in English.

ENGL 4991 Independent Study (1-17 Credits)

ENGL 4992 Directed Study (1-10 Credits)

ENGL 4995 Independent Research (1-17 Credits)

ENGL 5991 Independent Study (1-17 Credits)

ENGL 5995 Independent Research (1-17 Credits)

Faculty

Clark Davis, Professor and Department Chair, PhD, University at Buffalo - State University of New York

Linda Bensel-Meyers, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Oregon

Gerald Chapman, Professor, Emeritus, PhD, Harvard University

Ann Dobyns, Professor, PhD, University of Oregon

Donna Beth Ellard, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara

Rachel Feder, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Michigan

Graham Foust, Associate Professor, PhD, University at Buffalo - State University of New York

Jan Gorak, Professor, PhD, University of Southern California

Eric Gould, Professor, PhD, University of London

Tayana Hardin, Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Michigan

Douglas Hesse, Professor, PhD, University of Iowa

Scott Howard, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Washington

Laird Hunt, Professor, MFA, Naropa University

Brian Kiteley, Professor, MA, City College NY

Eleanor McNees, Professor, PhD, University of Colorado Boulder

Jessica Munns, Professor, Emerita, PhD, University of Warwick

Maik Nwosu, Associate Professor, PhD, Syracuse University

Charlotte Quinney, Adjunct Professor, PhD, Bowling Green State University

Bin Ramke, Professor, PhD, Ohio University

Adam Rovner, Associate Professor, PhD, Indiana University

Selah Saterstrom, Associate Professor, MFA, Goddard College

Eleni Sikelianos, Associate Professor, MFA, Naropa University

Billy J. Stratton, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Arizona

Nichol Weizenbeck, Visiting Teaching Assistant Professor, PhD, University of Denver

Margaret Whitt, Professor, Emerita, PhD, University of Denver

Barbara Wilcots, Associate Professor, PhD, University of Denver

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